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CASE CHAPTER OF SIGMA XI

 

Science Café Cleveland

presents

 

 

"Dopamine - how we fuel

 

the rush for drugs, sex

 

and everything else"

 

 

 

May 13, 2013

 


 

FEATURING: 

George E. Jaskiw, M.D.

Professor, Department of Psychiatry, Case Western Reserve University

 

Acting Director, Addiction Recovery Center,

Louis Stokes Cleveland Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center

 

 

 

 

EVENT INFORMATION:

 

The neurochemical dopamine mediates our ability to get up in the morning and seek food, love and whatever rocks our world. When the common dopamine brain pathways are working properly, we have a good crack at being happy and competent social beings. The dopamine pathways can go awry in certain illnesses, or get hijacked by drugs or gambling. In such cases, there can be hell to pay. Modern techniques allow us to measure dopamine levels in the living brain and correlate them with mood, emotion and movement. These studies should help us address understanding optimal brain function and help us treat conditions such as schizophrenia and Parkinson’s disease.


 

USEFUL LINKS:

 

General Reading...

Dopamine, Wikipediea, the free encyclopedia

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dopamine)

 

Why "My Get Up and Go Has Got Up and Went", National Institute of Mental Health, Science Update, September 15, 2008

(http://www.nimh.nih.gov/science-news/2008/why-my-get-up-and-go-has-got-up-and-went.shtml)

 

The Dope on Dopamine's Central Role in the Brain's Motivation and Reward Networks, Scientific American, Mind & Brain, September 15, 2008

(http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=dopamines-central-role-brains-motivation-reward)

 

Dopamine Determines Impulsive Behavior, Scientific American, Mind & Brain, July 29, 2010

(http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=dopamine-impulsive-addiction)

 

Aficionado...

Brain and Cognition, ScienceDirect, 41(3): 299-350, December 1999.

(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0278262699911296)

 

You have absolutely nothing better to do...

Brodnik Z., Double M., Jaskiw G.E., 2013. Presynaptic regulation of extracellular dopamine levels in the medial prefrontal cortex and striatum during tyrosine depletion, Psychopharmacology (Berl), 2013 Feb 1. PMID:23371490

(http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23371490)

 

Brodnik Z., Bongiovanni R., Double M., Jaskiw G.E., 2012. Increased tyrosine availability increases brain regional DOPA levels in vivo. Neurochem Int., 61(7): 1001-6. PMID:22841861

(http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22841861)

 

 

 

BIOGRAPHY:

 

After receiving an M.D. degree and completing a residency in psychiatry, Dr. Jaskiw was a Senior Fellow at the Clinical Brain Disorders Branch of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Since 1991 he has been taking care of patients while managing a research laboratory at the Louis Stokes Cleveland Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center and teaching at the CWRU School of Medicine. His main interest has been in understanding the causes and treatment of schizophrenia and in particular the relationship between tyrosine availability and dopamine levels in the brain.


 

 

EVENT DETAILS:

 

WHERE: The Market Garden Brewery

(Located at 1947 West 25th Street next to the West Side Market, Cleveland, Ohio)

 

WHEN: May 13, 2013

Discussion starts around 7:00 p.m.

*Please Note* A few of our cafes have approached capacity and/or standing room only. If you want to be 100% sure to get in and get a good seat, you might want to arrive a bit early.

 

WHO: Sponsored by Case Western Reserve University chapter of Sigma Xi, WCPN

ideastream, and the Market Garden Brewery

 

Click here to download a pdf flyer of the event