Experience the May Term!

This is a three-week intensive term that follows the end of Spring term finals and concludes before the regular summer session begins.  All of these courses are taught by regular Case faculty who have crafted these courses to take advantage of the longer meeting times that are only available in an intensive format. Read through the course descriptions and find a learning experience that fits your interests and curricular needs.  Contact the faculty for more information.

Meeting times

Most campus-based May Term courses meet daily, MTWRF, from 9:30 a.m.-noon.  Occasionally, faculty might extend class to accommodate trips into the community, film showings, or labs.

Housing

May term housing is available for continuing CWRU students with a Spring 2015 housing assignment.  For more information, contact housing@case.edu; 368-3780.

Tuition

Tuition for all May and Summer Session courses numbered 1-399 is discounted 50%.  Students may apply for loans and work-study by March 27 through the Office of Financial Aid; 368-3780. Follow "tuition" link above for specific infomration.

Visiting Students

Visiting students are welcome to enroll in all May and Summer Session courses.  Please follow the menu link above for Visiting Students for information on how to enroll.

May Term courses

Follow the links below for more information.

 

* ARTS 350/450 Multimedia I

* BIOL 114 Principles of Biology

* BIOL 215 Cells and Proteins

* BIOL 215L Cells and Proteins Laboratory

* BIOL 216 Physiology and Development
* BIOL 216L Physiology and Development Laboratory

* COSI 211 Phonetics and Phonology

* EBME 370 Principles of Biomedical Engineering Design

* ENGR 225B Thermodynamics, Fluid Dynamics, Heat and Mass Transfer - Botswana

* FRCH 308/408 The Paris Experience

* HSTY 219 Berlin in the Tumultuous 20th Century

* MUPM 212 History of Rock and Roll

* PHIL 201 Introduction to Logic

* RLGN 273 Religion and Healing in the United States
* SOCI 355/455 Special Topics:  Social Justice and Health

* THTR 206 Mr. Kiss Kiss Bang Bang: James Bond and Popular Culture

* WLIT 308/408 The Paris Experience

 

ARTS 350/450 3 credits

Multimedia I

May 12 - May 30

MTWRF 9:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Jared Bendis

Contact:  jared.bendis@case.edu

Fundamental concepts and skills for using technology to design, create, express, and present. This project-oriented class will develop knowledge and competencies related to digital imaging, animation, video, multimedia, production and presentation. Prereq.: One from ARTS 101, ARTS 106, ARTS 216, or ARTS 220 or permission of the director of art education, Tim Shuckerow, txs10@case.edu.

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BIOL 114 — 3 credits

Principles of Biology

May 12 - May 30

MTWRF 9:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Rebecca Benard

Contact: rebecca.benard@case.edu

A one-semester course in biology designed for the non-major. A primary objective of this course is to demonstrate how biological principles impact an individual's daily life. BIOL 114 introduces students to the molecules of life, cell structure and function, respiration and photosynthesis, molecular genetics, heredity and human genetics, evolution, diversity of life, and ecology. Minimal background is required; however, some exposure to biology and chemistry at the high school level is helpful. This course is not open to students with credit for BIOL 214 or BIOL 250. This course does not count toward any Biology degree.

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BIOL 215 — 3 credits

Cells and Proteins

May 12 - May 30

MTWRF 9:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Valerie Haywood

Contact: valerie.haywood@case.edu

Second in a series of three courses required of the Biology major. Topics include: biological molecules (focus on proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids); cell structure (focus on plasma membrane, endomembrane system and organelles of energy metabolism); protein synthesis, targeting and trafficking; protein structure-function, including binding of antibodies to antigens, enzymes to substrates, and oxygen to hemoglobin. Transduction of neural and hormonal signals; cellular controls involved in development, cell cycle, and cancer; cellular energetics, respiration and photosynthesis. Prereq: BIOL 214 and BIOL 214L or consent; or CHEM 105 and CHEM 106; or CHEM 111.

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BIOL 215L — 1 credit

Cells and Proteins Laboratory

May 12 - May 30

TR 1:00 - 4:00 p.m., MW 1:00-2:00.

Deborah Harris

Contact:  dlv7@case.edu

Second in a series of three laboratory courses required of the Biology major. Topics to include: protein structure-function, enzymes kinetics; cell structure; cellular energetics, respiration and photosynthesis. In addition, membrane structure and transport will be covered. Laboratory and discussion sessions offered in alternate weeks. This course is not available for students who have taken BIOL 215 as a 4-credit course. Prereq: BIOL 214L and Prereq or Coreq: BIOL 215.

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BIOL 216 — 3 credits
Development and Physiology

May 12 - May 30
MTWRF 9:00-11:30 a.m.
Barbara Kuemerle
Contact: barbara.kuemerle@case.edu

This is the final class in the series of three courses required of the Biology major. As with the two previous courses, BIOL 214 and 215, this course is designed to provide an overview of fundamental biological processes. It will examine the complexity of interactions controlling reproduction, development and physiological function in animals. The Developmental Biology section will review topics such as gametogenesis, fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation, the genetic control of development, stem cells and cloning. Main topics included in the Physiology portion consist of : homeostasis, the function of neurons and nervous systems; the major organ systems and processes involved in circulation, excretion, osmoregulation, gas exchange, feeding, digestion, temperature regulation, endocrine function and the immunologic response. Prereq: BIOL 214.

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BIOL 216L — 1 credit
Physiology and Development Laboratory

May 12 - May 30
MW 12:30-1:30 p.m. R
TR 12:30-3:30 p.m. L
Barbara Kuemerle
Contact: barbara.kuemerle@case.edu

Third in a series of three laboratory courses required of the Biology major. Students will conduct laboratory experiments designed to provide hands-on, empirical laboratory experience in order to better understand the complex interactions governing the basic physiology and development of organisms. Laboratories and discussion sessions offered in alternate weeks. Prereq: BIOL 214L and Prereq or Coreq: BIOL 216.

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COSI 211 3 credits

Phonetics and Phonology

May 12 – May 30

MTWRF 9:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Patrizia Bonaventura

Contact:  patrizia.bonaventura@case.edu

Theoretical and applied study of the speech sounds of language. The use of the international phonetic alphabet as a tool for characterizing normal and deviant sound patterns. The linguistic structure and function of speech sound systems of both the adult and developing child.

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EBME 370 — 2 credits
Principles of Biomedical Engineering Design
May 12 - May 30
MTWRF 9:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Dustin Tyler
Contact dustin.tyler@case.edu; 368-0319
Students learn and implement the design process to produce working prototypes of medical devices with potential commercial value to meet significant clinical needs. Critical examination of contemporary medical problems is used to develop a specific problem statement. The class is divided into teams of 3 to 4 students. Each team integrates their knowledge and skills to design a device to meet their clinical need. Project planning and management, including resource allocation, milestones, and documentation, are required to ensure successful completion of projects within the allotted time and budget. Formal design reviews by a panel of advisors and outside medical device experts are required every four weeks. Every student is required to give oral presentations at each formal review and is responsible for formal documentation of the design process, resulting in an executive summary and complete design history file of the project. The course culminates with a public presentation of the team's device to a panel of experts. This course is expected to provide the student with a real-world, capstone design experience. Recommended preparation: EBME 310.

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ENGR 225B — 4 credits
Thermodynamics, Fluid Dynamics, Heat and Mass Transfer
Taught in Botswana
May 21 - June 8
MTWRF 8:30 a.m.-11:00 a.m.
REC MTWRF 1:00 p.m.-2:15 p.m.
Daniel Lacks
Contact: daniel.lacks@case.edu
Elementary thermodynamic concepts: first and second laws, and equilibrium. Basic fluid dynamics, heat transfer, and mass transfer: microscopic and macroscopic perspectives. The course will be taught at the University of Botswana, and engineering applications will be discussed in the context of regional issues specific to Botswana. Prereq: CHEM 111 and ENGR 145 and PHYS 121.

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FRCH 308/408 3 credits

The Paris Experience

May 10 - May 30

Cheryl Toman

Contact: cheryl.toman@case.edu

Three-week immersion learning experience living and studying in Paris. The focus of the course is the literature and culture of the African, Arab, and Asian communities of Paris. Students spend a minimum of fifteen hours per week visiting cultural centers and museums and interviewing authors and students about the immigrant experience. Assigned readings complement course activities. Students enrolled in FRCH 308/408 do coursework in French. WLIT 308/408 students have the option of completing coursework in English. Graduate students have additional course requirements. Offered as FRCH 308, WLIT 308, FRCH 408, and WLIT 408. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement. Prereq: FRCH 202.

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HSTY 219 3 credits

Berlin in the Tumultuous 20th Century

May 11 – May 31

Kenneth Ledford

Contact:  kenneth.ledford@case.edu

The tumultuous but short twentieth century began and ended with a united Germany, with Berlin as its capital. But in between, Berlin, and Berliners, experienced the extremes of the economic, technological, and cultural progress that the century brought, and of the devastation, violence, division, and uncertainty that it also brought. This course introduces students to the German tumult of the twentieth century with Berlin as its laboratory and classroom. We will read about historical events and developments, and then visit the places where those events and developments occurred.  Students are welcome to take this course before they have any background or acquaintance with the German language, although the instructor expects students to be able to navigate independently in Berlin after he provides them with an introduction. Prof. Ledford is a professor of history and law, whose work focuses on the legal and social history of the 19th and 20th centuries in Germany. He has visited Berlin since 1974 and lived there for a total of more than 5 years. He visits regularly to use the city's rich archival sources. If you want to learn more, visit his web page at http://history.case.edu/faculty/kenneth-f-ledford. HSTY 219 fulfills a humanities distribution requirement for all CWRU Students. It is a Departmental Seminar and fulfills that SAGES requirement for any student who takes it. And it may be counted toward a major or minor in History.

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MUPM 212 — 3 credits

History of Rock and Roll

May 12 - May 30

MTWRF 9:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Daniel Goldmark

Contact:  daniel.goldmark@case.edu

This course surveys the musical practices of the rock and roll era, broadly defined to include much popular music since the 1950s. Prereq: For Non-Music Majors only.

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PHIL 201 — 3 credits
Introduction to Logic
May 12 - May 30
MTWRF 9:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Colin McLarty
Contact: colin.mclarty@case.edu
Presentation, application, and evaluation of formal methods for determining the validity of arguments. Discussion of the relationship between logic and other disciplines. Counts for CAS Quantitative Reasoning Requirement.

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RLGN 273 — 3 credits

Religion and Healing in the United States

May 12 - May 30

MTWRF 9:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Joy Bostic

Contact:  joy.bostic@case.edu

A cross-cultural exploration of the relationships between religion, health and healing in the United States. Through an interdisciplinary approach that includes religious studies, medical anthropology and ethnic/gender studies, the course investigates how persons interpret illness and suffering. Attention is also paid to how different groups utilized, or are served by, the health care system. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

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SOCI 355/455 — 3 credits
Special Topics: Social Justice and Health

May 12 - May 30
MTWRF 9:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Susan Hinze
Contact: susan.hinze@case.edu

Over 60 years after the founding of the World Health Organization (WHO) and recognition of health as a human right in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), millions of people annually die preventable deaths from treatable infectious disease and childbirth related complications. How close are we to achieving health as a human right? As social scientists, medical sociologists have been at the forefront of research on health inequalities—tracking local, national and international trends over time. In this class, we will pay close attention to how constructions of racial identity, social class, gender, age and sexuality are tied to overall physical and mental health and access to health care. A transnational focus allows for exploration of disadvantageous linkages between Economic South and North countries.  In line with the mission of the new "Social Justice Institute at CWRU", this course explores broader issues around the meaning of health justice, perspectives on laws related to health and health care, social policies and health movements, and contrasting views on how society should be organized to achieve health as a human right.

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THTR 206 — 3 credits
Mr. Kiss Kiss Bang Bang: James Bond and Popular Culture

May 12 - May 30

MTWRF 9:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
MW 12:00-1:00 p.m.
Jeffrey Ullom

Contact: JeffUllom@aol.com; 368-6097 for more information

The twenty-one films of James Bond have become part of popular culture, and the figure of the superspy has become mythic in proportion. This series, from its first installment in 1963 to the latest reinvention of James Bond in 2006, not only depicts one dashing man's efforts to save the world again and again from disaster, but also traces the development of our popular culture. Issues such as violence, sex, the presentation and treatment of women, racial stereotypes, and spectacle will be discussed, providing an opportunity to explore the changing expectations of American audiences and the developing form of contemporary cinema. Students who have taken USSO 286D may not receive credit for this course.

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WLIT 308/408 3 credits

The Paris Experience

May 10 - May 30

Cheryl Toman

Contact: cheryl.toman@case.edu

Three-week immersion learning experience living and studying in Paris. The focus of the course is the literature and culture of the African, Arab, and Asian communities of Paris. Students spend a minimum of fifteen hours per week visiting cultural centers and museums and interviewing authors and students about the immigrant experience. Assigned readings complement course activities. Students enrolled in FRCH 308/408 do coursework in French. WLIT 308/408 students have the option of completing coursework in English. Graduate students have additional course requirements. Offered as FRCH 308, WLIT 308, FRCH 408, and WLIT 408. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement. Prereq: FRCH 202.

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