Office of the Deputy Provost | The Deputy Provost

Lynn Twarog Singer

 

 

Press

  2013 Deputy Provost Lynn Singer named chairwoman of NIH Center for Scientific Review study section
 
  2010 Case Western Reserve Receives Award for Emergency Preparedness
    Colleges Look for New Ways to Help Women in Science
    Stand Together Against Anti-LGBT Bullying
 
  2009 Human Rights Campaign Leadership Award
 
  2008 Eye blinks may help to identify children prenatally exposed to alcohol
 
  2007 Million Dollar Challenge
 
  2006 Consider the Risk
    Children, Drugs, and Intelligence
 
  2005 Women Faculty updated on ACES grant - Program seeks to increase number and success of women faculty in science and engineering
    World-renowned MIT professor to speak at Case engineering speakers series Martha L. Gray to discuss biomedical imaging, interdisciplinary training
    YWCA Women of Achievement Awards Luncheon
 
  2004 CWRU: The Value of Research, 2003-04
    Case improving climate for women faculty with help from NSF grant
ACES program helping increase number of tenure-track women teaching in the sciences, engineering
    A Place To Shine
    Speaker Gives Tips to Women Faculty
Group Recognizes Award Winners
    Case to develop research relationships
with sister city Bahir Dar, Ethiopia
    Case study examines effects of prenatal cocaine exposure and influence of home environment on children's IQ scores - Suggests that prenatal cocaine exposure not associated with lower full scale IQ scores
    Vision investments to increase value of Case degree
 
  2003 CWRU Partners with ideastream
    Overall Accreditation Preparations Underway
    Case Researchers Receive $4.9 Million Grant to Continue
Study of Children Prenatally Exposed to Cocaine
    Grand Opening - Dedication of the Center for Women at CASE
    Columnist: American women settle for too little
    Women's center to celebrate grand opening
    Case for community
    Case to Enhance Campus Climate for Women
    Getting Things Done
    Singer Receives $1.9 Million Grant
to Study Progress of Premature Infants
    CWRU Engineering Professor Honored at White House
    Psychiatry Dept. Dedicates New Center of Excellence for Bipolar Disorder - Supported with close to $2 million from U.S. govt. and UHC
 
  Archives 19xx - 2002
 

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2005


Women Faculty updated on ACES grant - Program seeks to increase number and success of women faculty in science and engineering

June 2005

Cathleen Carlin, Ph.D., a professor in the Department of Physiology and Biophysics, which was one of the test departments during the first phase of the Academic Careers in Engineering and Sciences (ACES) program, recently told a group of women faculty about the value she found through the career coaching offered by the program.

She said one colleague had asked her why she, as a tenured full professor, needed coaching. Carlin said coaching helped her define research and professional goals.
“I’m no longer working to please the system, but to meet my goals,” she said.

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World-renowned MIT professor to speak at Case engineering speakers series
Martha L. Gray to discuss biomedical imaging, interdisciplinary training

News Center March 4, 2005

Martha L. Gray, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor recognized internationally for her research on novel biomedical imaging techniques and interdisciplinary training, will be the featured speaker at Case Western Reserve University’s Allen H. Ford Distinguished Visiting Professor Lecture Program on Tuesday, March 15, at 4 p.m., at the Wolstein Building, 2103 Cornell Road.

The lecture is being co-sponsored by Case’s Academic Careers in Engineering and Science (ACES) program.

Lynn Singer, Case’s deputy provost and vice president for academic programs who also serves as director of ACES, says that Gray’s appearance puts an exclamation point on the need for women to strive for careers in science and engineering and how ACES fits into the current climate.

“The ACES program is helping to increase the number of tenure-track women teaching in the sciences and engineering at Case,” Singer said. “And Professor Gray’s success illustrates the importance of encouraging women to pursue careers in those areas.”

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2004


Case improving climate for women faculty with help from NSF grant
ACES program helping increase number of tenure-track women teaching in the sciences, engineering

News Center November 3, 2004

Case Western Reserve University has dramatically increased the number of women on its engineering faculty, thanks in part to an innovative program designed to increase the number of women faculty in the physical and natural sciences and help women already on the faculty with their careers.

The program, known as Academic Careers in Engineering and Science (ACES) is funded with a five-year, $3.5 million grant from the National Science Foundation as part of the Foundation’s ADVANCE Institutional Transformation program. Its goal is to increase the number of tenure-track women teaching in the sciences and engineering and to eliminate some of the barriers, both institutional and in terms of attitude, that make it difficult for women in these fields to advance their careers. The program is in its second year.

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A Place To Shine

Case Magazine Winter 2004

Three young women settled onto a couch near the fireplace in Fribley Commons. They glanced occasionally at a group of kung fu students at the opposite end of the room and raised their voices so that they could be heard over the echo of cutlery from the cafeteria below. They had come to discuss the environment for women at Case Western Reserve University in an area where it might be toughest: the sciences, where—along with engineering—female students, instructors, and professors are vastly outnumbered by males.

It wasn’t bad, the three told me. They hadn’t felt excluded or discouraged by their fellow students or professors. In fact, they knew that some male professors made conscious efforts to include them. Still, there were subtle pressures and pangs about being a handful of women in a crowd of men.

“You’re afraid to show any signs of weakness,” says Stephanie Bush, a senior majoring in physics. “You’re afraid to say you don’t get it or that you feel like an idiot. The guys might come out of class feeling stupid, too, but they don’t talk about it.”

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Speaker Gives Tips to Women Faculty
GROUP RECOGNIZES AWARD WINNERS

Medlines September 2004 PDF

The status of women in leadership positions at academic medical centers lags behind the general trend of advancement of women in the academic arena, Sharon McDade, Ed.D., told approximately 60 women faculty members and students attending the annual spring
dinner of the Women Faculty School of Medicine (WFSOM), held this year on May 26 at the Allen Memorial Medical Library.

McDade, associate professor and director of the Center for Educational Leadership and Transformation in the Department of Educational Leadership at George Washington University in Washington, D.C., has studied leadership development, with a particular focus on women’s leadership roles in academic medicine.

 

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Case to develop research relationships with sister city Bahir Dar, Ethiopia

Case News July 16, 2004

When Cleveland becomes a sister city to Bahir Dar, Ethiopia, Case Western Reserve University will be poised to make the most of the relationship to foster scientific research and student and faculty exchanges.

A signing ceremony formalizing the sister city relationship will take place in Cleveland July 21. Case, through Deputy Provost Lynn Singer, is sponsoring two scientists from Bahir Dar University to be part of the city’s delegation coming to Cleveland for the signing. Others in the delegation include the mayor of Bahir Dar, the president of Bahir Dar University, its vice president of research, the director of the Bahir Dar hospital, and the head of the chamber of commerce. The delegation will meet with members of Case’s administration to explore potential collaborations on a number of topics.

 

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Case study examines effects of prenatal cocaine exposure and influence of home environment on children's IQ scores - Suggests that prenatal cocaine exposure not associated with lower full scale IQ scores

Case News Center May 27, 2004

Photo: Lynn Singer, Ph.D., and colleagues assessed the effects of prenatal cocaine exposureA study in the May 26 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) suggests that prenatal cocaine exposure was not associated with lower full scale IQ scores, or verbal or performance IQ scores at age 4 years.

However, the study also found that prenatal cocaine exposure was associated with specific cognitive impairments and a lower likelihood of an above average IQ, but that home environments could make a difference for better outcomes for some children.

"Cocaine readily crosses the placental and fetal brain barriers and has a direct effect on the developing fetal brain," the authors provide as background information in the article.

The authors add that "a number of methodologically sound studies have found a relationship between fetal cocaine exposure and negative child developmental outcomes in the first years of life, although others have not."

In this study, Lynn T. Singer, Ph.D., from the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, and colleagues assessed the effects of prenatal cocaine exposure and the quality of the caregiving environment on cognitive outcomes.

 

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Vision investments to increase value of Case degree

Campus News 1-29-94

The closer Case Western Reserve University comes to realizing its vision of becoming the world's most powerful learning environment, the greater the value of every Case degree.

And Case remains one of the best values in the country.

In order to make the university's vision reality, the Case Board of Trustees has approved bold investments in programs, facilities and human resources. A portion of these investments will be funded from tuition, room and board and other fees for the upcoming academic year.

"In order to provide a challenging and engaging academic and living environment-and to have a transformational impact on all who learn, teach, discover and work here-we must invest continually in targeted areas that will enhance the value of a Case education," Interim Provost and University Vice President Lynn T. Singer said in a letter to Case students and their families."

"Reaching our objective will help ensure a bright future for Case students, faculty, staff and alumni-and for the society that all of us serve," Singer said. "The investments we are making today will pay big dividends for all Case graduates in the future."

 

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2003


CWRU Partners with ideastream

Weatherhead School of Management Magazine Winter 2003 PDF
Case News 2-10-2002  PDF
Case News 2-10-2002

IdeastreamCWRU and ideastream (WVIZ/PBS- TV and 90.3WCPN-FM) have signed an agreement to develop content and collaborate in the application of technology for radio, television and video and audio webstream distribution, as well as fixed media such as videotapes and DVDs.
The collaboration, “will provide the University with new ways to serve the community and
share the research and activities taking place on our campus,” said Lynn Singer, Deputy Provost and Vice President for Academic Programs. “In addition, our students will benefit from the potential of real learning experiences that could emerge from our collaborative project.”

 

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Overall Accreditation Preparations Underway

Campus News 11-6-03

Case Western Reserve University soon will have the opportunity to present its powerful learning environment to the organization that provides overall institutional accreditation.

Every 10 years, the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association (NCA) evaluates the university for continued accreditation. Case was last accredited in 1994-1995 and has begun to prepare for its next evaluation visit in 2005.

Rather than treating accreditation as a compliance activity, Case is planning to use its extensive preparations for re-accreditation to help advance the university's vision.

The university has customized the self-study portion of its continued institutional accreditation process to focus on "The Transformational Learning Environment." The introspection will emphasize four areas of special interest: interdivisional collaborations and partnerships; faculty engagement, motivation and commitment; undergraduate student development; and graduate and professional student development.

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Case Researchers Receive $4.9 Million Grant to Continue Study of Children Prenatally Exposed to Cocaine

MedLines October 2003  PDF

During the next five years, Case Western Reserve University psychologist Lynn Singer, Ph.D., and her research collaborators will track one of the largest groups of cocaine-exposed children in the nation at 9, 10, 11 and 12 years of age. These children will be compared to children not exposed to cocaine to assess the risks of prenatal exposure to cocaine and to assess the role of the environment on the outcome of drug-exposed children at school age.

These children have been followed since birth. In prior studies of this group of children, the researchers found that prenatal cocaine exposure was associated with poorer fetal growth, neo- natal attentional abnormalities, less developed cognitive skills at 2 years, and poorer general knowledge/arithmetic and visual spatial skills at 4 years.

This continuation of their research is supported by a new $4.9 million grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, one of the National Institutes of Health. The grant will take the researchers up to their 14th year of funding.

 

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Grand Opening - Dedication of the Center for Women at CWRU

Campus News 10-30-03

Pulitzer Prize-winning and nationally syndicated columnist Ellen Goodman (left to right) joins Case Western Reserve University Interim Provost Lynn Singer, Case President Edward M. Hundert and Dorothy Miller, director of the university's new Center for Women.

Goodman was the keynote speaker for the center's grand opening celebration.

The event, in Thwing Center, where the new Center for Women is located, included a symposium, luncheon, dedication ribbon-cutting and day-long open house.

 

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Columnist: American women settle for too little
By Barb Galbincea

THE PLAIN DEALER Oct 24, 2003 PDF

Syndicated columnist Ellen Goodman speaks yesterday during the dedication of the new Center for Women at Case Western Reserve University. "I am here as an emissary of change," she said.

"What the women's movement needs is more movement," a nationally syndicated columnist told those gathered yesterday to dedicate a new womens center at Case Western Reserve University.

"It is still a man's world – a man's world in terms of standards and values," said Ellen Goodman, whose columns appear in more than 450 newspapers, including The Plain Dealer. And while women have gained some access to that world, she said, they have had much less success in changing the values on which male-dominated society is based.

 

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Women's center to celebrate grand opening
by Laura M. Massie

Campus News 10-16-03

Ellen GoodmanPulitzer Prize-winning and nationally syndicated columnist Ellen Goodman headlines the dedication of the new Center for Women at Case Western Reserve University at 9 a.m. October 23 in the Thwing Center Ballroom. Case President Edward M. Hundert and Dorothy Miller, center director, will kick off and host the event.

A symposium, luncheon and dedication ribbon-cutting celebrating the grand opening follow Goodman's address. She will host a question-and-answer session after her talk.

The symposium, "Women's Visions for a Strong Community: Health, Education and Leadership," begins at 10:45 a.m. in Thwing Center and features nine break-out sessions for participants. Case Interim Provost Lynn Singer will be the luncheon speaker from noon to 1:30 p.m., followed by the ribbon cutting at 1:30 p.m.

According to Miller, the Center for Women's mission is an important component in the achievement of Case's goal of creating the most powerful learning environment in the world. Activities at the center are designed to recognize, first, that learning takes place both inside and outside the classroom and, second, that learning is enhanced when all members of the community enjoy a safe, healthy and intellectually stimulating environment.

Literally all of the center's goals and activities are geared toward enhancing the learning environment, Miller said.

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Case for community

Campus News 9-25-03

Case Western Reserve University President Edward M. Hundert and Interim Provost Lynn Singer landscape outside the Cleveland School of the Arts during Case's first campuswide community service day, initiated by the Staff Advisory Council.

More than 400 faculty, staff and students, including School of Medicine Dean Ralph Horwitz who helped refurbish toys at Ronald McDonald House, volunteered their services for the event, which began with lunch in Thwing Center. (photo by Mike Sands)

 

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Case to Enhance Campus Climate for Women
by Susan Griffith

Campus News 8-28-03

With a prestigious grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF), Case Western Reserve University will be setting the national standards for work environments that promote women in science and engineering.

Case, in collaboration with Lubrizol Corp. and Fisk University, will use the five-year, $3.5 million NSF ADVANCE Institutional Transformation Award to implement a plan to advance women in science and engineering and to enhance diversity at the University.

This innovative "blueprint" will become a national model, called Academic Careers in Engineering and Science (ACES), for how research universities can recruit and retain women scientists and engineers.

"Findings from the program will inform other universities about how to tackle the problem of the leaky academic pipeline, which leads to the loss of talented women faculty in science and engineering," said Lynn Singer, interim provost and Case's ADVANCE project director.

ACES' goal is to increase women faculty in the sciences and engineering by 20 percent in the next five years.

 

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Getting Things Done

Case News July 24, 2003

Swear InLynn Singer, deputy provost and vice president for academic programs, swears in this year's CWRUCorps in the Sculpture Garden of Turning Point Park.

CWRUCorps is an AmeriCorps National Service program hosted by the University's Office of Student Community Service.

Photo by Julie Hewitt

 

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Singer Receives $1.9 Million Grant to Study Progress of Premature Infants
by George Stamatis

April 29, 2003

Lynn T. Singer, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Pediatrics and the division of general medical sciences, has received a $1.9 million, four-year grant from the Maternal and Child Health Bureau of the Department of Health and Human Services to continue followup studies into early adolescence of children who were born prematurely and suffer from a lung condition called bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD).

Her work examines how BPD affects children's thinking ability, language, behavior and other factors. She and her associates also examine stresses on the families associated with parenting children who were born with BPD and at a very low birth weight. The new phase of the study will assess children at 14 years of age and will have the study continuously funded for 17 years, making it the longest and most comprehensive study of BPD in the nation.

 

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CWRU Engineering Professor Honored at White House

March 21, 2003

CLEVELAND—Chung-Chiun Liu, the Wallace R. Persons Professor of Sensor Technology and Control and Director of the Electronics Design Center at Case Western Reserve University, received the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics and Engineering Mentoring (PAESMEM) at a ceremony at the White House in Washington, D.C.

He is one of 10 outstanding individuals and six organizations nationwide to receive the prestigious award.

Liu received the PAESMEM award from the Office of Science and Technology Policy for his exceptional mentoring efforts that enhance the participation of young women—who are traditionally underrepresented—in science, mathematics and engineering. He has been successful mentoring teen-agers in high school in electrochemical engineering. 

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Psychiatry Dept. Dedicates New Center of Excellence for Bipolar Disorder
Supported with close to $2 million from U.S. govt. and UHC

MedLines January 2003

The Research Institute of University Hospitals of Cleveland and the CWRU School of Medicine held a dedication ceremony for their new Center of Excellence for Care and Study of Children and Adults with Bipolar Disorder and Alcohol/Drug Abuse on Oct. 15. Instead of a ribbon-cutting, however, Pedro L. Delgado, M.D., chair of psychiatry and master of ceremonies, gathered the participating officials for a ribbon-joining ceremony, to symbolize how the new center will unite various constituents around northern Ohio, especially the people providing care with people needing care.

Ribbon cutting

Ribbon Joining- Rather than cut a ribbon, university, hospital, and government representatives joined a ribbon to demonstrate the connection the new center of excellence for biopolar disorder will make to the community. Gathered around the ribbon: Center Co-director Robert Findling, Congresswoman Marcy Kaptur, Deputy Provost and Interim Vice President for Medical Affairs Lynn Singer, Co-director Joseph Calabrese, CWRU President Edward Hundert, Congresswoman Stephanie Tubbs Jones, University Hospitals of Cleveland Interim President and Chief Executive Officer John Ferry, and psychiatry faculty member Robert Ronis.

 

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The Office of the Deputy Provost is located in Adelbert Hall, Room 216

Please call 216.368.1610 to request an appointment with the Deputy Provost.

The Office of the Provost is located in Adelbert Hall, Room 216

Please call 216.368.4346 to request an appointment with the Provost.

The organizational chart details the administrative structure of the Deputy Provost's Office. View the chart (PDF)

 
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Contact The Office of the Provost

Provost and Executive Vice President: 216.368.4346
Executive Assistant to the Provost: 216.368.4346
Deputy Provost & Vice President for Academic Affairs: 216.368.1610
Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education: 216.368.4389
Executive Assistant to the Deputy Provost: 216.368.1610
Secretary of the University Faculty: 216.368.4316
Special Assistant for Appointments, Promotion, and Tenure: 216.368.4342
Department Assistant:216.368.4389

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