IDEAL Participant Readings and Resources



Research and reports

 

Download the brochure of the IDEAL Final Report 2012

 

IDEAL Final Report to the National Science Foundation, August 2012

Appendices

Appendix 1: External Evaluation Report
Appendix 1A: 2010 Plenary Conference External Evaluation Report
Appendix 1B: 2011 Plenary Conference External Evaluation Report

Appendix 2: BGSU Co-Director Project Summary
Appendix 2A: BGSU Climate Survey Results
Appendix 2B: BGSU Climate Survey Results, Part 2
Appendix 2C: BGSU Climate Survey Results, Part 3
Appendix 2D: BGSU Institutional Research Climate Survey Report
Appendix 2E: BGSU Climate Survey Factor Analysis
Appendix 2F: BGSU Blog Participation Invitation
Appendix 2G: BGSU Search Committee Training Presentation

Appendix 3: CWRU Co-Director Project Summary
Appendix 3A: CWRU School of Medicine Project Report
Appendix 3B: CWRU School of Medicine Implementation Suggestions

Appendix 4: CSU Co-Director Project Summary
Appendix 4A: CSU Summary of Accomplishments

Appendix 5: KSU Co-Director Project Summary
Appendix 5A: KSU Years 1 - 3 Annual Project Reports
Appendix 5B: KSU Site Visit Materials
Appendix 5C: KSU Recommendations for a Presidential Commission on Women

Appendix 6: UA Co-Director Project Summary
Appendix 6A: UA Year Three Project Report
Appendix 6B: UA Achieving Distinction RFP

Appendix 7: UT Co-Director Project Summary

 

Bias Literacy: A Review of concepts in research on discrimination Ruta Sevo and Daryl E. Chubin (PDF)

The paper offers a quick digest of the evidence for discrimination, especially with reference to women in science and engineering. It explains common terminology and lists relevant legislation and national policy initiatives. Drawing on research in psychology and social science, it summarizes core concepts including: gender schema, accumulative advantage, stereotype threat, implicit bias, glass ceiling, mommy track, occupational segregation, statistical profiling, climate study, and the value of diversity in learning.

Diverse Faculty in Stem Blackwell 2009

In an attempt to address concerns regarding the experiences of academic faculty who are members of often-marginalized groups (e.g., women and ethnic/racial minorities), a climate survey of faculty members at a large public university was developed as part of a larger effort to improve aspects of the policies, procedures, and work climate. Multivariate analysis of variance revealed differences in performance-related variables and equality of treatment for women and racial/ethnic minorities working in the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) fields. Women in STEM fields and racial/ethnic minority non-STEM faculty generally reported more negative experiences, while ethnically diverse STEM faculty generally reported more positive experiences. The differential composition of the racial/ethnic minority STEM and non-STEM groups is thought to explain the discrepant findings between these 2 groups.

Diversifying Science and Engineering Leggon 2010

The fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) drive economies worldwide. In such knowledge-based economies, no nation can afford to use its human resources inefficiently and ineffectively. Faculties exert a great deal of influence on the science and engineering (S&E) enterprise insofar as they conduct cutting-edge research as well as educate and train the S&E labor forces. This article focuses on the dynamics of the intersections of race/ethnicity and gender on diversifying S&E faculties in colleges and universities in the United States, and the criticality of disaggregating data to better understand these dynamics. Failure to disaggregate race/ethnicity data by gender, and gender data by race/ethnicity, masks important distinctions among groups. Failure to systematically take into account these distinctions results in policy, programs, practices, and institutions that are both inefficient and ineffective in developing and enhancing the S&E labor forces.

Diversity Articles and Research from Academe (link)

The online version of the bimonthly magazine of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP)

The Faculty Time Divide Jerry A. Jacobs

The time demands of academic life are examined drawing on data from a large national sample of faculty. I outline the divide between full-time faculty, who work long hours irrespective of rank or institution type, and part-time faculty, who work at low pay with little job security, status, recognition or fringe benefits. The expectations of academic life in dual-career couples are hard to reconcile with the demands of parenting. This is a common problem because assistant professors are generally too old to wait until having tenure to have children. The segmentation of academic life into an over-worked core and a marginalized periphery tends to perpetuate gender equality.

Jerry Jacobs is a professor of Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania. This speech was his presidential address to the Eastern Sociological Society in Philadelphia during February 2003. Jacobs examines "the time demands of academic life."

Gender Bias Learning Project (link)

An online gender bias training that teaches you to identify the four basic patterns of gender bias: 1) Prove it Again! 2) The Double Bind, 3) The Matrenl Wall, 4) Gender Wars. The training also provides strategies for handling each type of bias as well.

Gender and Job Satisfation Callister 2006

This study investigates whether gender and the perceptions of department climate affects faculty job satisfaction and intentions to quit (work outcomes) with surveys responses from 308 faculty members in science and engineering fields. The study finds that both gender and department climate are related to work outcomes and that two facets of department climate (affective and instrumental) mediate the relationship between gender and both job satisfaction and intention to quit. This finding suggests that universities can benefit from improving department climate, which then may improve the retention of both male and female faculty, but may have an even greater impact on improving job satisfaction and reducing intentions to quit of female faculty.

Gender Disparity in STEM Disciplines: A Study of Faculty Attrition and Turnover Intentions Xu 2008

This study examines the underrepresentation of women faculty in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) by comparing the intentions of attrition and turnover between genders in Research and Doctoral universities. It is found that the two genders did not differ in their intentions to depart from academia, but women faculty had a significantly higher likelihood to change positions within academia. The indications are that women and men are equally committed to their academic careers in STEM; nonetheless, women's stronger turnover intentions are highly correlated with dissatisfaction with research support, advancement opportunities, and free expression of ideas. The findings suggest that the underrepresentation of women is more convincingly explained by an academic culture that provides women fewer opportunities, limited support, and inequity in leadership, rather than by gender-based differences such as roles in family responsibilities. Changes in academic STEM culture are needed in order to attract more women scientists and narrow the current gender gap.

The Impact of Gender on the Review of the Curricula Vitae of Job Applicants and Tenure Candidates: A National Empirical Study
Rhea E. Steinpreis, Katie A. Anders, and Dawn Ritzke

Published by the University of Wisconsin-Wilwaukee in Sex Roles, Vol. 41, Numbers 7 and 8, 1999, this study shows "...some of the factors that influence outside reviewers and search committee members when they are reviewing curricula vitae, particularly with respect to the gender of the name on the vitae."

Mysterious disappearance of female investigators
Davach Watson, Anja C. Andersen, and Jens Hjorth

This letter from Davach Watson, Anja C. Andersen, and Jens Hjorth of the University of Copenhagen concerns how only three of the twenty-five recipients of the European Young Investigator (EURYI) award are women. It appeared in Volume 436 of Nature, July 14, 2005.

Modeling Pathways Hoegh-Pawley 2010

Women increasingly earn advanced degrees in science, technology, and mathematics (STEM), yet remain underrepresented among STEM faculty. Much of the existing research on this underrepresentation relies on "chilly climate" and "pipeline" theoretical models to explain this phenomenon. However, the extent to which these models follow women's actual career pathways has been undertheorized. Further, alternative metaphors may more aptly describe the career pathways of women STEM faculty. In our broader research project, we examine the ways women's career pathways into STEM faculty positions are similar to and/or different from chilly climate and pipeline models, and if they vary based on race and/or ethnicity. At present, we focus on the ways oral histories and participatory research methods allow us to model the career pathways of women STEM faculty.

A National Analyis of Diversity in Science and Engineering Faculties at Research Universities
Dr. Donna J. Nelson and Diana C. Rogers

National Science Foundation, Division of Science Resources Statistics, Gender Differences in the Careers of Academic Scientists and Engineers: A Literature Review, NSF 03-322, Project Director, Alan I. Rapoport (Arlington, VA 2003).

New Study: Revolving Door Undermines Efforts to Increase Faculty Racial/Ethnic Diversity Report Shows Only Slight Increases in Underrepresented Minority Faculty, Higher Turnover Rates, at California Independent Colleges and Universities

This document summarizes the report
Colleges and universities are struggling to diversify because underrepresented minority faculty are leaving almost as fast as they can be hired. The report, "The Revolving Door for Underrepresented Minority Faculty in Higher Education", was part of The James Irvine Foundation Campus Diversity Initiative, coordinated by the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) and Claremont Graduate University (CGU). The report analyzed faculty hiring and retention data at 27 private colleges and universities in California between 2000 and 2004.

NSF: Women, Minorities, and Persons with Disabilities in Science and Engineering - 2002 (link)

This report, the 11th in a series of Congressionally-mandated biennial reports, provides data on the participation of women, minorities, and persons with disabilities in science and engineering education and employment. The data and analyses presented here can be used to track progress, inform the development of policies to increase participation in science and engineering, and evaluate the effectiveness of such policies.

NSF: The Division of Science Resources Statistics (SRS) (link)

The National Science Foundation central clearinghouse for the collection, interpretation, and analysis of data on scientific and engineering resources, which provides a source of information for policy formulation by other agencies of the Federal Government.

Perceptions of a Chilly Climate Morris 2008

The purpose of this study was to examine how perceptions of a chilly climate differ between students in traditionally female-dominated majors (nursing and education) versus traditionally male-dominated majors (information technology and engineering), and how these perceptions relate to students' intentions to persist or pursue higher education in their chosen field. Students (n = 403) attending a community college completed the 28- item Perceived Chilly Climate Scale (PCCS). The primary research question asked: To what extent can scores on the five subscales of the PCCS be explained by the predictor variable set of gender, ethnicity, age, college major, and intent to leave the field? Canonical correlation analysis indicated that women found the climate chillier than men, non-white students found the climate chillier than white students, younger students perceived the climate chillier than older students, and students in traditionally female-dominated majors perceived the climate chillier than students in traditionally male-dominated majors. Intent to leave the field was not a significant predictor of perceptions of chilly climate.

The Revolving Door for Underrepresented Minority Faculty in Higher Education (PDF)
Jose F. Moreno, Daryl G. Smith, Alma R. Clayton-Pedersen, Sharon Parker, and Daniel Hiroyuki Teraguchi

This research brief from the Jamies Irving Foundation utilizes readily available data from twenty-seven colleges and universities to examine their efforts to enhance faculty racial/ethnic diversity between 2000 and 2004.

Social Organizational Indicators

Drawing on recent survey data of women and men faculty in doctoral-granting departments in computer science, engineering, and science fields in nine highly ranked research universities, this article depicts four key social-organizational features of work, as reported by women and men respondents: frequency of speaking with faculty about research in home unit, ratings of aspects of position and department, characterizations of departmental climates, and levels of interference experienced with work and family. The article points to (a) the ways in which these features of work are consequential for significant status in academic science and engineering; (b) the ways in which experiences with these features vary for women and men faculty; and (c) the ways that institutional practices and policies, reflecting these features, may be improved toward greater equity for the full participation and status of both women and men in academic science and engineering.

The Subtle Side of Discrimination

Joan Williams, a professor of law at American University and director of its program on gender, work and family, discusses how academic women are disadvantaged in subtle ways by work and family roles. This article appeared in the Chronicle of Higher Education April 14, 2003.

Tenure Denied: Cases of Sex Discrimination in Academia

Published by the American Association of University Women Educational Foundation and American Association of University Women Legal Advocacy Fund in October 2004, and edited by Susan K. Dyer. This report "...presents evidence that ...gives a human voice to the concept of sex discrimination in academia. As this report makes clear, professors-turned-litigants are spurred by significantly more than an off-color joke or an occasional slight. Plaintiffs have risked and sometimes sacrificed promising, prestigious academic careers to seek justice for themselves and other women."

Voice Matters, Settles 2007

The current study examined whether women scientists' perceptions of voice moderate the impact of poor workplace climates on job satisfaction and whether effective leadership and mentoring promote women's voice. Survey data were collected from 135 faculty women in the natural sciences. The results from multiple regression analyses indicated that negative (e.g., sexist, hostile) departmental climates were related to lower job satisfaction. However, voice interacted with climate, such that women who perceived that they had more voice in departmental matters showed higher levels of job satisfaction than those who perceived having less voice. An additional regression indicated that mentoring by other women (but not men) in academia and effective departmental leadership were positively related to women's sense of voice. Theoretical and practical implications for the retention and success of women in male-dominated fields are discussed.

Why So Slow?: The Advancement of Women Virginia Valian

Chosen by the National Science Foundation as recommended reading for NSF-ADVANCE grant recipients and participants. Dr. Valian is Professor of Psychology and Linguistics at Hunter College and the CUNY Graduate Center. The book is available for purchase through several online booksellers, and university bookstores. MIT Press 1999.
Chapter 1, "Gender Schemas at Work" (PDF)
Chapter 11, "Women in Academia" (doc), 4 page excerpt of Chapter 11


National Science Foundation Grant Number (HRD 0929907)

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number (HRD 0929907). Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.



Bibliogaphy



Women´s Ways of Knowing the Development of Self, Voice, and Mind.
Belenky, Mary Field, Blythe McVicker Clinchy, Nancy Rule Goldberger, and Jill Mattuck Tarule.
New York: Basic Books, 1986.

A discussion of how women develop psychologically and how they learn.

The Shape of the River. Long-Term Consequences of Considering Race in College and University Admissions.
Bowen, William G. and Derek Bok. Princeton, N.J.:Princeton University Press, 1998.

Written pre-Grutter v. Bollinger (University of Michigan Affirmative Action case),
this book makes a compelling case as to why race should matter in college admittance.

Faculty Diversity Problems and Solutions.
Moody, JoAnn.New York: RoutledgerFalmer, 2004.

A very good book with practical advice regarding faculty diversity.

Towards The Abolition of Whiteness: Essays on Race, Politics, and Working Class History
Roediger, David. Verso Books, 1994.

Achieving Faculty Diversity Debunking the Myths.
Smith, Daryl G.Washington D. C.: Association of American Colleges and Universities, 1996.

Groundbreaking research debunking the myths of "pipeline issues"‚
"bidding wars for faculty-of-color"‚ "not enough qualified minorities"‚ etc.

"Why are all the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?" A Psychologist Explains the Development of Racial Identity.
Tatum, Beverly Daniel. New York: Basic Books, 1997.

Using the developmental concept of racial identity,
Tatum explains why young people often self-segregate in high school and college.

Colorblind Shakespeare.
Thompson, Ayanna. New York: Routledge, 2006.

Race Matters.
West, Cornel.New York: Vintage Books, 1994.

A discussion as to why race issues matter for everyone in the U.S.

White Like Me: Reflections on Race from a Privileged Son.
Wise, Tim.Brooklyn, NY: Soft Skull Press, 2005.

Personal account of "White Privilege" that explores speaker Tim Wise’s understanding of white male privilege
in the U.S. with research debunking many myths about minorities held by people of privilege.


National Science Foundation Grant Number (HRD 0929907)

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number (HRD 0929907). Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.


Participant Readings and Resources

Welcome to Year 3 of IDEAL!

This page is your source for pre-readings and resources before and after each Leadership Development session. Downloading documents directly to your computer will save trees and avoid email overload. Participants may also share relevant documents with each other by emailing them to the Project Director, Amanda Shaffer, for posting.



Change Leader Session #4

Tuesday, April 10th, 2012 at Bowling Green State University

RSVP for the final session on the Doodle online calendar

Agenda - Leadership Session Four

Directions to parking at Bowling Green State University>


Pre-Readings

  1. Survival Analysis of Faculty Retention in Science and Engineering by Gender
    Kaminski and Geisler, Science, 12 February 2012: Vol. 335 no. 6070 pp. 864-866

  2. Understanding current causes of women's underrepresentation in science (PDF)
    Ceci and Williams, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Early Edition, February 7, 2011

  3. The 13+ Club: An Index for Understanding, Documenting, and Resisting Patterns of Non-Promotion to Full Professor
    Geisler, Kaminski, and Berkley, 2007 NWSA Journal, Vol. 19 No. 3 (Fall).


Additional Optional Readings

  1. The Matilda Effect in science: Awards and prizes in the US, 1990s and 2000s Lincoln, Pincus, Koster, Leboy
    Science is stratified, with an unequal distribution of research facilities and rewards among scientists. Awards and prizes, which are critical for shaping scientific career trajectories, play a role in this stratification when they differentially enhance the status of scientists who already have large reputations: the 'Matthew Effect'. Contrary to the Mertonian norm of universalism – the expectation that the personal attributes of scientists do not affect evaluations of their scientific claims and contributions – in practice, a great deal of evidence suggests that the scientific efforts and achievements of women do not receive the same recognition as do those of men: the 'Matilda Effect'. Awards in science, technology, engineering and medical (STEM) fields are not immune to these biases. We outline the research on gender bias in evaluations of research and analyze data from 13 STEM disciplinary societies. While women's receipt of professional awards and prizes has increased in the past two decades, men continue to win a higher proportion of awards for scholarly research than expected based on their representation in the nomination pool. The results support the powerful twin influences of implicit bias and committee chairs as contributing factors. The analysis sheds light on the relationship of external social factors to women's science careers and helps to explain why women are severely underrepresented as winners of science awards. The ghettoization of women's accomplishments into a category of 'women-only' awards also is discussed.

  2. When Scientists Choose Motherhood Williams and Ceci
    Article in the American Scientist
    Concluding paragraph: The stresses faced when raising young families drive women out of careers for which they are trained and in which they would be as successful as men were they to make the choice not to have children. This critical constraint, which has both biological and cultural aspects, creates a sometimes grim and seemingly unfair reality for women that men simply do not face. Modern universities must create policies to target this real issue, which is supported by extensive empirical data, and which lies at the heart of the current problem.

  3. Leading Change; Why Transformation Efforts Fail Kotter
    Article published in the Harvard Business Review
    [HBR Editor's Note:] Guiding change may be the ultimate test of a leader – no business survives over the long term if it can't reinvent itself. But, human nature being what it is, fundamental change is often resisted mightily by the people it most affects: those in the trenches of the business. Thus, leading change is both absolutely essential and incredibly difficult. Perhaps nobody understands the anatomy of organizational change better than retired Harvard Business School professor John P. Kotter. This article, originally published in the spring of 1995, previewed Kotter's 1996 book Leading Change. It outlines eight critical success factors – from establishing a sense of extraordinary urgency, to creating short-term wins, to changing the culture ("the way we do things around here"). It will feel familiar when you read it, in part because Kotter's vocabulary has entered the lexicon and in part because it contains the kind of home truths that we recognize, immediately, as if we'd always known them. A decade later, his work on leading change remains definitive.


Session Handouts



Change Leader Session #3

Friday, March 2nd, 2012 as a video conference

RSVP for this session on the Doodle online calendar

Agenda - Leadership Session Three
Parking pass for University of Akron Lot#9, Infocision Stadium, Room 425
Map of Toledo campus to Lot 44 and Collier Building, Room 4415


Pre-Readings

  1. Framing: Position Your Messages for Maximum Impact Melissa Ruffoni, Harvard Management Update, 2005
    A manager's job is, quite simply, to motivate people toward achieving a common goal. Succeeding at this job requires a gamut of communication skills, ranging from delivering a prepared talk to helping team members negotiate the best way to move ahead on a project. No communication skill, however, is more critical to the manager than the ability to frame an issue effectively. What exactly does it mean to "frame" or "reframe" an issue? Think about the metaphor behind the concept. A frame focuses attention on the painting it surrounds. Moreover, different frames draw out different aspects of the work. Putting a painting in a red frame brings out the red in the work; putting the same painting in a blue frame brings out the blue.

  2. Diversity in Academic Medicine: The Stages of Change Mode Carnes, Handelsman and Sheridan, Journal of Women's Health, Vol 4, Number 6, 2005
    The benefits of increasing the diversity of leadership in academic medicine have been reviewed and confirmed by a number of expert groups,1–6 yet women and underrepresented minorities are not rising through faculty ranks or entering leadership in academic medicine at rates predicted by their proportions in medical school over the past 30 years.7,8 this is an issue that must engage all stakeholders in academic medicine in order to ensure a healthy future for academic medicine as well as a healthy future for our nations.

  3. Optional Reading - Beyond The Data Jeffrey Mervis, SCIENCE, Vol 334, 14 October 2011, pp 169 - 171.
    How NSF assesses grant proposals for possible impacts beyond the expected scientific results.


Session Handouts and Presentations

  1. Annual Change Project REPORT Template Year 3 (PDF)

  2. Collaboration Checklist (doc)

  3. Collaboration Checklist Key (doc)

  4. Evaluation Form - Leaderhsip Session Three (PDF) Please print and complete.

  5. Leadership Session #3 PowerPoint(PPT)


Additional Documents

  1. University Level Promotion and Tenure Committee Evaluative Bias presentation (PPT)
    Amanda Shaffer, Interim Faculty Diversity Officer, Manager of Faculty Diversity Development.

  2. School Level Promotion and Tenure Committee Bias presentation (PPT)
    Amanda Shaffer, Interim Faculty Diversity Officer, Manager of Faculty Diversity Development.

  3. SAMPLE agenda for evaluation site visit (PDF)



Change Leader Session #2

Wednesday, November 30th, 2011 at Kent State Univeristy

RSVP for this session on the Doodle online calendar
Agenda - Leadership Session Two (PDF)
Directions to parking at Kent State University


Pre-Readings

  1. "Why So Slow", Chapter 1 Valian (PDF)

  2. "A Good Place to Do Science" Jordan & Bilimoria (PDF)

  3. The Search is On: Engendering Faculty Diversity Through More Effective Search and Recruitment Bilimoria & Buch
    The underrepresentation of women and minority faculty in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines continues to be a major concern to university leaders, policy makers, and scientists. While a number of complex factors across the entire academic pipeline play significant roles in this problem, important contributing causes of the underrepresentation of women and minorities on the STEM faculty are how recruitment is conducted and how hiring decisions are made. In the following, we elucidate how universities can systematically transform their conventional recruitment practices to develop a more diverse faculty and a more inclusive faculty climate. First, we describe how conventional recruitment practices contribute to the homogenous replication of the faculty body. Next, we share the results of studies of the nature and consequences of diversity in applicant pools in recent science and engineering searches conducted at our universities. Finally, we provide guidelines and best practices for effective faculty hiring processes.

  4. Leadership That Gets Results Goleman (optional)
    New research suggests that the most effective executives use a collection of distinct leadership styleseach in the right measure, at just the right time. Such flexibility is tough to put into action, but it pays off in performance. And better yet, it can be learned.


Session Handouts and Presentations

  1. Year Three Change Project Template (docx)

  2. Evaluation Form - Leaderhsip Session Two (doc)

  3. Leading for Change PowerPoint (PPT)

 

Change Leader Session #1

Thursday, October 13, 2011 at Cleveland State University
Student Center Rooms 313 & 315

Agenda - Leadership Session One (PDF)
Directions to parking at Cleveland State University

Pre-Readings

  1. "Why So Slow", Chapter 1 (Valian) (PDF)

  2. "A Good Place to Do Science" (Jordan & Bilimoria) (PDF)

  3. NSF Project Description of Institutions Developing Excellence in Academic Leadership (PDF)
    (the entire grant) and Two page Summary of IDEAL (PDF)

  4. Breaking Barriers and Creating Inlcusiveness: Lessons of Organizational Transformation
    to Advance Women Faculty in Acdemic Science and Engineering
    , (PDF)
    Diana Bilimoria, Simy Joy, Xiangfen Liang, Human Resource Management, Fall 2008, Vol. 47, No. 3, Pp. 423–441


Session Handouts and Presentations

  1. Leadership Session One PowerPoint (PPT)
    Amanda Shaffer, Interim Faculty Diversity Officer, Manager of Faculty Diversity Development.

  2. Institutional Transformation Theme by School (PDF)
    Amanda Shaffer, Interim Faculty Diversity Officer, Manager of Faculty Diversity Development.

  3. Summary of Change Leader Team Responsibilities (PDF)
    Amanda Shaffer, Interim Faculty Diversity Officer, Manager of Faculty Diversity Development.

  4. Timeline of IDEAL Year Three Activities (doc)
    Amanda Shaffer, Interim Faculty Diversity Officer, Manager of Faculty Diversity Development.

  5. Financial Forms and Instructions - Memorandum of Understanding (individually distributed)

  6. Employee/Participant Request (ESSPR) needed to receive stipend (xls)

  7. W9 - Taxpayer Identification needed to receive stipend (PDF)

  8. Evaluation Form - Leadership Session #1 (doc)


Additional Documents

CWRU Work/Life Balance Policy Brochure (PDF)
Amanda Shaffer, Interim Faculty Diversity Officer, Manager of Faculty Diversity Development.


National Science Foundation Grant Number (HRD 0929907)

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number (HRD 0929907). Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.



Participant Readings and Resources

Welcome to Year 2 of IDEAL!

This page is your source for pre-readings and resources before and after each change leader workshop. Downloading documents directly to your computer will save trees and avoid email overload. Participants may also share relevant documents with each other by emailing them to the Project Director, Amanda Shaffer, for posting.



Change Leader Session #1

Thursday, October 7, 2010 at Case Western Reserve Univeristy
Kelvin Smith Library, 2nd floor Dampeer Room

Agenda - Leadership Session One (PDF)
Directions to parking and Kelvin Smith Library


Pre-Readings

  1. NSF Project Description of Institutions Developing Excellence in Academic Leadership (the entire grant)
    and Two page Summary of IDEAL (PDF)

  2. Breaking Barriers and Creating Inlcusiveness: Lessons of Organizational Transformation to Advance Women Faculty in Academic Science and Engineering(PDF),
    Diana Bilimoria, Simy Joy, Xiangfen Liang, Human Resource Management, Fall 2008, Vol. 47, No. 3, Pp. 423–441


Session Handouts and Presentations

  1. Powerpoint Presentations from Leadership Session One (PPT)

  2. Contact Information by School, Year Two 2010/11

  3. NSF-ADVANCE Brochure of Strategies (PDF)

  4. Institutional Transformation Theme by School (PDF)

  5. Summary of Change Leader Team Responsibilities (PDF)

  6. Timeline of IDEAL Year Two Activities (PDF)

  7. Financial Forms and Instructions - Memorandum of Understanding (individually distributed)

  8. Employee/Participant Request (ESSPR) needed for stipend

  9. W9 - Taxpayer Identification (PDF)

  10. Evaluation Form - Leadership Session #1 (doc)


Additional Documents

  1. Workplaces that work: Creating a workplace culture that attracts, retains and promotes women. Modified from McLean, D. (2003). (PDF)
    Report for the Centre of Excellence for Women's Advancement. Ontario: The Conference Board of Canada

  2. CWRU Work/Life Balance Policy Brochure (PDF)
    Amanda Shaffer, Interim Faculty Diversity Officer, Manager of Faculty Diversity Development.

  3. IDEAL Change Project Template (doc)
    Amanda Shaffer, Interim Faculty Diversity Officer, Manager of Faculty Diversity Development.

 


Change Leader Session #2

Friday, December 3rd, 2010 at University of Toledo

RSVP for this session on the Doodle online calendar


National Science Foundation Grant Number (HRD 0929907)

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number (HRD 0929907). Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.



Participant Readings and Resources

Welcome to Year 1 of IDEAL!

This page is your source for pre-readings and important resources before and after each change leader workshop. Downloading documents directly to your computer will save trees and avoid email overload. Participants may also share relevant documents with each other by emailing them to the Project Director, Amanda Shaffer, for posting.



Change Leader Session #4

Thursday, May 13th 2010, University of Toledo
Faculty Club in the Hilton Toledo, 3100 Glendale Avenue
12:00pm - 4:30pm



Change Leader Session #3

Thursday, March 25th 2010, University of Akron
Leigh Hall, Room 414

 

Handouts and Additional Resources

  1. Collaboration Checklist (doc)
    * Excerpted with permission from Building Dynamic Groups, by Nancy Stehulak, Ph.D., Ohio State University Extension.  See also “Assessing your Collaboration”, Borden and Perkins, Journal of Extension, April 1999 Vol. 37, 2 and Checklist for Developing Collaborations, National Academy of Engineering, www.nae.edu/cms/10181.aspx

  2. External Evaluation Site Visit Agenda- EXAMPLE (doc)

  3. Weatherhead School of Management Promotion Rules Excerpt

  4. The 13+ Club: An Index for Understanding, Documenting, and Resisting Patterns of Non-Promotion to Full Professor
    Geisler, Cheryl, Kaminski, Debbie, & Berkley, Robyn A., NWSA Journal - Volume 19, Number 3, Fall 2007, pp. 145-162

  5. Evaluation Form for Leadership Session Three (doc)


Pre-Readings

  1. Framing: Position Your Messages for Maximum Impact Melissa Ruffoni, Harvard Management Update, 2005
    A manager's job is, quite simply, to motivate people toward achieving a common goal. Succeeding at this job requires a gamut of communication skills, ranging from delivering a prepared talk to helping team members negotiate the best way to move ahead on a project. No communication skill, however, is more critical to the manager than the ability to frame an issue effectively. What exactly does it mean to "frame" or "reframe" an issue? Think about the metaphor behind the concept. A frame focuses attention on the painting it surrounds. Moreover, different frames draw out different aspects of the work. Putting a painting in a red frame brings out the red in the work; putting the same painting in a blue frame brings out the blue.

  2. Women and the Vision Thing
    Herminia Ibarra and Otilia Obodaru, Harvard Business Review, 2009

  3. Diversity in Academic Medicine: The Stages of Change Model
    Carnes, Handelsman and Sheridan, Journal of Women's Health, Vol 4, Number 6, 2005

  4. Optional Reading: Chapter One, (PDF)
    Why So Slow? The Advancement of Women
    , Virginia Valian, MIT Press, 1999



Change Leader Session #2

Thursday, January 28, 2010
Kent State University

 

Pre-Readings

  1. Leadership That Gets Results
    Daniel Goleman, Harvard Buisness Review, March-April 2000

  2. A Good Place To Do Science: A Case Study of An Academic Science Department, (PDF)
    Diana Bilimoria and C. Greer Jordan, 2005


Additional Resources Referenced during Session #2

  1. CWRU Faculty Climate Survey 2007 (PDF)

  2. Frehil Evaluation Toolkit for Advance Grants
    See Appendix A: Sample Evaluation Plan beginning on page 24, and Appendix B: So You want to Run a Climate Survey

 

Leadership Development for Department Chairs

  1. Annotated bibliography of various monographs (link)

  2. ACE Department Chair Resource Center (link)

 

Faculty Diversity

  1. Candidate Pool Study Report (doc)

  2. Engendering Faculty Diversity through More Effective Search and Recruitment Bilimoria & Bush, accepted for publication in Change, 2010
    The underrepresentation of women and minority faculty in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines continues to be a major concern to university leaders, policy makers, and scientists. While a number of complex factors across the entire academic pipeline play significant roles in this problem, important contributing causes of the underrepresentation of women and minorities on the STEM faculty are how recruitment is conducted and how hiring decisions are made. In the following, we elucidate how universities can systematically transform their conventional recruitment practices to develop a more diverse faculty and a more inclusive faculty climate. First, we describe how conventional recruitment practices contribute to the homogenous replication of the faculty body. Next, we share the results of studies of the nature and consequences of diversity in applicant pools in recent science and engineering searches conducted at our universities. Finally, we provide guidelines and best practices for effective faculty hiring processes.

  3. Link to Joanne Moody website (doc)
    booklets for sale on recruiting for diversity, mentoring early career faculty and "solo" faculty

 

Articles that measure attitude toward diversity:

  1. Maythew S. Montei, Gary A. Adams & Leigh M. Eggers.
    "Validity of Scores on the Attitudes toward Diversity Scale" (ATDS), Educational and Psychological Measurement, Vol. 56, No. 2, 293-303 (1996).

  2. Ellen Ernst Kossek and Susan C. Zonia.
    "Assessing Diversity Climate: A Field Study of Reactions to Employer Efforts to Promote Diversity", Journal of Organizational Behavior, Vol. 14, No. 1, 61-81 (1993)

  3. Dee, J.R. & Henkin, A. B.
    "Assessing Dispositions Toward Cultural Diversity among Preservice Teachers, Urban Education", Vol. 37, No. 1, 22-40 (2002).

 

Documents created for Speed Mentoring at CWRU

  1. Speed Mentoring How To (doc)

  2. Speed Mentoring Sign Up Method (doc)

  3. Speed Mentoring Evaluation (doc)

  4. Speed Mentoring Flyer (doc)



Change Leader Session #1

December 1, 2009, Case Western Reserve University

 

Session Handouts and Presentations

  1. Presentations from Workshop #1 (pdf)

  2. Contact Information by School, Year One 2009/2010

  3. Institutional Transformation Theme by School (pdf)

  4. Summary of Change Leader Team Responsibilities (pdf)

  5. Timeline of IDEAL Year One Activities (pdf)

  6. Financial Forms and Instructions - Memorandum of Understanding (individually distributed)

  7. Employee/Participant Request (ESSPR) needed for stipend (xls)

  8. W9 - Taxpayer Identification (pdf)

  9. Evaluation Form - Leaderhsip Session #1 (doc)


Pre-Readings

  1. NSF Project Description of Institutions Developing Excellence in Academic Leadership (pdf) (the entire grant)
    and Two page Summary of IDEAL (pdf)

  2. Breaking Barriers and Creating Inlcusiveness: Lessons of Organizational Transformation to Advance Women Faculty in Acdemic Science and Engineering, (pdf)
    Diana Bilimoria, Simy Joy, Xiangfen Liang, Human Resource Management, Fall 2008, Vol. 47, No. 3, Pp. 423–441


National Science Foundation Grant Number (HRD 0929907)

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number (HRD 0929907). Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.