Institute for the science of origins

mark your calendar.

The Institute for the Science of Origins and its partners produce and host a number of origins-related workshops through the year. Stay tuned to the Origins events listings (or sync with our calendar) for upcoming events and opportunities to explore the beginnings of life.

Upcoming Events

Department of Biology Seminar Series:

"Genetics, genomics, and natural history: Making population biology relevant to conservation in California."
H. Bradley Shaffer, Ph.D., Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Los Angeles
DeGrace Hall room 312, Thursday, April 19, 2012 at 4:15
For more information please contact Katie Bingman (krb28@case.edu)

Curator's Forum Lecture Series:

Wednesday's at 7 pm, hear the latest findings on research conducted by our curators:
- April 25th "The Origins and Evolution of Praying Mantises" Dr. Gavin Svenson, Curator of Invertebrate Zoology
- May 16nd "Early Hominid Locomotion: Did Lucy Watch Her Relatives Climb Trees?" Dr. Yohannes Haile-Selassie, Curator of Physical Anthropology
More information on the series can be found at the CMNH Curator's Forum webpage.

Frontiers of Astronomy Lectures Series:

A free lecture series that offers those with an interest in astronomy the chance to learn about some of the latest research in the field:
For more information, visit the CMNH Astronomy Lectures webpage.

Spring 2012 Origins Science Scholars Program

This seven-week program addresses Atoms, Quarks and Strings, Origins of Disease and Immunity, and the Origin and Evolution of Dogs.
Time: Wednesday evenings from 6-8 p.m. (excepting Tuesday May 8)
Dates: March 28, 2012 through May 8, 2012. Dinner in the Hvorka Atrium will follow each one-hour presentation.
Click here for all the details

Center for Education and Research in Cosmology and Astrophysics (CERCA)

CERCA sponsors a variety of talks on an ongoing basis
For more information about CERCA events, visit the CERCA Web site and the CERCA seminar web page.

Fellows Lunches

Wednesdays
This weekly lunch brings together the fellows of the institute for conversation about the institute and its scientific activities.
Hosted by the Institute for the Science of Origins

EvoClub!

meets monthly, 4-6:30pm in Goodyear Auditorium (Clapp Hall 108). Check this calendar for upcoming events!
To join the EvoClub! email list, please send an email to evolution@case.edu
Providing unique opportunities to diverse communities matters greatly to the Institute for the Science of Origins. The institute sponsors the university's undergraduate-led society, EvoClub! This informal group meets periodically so that members may engage each other in discussions about origins topics.

Life, the Universe & Hot Dogs: The Weighty Questions

The 4th Tuesday of each month
Join ISO scholars at the Happy Dog Bar to promote informal discussion between our scholars and the public.
The constant theme underlying the gatherings: "What do you want on your Hot Dog?"

Next program: "Pinot with the Pelvis: the Evolution of Childbirth" with Scott Simpson, Apr 24 at 7:30

Follow these links for Venue Information, an Event's calendar, and direction's and hours.


Past programs:
"Origins of Walking" with Bruce Latimer, Mar 27th 2012
"Dark Matter and Dark Beer" with Dan Akerib and Tom Shutt, Feb 28th 2012
"The Origins of the Universe" with Glenn Starkman, Jan 24th 2012


Recent Events


From the Frontiers of Astronomy Lectures Series:


Apr 12th, 2012: "The Archaeology of Galaxies: Unearthing Fossils of Formation"
By Alan McConnachie, Research Associate, Astrophysics, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

From the Curator's Forum Lecture Series:


- April 4th, 2012 "Stones for a Monument: Geological Aspects of the Rehabilitation of the Cuyahoga County Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument" Dr. Joe Hannibal, Curator of Invertebrate Paleontology

Celebrate Darwin Day with Origins! Feb. 8th

Stop by Goodyear Auditorium (Clapp 108) any time between 4:30-6:30.

Bring your friends, students, community members, guests, and transitional species!
No Reservations needed -- For more information: Call or text Patricia: 440-478-5292

Download Poster (pdf) here!

"The Origin of Mathematical Truth: On the Nature of Mathematical Proofs"

ISO Noontime Lecture Series

Daniel Solow, Department of Operations, Weatherhead School of Management, Case Western Reserve University
Wednesday, Dec 7, 2011
Noon, Ford Auditorium, Allen Library, corner Euclid Ave and Adelbert Road (park under Severance Hall)
Abstract:

This talk will present an introduction to mathematical proofs, starting with a definition of what a proof is. It will then be explained that any proof, regardless of the specific subject in which the proof arises, consists of a sequence of applications of proof techniques, just as a game of chess consists of a sequence of moves of the individual pieces. One technique, namely the forward-backward method, will be described in some detail. The remaining techniques are keyword-based, which means that you can choose an appropriate proof technique based on certain keywords that appear in the theorem under consideration. A brief discussion is included on how to read condensed proofs that typically appear in textbooks and other mathematical literature. This is challenging because written proofs often do not mention explicitly which proof techniques are being used and how they are applied to the specific theorem. Biography:

Daniel Solow was born in Washington, D.C. at a very young age. He soon learned that Danny was his name and mathematics was his game. He received a B.S. in Mathematics from Carnegie-Mellon University; an M.S. in Operations Research from the University of California at Berkeley; and a Ph.D. in Operations Research from Stanford University. He has been a professor at Case Western Reserve University since 1978. He has done basic research in deterministic optimization by developing and improving algorithms for solving linear and nonlinear programming problems as well as in combinatorial optimization. He also uses these tools together with mathematical modeling, analysis and computer simulations to derive insights that are applicable to broad classes of complex systems (such as how much central control is beneficial for system performance) and to study the role of leadership and its impact on the performance of systems of human interaction. He has also developed systematic methods for teaching mathematical proofs and reasoning, computer programming, and operations research.


"Virus! Epidemic and Evolution"

ISO Noontime Lecture Series

Eddie Holmes, Dept of Biology, Pennsylvania State University
Wednesday, Nov 30, 2011
Noon, Ford Auditorium, Allen Library, corner Euclid Ave and Adelbert Road (park under Severance Hall)
Dr. Holmes is an evolutionary biologist who has worked with viruses for 20 years. His research has focused on a number of key areas, namely (i) determining the fundamental mechanisms of viral evolution, (ii) studying the case-specific evolution of major viral infections of humans and animals, with a particular focus on influenza and dengue, (iii) revealing the evolutionary genetics of viral emergence, and (iv) assisting in the development of bioinformatic methods for gene/genome sequence analysis. His current research sits at the interface of four disciplines -evolutionary biology, genomics, bioinformatics and infectious disease- and is designed to reveal the factors that are responsible for the successful cross-species transmission of viral pathogens into humans and other eukaryotic species.

"Do the Locomotion: Lucy's feet were made for walking"

ISO Noontime Lecture Series

Carol Ward, Department of Pathology and Anatomical Sciences, University of Missouri
Wednesday, Nov 16, 2011
Noon, Ford Auditorium, Allen Library, corner Euclid Ave and Adelbert Road (park under Severance Hall)
Carol Ward obtained her B.S. in Anthropology and Zoology from the University of Michigan in 1986, and her Ph.D. in Functional Anatomy and Evolution from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 1991. She joined the University of Missouri as Assistant Professor with a joint appointment in the Department of Anthropology and the Department of Anatomy in 1991 where she worked until 2006 when she joined the Department of Pathology and Anatomical Sciences full time and earned the rank of Professor in 2007. Dr. Ward studies the evolution of apes and hominins from the Miocene through the early Pleistocene, with an emphasis on the locomotor skeleton, especially the pelvis and vertebrae in Miocene apes. She studies cranial and postcranial remains of early Australopithecus as well as later hominin postcranial anatomy and variation in the early Pleistocene of Kenya. Dr. Ward's research is currently funded by the National Science Foundation, Wenner Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research, and LSB Leakey Foundation. Dr. Ward is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

"Student Bodies: 19th-century med student cadaver portraiture"

ISO Noontime Lecture Series

James Edmonson, Director of the Dittrick Medical History Center, CWRU
Wednesday, Nov 2, 2011
Noon, Ford Auditorium, Allen Library, corner Euclid Ave and Adelbert Road (park under Severance Hall)
Dissection is the rite of passage marking the point at which medical students separate emotionally and intellectually from the paths taken by their non-medical friends. This moment teaches them to objectify the body -as an object of study, brings them face to face with the finality of death, and the physical dimension of the personal. "It's more interesting and pleasant than it looks like" remarked one young doctor in training sending a photo of his cadaver home as a postcard. As humans we often react to strong emotions with humor. Thus was founded in the 1800's a genre of slightly underground humor using the new medium of photography -med students posing with their cadavers- often in elaborate tableaux. Some are inside jokes shared only with other students. Others were attempts to share their viscerally shocking new experience with friends and relatives who followed a more typical path in life. Some of the 138 rare historical photos Edmonson analyzed for his book Dissection will strike us today as funny or macabre or downright puzzling. But all are fascinating!

"Glucose! When too much of a good molecule can go bad."

ISO Noontime Lecture Series

Timothy S. Kern, Professor, Endocrinology, CWRU and University Hospitals of Cleveland
Wednesday, Oct 19, 2011
Noon, Ford Auditorium, Allen Library, corner Euclid Ave and Adelbert Road (park under Severance Hall)
Timothy Kern is Director of the Center for Diabetes Research at University Hospitals of Cleveland. His lab�s major research focus is to learn what causes development of long-term complications of diabetes, with particular emphasis on diabetic retinopathy. This information then is translated into therapies that are being tested for their ability to prevent the development of diabetic complications. Recent studies are focusing on the roles of light/dark and of inflammation in the development of the retinopathy, and neuronal causes of visual impairment in diabetes. Because the complications of diabetes take many years to develop, much of this initial research has involved animal models, but these therapies are now beginning to be studied also in diabetic patients.

"Chance and Necessity in Adaptive Immunity"

ISO Noontime Lecture Series

Colm S. O'Huigin, Director of the Cancer and Inflammation Program Genetic Core Facility, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health
Wednesday, Oct 5, 2011
Noon, Ford Auditorium, Allen Library, corner Euclid Ave and Adelbert Road (park under Severance Hall)
The working of adaptive immunity has been shaped both by chance events and by the inevitable consequences of selection subsequent to such chance events. Data derive from a wide evolutionary trajectory - essentially everything from fishes to philosophers. The talk will cover lessons learned from Dr. O'Huigin's MHC work in lamprey, carp zebrafish, guppies, Darwin�s finches, marsupials and various primates, especially as it relates to human health. Dr. O'Huigin comes to us from the National Institutes of Health�s National Cancer Institute where he heads the Center for Cancer Research�s Cancer and Inflammation Program Genetic Core Facility. His training in both quantitative and molecular genetics was at the Genetics Dept. of Trinity College, Dublin. He learnt the techniques of molecular evolutionary analysis as a postdoctoral fellow with Wen-Hsiung Li at the Center for Population and Demographic Genetics in Houston Texas. As an EMBO fellow he worked at the Max-Planck Institute in Tuebingen, Germany with Jan Klein where later he headed a group working on the origins and genetic characteristics of the major histocompatability complex, on organogenesis and on speciation.

"Water in the Moon: Evidence & Implications for Lunar Formation"

ISO Noontime Lecture Series

James van Orman , Department of Geology, Case Western Reserve University
Wednesday, Sept 28, 2011
Noon, Ford Auditorium, Allen Library, corner Euclid Ave and Adelbert Road (park under Severance Hall)
v James Van Orman, earned his Ph.D. from MIT and is now professor of geological sciences at CWRU. After years of studying the interior of Earth's mantle and plate tectonics, he has turned his eyes to space, recently releasing findings that the moon's interior is quite different than previous researchers suspected. His discoveries include the startling fact that the moon�s interior contains up to 100 times more water than previously measured. The findings come from tiny melt inclusions discovered within samples brought back by Apollo 17. This important work provides a window not only into the nature of the moon, but also to the nature and skillful use of scientific evidence.

"How the Genome Folds"

Erez Lieberman-Aiden, Harvard Univ
Friday, Sept 23, 2011
2pm, Rockefeller 309

"Culturomics: Quantitative Analysis of Culture Using Millions of Digitized Books"

Erez Lieberman-Aiden, Harvard Univ
Thursday, Sept 22, 2011
4pm, Rockefeller 309

"MiddleAging: Aches & Pains"

ISO Fellow Linda Spurlock, Director of Human Health at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History
Thursday, Apr 21, 2011
8 PM, TV show on WVIZ
Dr. Spurlock was interviewed and demonstrated the effects of aging on specimens from the Museum's Hamann-Todd Osteological collection of human bones. As baby boomers age, so do their bones, muscles and joints, creating lots of aches and pains. This show examines the biology and pathology of middle-age on the musculoskeletal system, highlighting how and why so many baby boomers are taking normal wear and tear to new limits.
Her interview will air during the first segment of the show. The program re-airs at: 10:30 pm Saturday, April 23, and 3 pm and 11:30 pm on Easter Sunday, April 24
>Click here for more information or call: 216-368-3836

"Frontiers of Astronomy"

Lecture series
Series takes place monthly on Thursdays
8 p.m. Cleveland Museum of Natural History's Murch Auditorium
Please note: No tickets or reservations are required.
Frontiers of Astronomy is a free lecture series co-sponsored by the Department of Astronomy at Case Western Reserve University through the support of the Arthur S. Holden, Sr. Endowment; The Cleveland Museum of Natural History; and The Cleveland Astronomical Society. It offers those with an interest in astronomy the chance to learn about some of the latest research in the field. On clear evenings, the Ralph Mueller Observatory will be open afterward.

"Title: The Development of Colour Patterns in Fishes: Towards an Understanding of the Evolution of Beauty

Nobel Laureate Christiane Nusslein-Volhard, Director, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology
Wednesday, Apr 20, 2011
4 PM, Wolstein Auditorium room 1413, Wolstein Research Building, 2103 Cornell Road Case Western Reserve University Campus
The Hanna Lecture
For more information: 216-368-3836
Parking is available in the garage adjacent to University Hospitals of Cleveland on Cornell Road, or in the visitors lot under Severance Hall. Click for Directions

"Obscura Day at the Dittrick"

For one night, some of the quirky, strange and very rare items at the Dittrick will be on view as we host Obscura Day, an international celebration of unusual places, with happenings all over the world on Saturday, April 9. The Dittrick will host this ticketed, special behind-the-scenes tour from 7-9 p.m. For details and reservations, see the Dittrick website or the Obscura Day site.
Saturday, Apr 9, 2011
7-9pm, Dittrick Medical History Center, Allen Hall
Hosted by the Dittrick Medical History Center and the Institute for the Science of Origins
Parking is available in the visitors lot under Severance Hall

"Evolution and Development II"

Peter Harte, Department of Genetics, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine
Wednesday, Apr 6, 2011
4 PM, Goodyear Auditorium, Clapp Hall (room 108)

Hosted by EvoClub and the Institute for the Science of Origins
Refreshments will be served
Parking is available in the visitors lot under Severance Hall

"Evolution and Development I"

Peter Harte, Department of Genetics, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine
Wednesday, Mar 30, 2011
4 PM, Goodyear Auditorium, Clapp Hall (room 108)

Hosted by EvoClub and the Institute for the Science of Origins
Refreshments will be served

Parking is available in the visitors lot under Severance Hall

"Evolution and Forensic Anthropology"

Linda Spurlock, Cleveland Museum of Natural History
Wednesday, Mar 16, 2011
4 PM, Goodyear Auditorium, Clapp Hall (room 108)

Hosted by EvoClub and the Institute for the Science of Origins
Refreshments will be served
Parking is available in the visitors lot under Severance Hall

"A Contextual View of the Nature of Mathematical Truth"

Jie Liu, Princeton University
Friday, Mar 4, 2011
12:30 PM Guilford Lounge, Guilford House

Hosted by the Department of Philosophy
Refreshments will be served
Parking is available in the visitors lot under Severance Hall

Darwin Celebrations 2011

Ongoing throughout 2011
For more information about the Darwin Celebrations and events, visit the Darwin Celebrations Website.

"Anatomical Venuses, Slashed Beauties, and Three Fetuses Dancing a Jig: An Illustrated Journey into the Curious World of Medical Museums."

Joanna Ebenstein, Morbid Anatomy Blog
Tuesday, Mar 1, 2011
Lecture: 6:00 PM Powell Room, 2nd floor
Reception: 7:00 PM, in the Percy Skuy Gallery of the Dittrick Medical History Center and Museum
Allen Memorial Medical Library, 11000 Euclid Avenue.

In April 2007 Joanna Ebenstein created a fascinating blog, Morbid Anatomy,, where she has since been constantly "surveying the interstices of art and medicine, death and culture." Medical museum and collections, like the Dittrick, provide much of the content for Morbid Anatomy. But Ebenstein has cast her net still further, exploring arcane museums and curious collections across Europe and the UK. She'll be sharing with us the often macabre and sometimes beautiful fruit of that search. From wax moulages of syphilitics in Paris to obstetric models in Bologna, and from pathology specimens in London to fetal skeletons in Leiden, Ebenstein explores the wonder of things found in medical museums. In the procees, she will offer insights on the psychology of collecting, and reveal the secret life of objects and collections in these intriguing places.

Hosted by the Dittrick Medical History Center
Please RSVP by February 25th, phone 216-368-3648,or e-mail jennifer.nieves@case.edu
Parking is available in the visitors lot under Severance Hall

Present-Day Mars: From Moonscape to Desert to Tundra

Dr. Maria Zuber, E. A. Griswold Professor of Geophysics and head of the Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences at MIT.
Tuesday February 22, 2011, 7:30p.m.
Goodyear Auditorium in Clapp Hall (rm 108)

World renowned planetary geophysicist Maria Zuber will review the history of spacecraft exploration of Mars and explain how the increasing sophistication and diversity of observations has caused a dramatic change in our view of the present state and climate history of the Red Planet.
Includes free admission to "Facing Mars"
Great Lakes Science Center, For reservations call 216-621-2400.

Darwin Day Celebration!

ISO Wednesday Lecture Series
Wednesday February 16, 2011, 4-6:30p.m.
Goodyear Auditorium in Clapp Hall (rm 108)

4pm: "Charles Darwin: The Man and the Myth" Patricia Princehouse, Director, CWRU Program in Evolutionary Biology, Fellow of the ISO 4:15pm Birthday Cake!
4:30pm "Human Evolution from Ardipithecus to Homo erectus" Bruce Latimer, Director, Center for Human Origins, Fellow of the ISO
Hosted by EvoClub! and the Institute for the Science of Origins

Dinosaurs and the History of Life on Earth

ISO Wednesday Lecture Series
Wednesday January 19, 2011, 4:30-6p.m.
Goodyear Auditorium in Clapp Hall (rm 108)
Hosted by EvoClub! and the Institute for the Science of Origins

CMNH Explorer Series: "Teeth, Toes and Tales of Mammals Extreme"

Darin Croft, Assoc Professor of Anatomy, CWRU, Fellow of the ISO
Friday, December 17, 2010
7:30pm, Cleveland Museum of Natural History Murch Auditorium
Note: There is an admission charge: Members: $8 for adults; $7 for students and seniors Nonmembers: $10 for adults; $9 for students and seniors. For more information please call (216) 231-1177 or 800-317-9155, ext. 3279, or click through from CMNH website on the Explorer Series
What's the difference between Thylacoleo and Thylacosmilus? How do you weigh something that's been dead for 25 million years? Are those horns or antlers on that uintathere's head? Join Dr. Darin Croft, associate professor in the Department of Anatomy at Case Western Reserve University and research associate in the Museum's Department of Vertebrate Paleontology, as he answers these and other questions while taking you through the top 10 list of intriguing animals past and present. Croft is a collaborator of the Extreme Mammals exhibition. This program is offered in conjunction with the Extreme Mammals exhibition, which will be on display at the Museum November 6, 2010, through April 17, 2011. The exhibit is organized by the American Museum of Natural History, New York, in collaboration with the Cleveland Museum of Natural History; California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco; and Canadian Museum of Nature, Ottawa, Canada. The Explorer Lecture Series is sponsored by The Women�s Committee of The Cleveland Museum of Natural History. Since 1980, the Museum's Women's Committee has underwritten the Explorer Lecture Series and is pleased to fund the series again this year. The Women's Committee began in 1940 and has contributed more than $1 million to support the Museum's programs. Promotional sponsors include: WVIZ/WCPN ideastream, Cleveland Magazine and the Cuyahoga County Public Library

"EvoClub! Evolution Movie Night!"

Get together for some end-of-semester fun!
Wednesday, December 8, 2010
4:30-6pm, Clark 309
refreshments will be served
Everyone is welcome!

"Late Miocene-Early Pliocene Paleoecology of Eastern Africa: Case Studies from Ethiopia and Tanzania"

Denise Su, Bryn Mawr College
Friday, December 10, 2010
11:30am-1pm, Room 104, AW Smith Bldg
Pizza will be served at 11:30, talk starts at Noon
Everyone is welcome!
The end of the Miocene was not only a time of dramatic global environmental change but also when many of the modern African faunal communities were established. Thus, knowledge of the paleoecological setting of this time period is important for a deeper understanding of the origin, evolution, and phylogenetic relationships of these faunal communities. This talk will present paleoecological reconstructions conducted at key late Miocene and early Pliocene sites in Ethiopia and Tanzania, and provide the resulting paleoenvironmental contexts for the origin and evolution of humans and other modern African mammalian lineages of modern aspect. Dr. Su is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Bryn Mawr College in Pennsylvania. Her expertise is in paleoecology, and she coauthored one of a suite of papers about Ardipithecus ramidus, the earliest known hominid skeleton, that were published on October 2 in Science. Su earned her bachelor's degree in anthropology from the University of California-Berkeley, and her master's and doctoral degrees from New York University.

"The Driving Role of Gravity in Cosmology"

Dr. Stacy S. McGaugh, University of Maryland
Thursday, Dec 9, 2010
8 p.m. Cleveland Museum of Natural History's Murch Auditorium
Please note: No tickets or reservations are required. Free and open to the public
Frontiers of Astronomy is a free lecture series co-sponsored by CWRU's Department of Astronomy. It offers those with an interest in astronomy the chance to learn about some of the latest research in the field. On clear evenings, the Ralph Mueller Observatory will be open afterward.
In this lecture, Dr. McGaugh will address the inception of modern cosmology, which can be traced to Einstein�s General Theory of Relativity. This geometrical theory of gravity provides the fundamental force governing the expansion and ultimate fate of the Universe. Remarkable successes and spectacular failures mark the history of cosmology, which continues to evolve today. The twin modern puzzles of dark matter and dark energy provide clues to new physics that may supplant one or more of the most successful theories of the past century. Dr. Stacy McGaugh will discuss the colorful history and potentially bizarre prospects of a subject that resides at the intersection of science, philosophy and religion.

"The Search for Stellar Origins from Antiquity to the 21st Century"

Dr. Charles Lada, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics
Thursday, November 18, 2010
8 p.m. Cleveland Museum of Natural History's Murch Auditorium
Please note: No tickets or reservations are required. Free and open to the public.
Frontiers of Astronomy is a free lecture series co-sponsored by CWRU's Department of Astronomy. It offers those with an interest in astronomy the chance to learn about some of the latest research in the field. On clear evenings, the Ralph Mueller Observatory will be open afterward.
In this lecture, Dr. Lada will address the colorful history of astronomy. Most of what we know about the origins of stars and planets we have learned in the past quarter century, yet the question of stellar origins is among the oldest in astronomy. Discover ideas and concepts about the nature of stars and stellar origins from the ancient Greeks to Newton and then to William Herschel who in the eighteenth century proposed a surprisingly modern picture of star formation. Learn about the "dark ages" of the nineteenth century when the infusion of new technology and physics set back research in this field for nearly a century. Find out about the advances in physics and astronomy in the early twentieth century that led to the critical discovery of the true nature of the sun and the stars and set the stage for the renaissance in star formation research that began in mid to late twentieth century and continues unabated today.

EvoClub!"Evolution of the Human Pelvis"

Scott Simpson, Professor of Anatomy, CWRU, Fellow of the ISO and Center for Human Origins
Wednesday, November 17, 2010
4:30-6pm, Clark 309
refreshments served
Everyone welcome!

"Searching for Other Earths: Results from the Kepler Mission "

Dr. William D. Cochran, University of Texas at Austin
Thursday, October 14, 2010
8 p.m. Cleveland Museum of Natural History's Murch Auditorium
Please note: No tickets or reservations are required.
Frontiers of Astronomy is a free lecture series co-sponsored by CWRU's Department of Astronomy. It offers those with an interest in astronomy the chance to learn about some of the latest research in the field. On clear evenings, the Ralph Mueller Observatory will be open afterward.
In this lecture, Dr. Cochran will discuss the Kepler spacecraft, which was designed to survey our region of the Milky Way galaxy in order to discover Earth-size and smaller planets in or near the habitable zone and to determine how many of the billions of stars in our galaxy might have such planets. Kepler searches for the very slight dimming of the star when a planet crosses in front of its star as viewed by an observer. Kepler was launched in March 2009. Data from the first 43 days of observations were released to the public in June 2010. The exciting results from the new planetary systems discovered by Kepler will be presented and prospects for the future will be discussed.

EvoClub! "Human Evolution - The Significance of Ardi"

Bruce Latimer, Director, Center for Human Origins, Bruce Latimer, Departments of Anthropology, Cognitive Science, and Anatomy, Case Western Reserve University, Fellow of the ISO
Wednesday, October 13, 2010
4:30-6pm, Clark 309
refreshments served
Everyone welcome!

"Evolutionary Dynamics in Carcinogenesis and Cancer Treatment"

Robert Gatenby, M.D., H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute
Friday, October 8, 2010
Noon-1pm, BRB 105
refreshments served
Robert Gatenby is Senior Member and Chair of the Departments of Diagnostic Imaging and Integrative Mathematical Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute. Dr. Gatenby's research is focused on aspects of cancer therapy including the application of principles from evolution and ecology to controlling populations of tumor cells.

"Are you a supertaster? How do we know and what does it mean?"

By Linda M. Bartoshuk, University of Florida.
Thursday, September 22, 2010
4 p.m., SOM E501
Linda Bartoshuk is a Presidential Endowed Professor of Community Dentistry and Behavioral Science at the University of Florida. She is an internationally known researcher specializing in the chemical senses of taste and smell. Her research explores the genetic variations in taste perception and how taste perception affects overall health. Bartoshuk was the first to discover that burning mouth syndrome, a condition predominantly experienced by postmenopausal women, is caused by damage to the taste buds at the front of the tongue and is not a psychosomatic condition.
Hosted by the Department of Neurosciences

"Stone Tool Extravaganza"

12:30-1:45
Friday, August 27, 2010
Freiberger field
Everyone is welcome!
We have 2 flintknappers coming and some gathering-related artifacts. Experts from the Cleveland Museum of Natural History will help students make & use their own stone tools and will gather and process foodstuffs. We'll also have casts of famous hominid fossils such as Lucy and discussions with paleoanthropologists Bruce Latimer, Scott Simpson, and Yohannes Haile-Selassie. This is all to kick off the first year of the new Center for Human Origins --an affiliate of the Institute for the Science of Origins.

"Basics of Bioinformatics" Participatory Workshop"

Mark Adams, Department of Genetics, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University
Friday, May 7, 2010
The next in our series of Participatory Workshops, designed to provide just-in-time instruction on issues of interest to research scientists!

Dr. Adams and his colleagues introduced participants to a few common web-based bioinformatics resources to find what is known (and predicted) about a gene.

Mark Adams is an Associate Professor in the Department of Genetics at Case Western Reserve University. As a postdoc in Craig Venter's lab at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke at the NIH, Dr. Adams developed the expressed sequence tag (EST) methodology for rapid characterization of the expressed set of genes in a tissue. As one of the founding scientists at The Institute for Genomic Research, Dr. Adams established and managed the large-scale DNA sequencing facility. The initial work focused on developing a large collection of ESTs from several hundred cDNA libraries. He also contributed extensively to determining the first genome sequence of a free-living organism, Haemophilus influenzae, as well as to several additional microbial genomes. In 1998, Dr. Adams co-founded Celera Genomics, where he was responsible for the DNA sequencing and genome annotation groups. In this role he directed the fruit fly, human, and mouse genome sequencing projects and the effort to re-sequence exons and regulatory regions of all human genes to identify novel functional SNPs. Dr. Adams joined the faculty of CWRU in 2003.

Hosted by the Institute for the Science of Origins

"Natural History of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Wild-Living Chimpanzees"

Beatrice Hahn, M.D., University of Alabama, Birmingham
Thursday, May 6, 2010
1pm, W203 Rottman Seminar Room, School of Medicine
Beatrice Hahn is Professor of Medicine at the University of Alabama, Birmingham. Dr. Hahn's laboratory has a long-standing interest in elucidating the origins and evolution of human and simian immunodeficiency viruses, and in studying HIV/SIV gene function and disease mechanisms from an evolutionary perspective. Dr. Hahn was the first to describe the extensive in vivo genetic variability of HIV-1 (Hahn et al., PNAS 1985; Hahn et al., Science 1986), which is now recognized as the source of drug and immune escape mutants.

"William Herschel and the Invention of Modern Astronomy"

Michael D. Lemonick, Princeton University, Princeton Environmental Institute, and Climate Central
Thursday, May 6, 2010
4:15 in Rockefeller 301
Michael D. Lemonick is a Lecturer in Astrophysical Sciences at Princeton University, and a senior science writer at Time magazine, who recently joined Climate Central, a newly formed climate-change think tank based in Princeton.. In 1781, William Herschel became the first person in human history to discover a new planet. This feat was enough to make his reputation and enable him to give up his day job to concentrate on the heavens full-time. But he believed--correctly, in retrospect--that it wasn't nearly as important as his real astronomical work. Working alongside his sister Caroline, William Herschel was the first astronomer to think about the universe in the same way astrophysicists do today.

Hosted by the Department of Physics

"The Perils of Being Bipedal"

Bruce Latimer, Departments of Anthropology, Cognitive Science, and Anatomy, Case Western Reserve University
Tuesday, April 27, 2010
6:30pm, Clapp Hall 108 - The Goodyear Auditorium
Bruce Latimer is Director of the Center for Human Origins at Case Western Reserve University. Physical anthropologist Latimer is internationally recognized as an expert on the evolution of human locomotion. His research has helped shape our present understanding of the evolutionary processes that led to the ability of humans to walk upright on two feet. Latimer is among a group of scientists who analyzed the famous 3.2 million-year-old "Lucy" fossil skeleton. In the fall of 2009, Latimer and other members of an international scientific team that announced the discovery and identification of a new species of early human ancestor, Ardipithecus ramidus. The team also included CHO and ISO Fellows Scott Simpson, Linda Spurlock and Yohannes Haile-Selassie

Hosted by EvoClub and the Institute for the Science of Origins

"Modeling for Parasite Elimination Programs"

Manoj Gambhir, Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College, London, UK
Wednesday, 14 April 2010
1pm. W203 Rottman Seminar Room, School of Medicine

Hosted by CWRU's Center for Global Health and the Center for AIDS Research

"The Slow Process: A Hypothetical Cognitive Adaptation for Distributed Cognitive Networks"

Merlin Donald
Monday, 5 April 2010
4-5pm. 618 Crawford Hall
Merlin Donald is Professor Emeritus of Psychology at Queen's University, Ontario and Founding Chair of the Department of Cognitive Science at Case Western Reserve University from 2005-2008. His lecture will address how human brain has a unique symbiosis with culture. In fact, its design potential cannot be realized outside of culture, and many of its key capacities, including language and symbolic thought, will not develop at all in social isolation. Why is this? Evidence from many disciplines, including neuroscience, psychology, archaeology, paleontology, and anthropology suggests that brain and culture have co-evolved for at least 2 million years in hominids, and that culture itself is the generative source of many distinctive cognitive features of human beings. Merlin's work has focused recently on a key neural operation called 'slow processing,' which seems to carry the double burden of both generating and negotiating complex cultures.

"The Origin of the Universe and the Arrow of Time"

Sean Carroll, Physics Department, Caltech
Thursday, Mar 25, 2010
4:15 in Rock 301
Sean Carroll is a Professor in the Department at Caltech. Over a century ago, Boltzmann and others provided a microscopic understanding for the tendency of entropy to increase. But this understanding relies ultimately on an empirical fact about cosmology: the early universe had a very low entropy. Why was it like that? Cosmologists aspire to provide a dynamical explanation for the observed state of the universe, but have had very little to say about the dramatic asymmetry between early times and late times. I will argue that the observed breakdown of time-reversal symmetry in statistical mechanics provides good evidence that we live in a multiverse.

"The Past and Future of the Astrophysical Universe"

Avi Loeb (Harvard)
Thursday, Mar 18, 2010
4:15 in Rockefeller 301
Avi Loeb is a Professor at the Harvard University Department of Astronomy and the director of the Institute for Theory and Computation of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. The initial conditions of our Universe can be summarized on a single sheet of paper. Yet the Universe is full of complex structures today, such as stars, galaxies and groups of galaxies. I will describe how complexity emerged in the form of the first stars out of the simple initial state of the Universe at early cosmic times. The future of the Universe is even more surprising. Over the past decade it was realized that the cosmic expansion has been accelerating. If this accelerated expansion will continue into the future, then within a hundred billion years there will be no galaxies left for us to observe within the cosmic horizon except one: the merger product between our own Milky Way galaxy and its nearest neighbor, the Andromeda galaxy.

Hosted by the Department of Physics and the Department of Astronomy

"Detecting Local Selection in Human Populations"

Mark Stoneking, Max Planck Institute
Monday, Mar 8, 2010
4 � 5 p.m., Biomedical Research Building (BRB) #105, 2109 Adelbert Road
Mark Stoneking is a Professor at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany, and Director of the Molecular Anthropology Group, as well as Honorary Professor of Biological Anthropology at the University of Leipzig. Dr. Stoneking�s research interests involve using molecular genetic methods to address questions of anthropological interest concerning the origins, migrations, and relationships of human populations, and the influence of selection during human evolution.

For more information please call 216-368-4818. Sponsored by the Center for Global Health and Diseases, and ISO

"The Demographics of Exoplanets"

Scott Gaudi, Ohio State University
Thursday, Mar 4, 2010
4:15 in Rock 301
Scott Gaudi is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Astronomy of the Ohio State Unversity. The physical processes that govern planet formation, migration, and evolution are imprinted on the orbital element and mass distributions of exoplanets. Theories of planet formation and evolution have matured to the point where specific predictions for these distributions have been made, yet there are relatively few robust comparisons of these predictions with observations. I will discuss the progress and prospects for measuring the demographics of exoplanets using a variety of techniques, emphasizing the importance of homogeneous statistical analyses and proper accounting of selection effects, and highlighting the ability of various techniques to probe complementary regions of parameter space. In particular, a combination of ongoing and near-future surveys should determine the demographics of exoplanets with mass greater than the Earth and separations out to beyond the snow line, and so provide crucial constraints on models of planet formation and evolution.

Hosted by the Department of Astronomy and Department of Physics

Hosted by the Department of Physics

"So why don't I get an infection when I bite my tongue?: The silent role of innate immunity in human health."

Michael Zasloff, M.D., Ph.D., Georgetown University School of Medicine
Wednesday, March 3, 2010
1pm, Rottman Seminar Room W203, Wood Building, 2109 Adelbert Rd.
Michael Zasloff is Professor of Surgery and Pediatrics at the Georgetown University School of Medicine. Dr. Zasloff has been a pioneer in the field of innate immunity. In addition, he has been a leader in the discovery of antimicrobial peptides and aminosterols of animal and human origin and their development as human therapeutics.

"Tracking the jump of HIV from chimpanzees to humans in the 20th century"

Eric Arts, Ph.D., Professor at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine
Wednesday, March 3, 2010
7pm in the Cleveland Museum of Natural History's Murch Auditorium. The lecture is free with admission to the museum.
Dr. Eric Arts is an Associate Professor at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases. For the past 24 years, Dr. Arts has researched HIV-1 replication and evolution in relation to drug resistance and how different strains of HIV have evolved and changed virulence. He is the director of the Uganda Laboratory Core, a joint venture between Case Western Reserve University and the Joint Clinical Research Center in Kampala, Uganda. Dr. Arts will first provide an interactive and simple discussion of viruses causing human disease. He will then describe jumping of primate immunodeficiency virus among old world (African) monkeys/apes that led to the establishment of HIV in humans at the turn of 20th century. Over the past 80 years, a disease that was once limited to central Africa has now spread across the globe and is responsible for over 30 million accumulative deaths and 30 million current infections, the worse epidemic since the black plague. He will explore how HIV has evolved faster than any other pathogen (or organism on earth), which has both beneficial and determinant consequences to the eradication of HIV/AIDS. His presentation will include photographs from his fieldwork in Uganda.

"Barriers to Curing HIV Infections"

Robert Siliciano, M.D., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
Thursday, Feb 25, 2010
1pm, Rottman Seminar Room W203, Wood Building, 2109 Adelbert Rd.
Robert Siliciano is Professor of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and an HHMI Investigator. Dr. Siliciano's laboratory has made major contributions to understanding the immunopathogenesis of HIV infection and resistance to drug therapy.

Darwin Day 2010

February 11-13
For more information about the Darwin Celebrations and events, visit the Darwin Celebrations Website.

Inside the Human Genome:A Case for NON-Intelligent Design

John Avise, University of California, Irvine

February 11
4:15 pm, DeGrace Hall, Room 312, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio
John Avise is a world renowned biologist and author, and professor at the University of California, Irvine. Dr. Avise�s laboratory conducts research using genetic markers to analyze the evolution of wild animals, from micro- to macro-evolutionary dynamics, phylogeography, speciation, systematics, and phylogenetics. The primary goal is to unveil ecological, behavioral, or evolutionary features of the organisms themselves; an important secondary concern is to elucidate molecular and evolutionary properties of protein and DNA molecules. For more information about the Darwin Celebrations and events, visit the Darwin Celebrations Website.

Phylogenetics Symposium

February 12

8:30am-3pm
Wolstein Auditorium, Wolstein Research Building, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio

A series of lectures and discussions on the hot topic of Phylogenetics --patterns and processes of evolutionary descent with modification

8:30am: Coffee

9am - Dr. Helen Piontkivska, Kent State University. Dr. Piontkivska�s laboratory investigates molecular evolution of genes and genomes, large-scale analyses of genomic sequences, and adaptive evolution of host-parasite interactions.

10am - Dr. Richard Glor, University of Rochester. "Using phylogenies to understand evolutionary diversification of Caribbean Anolis lizards" With nearly 400 species, Anolis lizards are the world�s most species-rich amniote genus. Individual anole communities can have as many as eleven ecologically and morphologically distinct forms. Because anole radiations have occurred independently on each island, anoles present a unique opportunity to answer questions about evolutionary processes. Dr. Glor�s research investigates these questions through the use of molecular markers and resources such as museum and GIS databases.

11:00am - Coffee Break and Discussions with Speakers

11:30am - Dr. Phil Gingerich, University of Michigan. �A paleontological perspective on phylogeny and evolution� --Phylogeny and phylogenetics are about what happens to life through time and the consequences of history for understanding life today. Dr. Gingerich�s research has focused on rates of change in evolution, how rates differ on different scales of time, and the implications for understanding the evolutionary process. These are important for interpreting evolutionary patterns through time, and for interpreting phylogenetic relationships of animals living today.

12:30pm - Lunch, only $2!- To attend lunch, please RSVP to Lori Morton ( lmr5@case.edu )

1:30pm - Dr. John Avise, University of California, Irvine. Dr. Avise�s work on the evolution of animals in the wild includes genetic parentage, mating patterns, geographic population structure, gene flow, hybridization, introgression, phylogeography, speciation, systematics, and phylogenetics to unveil ecological, behavioral, or evolutionary features of the organisms themselves; an important secondary concern is to elucidate molecular and evolutionary properties of protein and DNA molecules.

2:30pm - Coffee and Discussions with Speakers
For more information about the Darwin Celebrations and events, visit the Darwin Celebrations Website.

Phylogenetics Workshop

February 13
9am-12 pm, Wolstien Center, 4th Floor

A phylogeny is a representation of the evolutionary relationships among different organisms. Phylogenies are widely used as a tool to answer questions in evolutionary biology, such as identifying the factors that affect the rate of species formation, or determining how often complex traits, such as wings or eyes, have evolved. Phylogenies also have applied uses, including identification of the origin of virulent disease strains or determining which species are most likely to be invasive. Phylogenies can be constructed from many different types of characters, including morphological traits and DNA sequence data. Dr. Rich Glor will lead an introductory workshop on how to construct a phylogeny. In the first part of the workshop, Dr. Glor will provide an example dataset and exercises to teach participants how to use current software to construct phylogenies using distance methods, parsimony and likelihood. In the second part of the workshop, Dr. Glor will discuss more difficult problems in phylogenetic reconstruction. Dr. Glor is an active researcher using phylogenetic methods, is an instructor at the Bodega Bay Phylogenetics Workshop (http://bodegaphylo.wikispot.org/), and a founder of the phylogenetics blog "dechronization" (http://treethinkers.blogspot.com/). Participants are invited to bring their own data sets and questions for the second part of the workshop. NOTE: Attendance is limited! Anyone interested in participating in the workshop should contact Mike Benard (michael.benard@case.edu) for details.
For more information about the Darwin Celebrations and events, visit the Darwin Celebrations Website.

Phylogenetics Journal Club: Phylogeography

February 8
Clapp 405

This journal club will meet weekly in preparation for Phylogenetics Workshop & Symposium, specifically on methods for constructing phylogenies, especially computational methodologies. Anyone interested in participating in the workshop should contact Mike Benard (michael.benard@case.edu) for details.
For more information about the Darwin Celebrations and events, and references for journal club articles, visit the Darwin Celebrations Website.

"Workshop on Low-l / Large Angle Cosmology"

February 4-6, 2010
Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio; specific venue to be announced
This exciting workshop is organized by ISO director Glenn Starkman, Craig Copi, Dragan Huterer, Dmitry Podolsky, Dominik Schwarz, and Amanda Yoho. For more information, visit the workshop web site.

Sponsored by the Institute for the Science of Origins, the University of MI, and CERCA.

Phylogenetics Journal Club: Macroevolution

February 2
Clapp 405

This journal club will meet weekly in preparation for Phylogenetics Workshop & Symposium, specifically on methods for constructing phylogenies, especially computational methodologies. Anyone interested in participating in the workshop should contact Mike Benard (michael.benard@case.edu) for details.
For more information about the Darwin Celebrations and events, and references for journal club articles, visit the Darwin Celebrations Website.

"A Cosmological Revolution -- Notes from the Field"

Julio Navarro (University of Victoria)
Thursday, December 10, 2009
4:15 in Rock 301
Julio Navarro is a Professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy, the University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. Cosmology---the study of how the Universe began and how its structures formed and evolved---has always been at the frontier of human knowledge; seeding religions, cementing civilizations, and challenging scientific thought. It is thus remarkable that a compelling, empirically verifiable account of the Universe's history has only emerged during the past few decades. I will briefly review the observations and theories that have shaped our present cosmological paradigm, the enigmas they have uncovered, and what they tell us about the fundamental laws of Physics as well as the fate and origin of the Universe.

Hosted by the Department of Astronomy and Department of Physics

"Dynamical Processes in Extrasolar Planetary Systems"

Fred Adams, University of Michigan, Physics
Thursday, December 3, 2009
4:15 in Rock 301
Fred Adams is a Professor in the Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics at Pennsylvania State University. Over the past decade, observations have sparked a renaissance of planetary studies, with nearly 400 planets discovered in orbit about external stars and an ever-increasing inventory of our solar system. These planetary systems display an unexpected diversity in their observed orbits and in the types of bodies found. This wealth of new data poses a number of dynamical issues: How do planets migrate, and how does migration ultimately produce the observed distribution of orbital elements? How does turbulence, which provides stochastic forcing, affect both early migration of planetary cores and the maintenence of mean motion resonance? What role is played by secular resonance? How do solar system properties constrain the birth environments of stars and planetary systems? And finally: How can we use this collection of newly discovered astronomical objects as physical laboratories to study chaos and general relativity?

Hosted by the Department of Astronomy, and the Department of Physics

"Origin of Species Birthday Party!"

With a talk by paleoanthropologist Bruce Latimer, Case Western Reserve University Department of Anthropology
Tuesday, November 24, 2009
11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. Clapp 108 (Goodyear Auditorium)
This November 24th marks the 150th anniversary of the publication of Charles Darwin's classic, On the Origin of Species. Join us for a birthday celebration and talk on human evolution by ISO Fellow Bruce Latimer!

Sponsored by the Evolutionary Biology Program, the Institute for the Science of Origins, and EvoClub!

"Human Evolution: The New Fossil Ardipithecus, a Foot on the Ground & a Hand in the Trees!"

An evening with the scientists who discovered and analyzed this exciting new fossil hominid
Wednesday, November 18, 2009
7 p.m. Cleveland Museum of Natural History Auditorium
The Institute for the Science of Origins is fortunate to have among its fellows, the scientists involved in the discovery and analysis of the most exciting new human ancestor since Lucy. Come hear about "Ardi" first hand!

Sponsored by the Institute for the Science of Origins

Free and Open to the Public!

"Who says Neandertals are so different?"

By David Frayer , University of Kansas Department of Anthropology
Thursday, November 12, 2009
4:30 p.m. 312 DeGrace Hall
David Frayer is a paleoanthropologist and CWRU alum.
Hosted by Sigma Xi,the Evolutionary Biology program, and the Departments of Biology and Anthropology.
Neandertals lived successfully in Europe and Western Asia for several hundred thousand years, disappearing about 30,000 years ago. Since their discovery in 1856, they have generally been considered a different species or offshoots from the subsequent European line with little or no contribution to the people who followed them. While few want to claim any relationship to later Europeans, a variety of morphological and behavioral traits link them with their European successors. This new (and old) information about Neandertal biology and culture makes them more like us in intriguing ways.

"The Structure and Kinematics of Galactic Disks"

By Robin Ciardullo, Penn State.
Thursday, November 12, 2009
11:30 a.m., Sears 552
Robin Ciardullo is a Professor in the Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics at Pennsylvania State University. Hosted by the Department of Astronomy

"Evolutionary Ecology"

By Andrew McCall, Denison University.
Thursday, November 5, 2009
4:15 p.m., 312 DeGrace Hall
Andrew McCall is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biology at Denison University. Hosted by the Department of Biology

Inherit the Wind

Cleveland Playhouse
October 24, 2009
The Institute for the Science of Origins, and its partner organizations invite you to an evening of science and theater. The ISO and the Case/Cleveland Play House MFA Program will come together for the opening weekend production of Inherit the Wind. Join us for a pre-performance reception and talk featuring Dr. Bruce Latimer, former executive director of The Cleveland Museum of Natural History, from 6:30 to 8:00 p.m. on Saturday, October 24 at the Cleveland Play House. Then watch our theater MFA students take the stage in the classic courtroom drama about evolution, creationism, and an American society struggling to balance science and scripture.
Tickets for the show may be purchased by calling (216) 795-7000 or by visiting www.clevelandplayhouse.com.
Mention or enter the code "Origins" for a ticket discount. For more information, please email contact-cas@cwru.edu or call (216) 368-0097

"Weighing the Universe"

By Neta Bahcall, Princeton University.
Thursday, October 15, 2009
4:15 p.m., Rockefeller 301
Neta Bahcall is the Eugene Higgins Professor of Astrophysics in the Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University. Hosted by the Departments of Physics and Astronomy Dr Bahcall will discuss data that suggest that the mass in the Universe, including the dark-matter, follows light on large scales, and most of the mass resides in huge dark halos around galaxies.

"Genetics of Speciation"

By Daniel Barbash, Cornell University.
Thursday, October 8, 2009
4:15 p.m., 312 DeGrace Hall
Daniel Barbash is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics at Cornell University. Hosted by the Department of Biology

"Star formation in extreme locales revealed by GALEX"

By David Thilker, Johns Hopkins University.
Wednesday, September 30, 2009
2:30 p.m., Sears 552
David Thilker is a research scientist in the Henry A. Rowland Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University. Hosted by the Department of Astronomy Dr Thilker discussed the implications of recent GALEX UV imaging, which reveals massive star formation in atypical environments including outer spiral disks, intergalactic gas clouds, and early-type galaxies.

"Genetics of Susceptibility to Parasitic Disease"

By Sarah Williams-Blangero, Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research.
Monday, September 28, 2009
11 a.m., Biomedical Research Building Auditorium (BRB 105)
Sarah Williams-Blangero chairs the Department of Genetics at the Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research. Hosted by the Departments of Genetics, Epidemiology, and Biostatistics

"Evolution of Complex Phenotypes"

By Darrin Hulsey, University of Tennessee.
Thursday, September 24, 2009
4:15 p.m., 312 DeGrace Hall
Darrin Hulsey is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Hosted by the Department of Biology

"Hepatitis C virus in vivo: Evolution that pushes the envelope"

By Stuart C. Ray, M.D, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
Monday, September 21, 2009
Stuart C. Ray is an Associate Professor in the Medical School at Johns Hopkins University. Hosted by Professor Neil Greenspan, Department of Pathology, as part of the Pathology Seminar Series.

"Age/metallicity gradients in the Milky Way's thick disk"

By Heather Morrison, Case Western Reserve University.
Wednesday, September 16, 2009
2:30 p.m., Sears 552
Heather Morrison Professor of Astronomy in the Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University. Hosted by the Department of Astronomy

"How the CMB challenges cosmology's standard model"

By Glenn Starkman , Case Western Reserve University Department of Physics
Thursday, September 3, 2009
4:15 p.m. Rockefeller Hall 301
Glenn Starkman is Director of the Institute for the Science of Origins.
Hosted by the Department of Physics, as part of the Physics Colloquium Series.
The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation is our most important source of information about the early universe. Many of its features are in good agreement with the predictions of the so-called standard model of cosmology -- the Lambda Cold Dark Matter Inflationary Big Bang. However, the large-angle correlations of the microwave background exhibit several closely related statistically significant departures from the standard model. The lowest multipoles seem to be correlated with each other, rather than statistically independent as inflationary theory demands. Indeed, they also seem to be correlated with the geometry of the solar system, suggesting that they are not cosmologically produced. Even stranger, when we avoid the part of the sky that is contaminated by the galaxy, we find that there are essentially no large angle correlations. The ripples in the CMB may be the sound of the cosmic symphony, but why are the tuba and the bass very quietly playing the wrong music?

Workshop: Tests of Gravity and Gravitational Physics

Sponsored by the Institute for the Science of Origins, CERCA, and CWRU's Department of Physics.
May 19-21, 2009
Inamori Center, Crawford Hall
Gravitational forces are being tested over a vast array of scales, from microns to Gigaparsecs, and many clever ideas have been proposed to test quantum effects in curved spacetime in laboratory analogs. The purpose of the workshop is to inspire theorists to propose further tests of both classical and quantum gravitational physics, whether in the laboratory or in outer space, experimental or observational, while also paying attention to the experimental and observational implementation. This focused workshop will bring together both theorists and experimentalists working on these topics.

Workshop: "Mathematics as an Emergent Phenomenon"

May 11-12, 2009
Department of Cognitive Science, 6th Floor, Crawford Hall
An eclectic set of participants, including James Alexander , Mark Turner, Rafael Nunez, Gilles Fauconnier, Anthony Jack, Edward Hubbard, Marcel Danesi, Doug Hofsteader, Reuben Hersh, and Arnaud Viarouge, explored the cognitive foundations that underlie the abstract processes called mathematical thinking. For more on this event, see Cog Sci Colloquium.

EvoClub!

Undergraduate Evolution Club meeting
Saturday, April 25, 2009
Goodyear Auditorium (Clapp Hall Rm. 108): 4-8 p.m.
Meeting starts at 4, followed by pizza and a movie (the fictional comedy "Evolution") and a discussion of the movie's scientific errors (and perhaps virtues).
For more information, visit the EvoClub Web site.

RNA-Mediated Epigenetic Inheritance

By Laura F. Landweber, Princeton University
Thursday, April 23, 2009
Goodyear Lecture Hall (Clapp 108): 4:30 p.m.
Laura F. Landweber is an Associate Professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Princeton University. Hosted by Professor Rajesh Viswanathan, Department of Chemistry, as part of the Sixty-Eighth Frontiers in Chemistry Lecture Series.

Against Medical Utopianism: An Evolutionary Perspective

By Neil Greenspan, CWRU Department of Pathology
Monday, April 20, 2009
Wolstein Research Building, Auditorium (Rm. 1413): noon
Dr. Greenspan is Professor of Pathology at Case Western Reserve University's School of Medicine. Hosted by the Department of Pathology.

Research ShowCASE

ISO Fellows, and CWRU Faculty & Students
Thursday, April 16, 2009
Veale Convocation Center 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
On April 16, 2009, ISO Fellows joined hundreds of researchers, scientists and scholars to come together for a day of collaboration, creativity, and innovation. Exhibits of real-world applications, critical insights, and creative and intellectual activities were on view for students, faculty, staff, alumni, business & industry leaders and the community, highlighting the full range of faculty, postdoctoral, and graduate research at Case. Research ShowCASE is a annual free public exhibit. For more information, please visit the Research ShowCASE Web site.

Systems Chemistry

By M. Reza Ghadir, The Scripps Research Institute
Thursday, April 16, 2009
Goodyear Lecture Hall (Clapp 108): 4:30 p.m.
M. Reza Ghadiri is Professor of Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, at The Scripps Research Institute. Hosted by Professor Gregory Tochtrop, Department of Chemistry, as part of the Sixty-Eighth Frontiers in Chemistry Lecture Series.

Is God a Mathematician?

By Mario Livio, Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore
Thursday, April 16, 2009, 8 p.m.
Cleveland Museum of Natural History
For centuries, mathematical theories have proven uncannily accurate at describing -- and predicting -- the physical world. Dr. Mario Livio attempts to explain why. His talk spans such fields as cosmology, religion and cognitive science and offers an accessible and lively account of the lives and thoughts of some of the greatest mathematicians in history, from Archimedes to Galileo, Descartes and Newton to Godel, on up to the present day. Along the way, he attempts to answer a question with which mathematicians, philosophers and neuroscientists have struggled for centuries: Is mathematics ultimately invented or discovered?

Free and open to the public

The Genetic Basis of Human Adaptation in Africa

Sarah Tishkoff, University of Pennsylvania
April 8, 2009
Clapp Hall 108: 4:30 p.m.
Professor Tishkoff is a highly respected geneticist and anthropologist who has made significant contributions to the understanding of human evolution through studies of genetic variation with particular emphasis on the genetic history of East African populations. Hosted by the Departments of Anthropology, Biology, and Evolutionary Biology.

The Image of Modern Medicine: Professional Identity and Visual Culture in America at the Turn of the 20th Century

By John Harley Warner, Yale University School of Medicine
April 3, 2009, 6 p.m.
Allen Memorial Medical Library, Case Western Reserve University
John Harley Warner is Avalon Professor and Chair of History of Medicine at the Yale University School of Medicine, and also Professor of History and of American Studies at Yale University. He received his Ph.D. in History of Science from Harvard in 1984, and joined the Yale faculty in 1986 after two years as a postdoctoral fellow at the Wellcome Institute for the History of Medicine in London. Professor Warner teaches medical and undergraduate students and is a core faculty member of the Yale graduate Program in the History of Science and Medicine. His books include The Therapeutic Perspective: Medical Practice, Knowledge, and Identity in America, 1820-1885 (1986; 1997), Against the Spirit of System: The French Impulse in Nineteenth-Century American Medicine (1998; 2003), and the co-edited volumes Major Problems in the History of American Medicine (2001) and Locating Medical History: The Stories and Their Meanings (2004). Current projects include Dissection: Photographs of a Rite of Passage in American Medicine, 1880-1930, a study of medical student identity and dissection-room photographic portraiture co-authored with James Edmonson (Dittrick Medical History Center, CWRU), and a book on the transformation of the hospital patient chart in America, tentatively titled Bedside Stories: Clinical Narrative and the Grounding of Modern Medicine.

Wine and hors d’oeuvres reception will follow in the Powell Room (second floor) of the Allen Memorial Medical Library at 11000 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, Ohio 44106. RSVP by March 27, 2009, to Dzwinka Holian at 216-368-3642 or dxk6@case.edu.

Molecular Self-Assembly

By Julius Rebek, Jr.
April 2, 2009
Goodyear Lecture Hall (Clapp 108): 4:30 p.m.
Director of the Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology and Professor of Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, at The Scripps Research Institute. Hosted by Professor Irene Lee, Department of Chemistry, as part of the Sixty-Eighth Frontiers in Chemistry Lecture Series.

Charles Darwin: The True Story

By John van Wyhe<
April 1, 2009, 12:30 p.m.
Location: O'Neill Reading Room, 2nd Floor, Kelvin Smith Library
Wyhe is professor of history and philosophy of science at the University of Cambridge and director of The Complete Work of Charles Darwin Online. More information about 'The True Story.'
Sponsored by the Kelvin Smith Library and the Institute for the Science of Origins./p>

The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hunter

By Simon Chaplin, Royal College of Surgeons of England
March 26, 2009, 6 p.m.
Allen Memorial Medical Library, Case Western Reserve University
Who — or what — was the inspiration for Robert Louis Stevenson's classic gothic thriller 'The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde'? Was it the 18th-century surgeon and anatomist John Hunter? In the Handerson lecture for 2009, Simon Chaplin, Director of Museums & Special Collections at The Royal College of Surgeons of England, will explore the role of anatomical museums in managing the social tension between private dissection and public life in 18th-century London. By reconstructing the relationship between anatomy, art and architecture in John Hunter's home, the lecture will show how the 'doctor's cabinet' transformed the noisome business of anatomy into a subject of polite interest, and will ask whether modern anatomists can learn lessons in public communication from John Hunter and his contemporaries.

Genetically Templated Magnetic and Optical Nanowires for Targeted Imaging

By Angela Belcher, MIT
Van Horn Lecture Series
March 19, 2009, 4 p.m.
White 411

Genetically Engineered Materials for Energy Applications

By Angela Belcher, MIT
Van Horn Lecture Series
March 18, 2009, 4 p.m.
White 411

Dark Matter in the Milky Way

March 12-14, 2009
Location: Inamori International Center for Ethics and Excellence
Case Western Reserve University

This intensive workshop focuses on bringing together astronomers and experimental and theoretical physicists on the question of how to test our theories about the nature of dark matter. More information about Dark Matter in the Milky Way.
Sponsored by ISO, CERCA and the departments of Physics and Astronomy.

Evolutionary Medicine Workshop

March 4, 2009
Location: ideastream in Cleveland
This one-day planning workshop on the intersection of evolution and medicine will bring together outstanding researchers from Cleveland institutions around the topics of cancer and genetics, anatomy and physiology, oxygen delivery, and infectious and chronic diseases.
Sponsored by the ISO and hosted by ISO partner ideastream.