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Robin L. Jump, M.D., Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine,
 Case Western Reserve University

Division of Infectious Diseases & HIV Medicine

Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center (GRECC)

Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center


Email : robin.jump@ va.gov
Office Phone : 216.791.3800

Education

  • B.S. : Microbiology & Biochemistry, Colorado State University, 1991-1995
  • M.D/Ph.D. : Medical Scientist Training Program, Case Western Reserve University, 1996-2004
  • Internship & Residency : Internal Medicine, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, 2004-2007
  • Fellowship, Infectious Diseases, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, 2007-2009

Clinical Interests

  • Geriatric Infectious Diseases

Research Interests

My research continues along a translation and clinical track, focusing on preventing C. difficile infections in long-term care facility (LTCF) residents. An unintended consequence of antimicrobial administration is disruption of the human gut microbiota that protects the host from enteric pathogens, including C. difficile, through colonization resistance. Residents of LTCF are particularly vulnerable due to their inherent frailty, communal living conditions and frequent exposure to antimicrobials, the principle risk factor for C. difficile infection. Through their Grants for Early Medical/Surgical Subspecialists Transition to Aging Research (GEMSSTAR) program, the National Institute of Aging recently awarded me an R03 to study recovery of colonization resistance to C. difficile in LTCF residents who receive systemic antimicrobials. The work proposed in this grant also led to the 2011 Young Investigator Award in Geriatrics from the Infectious Disease Society/National Foundation for Infectious Diseases Association of Specialty Professors. The Steris Foundation has also awarded me a one-year grant to study restoration of colonization resistance to other nosocomial pathogens including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus and multi-drug resistant Gram-negative bacteria.

Selected References

  • Jump RL, Li Y, Pultz MJ, Kypriotakis G, Donskey CJ. Tigecycline exhibits inhibitory activity against Clostridium difficile in the colon of mice and does not promote growth or toxin production. Antimicrobial Agents & Chemotherapy. 2011 Feb;55(2):546-9. Epub 2010 Dec 6
  • Guerrero DM, Nerandzic MM, Jury LA, Chang S, Jump RL, Donskey CJ. Clostridium difficile infection in a Department of Veterans Affairs long-term care facility. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2011 May;32(5):513-5
  • Sitzlar B, Vajravelu RK, Jury LA, Donskey CJ, Jump RL. Environmental decontamination with ultraviolet radiation to prevent recurrent Clostridium difficile infection for two roommates in a long-term care facility. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. (in press).
  • Jump RL, Riggs MM, Sethi AK, Pultz MJ, Ellis-Reid T, Riebel W, Gerding DN, Salata RA, Donskey CJ. Multihospital outbreak of Clostridium difficile infection, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010 May;16(5):827-9.
  • Al-Nassir WN, Sethi AK, Nerandzic MM, Bobulsky GS, Jump RL, Donskey CJ. Comparison of clinical and microbiological response to treatment of Clostridium difficile-associated disease with metronidazole and vancomycin. Clinical Infectious Disease 2008:47(1):56-62.
  • Lederman MM, Jump RL, Pilch-Cooper HA, Root M, Sieg SF. Topical application of entry inhibitors as "virustats" to prevent sexual transmission of HIV infection. Retrovirology 2008;5(116).