item2a1 JeffColler02

Jeff Coller, Ph.D. (Principal Investigator)



P 216.368.0299

F 216.368.2010

Center for RNA Molecular Biology, Case Western Reserve University, School of Medicine, Wood Bldg.  W113, 10900 Euclid Ave., Cleveland OH 44106-4960, USA

Primary Appointment:

Director of The Center for RNA Molecular Biology

Secondary Appointments:

Case Comprehensive Cancer Center

Department of Biochemistry

Biomedical Sciences Training Program

Director of the Cellular and Molecular Training Program


University of Michigan 1990-1994 (BS in Biology/Chemistry)

Stockholm University 1993 (Visiting Scientist)

University of Wisconsin-Madison 1994-2000 (Ph.D. in Cell and Molecular Biology)

Howard Hughes Medical Institute / University of Arizona 2000-2005 (Post-doctoral Fellow)


I have a long standing fascination with the study of RNA that dates back more than 15 years. My interest stems from undergraduate work I conducted on group I introns in Dr. Britt-Marie Sj÷berg’s lab at Stockholm University in Sweden. Following that experience, I was drawn to the University of Wisconsin-Madison for graduate school where I immersed myself in the rich culture of RNA research that occurs at that institution. My Ph.D. work was performed in the lab of Dr. Marv Wickens; I was attracted to Marv’s lab because I was fascinated by the observation that most early developmental decisions in the embryo do not occur as a consequence of gene transcription, rather, most are made by regulating the translational status of maternal mRNAs. Following completion of my graduate work, I continued to study the process of mRNA translation as a Post-doc in Dr. Roy Parker’s lab (University of Arizona, HHMI). During the course of our work, Roy and I realized that the active regulation of mRNA translation is not an event reserved solely for the embryo, rather, it most likely occurs in all cells and is ancient in origin. I recently left Roy’s lab as I was most fortunate to have the opportunity to start my own lab in an environment renowned for its RNA community, Case Western Reserve University (CWRU). Now, as Director of the Center for RNA Molecular Biology at CWRU, I continue to explore an intriguing aspect of gene expression that involves the active movement of mRNA in and out of translation.

Curriculum Vitae