CORPORATE RELATIONS

nobel laureates

  • 1907: Albert Michelson is named first American scientist to win the Nobel Prize in physics.
  • 1923: John J. R. Macleod, professor of physiology/medicine, wins the Nobel Prize.
  • 1954: Frederick C. Robbins, University Professor who enjoyed a 50-year career at Case Western Reserve, wins the Nobel Prize in physiology/medicine.
  • 1955: Polycarp Kusch, who earned a BS in physics in 1931, earns the Nobel Prize in physics.
  • 1960: Donald A. Glaser, who earned a BS in physics in 1946, receives the Nobel Prize in physics.
  • 1971: Earl W. Sutherland Jr., professor and chair of pharmacology, wins the Nobel Prize in physiology/medicine.
  • 1980: Paul Berg, who earned a PhD in 1952, receives the Nobel Prize in chemistry.
  • 1988: George H. Hitchings, a professor of biochemistry, is awarded the Nobel Prize in physiology/medicine.
  • 1994: Alfred G. Gilman, who earned an MD and PhD in 1969, receives the Nobel Prize in physiology/medicine.
  • 1994: George A. Olah, professor and chair of chemistry, wins the Nobel Prize in chemistry.
  • 1995: Frederick Reines, professor and chair of physics, wins Nobel Prize in physics.
  • 1998: Case Western Reserve trustee Ferid Murad wins the Nobel Prize in physiology/medicine. He earned an MD and PhD in 1965.
  • 2003: Peter Agre, a former instructor at the School of Medicine, wins the Nobel Prize in chemistry.
  • 2003: Chemist and alumnus Paul C. Lauterbur shares the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with Sir Peter Mansfield.
  • 2004: Edward C. Prescott, who earned an MS in operations research in 1964, receives the Nobel Prize in Economic Science.

Learn more about the history of Case Western Reserve, read about our campus today by the numbers, or learn about our latest research achievements in Think.

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