value a business enterprise. Prereq: BAFI 403.


BAFI 460. Investment Banking (3)
This course covers the role of the investment banker as a strategic financial advisor, primarily to corporate clients. The course is divided into three sections, roughly equal in length: (1) industry structure, key players, services and strategies, (2) the capital acquisition process, with a particular focus on initial public equity offerings, and (3) mergers and acquisitions, with a focus on advising financial and strategic buyers and financing these transactions. Students will gain extensive experience in applying financial models that support valuations in various markets. Prereq: BAFI 403.


BAFI 480. International Financial Management (3)
This course introduces students to international finance and foreign exchange risk management by corporations. Topics include foreign exchange markets and international financial institutions; fx contracts; exchange rate risk and corporate risk management; and international aspects of long-term financing. Prereq: BAFI 403.


BAFI 501. Special Problems and Topics (1 - 18)
This course is offered, with permission, to students undertaking reading in a field of special interest.


BAFI 601. Special Problems and Topics (1 - 18)
This course is offered, with permission, to Ph.D. candidates undertaking reading in a field of special interest.

 


Department of Economics
Peter B. Lewis Building
James Rebitzer, Chair
Teresa Kabat, Department Administrator
Phone 216-368-5537; Fax 216-368-5039


FACULTY


Bo Carlsson, PhD (Stanford University)
Frank Tracy Carlton Professorship in Economics


David Clingingsmith, PhD (Harvard University)
Assistant Professor of Economics


Robin Dubin, PhD (Johns Hopkins University)
Associate Dean for Graduate and Professional Programs, Professor of Economics, University Marshal


Asim Erdilek, PhD (Harvard University)
Professor of Economics


Susan Helper, PhD (Harvard University)
AT&T Professorship in Economics


Nicola Lacetera, PhD (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
Assistant Professor of Economics


Gary Murphy, MSc (Universitetet for miljø og biovitenskap)
Professor for the Practice of Economics


Silvia Prina, PhD (Boston University)
Assistant Professor of Economics


James B. Rebitzer, PhD (University of Massachusetts)
John R. Mannix Medical Mutual of Ohio Professorship in Health Care Finance, Professor of Economics, Department Chair


Scott Shane, PhD (University of Pennsylvania)
Professor of Economics, A. Malachi Mixon, III Professorship in Entrepreneurial Studies


Justin Sydnor, PhD (University of California)
Assistant Professor of Economics


Mark Votruba, PhD (Princeton University)
Assistant Professor of Economics, Director of the Health Economics Unit, Center for Health Care Research and Policy at MetroHealth Medical Center


K. Laurence Chang, PhD

Associate Professor Emeritus of Economics


William S. Peirce, PhD
Professor Emeritus of Economics


Gerhard Rosegger, PhD
Professor Emeritus of Economics


ECONOMICS (ECON)


ECON 102. Principles of Microeconomics (3)
This course is an introduction to microeconomic theory, providing a foundation for future study in economics. In particular, it addresses how individuals and businesses make choices concerning the use of scarce resources, how prices and incomes are determined in competitive markets, and how market power affects the prices and quantities of goods available to society. We will also examine the impact of government intervention in the economy.


ECON 103. Principles of Macroeconomics (3)
While Microeconomics looks at individual consumers and firms, Macroeconomics looks at the economy as a whole. The focus of this class will be on the business cycle. Unemployment, inflation and national production all change with the business cycle. We will look at how these are measured, their past behavior and at theoretical models that attempt to explain this behavior. We will also look at the role of the Federal Government and the Federal Reserve Bank of the United States in managing the business cycle.


ECON 120. Life After Graduation (1)
This is a one-credit seminar intended for freshmen, sophomores and juniors. The purpose of the class is to help students understand what career choices they will have with an economics major. During this course, students will assess their strengths and weaknesses, learn networking tools, and explore the options available to them. The class will meet once a week for an hour. Graduating seniors need to obtain permission to enroll. Students may not earn credit for ECON 120 if they have completed MGMT 250.


ECON 205. Economic Perspectives (3)
This course examines important contemporary and historical issues from an economic perspective. It enables students to think about the world “like an economist.” Possible topics of current interest include the transformation of Eastern Europe, ethnic and racial strife, environmental policy and sustainable development, and professional sports.


ECON 255. Economic History of the United States (3)
The growth of the American economy from the colonial period to the present. Competing explanations of economic growth; significant attention to the political and legal environment in which the U.S. economy developed; “lessons” of past experience for contemporary policy; some attention to inequality and the changing distribution of wealth and income.Offered as ECON 255 and HSTY 255.


ECON 307. Intermediate Macro Theory (3)
Macroeconomics studies aggregate indicators of the performance of an economy, most commonly measured in terms of GDP, unemployment rate and inflation rate. An important goal of macroeconomic researchers is to develop a model of an economy that is simple, yet powerful enough to explain the historical trends of these aggregate economic indicators. Needless to say, coming up with a good model has remained a very difficult task. So far, there is no single model that is good enough to coherently explain even the most prominent historical trends of aggregate economic indicators. But several models have been built, each offering insight into a certain aspect of the economy. Throughout the course model building is motivated by real world cases from the American economy. Prereq: ECON 103.


ECON 308. Intermediate Micro Theory (3)
This class will give you an overview of microeconomic theory, which forms a basis for much of economic analysis. The main focus of the class will be theoretical, in order to give you a solid foundation for future study in virtually any other field of economics. This includes the theory of how consumers decide what to consume and how firms decide when to stay in business, and how much to produce at what price. Note: a student cannot receive degree credit for both ECON 308 and ECON 309. Prereq: ECON 102.


ECON 309. Intermediate Micro Theory: Math Based (3)
This course will cover the same topics covered in Economics 102: theory of the consumer, theory of the firm, markets and government intervention in the market. However, we will cover these topics in more detail and we will use calculus in our analysis. You should come away from this course with a greater understanding of how consumers and firms make their decisions and how they interact in the market place. Note: a student cannot receive degree credit for both ECON 308 and ECON 309. Prereq: ECON 102, MATH 121 or MATH 125.


ECON 326. Econometrics (3)
Econometrics is the application of statistics to empirical economic analysis. One way of testing the validity of economic theories is to gather data and apply statistical tests to see if the data support the theory. These data are usually gathered by observing actual economies, firms and consumers, rather than by performing experiments in a laboratory. Because economic analysts lack the precision and control of the laboratory, they must compensate by adjusting their statistical procedures. In this class, we will concentrate on regression analysis, which is the basic tool of the economic researcher. We will study the assumptions commonly made in the application of this technique, the consequences of violating these assumptions, and the corrections that can be made. Students will have a chance to formulate and test their own hypotheses using econometric software available for personal computers. Recommended preparation: One semester of statistics or consent of instructor. Prereq: ECON 102, ECON 103 and STAT 207.


ECON 328. Experimental Economics (3)
This course introduces students to the methods of studying Economics using laboratory experiments and to examine some of the major insights that have been gained through experiments and to examine some of the major insights that have been gained through experimental economics. Students will examine the three related branches of experimental economics; market institutions, game theory, and individual choice problems. The course presents known robust findings from the past 50 years of experimental economics, some of which conform tightly with economic theory while others have led to significant modifications in the way economists view markets and behavior. Prereq: ECON 102.


ECON 329. Game Theory: The Economics of Thinking Strategically (3)
The term “game theory” refers to the set of tools economists use to think about strategic interactions among small groups of individuals and firms. The primary purpose of this course is to introduce students to the basic concepts of game theory and its applications. The class will stress the use of game theory as a tool for building models of important economic phenomena. The class will also include a number of experiments designed to illustrate the game theoretic results, and to highlight how reality may depart from the theory. The course will stress the value of thinking strategically and provide students with a framework for thinking strategically in their everyday lives. Rather than approaching each strategic situation they encounter as a unique problem, students will be taught to recognize patterns in the situations they face and to generalize from specific experiences. Prereq: ECON 102.


ECON 330. Economic Behavior and Psychology (3)
This course will cover the relatively new field of Behavioral Economics, also sometimes called “Psychology and Economics.” Behavioral economics involves incorporating insights into economics from other disciplines that enrich the understanding of how people make economic decisions. Most of the crossovers come from the field of psychology, but there is also a growing interest in ideas from sociology and neuroscience. We will cover fundamental concepts related to decision-making, such as how people respond to risk, how people make decisions over time, and the ways in which people really aren’t as selfish as economists sometimes make it seem. We will also discuss empirical work that shows how these concepts affect how economists think about real-world issues. Examples include examining how to set the default options for 401k programs, understanding why people pay for costly gym memberships they do not use, and looking at whether sellers on Ebay use the best possible ending times for their auctions. Prereq: ECON 102.


ECON 332. Economic Analysis of Labor Markets (3)
This course is about the economics of work and pay. We will take a comprehensive look at labor markets in the U.S. and other advanced countries and examine related social policy issues. This will include the effect of unions on wages, the underpinnings of the income distribution of the U.S., issues of poverty and welfare, discrimination and wage differential by gender and race, the relationship between work and family, education as a determinant of wages, and the way firms use wage and employment practices to motivate their employees to work productively. What makes labor economics special is that the commodity we examine is human labor, something that is central to the organization of our lives and the functioning of the economy. Labor economics thus applies the standard neoclassical model of demand, supply, and equilibrium to many areas that also have a profound human dimension. Prereq: ECON 102.


ECON 333. The Economics of Organizations and Employment Relationships (3)
Organizational Economics is the study of effective organizational design and management. It applies the powerful tools of modern economics to such questions as: what are the practices and structures that make for successful firms? Why are successful firms able to excel at some things (think Microsoft and word processors and spreadsheets) but not at other things (think Microsoft and web-based search)? Fundamentally organizations are human enterprises and their performance is driven by the people they employ. For this reason a good deal of organizational economics is concerned with how firms structure relationships with their employees. One of the important benefits students gain from studying organizational economics is a rigorous and logical framework for thinking about their jobs and careers. By applying this framework to many different real world settings, students become adept at translating general insights to their specific concerns. Organizational economics is built upon a hybrid approach to human behavior that draws from economics and social psychology. From economics, we take the idea that individuals can skillfully use the resources and information at their disposal to achieve their goals. From social psychology we take the idea that individual pursuit of their interests is complicated by the emotions, impulses, and cognitive biases built into human brains. The economic emphasis on goals implies that successful organizations must structure incentives and design jobs in ways that are consistent with the interests of employees. The psychological approach implies that successful organizations must also adopt motivational strategies that appeal to both the rational and non-rational drivers of human behavior. Prereq: ECON 102.


ECON 341. Money and Banking (3)
This course emphasizes the importance of financial markets, the nature and role of the financial system, and the linkages between these--money and banking--and the economy. Emphasis is placed on both theoretical and practical constructs, on major innovations and contemporary changes, and the closely intertwined condition of financial and economic systems with monetary and fiscal policy. Offered as BAFI 341 and ECON 341.


ECON 342. Public Finance (3)
Government intervention is a pervasive feature of every modern economy. The goal of this course is to develop the economic tools for understanding and evaluating a wide range of government behaviors such as taxation and redistribution policy, the public provision of goods and services, and the regulation of private markets. ECON 342 begins by considering “market failures” that justify government intervention in a market economy. To respond to such failures, governments must raise revenues through taxation. Using the tools of microeconomic theory, we will develop a framework for thinking about the positive and normative effects of alternative forms of taxation. Particular attention will be paid to the individual income tax in the U.S., allowing students to understand the efficiency, distributional and behavioral implications of recent changes in the tax code. We will then turn to the expenditure side of the public sector. The economic principles used to evaluate public expenditures will be discussed and exemplified through the analysis of significant public programs. Of particular interest will be the effect of public programs on the incentives faced by workers and families. Offered as BAFI 342 and ECON 342.


ECON 343. Economics of State and Local Governments (3)
This course uses economic analysis to gain insight in the U.S. system of state and local governments. In the case of local governments, unlike the familiar case of the U.S. government, people often display their displeasure with the government’s actions by leaving rather than by voting against the incumbents. A careful consideration of the circumstances under which people will choose “exit” (moving out) over “voice” (voting) is central to the course. We’ll also examine economic theories of why people vote and how people vote. We consider a broad range of policy issues. Among them are school finance, zoning, local government economic development policies, lotteries, and affordable housing policy. Of course, we also analyze the full range of state and local government taxes, including the property tax, personal income tax, corporate income tax, and sales tax. Prereq: ECON 102 or consent of instructor.


ECON 345. Public Choice (3)
This course covers economic theory and empirical analysis of the behavior of politicians, bureaucrats, and voters based on the assumption of rational pursuit of self-interest, comparison with other approaches to the study of political behavior, and implications of alternative collective decision procedure. Prereq: ECON 102 and ECON 103.


ECON 350. World Economic History: From Poverty to Prosperity (3)
The average person living in the industrialized world today has 10-20 times the annual income of his or her forbearers in 1800 and a much longer lifespan. What explains the massive increases in living standards for residents of the industrialized world? The average person living in Africa today has roughly the same if not less annual income than in 1800. Why haven’t all the world’s people seen a similar increase in living standards since 1800? These questions are the central themes of this course on the evolution of the world economy over the past millennium. Highlights of the class will include the pre-1800 Malthusian economy, the industrial revolution and its spread, 19th and 20th century globalization booms, and the development successes and failures of the 20th century. Prereq: ECON 102.


ECON 361. Managerial Economics (3)
This course explores the economic principles that underlie strategic decisions in firms. Topics include the determination of vertical and horizontal boundaries of firms, strategic positioning and the sources of competitive advantage. Prereq: ECON 102.


ECON 364. Industrial Organization (3)
This course examines how companies compete against each other and interact with customers in an effort to increase profits. Topics include: pricing strategies, product differentiation, advertising, R&D strategies, bundling and tie-ins, entry barriers, mergers and acquisitions, collusion and cartels, the dynamics of network industries (e.g. information technology), and technology adoption and diffusion. The course will take two complementary perspectives. First, we will consider the point of view of companies, and ask how different business strategies can affect competitive success. Second, we will consider the perspective of consumers and policymakers: we will ask whether different firm strategies enhance or reduce social welfare, and will explore different policy options to increase welfare (e.g. antitrust policies, patent systems). The first part of the course will utilize a range of basic economic tools. In the second part of the course, we will apply what was learned in the first part to real examples of firms and industries, including both business and legal cases. Prereq: ECON 102.


ECON 367. Energy Economics and Engineering Solutions (3)
This course examines the economics of markets for various energy sources, and the potential of emerging technologies to alter the market outcomes. We will look at why energy markets have historically been subject to extensive government intervention. We will analyze the effects of traditional policy measures such as price controls and regulation; and we will examine current policy issues arising from the relationships among energy use, economic growth, and the environment. Prereq: ECON 102.


ECON 368. Environmental Economics (3)
This course will use economic theory as an aid to understanding environmental problems and their solutions. We will start with a study of the firm. Once we have developed an understanding of firms’ incentives to pollute and overexploit natural resources, we will learn how various economic policies can change these incentives and thus prevent environmental degradation. Thereafter, we will evaluate the efficiency of these economic policies. Finally, we will apply our theoretical analysis to specific environmental problems. Prereq: ECON 102.


ECON 369. Economics of Technological Innovation and Entrepreneurship (3)
This course is designed to help students identify, evaluate, and obtain control over technological opportunities so they may successfully understand the challenges of starting new companies. The course focuses on four themes: 1) the source, discovery and evaluation of technological opportunities; 2) the process of organizing a new firm to produce new technology that satisfies the needs of customers; 3) the acquisition of financial and human resources necessary to exploit technological opportunities; and 4) the development of mechanism to appreciate the returns from exploitation of technological opportunities. Prereq: ECON 102.


ECON 372. International Finance (3)
This course deals with open-economy macroeconomics and international financial markets, covering open-economy national income analysis, international macroeconomic policy coordination, exchange rate determination, foreign portfolio investment, and global financial crises. Recommended preparation: ECON 102 and ECON 103. Offered as BAFI 372 and ECON 372.


ECON 373. International Trade (3)
This course deals with international trade theories and policies, covering gains from and patterns of trade, immigration, foreign direct investment, protectionism, multilateral trade liberalization, regionalism and the costs and benefits of globalization within as well as among nations.Prereq: ECON 102 and ECON 103.


ECON 375. Economics of Developing Countries (3)
This course focuses on international aspects of economic development. The term “developing country” is often defined as a country that exhibits low per capita income, high poverty level, low level of industrialization, or low life expectancy. In terms of size, the developing countries make up at least three-fourth of the world population. Why do we study those countries’ economies separately from the industrialized economies? In fact, low economic growth, high unemployment, or high poverty rates also exist in many developed countries. The differences lie not in the types of problems but in the causes of these problems. In addition, differences in the kind of institutions that prevail in developing countries also lead to different policy prescriptions. Among developing countries, differences in historical experience, cultural practices, political institutions and economic conditions are also enormous. Illustrations and explanations of those differences are provided from a wide range of developing countries. Prereq: ECON 102 and ECON 103.


Global & Cultural Diversity


ECON 377. Economics of Nonprofit Organizations (3)
The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the private non-profit sector of the U.S. economy, with economic theory contributing to our understanding of this sector, and with the policy and management issues affecting non-profit organizations. Topics include understanding the different types of non-profit organizations; the size, scope and economic significance of the non-profit sector; the different parts of the economy in which non-profits operate; economic theories of why non-profit organizations exist and how they behave; analysis of important trends such as commercialization and globalization of the sector and its changing relationships with government, and how the U.S. non-profit sector compares with the third sector in other countries. Prereq: ECON 102.


ECON 378. Health Care Economics (3)
The health care industry is the fastest growing sector of the U.S. economy, with expenditures on health care now accounting for over 14% of total GDP. Because of its complexity and sheer size, the health care industry affects virtually every facet of the economy including labor productivity, income distribution and international competitiveness. The goal of ECON 378 is to apply the tools of economic analysis to develop students’ understanding of health care markets and related public policy issues. The course begins with an overview of the health care system in the U.S. with attention to disturbing statistics that have inspired calls for reform. The remainder of the course is approximately divided between analysis of the consumer side of the health care market and analysis of the provider side. Throughout the course, proposals for reforming the health care system will be described and discussed.Prereq: ECON 102.


ECON 386. Urban Economics (3)
Microeconomic theory as taught in principles (and even intermediate) does not usually take into account the fact that goods, people, and information must travel in order to interact. Rather, markets are implicitly modeled as if everyone and everything is at a single point in space. In the first part of the course, we will examine the implications of spatial location for economic analysis. In the second part of the class, we will use microeconomic tools to understand urban problems. Topics that we will cover include urban growth, suburbanization, land use, poverty, housing, local government, transportation, education, and crime. Prereq: ECON 102.


ECON 391. Advanced Topics and Writing in Economics (3)
This course is characterized by intense yet open-ended intellectual inquiry, guided by reading from primary and secondary sources, and will include extensive practice in written and oral communication. The focus will be on contemporary economic issues and scholarship, and assumes a high level of ability in undergraduate economics training. Specifically, this course provides an avenue for an intellectual discourse on some of the most challenging present day economic issues, and we will rigorously think and write about how economic concepts can be applied to virtually any topic, issue and event in the social world. Students will be challenged throughout the course to think and write like an economist and see the world through the economist’s lens. Prereq: ECON 308 or ECON 309 and ECON 326 and junior or senior standing.


SAGES Dept Seminar


ECON 395. Public Policy Case Competition (4)
This course uses economics to conduct an in-depth analysis of an important and current public policy issue. The specific issue will change from year to year, as will the set of economic tools used in the analysis. A constant feature of this capstone however will be the Richard Shatten Public Policy Case Competition. In this competition, students in the class will form teams and present policy suggestions to faculty as well as to public policy makers. Monetary prizes will be awarded to the top three team projects. The competition is in memory of Richard Shatten, a professor at the Weatherhead School who was also executive director of Weatherhead’s Center for Regional Economic Issues (REI). Through his work at REI and his earlier work as executive director of Cleveland Tomorrow, Richard was an important voice shaping public and private economic decision-making in Northeast Ohio. Prereq: Junior or Senior standing.


SAGES Senior Cap


ECON 397. Honors Research I (3)

All students admitted to the Honors Program will undertake an independent research project (senior thesis) under the guidance of a faculty member (thesis advisor). All Honors students will enroll in the 397/398 sequence. ECON 397 is used to define the topic, review the literature, formulate hypotheses, and collect appropriate data. Students will complete their research in ECON 398. Prereq: Junior standing and minimum GPA of 3.3 in ECON major and 3.0 overall. Coreq: Declared ECON major.


SAGES Senior Cap


ECON 398. Honors Research II (1 - 3)

This is the second course in a two course sequence to complete the Honors Research Program in Economics. Prereq: ECON 397. Coreq: Declared Economics major.


SAGES Senior Cap


ECON 399. Individual Readings and Research (1 - 6)

Intensive examination of a topic selected by the student.


ECON 403. Economics for Management (3)
This course surveys of the basic principles of micro and macroeconomics. Topics covered in microeconomics include supply and demand, the theory of production and costs, market structures and factor markets. Macroeconomics topics are the national incomes accounts, the determination of national income, employment and inflation, fiscal and monetary policies and international trade.


ECON 403A. Economics (1)
This course serves as a review of economic principles and an introduction to the use of economics in the management setting. Basic economic concepts will be demonstrated by analyzing economic issues and policies relating to the environment in which organizations function. Economic analysis will be demonstrated with reference to particular decisions confronted by firms, including game theory. Prereq: Open to ACL-MBA students.


ECON 406. Innovation and Entrepreneurship (2)
The purpose of this module is to acquaint and ultimately engage clinical researchers with the business of innovation and entrepreneurship. Goals include: (1) to provide researchers with many of the skills that they would need to translate academic research into commercial uses; (2) to sensitize clinical researchers to the goals of the business community and facilitate their ability to work with the private sector on technology development; and (3) to make clinical researchers aware of the processes of academic technology development and transfer. Sessions consist of lectures and case discussion facilitated by the instructor. Some sessions include members of the business community as guest lecturers. As an example, students will discuss the financing of new companies with local venture capitalists. Student products include the evaluation of the commercial potential of a university technology in which they apply their new knowledge about commercialization of scientific discoveries. Offered as CRSP 503, ECON 406, and HSMC 406.


ECON 421. Health Economics and Strategy (3)
This course has evolved from a theory-oriented emphasis to a course that utilizes economic principles to explore such issues as health care pricing, anti-trust enforcement and hospital mergers, choices in adoption of managed care contracts by physician groups, and the like. Instruction style and in-class group project focus on making strategic decisions. The course is directed for a general audience, not just for students and concentration in health systems management. Offered as ECON 421, HSMC 421, and MPHP 421. Prereq: ECON 403.


ECON 431. Economics of Negotiation and Conflict Resolution (3)
Students frequently enroll in a negotiation class with one thought in mind--negotiating a better job offer from an employer. They soon learn, however, that negotiation skills can do far more than improve a pay check. Negotiations occur everywhere: in marriages, in divorces, in small work teams, in large organizations, in getting a job, in losing a job, in deal making, in decision making, in board rooms, and in court rooms. The remarkable thing about negotiations is that, wherever they occur, they are governed by similar principles. The current wave of corporate restructuring makes the study of negotiations especially important for M.B.A.s. Mergers, acquisitions, downsizing and joint ventures call into question well established business and employment relationships. Navigating these choppy waters by building new relationships requires negotiation skills. The increased stress on quality and other hard-to-measure aspects of relationships with customers and suppliers makes the process of negotiation even more complex and subtle. For these reasons, negotiation classes have taken center stage in the study of management. Every major business school now offers classes in negotiation and these classes are overflowing with students. Offered as ECON 431 and LHRP 413.


ECON 436A. Economics of Organizations-E.M.B.A. (2)
Dramatic changes in technology, work force demographics and economic competition are forcing firms to rethink their internal organization. Implementing new internal strategies is remarkably hard for organizations and managers to do. This class is designed to provide the economic tools that managers need to understand why their organizations are the way they are and why change can be as difficult as it is important. This course focuses on two elements of a firm’s internal strategy: structuring incentives and investing in relationships. In the incentives section, we analyze how organizations: allocate decision rights; evaluate performance; and implement motivation strategies. In the relationships section, we analyze how organizations sustain functional, long-term relationships in competitive or conflictual environments. A small number of surprisingly simple economic models, it turns out, offer important insights into incentive design and investments in long-term relationships.


ECON 436B. Economics of Organizations-M.B.A. (3)
Dramatic changes in technology, work force demographics and economic competition are forcing firms to rethink their internal organization. Implementing new internal strategies is remarkably hard for organizations and managers to do. This class is designed to provide the economic tools that managers need to understand why their organizations are the way they are and why change can be as difficult as it is important. This course focuses on two elements of a firm’s internal strategy: structuring incentives and investing in relationships. In the incentives section, we analyze how organizations: allocate decision rights; evaluate performance; and implement motivation strategies. In the relationships section, we analyze how organizations sustain functional, long-term relationships in competitive or conflictual environments. A small number of surprisingly simple economic models, it turns out, offer important insights into incentive design and investments in long-term relationships.


ECON 441. Economics of Financial Intermediation (3)
Institutions such as commercial banks, investment banks, insurance companies, and mutual funds perform important financial intermediation roles in an economy. This course provides a conceptual framework that allows the exploration of how these financial institutions perform their intermediation role through their different activities, such as loan origination, underwriting, insurance, and asset management. This framework also lends itself to the study of how and why regulation can be critical in ensuring the safety and soundness of the financial system. Prereq: ACCT 401, BAFI 402, ECON 403 and QUMM 414.


ECON 450. Health Care Economics for the Biosciences (1.5)
This course utilizes economic principles to explore such issues as health care pricing, anti-trust enforcement and pharmaceutical economics, choices in adoption of managed care contracts by physician groups, and the like. Instruction style and in-class group project focus on making strategic decisions. The course is directed for a general audience, not just for students and concentration in bioscience or health systems management. Offered as BIOS 450, ECON 450, and HSMC 450.


ECON 462. The Digital Economy (3)
What is the digital economy all about? How big is it, and what are its main features? Despite the dot-com debacle and subsequent stock market decline, there are some fundamental changes taking place in the economy, due to the Internet, that will affect business for many years to come. Among the topics discussed are the effects on productivity growth, structural change at the industry level and organizational change at the corporate level, the role of small business and entrepreneurship, the digital economy in Cleveland, and issues for public policy. Prereq: ECON 403.


ECON 464. Technology Entrepreneurship (3)
This course is designed to help students to identify, evaluate, and obtain control over technology opportunities that they can successfully exploit by starting new companies. The course focuses on four themes: (1) the source, discovery, and evaluation of technological opportunities, (2) the process of organizing innovation to produce new technology that satisfies the needs of customers, (3) the different mechanisms available to appropriate the returns from the exploitation of technological opportunities, and (4) the differences between opportunities and approaches that are valuable and sustainable for independent entrepreneurs and large firms. Students taking this course may not receive credit for both ECON 464 and ENTP 441. Offered as ECON 464 and ENTP 464.


ECON 474. International Trade (3)
This course deals with the causes and effects of international trade and investment. Its coverage includes the global and regional commercial agreements and institutions that affect the international business environment. The European Union, the North American Free Trade Agreement, and the World Trade Organization are treated extensively. Prereq: ECON 403.


ECON 475. International Finance (3)
This course covers the global financial markets that multinational corporations, government agencies, and banks use in conducting business. These financial markets include the market for foreign exchange, the Eurocurrency and related money markets, the Eurobond and global equity markets, the commodity markets, the markets for forward contracts, options, swaps, and other derivatives. Prereq: ECON 403.


ECON 486. Value Creation Through Real Estate (3)
Introduction to economic analysis of real estate markets, with focus on development of urban land. Introduction to financial instruments used in development, and to the role of government in facilitating and constraining the use of real property. Prereq: ECON 403.


ECON 501. Special Problems and Topics (1 - 18)
This course is offered, with permission, to students undertaking reading in a field of special interest.


ECON 525. Advanced Microeconomic Theory (3)
This course will give students an introduction to microeconomic theory at the Ph.D. level. Topics to be covered include consumer theory, the theory of the firm, general equilibrium (in other words, the theory of competitive markets), imperfect competition (models of Cournot oligopoly, Bertrand oligopoly, etc.), information economics (with focus on principal-agent problems), and auction theory. Students in the course will be expected to have a working knowledge of calculus. Some knowledge of constrained optimization and real analysis will be useful as well, although this is not required. While this is not a course in game theory, basic game theoretic concepts will be introduced to the extent they are necessary to understand the material. No previous background in economics will be assumed.Prereq: Ph.D. standing.


ECON 526. Advanced Econometrics (3)
This course focuses on the theoretical underpinning of multivariate regression analysis. The course also develops practical applications of econometric analysis. The course also introduces students to more advanced topics including discrete choice analysis, instrumental variables, and time-series methods.


ECON 601. Special Problems and Readings (1 - 18)
This course is offered, with permission, to Ph.D. candidates undertaking reading in a field of special interest.


ECON 701. Dissertation Ph.D. (1 - 18)
Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.

 


Department of Marketing and Policy Studies
Peter B. Lewis Building
Sayan Chatterjee, Chair
Retta Holdorf, Department Administrator
Phone 216-368-5373; Fax 216-368-4785

 


Division of Labor and Human Resource Policy
Paul F. Gerhart, Head
Phone 216-368-2045; Fax 216-368-4785


FACULTY


Paul F. Gerhart, PhD (University of Chicago)
Professor of Labor and Human Resource Policy


Paul F. Salipante Jr., PhD (University of Chicago)
Professor of Labor and Human Resource Policy


LABOR AND HUMAN RESOURCE POLICY (LHRP)


LHRP 311. Labor Problems (3)
This course examines labor/capital/government relations from current and historical perspectives. It reviews sociological, political, psychological, and economic explanations for conflicts and cooperation between labor and management. Selected aspects of law and negotiated institutions, such as individual rights and grievance procedures and a comparison of the U.S. with other countries, are also covered.


LHRP 360. Independent Study (1 - 18)
This course is offered for candidates undertaking reading or independent research in a field of special interest.


LHRP 409A. Unions, Collective Bargaining, and Management Policy (1.5)
The course examines why and how employees join or do not join unions; the processes of certifying and decertifying unions; alternative strategies used by management in dealing with unions; and models of union-management cooperation in traditional manufacturing, transportation, and service industries. The course is focused on U.S. managerial practice, but public policies and practices among selected major trading partners are also considered briefly. Ordinarily an all-day collective bargaining simulation is part of the course. Students enrolling in the 2.0 credit version of the course develop an independent reading assignment on grievance arbitration and attend and analyze a live grievance arbitration hearing.


LHRP 409B. Unions, Collective Bargaining and Management Policy (2)
Same as LHRP 409A except that students enrolling in the 2.0 credit version of the course develop an independent reading assignment on grievance arbitration and attend and analyze a live grievance arbitration hearing.


LHRP 413. Economics of Negotiation and Conflict Resolution (3)
Students frequently enroll in a negotiation class with one thought in mind--negotiating a better job offer from an employer. They soon learn, however, that negotiation skills can do far more than improve a pay check. Negotiations occur everywhere: in marriages, in divorces, in small work teams, in large organizations, in getting a job, in losing a job, in deal making, in decision making, in board rooms, and in court rooms. The remarkable thing about negotiations is that, wherever they occur, they are governed by similar principles. The current wave of corporate restructuring makes the study of negotiations especially important for M.B.A.s. Mergers, acquisitions, downsizing and joint ventures call into question well established business and employment relationships. Navigating these choppy waters by building new relationships requires negotiation skills. The increased stress on quality and other hard-to-measure aspects of relationships with customers and suppliers makes the process of negotiation even more complex and subtle. For these reasons, negotiation classes have taken center stage in the study of management. Every major business school now offers classes in negotiation and these classes are overflowing with students. Offered as ECON 431 and LHRP 413.


LHRP 421. Strategic Human Resource Management (3)
The effective motivation and management of human resources within the enterprise is treated in this course with special emphasis on the integration of Human Resources strategy into the overall competitive strategy of the enterprise. Implications of the inevitable conflict of goals and interests among organization members are considered, covering such areas as hiring, performance appraisal, labor-management relations, employee rights, pay systems, grievance systems, and worker participation.


LHRP 424. Developing High Performance Work Systems (3)
This course will focus on understanding the factors shaping high performance work systems (HPWS) in organizations. Overall, an HPWS is based on a philosophy of using people to provide a sustainable competitive advantage; a reorganization of work structures and processes to maximize organizational learning and customer responsiveness; a set of human resource policies that seeks to build employees’ motivation and skills, and align individual interests with those of the organization; and new approaches to managing employees that are consistent with these philosophies, work organizations, and policies. Prereq: MGMT 413.


LHRP 425. Managing Human Resource Issues in Entrepreneurial Firms (3)
This course examines how entrepreneurial firms can develop human resource practices and strategies to sustain their vision, grow their businesses, and create value for customers, shareholders, and employees. The first half of the course will be devoted to exploring the distinctive challenges entrepreneurial firms encounter in aligning organizational goals and human resource strategy and practices. Among those practices are staffing, recruitment and selection, compensation, and employee motivation. The second half of the course will explore these issues further in the context of key organizational phases ranging from firm foundings, the transition from entrepreneurial to professional management, the development of “intrepreneurship” in existing organizations, and the spin-off of the new corporate ventures. Offered as ENTP 425 and LHRP 425.


LHRP 431. Negotiations for Managers (3)
The aim of this course is to enhance individual as well as organizational performance and competitive advantage through “principled negotiation”, “win-win bargaining”, and collaborative as opposed to competitive approaches to team problem solving. The context crosses all types of business, government and non-governmental organizations. Concepts, strategies, and models of negotiation are drawn from social psychology, economics, labor relations, and legal literature. Students will also be introduced to mediation (both as mediators and negotiators); to the complex art of advocacy and to the latest alternative dispute resolution (ADR) techniques. There is heavy reliance on simulations and role play to enhance student understanding of key course concepts. Although immediate skill enhancement through practice is a goal, students understanding of key concepts will enable them to continuously improve their insights and skills long after the course is concluded. There is no prerequisite for the course.


LHRP 435A. International Human Resources Management (1.5)
This course examines the unique challenges of managing Human Resources globally. Particular emphasis is on cultural and other contextual differences, and their influence on other HR practices such as selection, training, performance management, compensation, and union relations. The course establishes a conceptual foundation in cross-cultural cognitive and behavioral differences. Heavy emphasis is on case analysis. There is no formal prerequisite, but it is recommended that students have either completed, or are taking concurrently, the Human Values in Organizations course (MGMT 413) or LHRP 421.


LHRP 435B. International Human Resources Management (2)
Same as LHRP 435A except that students enrolling in the 2.0 credit version of the course will select a particular region or country (other than the one where they hold citizenship) and develop an independent analysis of particular advantages and challenges facing the human resource manager assigned to this country or region. The instructor may approve alternative projects.


LHRP 445. Compensation and Benefits (3)
Strategic management of compensation and benefits for effective motivation of managers and employees is introduced through the use of cases and student development of a wage and salary system based on a live organization. Since government-mandated and voluntary benefits comprise a third of compensation costs for many firms, significant attention is given to the attraction, retention, and motivational effects of benefits such as tuition reimbursement and training programs. Contingent compensation as a motivator and employment cost control device are also given significant attention.


LHRP 451. Alternative Dispute Resolution (2)
Students will examine the processes of alternative dispute resolution (ADR) through reading materials, videotapes, guest lectures, and simulation exercises. Particular emphasis will be given to the interaction of lawyers and clients in business negotiations and in litigation. Negotiation, arbitration, mediation, the summary jury trial, and the mini-trial will be examined. The class will also cover impediments to ADR, such as lack of understanding or hostility on the part of clients or lawyers. Offered as LAWS 351 and LHRP 451.


LHRP 501. Special Problems and Topics (.5 - 18)
This course is offered, with permission, to students undertaking individual reading or research projects in a field of special interest.


LHRP 601. Special Problems and Topics (1 - 18)
This course is offered, with permission, to Ph.D. candidates undertaking reading in a field of special interest.


LHRP 701. Dissertation Ph.D. (1 - 18)
Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.

 


Division of Management Policy
Vasudevan Ramanujam, Head
Phone 216-368-5100; Fax 216-368-4785

 

FACULTY


Sayan Chatterjee, PhD (University of Michigan)
Professor of Management Policy and Department Chair


Steven P. Feldman, PhD (Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania)
Associate Professor of Management Policy


Jennifer Johnson, MBA (Case Western Reserve University)
Senior Lecturer, Marketing and Policy Studies


Leonard H. Lynn, PhD (University of Michigan)
Professor of Management Policy


Richard L. Osborne, MS (Case Western Reserve University)
Professor for the Practice of Management Policy


Simon I. Peck, PhD (University of Leeds)
Assistant Professor of Management Policy


Vasudevan Ramanujam, PhD (University of Pittsburgh)
Associate Professor of Management Policy


MANAGEMENT POLICY (PLCY)


PLCY 200. Social and Political Environment of Management (3)
This course is concerned with the relationship between business activities and the broader social environment. Business is a part of society and has responsibilities and obligations beyond mere profit maximization. These responsibilities and obligations are those that fall on all citizens: to contribute to the health and well-being of our democracy and civil society. In this course, we will explore and debate these responsibilities and obligations in the context of a broad array of ideas and cases. Our goal will be to make some progress toward answering the question: “What is the right ethical responsibility of business, both inside and outside the organization, and how is it correctly implemented?”


PLCY 360. Independent Study (1 - 18)


PLCY 399. Business Policy (3)

This course uses case analysis to develop perspective and judgment on business problems through the integration of functional areas. Formulation, development, and implementation of organization goals and policies, the development of strategy in relation to the competitive environment, and applications of quantitative and behavioral decision-making techniques are examined.Prereq: Senior standing.


PLCY 418. Enterprise Development (3)
Course features new product launch by students and new business idea competition judged by actual venture capitalists. Students will also learn how to acquire control of an existing company, including valuation methods, sources of funding, tactics for finding companies to buy, and how to negotiate the purchase of a business. Also includes actual student negotiation with sellers of a company. Course is designed to accelerate career success through bold entrepreneurial strategies. Offered as ENTP 418 and PLCY 418.


PLCY 419. Entrepreneurship and Personal Wealth Creation (3)
Course explores the accumulation of personal wealth utilizing entrepreneurial strategies. The underlying competencies of successful entrepreneurs are identified and applied to individual lives of students. Active entrepreneurs will be studied, and original case studies of start-ups and acquisitions provide the basis for class exercises. Offered as ENTP 419 and PLCY 419.


PLCY 420. Managing the Family Firm (3)
The vast majority of U.S. firms are family controlled and present special problems in strategic management including the interaction of family and firm objectives, executive succession, management development and motivation, finance, estate planning, etc. This course explores solutions to these problems in the context of guiding the firm’s growth through the threshold between personal and professional management. The course pedagogy is participative and experiential. Offered as ENTP 420 and PLCY 420.


PLCY 422. Managing an Emerging Growth Enterprise (3)
Students are exposed to what it is like to work in an emerging growth company with sales under $100 million. Prospective students might be individuals who are considering employment with middle market company, entrepreneurs who may start a company, or business persons who may buy a middle market company. The learning experience will stem from participating in an actual semester-long project. In-class discussions include: business planning, selling, managing technology transfer, and creativity/innovation, and guest presentations by CEOs from middle market companies. Offered as ENTP 422 and PLCY 422. Prereq: ACCT 401, BAFI 402, MKMR 403 and MIDS 409.


PLCY 425. Chief Executive Officer (3)
This course is designed for students who aspire to become a chief executive officer. The unique role, responsibilities, and requirements of the CEO will be explored. Students will benchmark CEO best practices through exposure to leading chief officers, study the paths to and preparation for the top job, and develop a personal career strategy to increase their chances of becoming a CEO.


PLCY 426. International Entrepreneurship (3)
This course introduces the area of international entrepreneurship by focusing on various aspects of this area. Topics to be covered include: conditions making small, medium-sized, and new ventures increasingly important in international business; information sources relevant to international entrepreneurship; critical steps in deciding on doing international entrepreneurship, strategic planning and methods in conducting international entrepreneurship; and benefits and problems of going international as a new venture. Offered as ENTP 426 and PLCY 426.


PLCY 427. Entrepreneurial Strategy (3)
Creating and managing a new venture inside or outside a corporation is a task that few individuals are able to accomplish, even though many profess the desire. The primary goal of this course is to provide an understanding of entrepreneurship and the entrepreneurial process. The course will broaden a basic understanding obtained in the functional areas (organization, strategy, finance) as they apply to new venture creation and growth. While most of the examples in class will be drawn from new venture formations, the principles also apply to new business development in corporate settings and to non-profit entrepreneurship. Offered as ENTP 427, PLCY 427.


PLCY 429. New Venture Creation (3)
The primary goal of this course is to provide an understanding of entrepreneurship and the entrepreneurial process. The course will broaden a basic understanding obtained in the functional areas as they apply to new venture creation and growth. Offered as ENTP 429 and PLCY 429.


PLCY 439. Intrapreneurship - Entrepreneurship within the Corporation (3)
Intrapreneurs are the entrepreneurs within corporations who combine innovation, creativity and leadership to develop and launch new products, new product lines, and new business units that grow revenues and profits from within. Intrapreneurial innovation and creativity have never been needed more by U.S. corporations than they are today. Numerous corporations have been increasing revenues through mergers and acquisitions, rather than through internal product innovation and new business creation. Today, many companies are returning to their entrepreneurial roots. Revitalizing existing companies through intrapreneurial activity creates new capital, retains and increases jobs, and creates exciting places to work and achieve. The purpose of this course is to encourage students to research and understand the theories, principles, concepts, and practices of entrepreneurship within organizations--Intrapreneurship. Students will become acquainted with trends, expectations, organizational challenges to innovation, and opportunities in today’s corporate America. Offered as ENTP 439 and PLCY 439.


PLCY 450. Challenges to U.S. Management from East Asia (3)
Examination of the Japanese, Chinese, and other East Asian business systems. Looks at how the business systems relate to broader social, economic, and political contexts. Compares the different systems with each other and with that of the United States. Inquires into the reasons for the past successes and recent problems of these systems.


PLCY 474. Innovation for Competitive Advantage (3)
In this course, we will develop frameworks to identify new value propositions for the customer. We will then apply these frameworks to three types of innovations that we see in practice--incremental, disruptive and white space--and more importantly understand business model innovations that go beyond just a product or process innovation. The course will also explore techniques of focused brainstorming and creative problem solving techniques. Prereq or Coreq: MGMT 499.


PLCY 490. Corporate Strategy (3)
This course is an advanced strategy course that explores the determinants of successful corporate strategy. In Strategy Issues and Applications you were exposed to the basic frameworks for developing successful competitive or business unit level strategy. Corporate strategy takes you to the next level and provides the frameworks you need to be able to be successful in multiple businesses. At its core corporate strategy constitutes any and all decisions that change the core business model of a firm. Examples are vertical integration, new but related product lines, entering new markets with existing products and entering new or existing markets with unrelated products. The fundamental premise of the course is that successful corporate strategy is rooted in competitive advantage arising from capabilities residing at the business unit level. Starting from analyzing business level strategies of very simple firms, the course successively builds frameworks towards more complicated business level strategies. Next, the course develops frameworks to discuss corporate strategy based around the concept of core competencies and market entry strategies. Finally, the course develops the concepts that are useful in greenfield entries, alliances and acquisitions as part of an overall corporate strategy. Prereq: MGMT 499.


PLCY 494. Managerial Consultancy (3)
Students will learn to match consulting methodologies with client needs and employ a step by step strategy development process applied to actual companies which are semester-long clients of the class. Accelerated career strategies in the consultancy business are featured as well as tactics for getting hired in the first place. The course views consultancy as a role rather than career and conceptualizes consultancy as a process of optimizing an organization’s value creation potential and competitive advantage. Students should be able to apply the concepts regardless of career choice. Exposure to senior practicing consultants is featured.


PLCY 495. Industry and Competitive Analysis for Strategic Planning (3)
This course introduces methods of industry and competitive analysis. Industry structure and firm competitive behavior are studied with a view to develop business strategies for securing and preserving competitive advantage. Emphasis is placed on understanding industry dynamics and the processes by which industries undergo change and evolution. Emphasis is also placed on firms’ capabilities and core competencies and their capacity to implement major strategic changes in their industries. Readings and cases are the principal pedagogical tools utilized in this course. Students are required to analyze an industry of their choice in small project teams and present their analyses in class.


PLCY 496. Strategic Planning and Control Systems for Strategy Implementation (3)
This course introduces the principal tools of strategy implementation, namely the design of organization structures, the use of formal planning and control systems, and the design of measurement and reward systems. The importance of organizational context (small vs. large, for profit vs. not-for-profit, manufacturing vs. service, etc.) and the need to tailor systems to the context of the organization are emphasized. New and emergent organizational forms and their role in strategy development and implementation are reviewed. Cases and readings are the principal pedagogical methods utilized. Students work in small project teams, study the operation and effectiveness of systems for strategic control in organizations, and present the results of their analysis in class presentations.


PLCY 501. Special Problems and Topics (1 - 18)
This course is offered, with permission, to students undertaking reading in a field of special interest.


PLCY 601. Special Problems and Topics (1 - 18)
This course is offered, with permission, to Ph.D. candidates undertaking reading in a field of special interest.


PLCY 701. Dissertation Ph.D. (1 - 18)
Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.

 


Division of Marketing
Stanton G. Cort, Head
Phone 216-368-2064; Fax 216-368-4785


FACULTY


Stanton G. Cort, DBA (Harvard University)
Associate Professor of Marketing


Andrew Gallan, PhD (Arizona State University)
Assistant Professor of Marketing


Gary Hunter, PhD (University of North Carolina)
Assistant Professor of Marketing and Policy Studies


Jean Kilgore, PhD (Case Western Reserve University)
Senior Lecturer, Marketing and Policy Studies


N. Mohan Reddy, PhD (Case Western Reserve University)
Dean and Albert J. Weatherhead, III Professor of Management


Jagdip Singh, PhD (Texas Tech University)
Professor of Marketing, H. Clark Ford Professorship


Walter Sokira, MBA (Kent State University)
Senior Lecturer, Marketing


MARKETING (MKMR)


MKMR 301. Marketing Management (3)
This course covers key concepts and practices of marketing with emphasis on analysis and development of integrated marketing plans and programs that create customer value and competitive advantage in the world-wide marketplace. Prereq: ACCT 202 or ACCT 303.


MKMR 304. New Product Development and Marketing (3)
This course focuses on preparing students to manage the marketing processes that are essential to extract and make useful to the marketplace and society the commercial and social values embedded in new product and process ideas. All levels of technology and of innovativeness are addressed, including breakthrough technologies and radical innovations. The objective function for the organization is to create commercial and/or social value. Students will discuss the role of product development in achieving and sustaining competitive advantage, the structure and dynamics of managing development from concept to successful commercialization, and the marketing management concepts and tools required to manage the process. A variety of exercises, cases and projects will allow students to practice the idea. Prereq: MKMR 301.


MKMR 307. Marketing Through the Supply Chain (3)
This course views the supply chain (including the distribution channels) as a multi-organization business system that enables customers at all points in the system to acquire the benefits/value they want in the way they want to acquire them. It is a collaborative human network creating customer and shareholder value throughout the system. Strategic and tactical management topics include specifying customer desired value, assessing network members’ (suppliers, producers, distributors, and customers) abilities to create it, and consequently allocating decisions, tasks, and rewards to members. Emphasis is on structure, communication, motivation, and control/discipline to encourage effective implementation throughout the supply chain system. Offered as MKMR 307 and MKMR 407 and OPMT 407.


MKMR 310. Marketing Research for Decision Making (3)
This course will introduce students to marketing research, its applications to managerial decision-making and emphasize research as an aid to problem solving in marketing management. Students will go through the steps of conducting marketing research, which include problem definition, research design (exploratory, descriptive and causal), data collection methods, questionnaire design, attitude measurement, sampling and data analysis. The course will be based on lecture, discussion, individual problem solving analytical assignments, case analyses, and a semester-long team-based marketing research project. Students will also learn to use the SPSS software for solving specific research problems through data analysis. Prereq: STAT 207 or STAT 243 or STAT 312 or PSCL 282 or consent of instructor.


MKMR 311. Consumer Behavior (3)
This course focuses on human decision making processes and how they influence purchase and consumption behavior. Drawing on psychology and sociology it examines a wide variety of topics including motivation, attribution, decision-making, reference group influence, and information processing with an emphasis on the practical application of these theories into actionable marketing strategies. An understanding of the factors that drive consumers’ purchase and consumption decisions is critical to predicting or influencing their behavior. Although we will focus on consumer behavior, much of the content is basic human behaviors and so is also applicable in business-to-business and not-for-profit settings. Prereq: MKMR 301 or consent of instructor.


MKMR 312. Selling and Sales Management (3)
Selling and sales management are keys to implementing an organization’s marketing program and customer relationships. This course emphasizes developing an understanding of basic marketing concepts, selling principles, interrelationships among sales force management and other business functions, appropriate strategy for managing a sales force and measurement of sales force productivity. We will use theories of work motivation and explore how individual difference variables influence the choices of sales managers. This course uses a synthesis of sales research and leading practices to focuses on both a strategic and a tactical perspective. Strategic issues include: entrepreneurial strategy, the sales force’s role in company strategy, customer relationship and strategic account management, sales force size and organization and career paths to sales management. Tactical issues include: effective approaches to selling, finding and retaining top sales talent, motivating and compensating the field force, evaluating performance, and aligning sales territories. Prereq: MKMR 301 or consent of instructor.


MKMR 360. Independent Study (1 - 3)
This course is offered, with permission, to students undertaking reading and research in an area of their special interest.


MKMR 403. Managerial Marketing (3)
This course focuses on managing marketing as a process of creating value and mutually desirable exchanges of values. That is the foundation of a customer orientation and a central theme of market-driven management. Methods for strategic marketing planning, understanding buyer behavior, market analysis, segmentation and devising integrated marketing programs are introduced. Creating customer value and competitive advantage in worldwide markets is the central theme. Prereq: ACCT 401.


MKMR 403A. Marketing (1)
This course is designed to refresh and enhance student familiarity with fundamental concepts in marketing management, and with how those concepts are applied to solve realistic business problems. The course exposes students to basic marketing theory in the areas of consumer behavior and decision making (both individual consumers and organizational buyers), pricing strategies, channel management and its importance to marketing strategy, new product development and management and its importance to marketing strategy, new product development and management, and promotion management. Equal emphasis is given to analyzing business cases that deal with realistic situations where the theories described above can be applied. Considerable emphasis is also given to learning analysis techniques and back-of-the-envelope calculations that can be applied to case data (financial, market research results, industry reports, etc.) to gain further insights. Prereq: Open to ACL-MBA students.


MKMR 405. Industrial/New Technologies Marketing (3)
This course focuses on concepts and practices of business-to-business marketing of products and services. It also examines how rapid technological change impacts industrial markets. Topics covered include: buyer-seller relationship building, competitive bidding, developing markets for new materials and value-based pricing strategies. Marketing to the government, marketing of intellectual property and marketing-R&D-manufacturing interface issues will also be explored. Prereq: MKMR 403.


MKMR 406. Sales Force Management (3)
Selling and sales management are keys to implementing an organization’s marketing program and customer relationships. This course emphasizes developing an understanding of basic marketing concepts, selling principles, interrelationships among sales force management and other business functions, appropriate strategy for managing a sales force and measurement of sales force productivity. We will use theories of work motivation and explore how individual difference variables influence the choices of sales managers. This course uses a synthesis of sales research and leading practices to focus on both a strategic and a tactical perspective. Strategic issues include: entrepreneurial strategy, the sales force’s role in company strategy, customer relationship and strategic account management, sales force size and organization and career paths to sales management. Tactical issues include: effective approaches to selling, finding and retaining top sales talent, motivating and compensating the field force, evaluating performance, and aligning sales territories. Prereq: MKMR 403.


MKMR 407. Marketing Through the Supply Chain (3)
This course views the supply chain (including the distribution channels) as a multi-organization business system that enables customers at all points in the system to acquire the benefits/value they want in the way they want to acquire them. It is a collaborative human network creating customer and shareholder value throughout the system. Strategic and tactical management topics include specifying customer desired value, assessing network members’ (suppliers, producers, distributors, and customers) abilities to create it, and consequently allocating decisions, tasks, and rewards to members. Emphasis is on structure, communication, motivation, and control/discipline to encourage effective implementation throughout the supply chain system. Offered as MKMR 307 and MKMR 407 and OPMT 407.


MKMR 410. Marketing Research for Decision Making (3)
This course stresses the generation and use of marketing information for a range of managerial decisions, including identifying and defining marketing performance and improving understanding of marketing as a process. This course discusses contemporary approaches for defining marketing information needs, designing methods for information collection and making sense of obtained results. The course utilizes lecture/discussion, case analysis, and a field project to develop skills in defining and solving marketing problems. Prereq: MKMR 403 and QUMM 414.


MKMR 411. Consumer Behavior (3)
This course addresses micro and macro issues in consumer behavior which are essential for managers seeking to analyze and influence consumer decision making. The course focuses on how consumer behavior analysis can be used to develop effective marketing techniques and strategies. This involves developing an understanding of consumer behavior from a variety of perspectives, identifying the major factors that influence how consumers process and learn, marketing communications, managing consumer satisfaction, and developing an understanding of purchase decision making and its implications for marketing strategy. Emphasis is placed on designing persuasion strategies, enhancing brand memory, consumer profiling, analyzing consumer trends, and customer relationship management. Prereq or Coreq: MKMR 403.


MKMR 412. E-Marketing (3)
Using a combination of lectures, cases, and hands-on projects, the course examines how the Internet influences all the key aspects of marketing, including marketing strategy, pricing, advertising, segmentation, marketing research, retailing, distribution channels, and international marketing. Additionally, the course will cover more Internet specific topics such as privacy, wireless web, sales force automation, and emarketplace models. The course incorporates both business-to-business and business-to-consumer outlooks.


MKMR 421. Product and Brand Management (3)
Established products and brands typically provide the majority of firms’ earnings. If carefully managed, these products also are a significant source of growth and future earnings. This course focuses on the role of a Product/Brand Manager in profitably managing a firm’s existing offering. Students identify areas for growth (or decline) within a firm’s mature product lines, devise ideas to capitalize on growth potential or address decline, develop and assess concrete marketing initiatives, and determine the financial impact of alternative plans. The course uses a combination of case analysis, lecture/discussion and guest speakers, allowing students to develop their repertoire of quantitative and qualitative marketing decision skills. Prereq: MKMR 403.


MKMR 430. Marketing Problem-Solving (3)
The objective of this course is to build skills for effective problem solving in practical, real-world marketing situations. Utilizing case studies, online databases and secondary data, the course focuses on contemporary analytical approaches that provide insights into, and clarify the underlying dynamics of marketing phenomenon. Marketing decisions discussed cover consumer and industrial marketing problems. This course is intended for students who are interested in data-based-decision-making tools for solving marketing problems.


MKMR 450A. Entrepreneurial Marketing-E.M.B.A. (2)
This course addresses the entrepreneurial/intrapreneurial process of commercializing an idea for a market opportunity. Students select an opportunity and develop a deployable, one-year market entry program and a five-year strategic marketing program. Emphasis is on the entrepreneurial marketing decision process, including defining the business, defining the market, specifying customer perceived value, assessing competitive capability and advantage, identifying and properly using secondary and primary information, and deploying marketing programs throughout the organization and the supply chain. Prereq: Open to E.M.B.A. students only.


MKMR 450B. Entrepreneurial Marketing-M.B.A. (3)
This course addresses the entrepreneurial/intrapreneurial process of commercializing an idea for a market opportunity. Students select an opportunity and develop a deployable, one-year market entry program and a five-year strategic marketing program. Emphasis is on the entrepreneurial marketing decision process, including defining the business, defining the market, specifying customer perceived value, assessing competitive capability and advantage, identifying and properly using secondary and primary information, and deploying marketing programs throughout the organization and the supply chain. Offered as ENTP 450 and MKMR 450B. Prereq: MKMR 403.


MKMR 460. Marketing Communications Management (3)
This course provides a sound understanding of management of an organization’s total marketing communications. The focus is on identifying appropriate strategies and tactics for effectively communicating with end consumers and other stakeholders/publics, in order to manage the firm’s brand equity and its market, industry and societal positioning. Students examine the roles of advertising, sales promotion, point-of-purchase efforts, and public relations, and emerging direct marketing technologies. They work with developing and managing these elements as part of an overall, synergistic communications strategy. Marketing communications for ongoing as well as crisis situations are developed. Multiple perspectives on evaluation of the effectiveness of marketing communications are introduced. Topics addressed include: integrated marketing communications, brand equity management, corporate communications strategies, public relations management, and crisis management. Prereq: MKMR 403.


MKMR 475. Supply Chain Logistics (3)
The focus of this course is on the effective management of a firm’s downstream processes in the supply chain that deliver goods and services to customers. Concepts, methods, and strategies are presented that can lower supply chain costs while maintaining or improving customer service. In addition, ideas for using the supply chain for competitive advantage leading to revenue enhancement are discussed. Adding value for customers is the objective. Key topics include transportation planning, inventory management, network design, and customer service goal setting. Offered as MKMR 475 and OPMT 475.


MKMR 476. Supply Management in the Supply Chain (3)
The focus of this course is on the effective management of a firm’s upstream supply chain processes that provide it with the services and physical goods needed for product and service creation and distribution. The primary objectives of the course are: 1) to understand the complexity of inter-firm and intra-firm coordination in implementing cutting-edge supply chain programs such as vendor managed inventories, third-party logistics, mass-customization, quick response, and strategic alliances; 2) to develop the ability to design efficient supply systems and formulate integrated supply strategies so that all components are synchronized to fit a firm’s competitive environment, market needs, and overall corporate strategies; and 3) to impart analytical skills necessary to develop effective solutions for a variety supply management problems. Offered as MKMR 476 and OPMT 476.


MKMR 501. Special Problems and Topics (1 - 18)
This course is offered, with permission, to students undertaking reading or a project in a field of special interest.


MKMR 601. Special Problems and Topics (1 - 18)
This course is offered, with permission, to Ph.D. candidates undertaking reading or a project in a field of special interest.


MKMR 701. Dissertation Ph.D. (1 - 18)
Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.

 


Department of Information Systems
Peter B. Lewis Building
Fred Collopy, Chair
Tedda Nathan, Department Administrator
Phone 216-368-2048; Fax 216-368-4776


FACULTY


Richard J. Boland, Jr., PhD (Case Western Reserve University)
Professor of Information Systems

 

Richard Buchanan, PhD (University of Chicago)
Professor of Information Systems


Fred Collopy, PhD (The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania)
Professor of Information Systems, Department Chair


Kalle Lyytinen, PhD (University of Jyväskylä)
Iris S. Wolstein Professor of Management Design, Professor of Information Systems


Miles Kennedy, PhD (London School of Economics)
Associate Professor Emeritus of Information Systems


Adjunct Faculty


Alan F. Dowling Jr., PhD (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
Adjunct Professor of Information Systems


INFORMATION SYSTEMS (MIDS)


MIDS 301. An Introduction to Information Systems (3)
The focus of this course is information, the design of systems used to manage it, and the benefits that can be derived from it in an organizational context. Topics include interface design, design standards and tools, networks, infrastructure use, software applications and implementation, data collection, storage and retrieval, and web systems. The course balances organizational issues illustrated through readings, and hands-on development, through assignments and projects.


MIDS 310. Technology of Information Systems (3)
Review of present day computing systems and function of modern computer technology. Computer systems architecture, file structures, operating systems, compilers and assemblers, and telecommunications. Prereq: MIDS 309.


MIDS 315. Multimedia Systems (3)
Current practices and future directions of multimedia systems are discussed. Special attention is given to management issues involved in specifying, designing, developing, and assessing multimedia systems and to design principles that can be used to improve the quality of multimedia. This is a project-based course in which students gain experience in developing websites, CD-ROMs, and films. Description for MIDS 415: As information becomes more abstract and therefore more difficult to perceive directly with one’s sense, sonic and visual presentation become more important than ever. Designing systems that take advantage of people’s aesthetic sensibilities is an area wide open to the enterprising and inventive entrepreneur. This course will interest those who think that artists have a say about how sound and graphics and words might be put together. The course examines aesthetic issues that arise in the development of multimedia. It focuses on creative integration of video, audio, and graphics particularly for the web, interactive CDs, and virtual reality. Offered as MIDS 315 and MIDS 415. Prereq: Not open to first-year students.


MIDS 326. Systems Analysis and Design (3)
This course investigates concepts and techniques for analyzing organizational systems in order to identify opportunities for redesigning the organization, its work practices and/or its information systems. It emphasizes creativity in diagnosing organizational problems and opportunities. You will learn consultation and intervention strategies for moving to a consensus on problem definition and a vision of desired changes. You will learn both soft and structured object-oriented methods for performing systems analysis. In addition you will learn the process of documenting new organizational and information system requirements in a form suitable for detailed system design and implementation. Prereq: MIDS 309.


MIDS 327. Database Management (3)
From large-scale business systems to on-line shopping carts, databases are the engines of contemporary business. This is a course on the design and development of database management systems with an emphasis on the business processes that these databases are created to support, as well as methods for extracting powerful information from databases. Students will learn to apply a broad range of tools, including various data and process modeling techniques. Different database systems will be employed during the semester, and there will be introductions to web integration, business applications, and data mining. The final project puts it all together in a real-world database development project. Prereq: MIDS 309 and MIDS 310.


MIDS 329. Design of Object-Oriented Systems (3)
This course provides an opportunity to gain an understanding of the concepts and technology of object-oriented systems and learn system design techniques that take full advantage of this technology. Students also develop competence in programming in an object-oriented language. Recommended preparation: Ability to program in Pascal or C, or consent of the instructor.


MIDS 360. Independent Study (1 - 18)


MIDS 385. Web Systems Integration (3)
Standards-based technology is used to help solve complex information system problems in modern organizations. This course brings together component-based development approaches in the context of doing business on the global Internet and on corporate intranets. Enabling technologies are based on published and defacto Internet standards including HTTP and HTML, CGI/API and Perl, CSS, JavaScript, ActiveX, XML, CORBA/DCOM, and SSL/SET. Students are encouraged to contribute to a team effort to design, implement, and integrate an appropriate solution to a selected business problem in electronic commerce or distance learning. They will also develop competency in the foundation technologies. Offered as MIDS 385 and MIDS 485.


MIDS 409. System and Design Thinking (3)
For over a half-century, the field of information systems has been learning about the design, development, testing, and use of complex systems. Computers are just the start. The networks that connect them to create a massive communications grid, the software that runs on them, and the impact of these artifacts on organizations have all generated large bodies of knowledge. Two modes of thinking have proven particularly valuable in making sense of these developments--system thinking and design thinking. While this course applies concepts from system thinking and design thinking to problems related to using information in organizations, the techniques are widely applicable to managing.


MIDS 409A. System and Design Thinking (1)
For over a half-century, the field of information systems has been learning about the design, development, testing, and use of complex systems. Computers are just the start. The networks that connect them to create a massive communications grid, the software that runs on them, and the impact of these artifacts on organizations have all generated large bodies of knowledge. Two modes of thinking have proven particularly valuable in making sense of these developments--system thinking and design thinking. While this course applies concepts from system thinking and design thinking to problems related to using information in organizations, the techniques are widely applicable to managing. Prereq: Open to ACL-MBA students.


MIDS 410. Information Technology Architectures (3)
Just as a craftsperson needs an intimate understanding of the tools of a trade, the information professional must understand the architecture of hardware, telecommunication facilities, operating systems, applications and networks. This course covers how prioritization, security, sharing and distribution can be improved by parallelism and how required synchronization can be safely and efficiently implemented across an essentially layered architecture that extends from the chip to the user-friendly application. Prereq: MIDS 409.


MIDS 413. Managing Large Systems (3)
This course will help you understand the complex nature of the selection, implementation and management of large enterprise business systems (such as Enterprise Resource System, Customer Relationship Management systems and Supply Chain Management systems). It is no secret that many companies have publicly, and privately, struggled with large enterprise business systems projects which ended up millions of dollars over budget, many years behind schedule, or worse, crippling the companies’ operations by failing to meet the day-to-day demands of the business. During this course, we will examine case studies of successful, and unsuccessful, projects and organize the common themes into a framework applicable to the successful navigation of the life cycle of large enterprise business systems. Prereq: MIDS 409.


MIDS 415. Multimedia Systems (3)
Current practices and future directions of multimedia systems are discussed. Special attention is given to management issues involved in specifying, designing, developing, and assessing multimedia systems and to design principles that can be used to improve the quality of multimedia. This is a project-based course in which students gain experience in developing websites, CD-ROMs, and films. Description for MIDS 415: As information becomes more abstract and therefore more difficult to perceive directly with one’s sense, sonic and visual presentation become more important than ever. Designing systems that take advantage of people’s aesthetic sensibilities is an area wide open to the enterprising and inventive entrepreneur. This course will interest those who think that artists have a say about how sound and graphics and words might be put together. The course examines aesthetic issues that arise in the development of multimedia. It focuses on creative integration of video, audio, and graphics particularly for the web, interactive CDs, and virtual reality. Offered as MIDS 315 and MIDS 415.


MIDS 420-1. Identifying Design Opportunities (0)
Designing is giving form to an idea to conceive of a more desirable product, service, process or organization and refining the idea into something that can be delivered reliably and efficiently. Good design integrates these evolving ideas with the day-to-day realities of a firm’s operations, systems, marketing, economics, finance and human resources. Designing is thus a unique managerial activity that brings together changing technologies, capabilities, relationships, activities and materials to shape an organization’s plans and strategies. It combines analysis and synthesis in ways that are integrative and inventive, and through it managers create opportunities and means of attaining them. Viewed this way, designing is a core competence of a successful entrepreneur or innovative leader. This course is the first in a two-semester sequence. Design analysis is the systematic review of the four orders of design found in every firm ---- namely, the firm’s communications, products, interactions and environments -- and the creation of opportunities to increase firm value by improving each. Students will identify ill-defined, ill-structured problems within organizations. Such problems are ones for which there are no definitive formulations and for which the formulation chosen affects the solutions available. For such problems, there is no explicit way of knowing when you have reached a solution, and solutions cannot necessarily be considered correct or incorrect. But finding innovative solutions to such problems can provide unique opportunities to distinguish organizations and to create exceptional value. A major outcome of the semester’s inquiry is a presentation of the challenges and opportunities discovered during the design analysis of the client organization. The presentation will include a conceptualization of the client’s current situation and opportunities, along with a statement of their design requirements. It is successful to the extent that it demonstrates learning by creating unexpected value to the client.


MIDS 420-2. Identifying Design Opportunities (6)
Designing is giving form to an idea to conceive of a more desirable product, service, process or organization and refining the idea into something that can be delivered reliably and efficiently. Good design integrates these evolving ideas with the day-to-day realities of a firms’ operations, systems, marketing, economics, finance and human resources. Designing is thus a unique managerial activity that brings together changing technologies, capabilities, relationships, activities and materials to shape an organization’s plans and strategies. It combines analysis and synthesis in ways that are integrative and inventive, and through it manages to create opportunities and means of attaining them. Viewed this way, designing is a core competence of a successful entrepreneur or innovative leader. This course is the first in a two-semester sequence. Design analysis is the systematic review of the four orders of design found in every firm---namely, the firm’s communications, products, interactions and environments---and the creation of opportunities to increase firm value by improving each. Students will identify ill-defined, ill-structured problems within organizations. Such problems are ones for which there are no definitive formulations and for which the formulation chosen affects the solutions available. For such problems, there is no explicit way of knowing when you have reached a solution, and solutions cannot necessarily be considered correct or incorrect. But finding innovative solutions to such problems can provide unique opportunities to distinguish organizations and to create exceptional value. A major outcome of the semester’s inquiry is a presentation of the challenges and opportunities discovered during the design analysis of the client organization. The presentation will include a conceptualization of the client’s current situation and opportunities, along with a statement of their design requirements. It is successful to the extent that it demonstrates learning by creating unexpected value to the client.


MIDS 426. Designing Successful Systems (3)
One of the greatest challenges organizations face is creating information systems that work. Not only must you be able to diagnose problems, envision new possibilities, and design solutions, you must also be able to communicate your ideas to the technologists who will build and support the systems you need. In this course we will investigate concepts and techniques for analyzing systems and processes in order to identify opportunities for improving the organization, its work practices and its information systems. We will emphasize creativity in diagnosing organizational problems and opportunities. We will explore consultation and intervention strategies for moving to a consensus on problem definition and a vision of desired changes. We will investigate strategies for documenting organizational and information system requirements that both managers and information technology professionals can understand and act on. Finally, we will discuss project management approaches that keep development efforts in time and under budget.


MIDS 427. System Development and Data Management (3)
Information drives modern organizations. From ERP systems to on-line shopping carts, databases are the engines of contemporary business applications. Managers who possess a fundamental understanding of databases have an advantage. These managers appreciate the potential of the data at their fingertips, and they know how to improve the business processes that databases support. This is a course on the design and development of database management systems with an emphasis on the role of databases in business processes. Students will learn the tools of data and process design, and will learn how to extract powerful information from databases. The final project puts it all together in a real-world database development project.


MIDS 432. Health Care Information Systems (3)

This course covers concepts, techniques and technologies for providing information systems to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of health care organizations. Offered as HSMC 432, MIDS 432, and MPHP 532.


MIDS 438. Digital Law and Business (1)
The course provides Law and MBA students with an understanding of legal issues that need to be addressed in the development of digital business at the level of website management and transactions. The course also highlights the critical role of technology as a source of new legal requirements, and also as a means to address and enforce legal requirements that are critical in conducting on-line business (e.g. demand for authenticity, or non-repudiation). The course is organized as a series of topics that focus on critical aspects of e-business development and related contractual issues, business transactions and their enforcement, security, privacy, intellectual property rights, consumer protection, international legal issues and e-business regulation. Specific legal topics include: a). Copyright, trademark, and (to a lesser extent) patent issues (web development, content management). b). Contract law in the e-business context (formation, repudiation, E-sign, UETA, UCITA, etc.) (B2B, B2C transactions, financial transactions). c). Online privacy law and privacy policies (marketing topics). d). DMCA, ACPA, ECPA and the Patriot Act, COPPA. e). Website Terms of Use (web development). f). Website affiliate agreements (web development). g). Website development and maintenance agreements (web development). h). Web product distribution agreements. i). Shrinkwrap, clickwrap, and EDI agreements (B2B). j). Various IP-related licensing, confidentiality, development, and assignments, agreements, domain naming (Internet). Offered as LAWS 438 and MIDS 438.


MIDS 447. Chief Officer Dialogues on Information and Management (3)
Each week, Chief Level Officers (CIO, CEO, CFO, CMO, CTO, etc.) from major corporations present the class with live problems in which technology, strategy and operational issues must be integrated in a coherent organizational course of action. Students work in teams to design courses of action in response to those problem situations, which Chief Level Officers then review, critique and discuss. Offered as MGMT 447 and MIDS 447. Prereq: MIDS 409.


MIDS 461. Change Management (3)
Change is an inherent dimension of organizational life-new policies, regulations, technologies, people, products, competitors, markets, processes, physical facilities...the list goes on. Consequently, the abilities to adapt to and manage technical and organizational changes are critical managerial competencies. This course aims to provide a framework for planning, analyzing, and managing those changes over which you as a manager will have some control. Though our discussions will focus on technology-enabled and technology-related change, the intention is to equip you with a process model, tools, and guiding principles that can be applied more generally to other change processes.


MIDS 470. Analyzing Mobility and Mobile E-Business (3)
Pervasive digital services and mobile computing applications, and intelligent and ubiquitous computing environments will change the landscape of organizational computing and business applications in the next decade. They will also change how we work and how business is conducted. There are technological, business, and regulatory challenges that must be addressed in shifting organizational approaches and technological solutions to this new environment. The goal of this course is to examine state-of-the art solutions to this new arena, explore business opportunities and analyze research themes and issues that are emerging in this new arena. The course is meant for Ph.D. students studying pervasive computing, advanced M.S.M. students who are interested in this new area, technologically savvy M.B.A. students who want to explore and expand their knowledge in the leading edge technologies and for students in the engineering school who want to study business applications of telecommunication and agent-based technologies.


MIDS 485. Web Systems Integration (3)
Standards-based technology is used to help solve complex information system problems in modern organizations. This course brings together component-based development approaches in the context of doing business on the global Internet and on corporate intranets. Enabling technologies are based on published and defacto Internet standards including HTTP and HTML, CGI/API and Perl, CSS, JavaScript, ActiveX, XML, CORBA/DCOM, and SSL/SET. Students are encouraged to contribute to a team effort to design, implement, and integrate an appropriate solution to a selected business problem in electronic commerce or distance learning. They will also develop competency in the foundation technologies. Offered as MIDS 385 and MIDS 485.


MIDS 501. Special Problems and Topics (1 - 18)
This course is offered, with permission, to students undertaking reading in a field of special interest.


MIDS 527. Seminar in MIDS (3)
This seminar addresses topics of current interest with a strong emphasis on research. It is intended primarily for the faculty and doctoral students of the MIDS Department.


MIDS 601. Special Topics in MIDS (1 - 18)
This course is offered, with permission, to Ph.D. candidates undertaking reading in a field of special interest.


MIDS 701. Dissertation Ph.D. (1 - 18)
Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.

 


Department of Operations
Peter B. Lewis Building
Kamlesh Mathur, Chair
Elaine Iannicelli, Department Administrator
Phone 216-368-4141; Fax 216-368-6250

 

FACULTY


A. Dale Flowers, DBA (Indiana University)
Associate Professor of Operations


Ankur Goel, PhD (University of Texas-Austin)
Assistant Professor of Operations


Kamlesh Mathur, PhD (Case Western Reserve University)
Professor of Operations and Department Chair


Harvey M. Salkin, PhD (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute)
Professor of Operations


Matthew J. Sobel, PhD (Stanford University)
Professor of Operations; William E. Umstattd Professor of Industrial Economics; Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science


Daniel Solow, PhD (Stanford University)

Associate Professor of Operations


George Vairaktarakis, PhD (University of Florida)
Associate Professor of Operations


Ronald Ballou, PhD (The Ohio State University)
Professor Emeritus of Operations


Hamilton Emmons, PhD (Johns Hopkins University)
Professor Emeritus of Operations


Secondary Appointment


Peter Ritchken, PhD (Case Western Reserve University)
Professor of Operations; Kenneth Walter Haber Professor of Finance


OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT (OPMT)


OPMT 360. Independent Study (1 - 18)


OPMT 390. Special Problems and Topics in Operations Management (1 - 18)
Undergraduate student pursues a special topic or problem, with agreement of operations management instructor.


OPMT 405. Operations Management (3)
Operations management deals with the design of products and processes, the acquisition of resources, the conversion of inputs to outputs, and the distribution of goods and services. It is central to a firm’s ability to compete effectively. As global competition in both goods and services increases, the management of operations is becoming more and more important. This course provides a broad overview of the managerial issues associated with production and delivery of goods and services. It includes the use of quantitative modeling using computers as a central methodology. Prereq: QUMM 414.


OPMT 405A. Operations Management (1)
In recent years, a changing competitive landscape has highlighted the critical role of the operations function in ensuring business success. In this course, we treat business as a value-added chain of processes that supply and convert disparate inputs into products and services and distribute these outputs. We examine how to best design, run and improve these processes. A variety of manufacturing and service sector settings will be used as examples to illustrate the concepts. It is assumed that the student is familiar with the material covered in a basic undergraduate course in operations management. Specifically, a vocabulary of operations management terminology and proficiency in basic tools and techniques of operations management are expected. Prereq: Open to ACL-MBA students.


OPMT 407. Marketing Through the Supply Chain (3)
This course views the supply chain (including the distribution channels) as a multi-organization business system that enables customers at all points in the system to acquire the benefits/value they want in the way they want to acquire them. It is a collaborative human network creating customer and shareholder value throughout the system. Strategic and tactical management topics include specifying customer desired value, assessing network members’ (suppliers, producers, distributors, and customers) abilities to create it, and consequently allocating decisions, tasks, and rewards to members. Emphasis is on structure, communication, motivation, and control/discipline to encourage effective implementation throughout the supply chain system. Offered as MKMR 307 and MKMR 407 and OPMT 407.


OPMT 420. Managing Quality with Six Sigma (3)
This course provides an introduction to managing quality throughout the supply chains in both manufacturing and service organizations, utilizing the popular Six Sigma approach. The familiar DMAIC (define, measure, analyze, improve, control) problem solving approach will be emphasized. Students will learn the basic tools of quality (such as cause-and-effect diagrams for brainstorming), quality processes (such as benchmarking), and quality management including quality planning, quality control, and quality improvement. The course will include the subject of statistical process control, an integral component of Six Sigma.


OPMT 422. Service Operations Management with E-Commerce (3)
This course concerns the management of operations in e-commerce and other kinds of services. E-commerce absorbs more course time than any other type of service, but we also examine other settings such as financial services, health care, information systems, and transportation. There are modules on the similarities and differences of operations in e-commerce versus other service industries, structures of service industries, design of services, profitably utilizing service capacity, enhancing the quality of services, and managing service projects. Topics in capacity management include revenue management, queueing models, and simulation. A recurring theme is the integration of service operations with marketing, finance, and information systems.Prereq: OPMT 405.


OPMT 450. Project Management (3)
Project management is concerned with the management and control of a group of interrelated tasks required to be completed in an efficient and timely manner for the successful accomplishment of the objectives of the project. Since each project is usually unique in terms of task structure, risk characteristics and objectives, the management of projects is significantly different from the management of repetitive processes designed to produce a series of similar products or outputs. Large-scale projects are characterized by a significant commitment of organizational and economic resources coupled with a high degree of uncertainty. The objective of this course is to enhance the ability of participants to respond to the challenges of large-scale projects so that they can be more effective as project managers. We study in detail up-to-date concepts, models, and techniques useful for the evaluation, analysis, management, and control of projects. Prereq: QUMM 414.


OPMT 475. Supply Chain Logistics (3)
The focus of this course is on the effective management of a firm’s downstream processes in the supply chain that deliver goods and services to customers. Concepts, methods, and strategies are presented that can lower supply chain costs while maintaining or improving customer service. In addition, ideas for using the supply chain for competitive advantage leading to revenue enhancement are discussed. Adding value for customers is the objective. Key topics include transportation planning, inventory management, network design, and customer service goal setting. Offered as MKMR 475 and OPMT 475.


OPMT 476. Supply Management in the Supply Chain (3)
The focus of this course is on the effective management of a firm’s upstream supply chain processes that provide it with the services and physical goods needed for product and service creation and distribution. The primary objectives of the course are: 1) to understand the complexity of inter-firm and intra-firm coordination in implementing cutting-edge supply chain programs such as vendor managed inventories, third-party logistics, mass-customization, quick response, and strategic alliances; 2) to develop the ability to design efficient supply systems and formulate integrated supply strategies so that all components are synchronized to fit a firm’s competitive environment, market needs, and overall corporate strategies; and 3) to impart analytical skills necessary to develop effective solutions for a variety supply management problems. Offered as MKMR 476 and OPMT 476.


OPMT 477. Enterprise Resource Planning in the Supply Chain (3)
Enterprise resource planning is the dominant system by which companies translate the needs from their customers into the detailed plans that the company must perform to meet the customer needs, and the resulting support the company will need from its suppliers. Both quantitative and qualitative techniques for performing all the functions involved in this process provide the focus for this course. The quantitative analysis will be supported by microcomputer software available in the Weatherhead computer lab.


OPMT 479. International Operations Management (3)
The main objective of this case-based course is to help prospective operations managers to overcome national and cultural myopia, identify cultural and contextual differences in operations management practice, describe successful operations management approaches in other countries and examine reasons for their success as well as the viability of transferring them to significantly different operating environments, and finally address the impact of the global scope of operations on the usual operating decisions (production planning, quality control, etc.). Topics to be covered include organization of global operations, production strategies in entering foreign markets, development of a global manufacturing strategy, international facilities location, offshore manufacturing, global sourcing and logistics, global transfer of technology, risk management on global operations, cultural and national comparisons of operations management practices, and successful global service operations. Prereq: OPMT 405.


OPMT 480. Operations Strategy and Technology (3)
This course discusses the process of developing an operations strategy for competitive advantage. A number of strategic issues are studied from a manufacturing perspective, including: product development, introduction of new technologies, managing multiple plant operations, flexibility, and financial control systems. Prereq: OPMT 405.


OPMT 490. Independent Study in Operations Management (1 - 15)
This course is offered, with permission, to students undertaking reading in a field of special interest.


OPMT 501. Special Problems and Topics (1 - 18)
This course is offered, with permission, to students undertaking reading in a field of special interest.


OPMT 504A. Research in Operations Management I (1.5)
The material in this introduction to the research literature in operations management consists of several research papers on supply chains for goods and services. Although specific topics and papers vary from year to year, representative topics include manufacturing, logistics, design of service networks, and revenue management. Prereq: OPRE 412A, OPRE419, OPRE426, and OPRE513A, or consent of instructor.


OPMT 504B. Research in Operations Management II (1.5)
Seminar continuation OPMT 504A’s introduction to the research literature in supply chains for goods and services. Specific topics and papers vary from year to year, but representative topics include manufacturing, logistics, service networks, and revenue management. Prereq: OPMT 504A or consent of instructor.


OPMT 601. Special Problems and Topics (1 - 18)
This is a course of flexible design in which a student, with the agreement of an instructor in operations management, may pursue a special topic or problem. M.B.A. students should enroll in OPMT 501.


OPMT 701. Dissertation Ph.D. (1 - 18)
This course is open to Ph.D. candidates who are preparing dissertations in some field of operations management. Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.


OPERATIONS RESEARCH (OPRE)


OPRE 300. Undergraduate Projects in Operations Research (1 - 18)
Individual operations research projects are carried out by qualified students.


OPRE 301. The Science of Business Decision Making (3)
The science of decision making, also called operations research (OR) or management science, is the discipline of applying advanced quantitative methods to make better decisions. By using mathematical models to analyze complex situations, decision science gives managers the power to make more effective decisions and build more productive systems. Techniques covered include linear programming, networks, project management, inventory, queuing and simulation. Recommended preparation: one semester of statistics or consent of instructor. Prereq: STAT 207.


OPRE 345. Decision Theory (3)
This course provides an understanding of the principles, basic concepts, and methodology of engineering economics. It develops proficiency with these methods and with the process for making rational decisions regarding situations likely to be encountered in professional practice.


OPRE 348. Personal Investment Strategies (3)
This course is an introduction to the world of personal investing. In the framework of personal investment objectives and alternatives, topics included are: stocks, bonds, convertibles, warrants, options and mutual funds. Discussions of contemporary factors driving stock and bond prices such as international currency and interest rate implications are also discussed. Practical money management programs to meet different investment objectives and levels of wealth are explored. Prereq: ACCT 202.


OPRE 402. Stochastic Models with Applications (1.5)
This course surveys fundamental methods and models in operations research and operations management that incorporate random elements. Topics discussed will include basic results from the theory of stochastic processes, especially Markov chains; an introduction to stochastic dynamic programming; and models in the control of queues and inventories.Prereq: OPRE 433A and OPRE 433B.


OPRE 411A. Linear Programming (1.5)
The objective of this course is to enable the student to formulate deterministic (linear, nonlinear, integer and network) models. The simplex algorithm for solving linear programming problems is presented geometrically, algebraically and economically. The role of duality theory is also discussed. Case studies are used to teach the student how to interpret computer output obtained from the simplex algorithm and how to use that output to answer “What happens if...” questions. Recommended preparation: One semester of undergraduate linear algebra or consent of instructor.


OPRE 411B. Deterministic Models with Applications (1.5)
Case studies are used to teach the student how to formulate, use computer packages, and prepare managerial reports for solving deterministic (linear, nonlinear, integer, network, and goal programming) problems that arise in business operations as well as project management problems (using PERT/CPM techniques). Conceptual and mathematical ideas of the various methods for solving such problems are presented. Prereq: OPRE 411A or QUMM 414. Coreq: OPRE 411A or QUMM 414.


OPRE 413. Business Applications of Decision Models (3)
The objective of this course is to expose the students to situations from various business disciplines (e.g., finance, marketing, information systems, supply chain management, etc.) where quantitative models effectively address the decision problems. This course will also integrate these business disciplines. The course will also prepare students for action learning projects where quantitative tools may be appropriate. The course will apply tools and techniques learned in QUMM 414. Other quantitative tools will be introduced “just-in-time” in context to particular application area. Prereq: QUMM 414. Coreq: OPMT 405.


OPRE 419. Game and Decision Theory (1.5)
Most of this course is an introduction to game theory; the remainder is a brief introduction to Bayesian analysis of decision problems including decision trees and conjugate pairs of distributions. The game theory portion consists of an axiomatic approach to utility theory, noncooperative solution concepts emphasizing equilibrium points, and cooperative solution concepts. Examples are drawn from economics, marketing, and operations research. Coreq: OPRE 411A.


OPRE 424. Scheduling Theory (3)
Combinatorial and implicit search techniques are developed and applied to scheduling problems, including sequencing on a single and on parallel processors, scheduling in flow shops, open shops and general job shops, and resource-constrained project scheduling, to satisfy various objectives. Topics in the complexity of algorithms and worst-case analysis of heuristics are discussed. Stochastic extensions, manpower scheduling or other special topics may be considered. Prereq: OPRE 425A.


OPRE 427. Convexity and Optimization (3)
Introduction to the theory of convex sets and functions and to the extremes in problems in areas of mathematics where convexity plays a role. Among the topics discussed are basic properties of convex sets (extreme points, facial structure of polytopes), separation theorems, duality and polars, properties of convex functions, minima and maxima of convex functions over convex set, various optimization problems. Offered as MATH 327, MATH 427, and OPRE 427. Prereq: MATH 223 or consent of instructor.


OPRE 432A. Simulation Models with Applications (1.5)
This course covers the modeling and analysis of business systems using computer simulation. The focus of the course is the introduction of simulation as a modeling tool with emphasis on understanding the structure of a simulation mode and how to build such models with the help of popular simulation software(s). Some fundamental statistical concepts behind simulation modeling will also be discussed. Prereq: OPRE 433A and OPRE 433B or consent of instructor.


OPRE 432B. Simulation Design (1.5)
This course covers the statistical design and analysis of simulation models. The topics include random number generation, input data analysis, statistical analysis of simulation outputs, variance reduction techniques, and design of simulation experiments. Prereq: OPRE 432A. Coreq: OPRE 434 or consent of instructor.


OPRE 433A. Probability and Statistics for Management Science I (1.5)
This course introduces the basic tools of probability. Topics include elementary probability theory, conditional probability, Bayes Theorem, commonly encountered distributions including binomial, Poisson, uniform, exponential, and normal (univariate and bivariate), organizing and summarizing data--mean, variance, moments, and other descriptive statistics. Examples are given of business applications in operations, finance, and marketing. Recommended preparation: A semester of calculus or consent of instructor.


OPRE 433B. Probability and Statistics for Management Science II (1.5)
This course covers the foundations of statistical analysis, with an emphasis on applications of confidence intervals and hypothesis testing for a wide array of experimental designs. Topics include: sampling, comparison of means, medians and proportions through interval estimation and hypothesis testing, and an introduction of regression analysis. Prereq: OPRE 433A or consent.


OPRE 434. Regression and Forecasting (1.5)
The first part of this course covers the fundamentals of multiple linear-regression analysis and logistic regression models emphasizing understanding and forecasting relationships between variables in a variety of data settings. The second part includes time series analysis and forecasting. Using case studies and commonly used state-of-the-art statistical software (e.g., SPSS, SAS, etc.) students learn to summarize relationships and measure how well these relationships fit data, and how to make meaningful statistical inferences and forecasts. Prereq: OPRE 425B or QUMM 414.


OPRE 435A. Computer Programming (1.5)
The objective of this course is to provide the student with the ability to write object-oriented computer code in C++ for solving problems that do not involve complex data structures. Topics include the use of variables and pointers, built-in functions, input and output, selection statements, loops, functions, and classes.


OPRE 435B. Integrated Problem Solving in OR and OM (1.5)
This project-oriented course uses a variety of software to involve the student in the complete problem-solving process in OR and OM. This process includes problem definition and formulation, data collection, and storage in a database, connecting the database to the solution algorithm, designing and implementing an appropriate user interface, and presenting the final solution. Prereq or Coreq: OPRE 411B.


OPRE 435C. Data Structures (1.5)
The objective of this course is to provide the student with the data structures (arrays, files, linked lists, trees, and so on) and the numerical methods (differentiation, integration, and solving linear equations) needed for implementing algorithms that solve operations research and operations management problems. These topics are illustrated with C++ and object-oriented programming. Emphasis is given to ensuring that the programs are robust and usable by nontechnical people. Prereq: OPRE 435A.


OPRE 448. Personal and Institutional Money Management (3)
This course is an introduction to contemporary portfolio management. In addition to introductory material on securities, options and security markets, topics include contemporary equity and debt management models, hedging strategies, program trading, portfolio insurance, arbitrage programs, mergers and acquisitions, international investing and intermarket influences, and other contemporary factors driving stock and bond prices. Prereq: BAFI 402.


OPRE 454. Analysis of Algorithms (3)
This course presents and analyzes a number of efficient algorithms. Problems are selected from such problem domains as sorting, searching, set manipulation, graph algorithms, matrix operations, polynomial manipulation, and fast Fourier transforms. Through specific examples and general techniques, the course covers the design of efficient algorithms as well as the analysis of the efficiency of particular algorithms. Certain important problems for which no efficient algorithms are known (NP-complete problems) are discussed in order to illustrate the intrinsic difficulty which can sometimes preclude efficient algorithmic solutions. Recommended preparation for EECS 454: MATH 304 and (EECS 340 or EECS 405). Offered as EECS 454 and OPRE 454. Prereq: OPRE 435A and OPRE 435C.


OPRE 490. Independent Study in Operations Research (1 - 15)
This course is offered, with permission, to students undertaking reading in a field of special interest.


OPRE 501. Special Problems and Topics (1 - 36)
This course is offered, with permission, to students undertaking reading in a field of special interest.


OPRE 504A. Research in Mathematical Finance I (1.5)
The course introduces the basic principles of discrete time financial markets. The focal points are the method of no arbitrage asset pricing, its relationship with equilibrium investment strategies of individuals in a market of financial securities, and its applications in valuation of contingent claims. Specific topics include basic utility theory, single and multiple period investment models, complete and incomplete markets, risk neutral probability measures, pricing of European and American stock options, and introduction to bonds and interest rate derivative models. Prereq: OPRE 411A, OPRE 433A and OPRE 433B.


OPRE 504B. Research in Mathematical Finance II (1.5)
The course introduces the mathematical models of financial analysis in continuous time. Topics include diffusion processes, stochastic differential equations and Ito’s lemma martingales, equivalent martingale measures for risk neutral valuation, Girsanov’s theorem, the Black-Scholes model of European option pricing, American options in continuous time, and introduction to the Heath-Jarrow-Morton model of interest rate claim valuation. Prereq: OPRE 504A.


OPRE 505. Theory of Linear Programming (1.5)
This course presents the theory of linear programming, including the formal development and proofs of (a) the geometry of linear programming problems (convex sets, extreme points and extreme rays), (b) the steps of the simplex algorithm and their relationship to the geometry, and (c) duality theory and its uses in sensitivity and post-optimality analysis. Prereq: OPRE 411A and OPRE 510.


OPRE 506. Theory of Nonlinear Programming (1.5)
This course presents the algorithms and theory for solving nonlinear programming problems. Problems that do not have constraints include: (a) solving nonlinear systems of equations with Newton’s method, (b) finding fixed points of functions using the Brouwer and contractive fixed-point theorems, and (c) optimizing nonlinear functions of a finite number of variables using gradient and conjugate-gradient algorithms with line searches. Problems that have constraints include: (a) solving the linear complementarity problems, (b) solving optimization problems with methods of feasible directions that use the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions and also with methods that use penalty functions. Throughout, the role of convexity in establishing convergence of algorithms is explained. Prereq: OPRE 505.


OPRE 510. Math Foundations for Advanced Studies (1.5)
This course enhances the ability to use mathematics in advanced studies. In addition to learning such elementary ideas as the difference between closed-form and numerical-method solutions, a systematic approach is used to learn how to read, understand, think about, and do proofs. Specifically, it is shown how all proofs, regardless of subject area, can be explained as a sequence of individual proof techniques. The following mathematical skills are also taught: translating visual images to symbolic form using quantifiers; classifying mathematical objects into groups having similar properties; creating and working with mathematical definitions; unification; generalization.


OPRE 513. Stochastic Optimization (3)
This course concerns optimization of stochastic models, it emphasizes models of sequential decisions, and it includes some topics in stochastic processes. It includes the formulation of Markov decision processes and their optimization with various algorithms (often called dynamic programming). Other topics include stochastic order relations and other aspects of lattice programming, adaptive control, and stochastic programming. General results are employed to elicit the structure of optimal policies in areas such as inventory, finance, maintenance, and queueing. Prereq: OPRE 411A. Coreq: OPRE 526.


OPRE 515A. Combinatorial Optimization (1.5)
This course provides the ability to recognize, formulate, and solve (or determine how difficult it is to solve) combinatorial optimization problems. Mathematical programming and network/graph-theory problems are used to illustrate the art of problem formulation. The individual components of combinatorial optimization are identified and presented in a unified framework. The two standard search strategies for finding an optimal solution--namely, the greedy approach and the finite-improvement approach--are illustrated with numerous examples. Conditions are presented under which these search strategies provide an optimal solution. Prereq or Coreq: OPRE 510.


OPRE 515B. Graph Theory (1.5)
This course provides the ability to use graph theory as a problem-solving tool. The student is taught to recognize, formulate, and solve graph theory problems. Numerous examples from Operations Research, Computer Science, and related areas are used to illustrate the art of problem formulation. Appropriate theory and algorithms are then developed for solving these problems using the two basic search strategies of the greedy algorithm and the finite-improvement algorithms. Prereq: OPRE 515A.


OPRE 516. Discrete Optimization (3)
This course is an introduction to optimization problems involving a finite number of alternatives. Applications include problems in network flows (distribution systems, project scheduling, production planning, routing etc.) and integer programming (scheduling, location, sequencing, capital budgeting, etc.). Numerous algorithms and heuristics are presented for solving these problems (shortest path, maximum flow, cutting plane, enumerative and partitioning algorithms). Computational complexity of these algorithms is also emphasized. Prereq: OPRE 411A and OPRE 505.


OPRE 526. Stochastic Processes (3)
This course analyzes probabilistic models of phenomena which evolve over time. Modules include birth-and-death processes (including the Poisson process), renewal theory, renewal-reward and regenerative processes, Markov chains (discrete- and continuous-time), semi-Markov processes, system properties of queueing models, martingales, and Brownian motion. The course frequently explores the queueing theory consequences of general stochastic processes. Prereq: OPRE 433A and OPRE 433B.


OPRE 601. Advanced Readings in Operations Research (1 - 18)
Students report on recent literature and review selected topics in the various areas of operations research. Students also perform detailed studies of special topics in operations research under the guidance of a faculty member. M.B.A. students should enroll in OPRE 501.


OPRE 602. Predissertation Research (3)
The objective of this course is to introduce the student to the process of doing research. Students work with a faculty member on a research topic of mutual interest. The student presents the results in a written report and an oral presentation open to all faculty and students. The work is evaluated by a committee of three faculty members.


OPRE 701. Dissertation Ph.D. (1 - 18)
This course is limited to candidates for the Ph.D. degree who are preparing dissertations in some field of operations research. Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.

 


Department of Organizational Behavior
Peter B. Lewis Building
Ronald Fry, Chair
Lila Robinson, Department Administrator
Phone 216-368-2060; Fax 216-368-6228


FACULTY


Diane Bergeron, PhD (Columbia University)
Assistant Professor of Organizational Behavior


Diana Bilimoria, PhD (University of Michigan)
Associate Professor of Organizational Behavior


Richard E. Boyatzis, PhD (Harvard University)
Professor and H.R. Horvitz Professorship in Family Business


Susan S. Case, PhD (New York University at Buffalo)
Associate Professor of Organizational Behavior


Harlow Cohen, PhD (Case Western Reserve University)
Professor for the Practice of Organizational Behavior


David L. Cooperrider, PhD (Case Western Reserve University)
Professor of Organizational Behavior, Fairmount Minerals Professor of Social Entrepreneurship, Director of University Center for Business as an Agent of World Benefit


Ronald E. Fry, PhD (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
Associate Professor of Organizational Behavior and Department Chair


David A. Kolb, PhD (Harvard University)
Professor of Organizational Behavior


Tony Lingham, PhD (Case Western Reserve University)
Lecturer of Organizational Behavior


Melvin Smith, PhD (University of Pittsburgh)
Faculty of Executive Education, Professor for the Practice of Organizational Behavior


Eric Neilsen, PhD (Harvard University)
Professor Emeritus of Organizational Behavior


Suresh Srivastva, PhD (University of Michigan)
Professor Emeritus of Organizational Behavior


Secondary Appointments


David Aron, MD (Columbia University)
Professor of Medicine, School of Medicine and Sr. Staff Physician, Cleveland VA Medical Center; Professor of Organizational Behavior


Duncan Neuhauser, PhD (University of Michigan)
Professor of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medicine; Professor of Organizational Behavior


James Stoller, MD, MSODA (Case Western Reserve University)
Director Leadership Development, Cleveland Clinic Foundation


Peter Whitehouse, MD, PhD (Johns Hopkins University)
Professor of Bioethics, Neurology, Neuroscience, and Psychiatry, School of Medicine; Professor of Organizational Behavior


ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR (ORBH)


ORBH 303. Leadership and Personal Development (3)
This is an experience-based course designed for increased integration of cognitive and emotional processes, greater awareness of one’s behavior and impact on others, and greater opportunity for behavioral choice in interpersonal relations. Several Saturday classes.


ORBH 304. Advanced Workshops in Personal Development (3)
This is an experience-study course offered for groups of interested and qualified individuals. This course concentrates on an affective theme: conflict and power, intimacy, aggression, etc. There is an effort to combine experience-based learning with conceptual understanding. Prereq: ORBH 303.


ORBH 370. Women in Organizations (3)
The purpose of this course is to explore the unique challenges of life for women in their twenties as they increase understanding of the issues surrounding women, ambition, and success in a variety of organizations and professions. At this stage of life there are many choices women can make regarding careers and relationships. This course will broaden understanding of the context of work in women’s lives and help women and men understand the leadership and managerial issues that will surround them in organizations. Offering more complex understandings of issues women face in the workplace related to race and gender, the course will help increase self knowledge about personal identity and direction, values, and abilities including the enhancement of leadership capabilities. It will also facilitate career development, improving the ability of individual women to be choiceful about the quality of integration of both a personal and professional life.


ORBH 390. Special Topics (1 - 18)
This course is offered for candidates undertaking reading in a field of special interest.


ORBH 403. Developing Interpersonal Skills for Managers (3 )
This course is intended to sharpen students’ skills in the art of relating successfully to other individuals and groups. The course uses an intensive group experience to make students more aware of how their actions affect others, more capable of giving and receiving interpersonal feedback, and more cognizant of processes through which groups work. Several Saturday classes.


ORBH 412. Organizational Analysis (3)
This course studies organizational analysis through appreciative inquiry. It explores multiple frame works for understanding the complexity of organizational life. Students form teams and conduct appreciative studies across industries. This course also addresses questions of organizational change (how to move from theory/ideal to practice). Learning is experiential in nature.


ORBH 413. Foundations of Positive Organization Development and Change (4)
This course explores and develops the art of reading and understanding social systems in ways that help us imagine, design and develop organization excellence. First it seeks to show how many of our conventional ideas about organizations are based on discourse and metaphors that lead us to see and understand organizations in partial and often limiting ways. Growing research from the domains of Positive Psychology and Positive Organization Scholarship and the theory and practice of Appreciative Inquiry will be explored to show how we can create new and more positive, strength-based ways of designing and developing social systems. Includes presentations, guest lectures and panel discussions on current topics of interest for the Master in Positive Organization Development and Change (MPOD) candidates. Led by a faculty member of the Department of Organization Behavior, these dialogues and seminars will be presented in several of the six main residencies of the MPOD program. Reflective essays and integrative papers will enable participants to explore their practice of OD, leadership capacity, application of learnings from the program and deeply held values related to current issues and opportunities in the domain of human systems change and development. Prereq: Open to MPOD candidates only.


ORBH 414A. Organization Design for a Knowledge World (1)
The objective of this course is to familiarize participants with the theory and technique of organization design and corporate change with particular emphasis on helping leaders understand and implement the latest forms of organizing in a customer-focused, electronically mediated and knowledge-driven world. Frameworks presented will be used to explore the impact of the information revolution on organization design and change, and the evolution of traditional vertically integrated and multi-divisional enterprises toward spider web structures, trans-organizational networks and communities of practice. (Part-one of a two-section course.) Prereq: Open to MPOD candidates only.


ORBH 414B. Organization Design for a Knowledge World (2)
The objective of this course is to familiarize participants with the theory and technique of organization design and corporate change with particular emphasis on helping leaders understand and implement the latest forms of organizing in a customer-focused, electronically mediated and knowledge-driven world. Frameworks presented will be used to explore the impact of the information revolution on organization design and change, and the evolution of traditional vertically integrated and multi-divisional enterprises toward spider web structures, trans-organizational networks and communities of practice. (Part-two of a two-section course.) Prereq: ORBH 414A.


ORBH 415. Residency Periods-E.M.B.A. (2)
The primary objective of the residency periods is to create and maintain relationships among the E.M.B.A. participants and faculty that enable and accelerate learning throughout the program. This includes the formation, maintenance and development of effective Study Groups. Another primary objective is to develop behavioral management skills in leadership, teamwork, conflict negotiation, decision making and problem management that are best studied through sustained periods of experiential learning, simulations and exercises available in a residential setting. This course is limited to students in the Executive M.B.A. Program.


ORBH 416A. Coaching Leadership and Executive Assessment and Development (1)
Leadership with emotional intelligence will be examined by studying a number of topics and applying them to two major case studies: 1) a CEO; and 2) yourself. In this context, coaching the development of leadership will be a major topic throughout the course. This course will explore questions such as: Who are effective leaders? Are they different from effective managers? How do they think and act? What makes us want to follow them? How are leaders developed? What and how can people (you) help/coach others develop their competencies to become more effective leaders? (Part one of a three-section course.) Prereq: Open to MPOD candidates only.


ORBH 416B. Coaching Leadership and Executive Assessment and Development (1)
Leadership with emotional intelligence will be examined by studying a number of topics and applying them to two major case studies: 1) a CEO; and 2) yourself. In this context, coaching the development of leadership will be a major topic throughout the course. This course will explore questions such as: Who are effective leaders? Are they different from effective managers? How do they think and act? What makes us want to follow them? How are leaders developed? What and how can people (you) help/coach others develop their competencies to become more effective leaders? (Part two of a three-section course.) Prereq: ORBH 416A.


ORBH 416C. Coaching Leadership and Executive Assessment and Development (1)
Leadership with emotional intelligence will be examined by studying a number of topics and applying them to two major case studies: 1) a CEO; and 2) yourself. In this context, coaching the development of leadership will be a major topic throughout the course. This course will explore questions such as: Who are effective leaders? Are they different from effective managers? How do they think and act? What makes us want to follow them? How are leaders developed? What and how can people (you) help/coach others develop their competencies to become more effective leaders? (Part three of a three-section course.) Prereq: ORBH 416B.


ORBH 417. Managing Organizational Change (3)
This course focuses on change as an inescapable fact for organizations and societies of the present and future. Given the existence of such change, how may individuals charged with managing or facilitating an organization’s response to change deal with their task, and what conceptual or technical tools will help them cope with the challenges of the unpredictable? The course examines social and organizational change to provide a base for considering the future and the demands it is likely to pose. Strategies and tactics used in organizational and social developments in the past are critically examined for their relevance to the future.


ORBH 418. Systems Thinking, Action Research and Sustainability (2)
Sustainability is introduced as a movement in business to create value by responding to social and environmental problems in ways that meet current needs without reducing future capacity. Students are introduced to systems thinking skills, such as whole system mapping, causal loop modeling, emergent hypotheses, stakeholder analysis and engaging productive dialogues. Emphasis is placed on use of these skills as methods for working with clients to create actionable knowledge, thereby integrating reflection with action to leave the client system stronger. Prereq: Open to MPOD candidates only.


ORBH 419A. Building the Sustainable Enterprise (2)
In this course, participants will build on skill developed in ORBH 418 by working in the field with a client system to build a sustainable enterprise. Emphasis is on clarifying what sustainability means for a successful enterprise, the advantages to stakeholders of working as action researchers and the use of systems tools to foster generative dialogue. Professional presentations and papers are developed to advance a collaborative learning network among participants and clients. (Part one of a two-section course.) Prereq: Open to MPOD candidates only.


ORBH 419B. Building the Sustainable Enterprise (2)
In this course, participants will build on skill developed in ORBH 418 by working in the field with a client system to build a sustainable enterprise. Emphasis is on clarifying what sustainability means for a successful enterprise, the advantages to stakeholders of working as action researchers and the use of system tools to foster generative dialogue. Professional presentations and papers are developed to advance a collaborative learning network among participants and clients. (Part two of a two-section course.) Prereq: ORBH 419A.


ORBH 425. Developing Emotional Intelligence (3)
Although helping or stimulating individuals to change, learn, and develop is considered a responsibility of the human resource function in an organization, every professor, manager, consultant, and helping professional spends most of their time trying to provoke, evoke, or catalyze a change in others. This course will examine the processes by which individuals change and the methods often used to facilitate this change. How and what a person chooses to change (i.e., select their change goals) will be explored, as well as factors affecting the extent to which he/she changes. The efficacy and ethics of various approaches to individual change as part of human resource and organization development efforts will be discussed. Prereq: MGMT 403.


ORBH 430A. MBA Institute In Sustainable Value and Social Entrepreneurship I (0)
The MBA Institute in Sustainability and Social Entrepreneurship involves 6 credits divided up into two “courses”. The first course --- phase one ---- creates a foundational platform featuring key models and managerial tools for the building sustainable value and “turning the social and global issues of our day into business opportunities.” The second course in an applied sustainability field experience where teams work with companies and communities or real-life sustainability and social entrepreneurship opportunities. The foundations course is a prerequisite to the applied field project phase.


ORBH 430B. MBA Practicum in Sustainable Value and Social Entrepreneurship II (6)
The MBA Institute in Sustainability and Social Entrepreneurship involves 6 credits divided up into two “courses”. The first course--- phase one--- creates a foundational platform featuring key models and managerial tools for the building sustainable value and “turning the social and global issues of our day into business opportunities.” The second course is an applied sustainability field experience where teams work with companies and communities or real-life sustainability and social entrepreneurship opportunities. The foundations course is a prerequisite to the applied field project phase. Prereq: ORBH 488.


ORBH 431. Experiential Learning for Individuals, Teams, and Organizations (3)
This course focuses on the theory of experiential learning and its application at the individual, team, and organizational levels of analyses. This course offers the chance for students to gain insight into their individual learning & adaptive styles, and how such styles impact the way they interact and have consequence for team. The course also explores how teams and organizations learn, and the effect that cultural determinants have on learning and adaptability. In addition, the course examines how learning theory can be applied to focused institutional development projects and educational processes. The course uses presentations, lectures, research findings, interactive activities, and class discussion. The current topics of interest are for the Masters in Positive Organization and Development (MPOD) candidates. It is led by a faculty member of the Department of Organization Behavior. Reflective essays and integrative papers will enable participants to explore their learning styles and that of their organizations and teams to strengthen the practice of OD and human systems change and development. Prereq: MPOD students only.


ORBH 432A. Relational Skills Laboratory (2)
The objective of this course is to hone the participant’s abilities to use themselves as instruments of change and development in relationships with colleagues and clients. Participants will explore theories of adult development along with interpersonal and group dynamics, write and analyze autobiographies, diagnose interpersonal needs and styles, and practice techniques for developing generative relationships with clients during an OD intervention, or as process consultants in group/team settings. (Part one of a two-section course.) Prereq: Open to MPOD candidates only.


ORBH 432B. Relational Skills Laboratory (2)
The objective of this course is to hone the participant’s abilities to use themselves as instruments of change and development in relationships with colleagues and clients. Participants will explore theories of adult development along with interpersonal and group dynamics, write and analyze autobiographies, diagnose interpersonal needs and styles, and practice techniques for developing generative relationships with clients during an OD intervention, or as process consultants in group/team settings. (Part two of a two-section course.) Prereq: ORBH 432A.


ORBH 435. Practicum in Appreciative Inquiry and Positive OD (4)
This course develops participants’ consultative skills. Competence in role entry and development, data collection, intervention and evaluation is gained through class exercises and field projects. The focus is on developing a problem-centered approach to intervening in organizations that minimizes reliance on programmed techniques and maximize collaborative innovation and learning between client and consultant. Prereq: Open to MPOD candidates only.


ORBH 438. Design of Organizational Development and Analysis Projects (4)
This course has two objectives: (1) to learn to design and deliver training workshops; and (2) to plan and execute organizational change and/or analysis projects that are consistent with their current skills, career plans and developmental needs, and with the opportunities, strategic needs and organizational problems of their client organizations. This course is limited to candidates for the MSODA program.


ORBH 439A. Individual Field Project (2)
The objective of this course is to plan and execute a significant organization development, change and/or analysis project with an ongoing client or employer. Emphasis is placed on the craft of developing projects that are consistent with one’s current skills, career plans and developmental needs, combined with the needs, opportunities, readiness, and resources of the client organization. This course is limited to candidates for the MPOD program. (Part one of a two section course.) Prereq: Open to MPOD candidates only.


ORBH 439B. Individual Field Project (2)
The objective of this course is to plan and execute a significant organization development, change and/or analysis project with an ongoing client or employer. Emphasis is placed on the craft of developing projects that are consistent with one’s current skills, career plans and developmental needs, combined with the needs, opportunities, readiness, and resources of the client organization. This course is limited to candidates for the MPOD program. (Part two of a two-section course.) Prereq: ORBH 439A.


ORBH 450. Executive Leadership (3)
This course explores answers to questions such as: Who are leaders? Are they different than managers, heroes and heroines? How do the effective ones think and act? What situations create leaders, foster their emergence or provide opportunities? What makes us want to follow them? What are the personal pits of being a leader (i.e., sex, drugs, alcohol, insomnia, ulcers, etc.)? How are leaders developed? Case studies, self-study and at-work projects will be the primary methods used in the course.


ORBH 460. Women in Organizations (3)
This course addresses important leadership and management issues concerning women in organizations. The course provides complex understandings of issues pertinent to professional women and work such as sex role typing, sex-based discrimination, equal pay, sexual harassment, work-family balance, women’s leadership and women’s career issues and development. The course helps students increase self-knowledge about their own values and practices as well as enhance their capabilities as leaders and managers. We will examine the opportunities, challenges, trade-offs, and organizational dynamics experienced by women in work settings, as well as the interpersonal, organizational, and societal structures and processes impacting women in organizations. Through a variety of course methods, students gain greater awareness of the gendered nature of work and organizations and learn effective strategies for women’s career progress and effective participation in organizations.


ORBH 470. Leading Change from a Complexity Perspective (3)
In this course, we will continuously attempt to answer two questions: (1) What is the process of sustained, desirable change? and (2) What is the role of a leader? Concepts from complexity theory will be used, including understanding the multilevel nature of SDC at the individual, dyad, team, organization, community, country, and global levels. Intentional Change Theory (ICT) will be used as the organizing concept for the changes studied. Prereq: MGMT 403.


ORBH 478. Organization and the Environment (3)
This course focuses on ways of looking at the interface between organizations and their environments that have important implications for organizational development activities and the people who design and implement them. The first part of the course reviews several conceptual approaches to assessing this interface. The second part involves the application of these approaches to a series of organizational/environmental problems that members of the class perceive their organizations as currently experiencing. Limited to MSODA candidates.


ORBH 479A. Foundations of Strategic Thinking (1)
This course will define what constitutes strategic change and what does not. Students will be introduced to a variety of strategic interventions and models from which to interpret, understand and achieve positive organizational change. Opportunity will be provided to apply selected models to the student’s organization and other cases in order to gain insight and appreciation for financial and non-financial factors that influence fundamental organizational growth and development. (Part one of a two-section course.) Prereq: Open to MPOD candidates only.


ORBH 479B. Foundations of Strategic Thinking (2)
This course will define what constitutes strategic change and what does not. Students will be introduced to a variety of strategic interventions and models from which to interpret, understand and achieve positive organizational change. Opportunity will be provided to apply selected models to the student’s organization and other cases in order to gain insight and appreciation for financial and non-financial factors that influence fundamental organizational growth and development. (Part two of a two-section course.) Prereq: ORBH 479A.


ORBH 480. The Dynamics of Effective Consulting Strategies (3)
This course will: 1) highlight the major current trends and changes that affect the nature of managerial work; 2) describe how OD practitioners and consultants need to factor such trends into their consulting strategies; 3) differentiate between types of interventions, the circumstances in which they apply and their unique strengths; 4) provide background theories that explain the challenges inherent in mobilizing positive change; 5) describe ways to bridge the gap between knowing and doing in order to build organization resilience; and 6) introduce a variety of consulting techniques and skills that the students can add to their repertoire. Prereq: Open to MPOD candidates only.


ORBH 488. Leadership and the Global Agenda (3)
This course will attempt to develop leadership values and competencies in Organization (OD) within the global arena. Objectives for the course include: (1) developing an executive view of the state of the world; (2) building skills in appreciative inquiry for researching best practices of organizations to maintain sustainable economic development; (3) learning how to build organizational capacities for responding to the global agenda for change; and (4) developing a global consciousness to a larger set of global values to provide a vision for a better world and the potentials of our organizations to assist in realizing such a vision.


ORBH 490. Special Topics (1 - 18)
This is a seminar course led by a member of the faculty of the Department of Organizational Behavior. Specific topics are announced at the start of each semester. This course is intended also for independent study.


ORBH 491. Managing Diversity and Inclusion (3)
This course addresses workforce diversity issues from individual, group, and organizational perspectives. The focus is on innovative ways of utilizing today’s culturally expanding workforce. Emphasis is on the “what and how” for managers in developing a corporate culture that embraces diversity, helping them in learning to work with, supervise and tap the talent of diverse employees within their organizations. Included are methods for modifying systems to attract, retain, develop, and capitalize on benefits of the new workforce demographics. A retreat experience is part of this course and is required of all participants.


ORBH 497. Development of Executive Leadership Skills (3)
The objective of this course is the development of skills in effective human interaction, with emphasis on the pragmatics of working with people in organizations. The focus is on learning by doing through the use of applied behavioral science methods of simulation, role plays and structured exercise. Leadership topics covered include decision management, problem management, motivation, planned change, teamwork, and the language of leaders. Designed for MSODA students. M.B.A. students admitted upon consent of instructor.


ORBH 498. Global Citizenship and Multi-Cultural OD: International Study Tour (4)
This course will broaden perspectives and knowledge of how OD principles and technologies are generated and applied in contexts and cultures outside of North America. Selected literature representing global perspectives on the practice of OD and field experiences will provide support and background for personal experience and reflection on cross-cultural issues in organizing. The primary learning context will be an intense, 10-day study tour to some country outside of North America to provide the participants with opportunities for: 1) comparative studies of OD practices in different cultural settings; 2) in-depth experiences with OD practitioners and students in a different national, regional and cultural context; 3) co-inquiry with non-North American students also involved in developing OD knowledge and skills; and 4) on-site organization visits outside of North America to observe and learn about on-going dynamic change efforts. Prereq: Open to MPOD candidates only.


ORBH 501. Special Problems and Topics (1 - 18)
This course is offered, with permission, to students undertaking reading in a field of special interest.


ORBH 510. Organizational Behavior Department Seminar (3)
The OB Department Seminar is organized and managed by the first year PhD students. Seminar sessions will alternate between first year meetings and gatherings of the ORBH community of students, faculty and friends. Community sessions will be organized around research presentations of PhD Qualifying Papers, Dissertation Proposals and Dissertation Defense. Seminar Objectives: 1. To create and sustain an appreciative, intellectually nourishing learning space for the ORBH community that will support, inspire and empower us to explore the frontiers of scholarship in our field; 2.To provide a forum for sharing the ongoing research and scholarship of the department; 3. To develop productive collaborative research relationships; 4. To increase our collective knowledge of the current state of the art in OB and to develop productive collaborative research relationships; 4. To increase our collective knowledge of the current state of the art in OB and related fields.


ORBH 511. Micro Organizational Behavior (1)
Examines the field of micro-organizational behavior. Specifically, the study of individuals and groups within an organizational context and the study of internal processes and practices as they affect individuals and groups. Major topics include individual characteristics such as beliefs, values and personality. Individual processes such as motivation, emotions, commitment, group and team processes, such as decision-making; organizational processes and practices such as goal setting, performance appraisal and rewards, and the influence of all of these on such individual, group and organizational outcomes as performance, job satisfaction, citizenship behaviors, turnover, justice, absenteeism and employee engagement.


ORBH 513. Appreciative Inquiry and Strength-Based Change (1)
This course explores and develops the art of understanding social systems in ways that help us imagine, design and develop organization excellence. It seeks to show how many of our conventional ideas about organizations are based on discourse and metaphors that lead us to see and understand organizations in partial and often limiting ways. Growing research from the domains of Positive Psychology and Positive Organization Scholarship and the theory and practice of Appreciative Inquiry will be explored to show how we can create new and more positive, strength-based ways of designing and developing social systems.


ORBH 520. Group and Interpersonal Analysis (1)
This course is a review of major concepts and research in group dynamics and interpersonal relations. Topics concern face-to-face social interaction such as communication patterns, power, hierarchy, leadership, norms, goals, productivity, social theories of personality, and personal change through group methods. The course combines cognitive emphasis and personal experience-based learning.


ORBH 525. Developing Emotional Intelligence (1)
This course will examine the process by which individuals change and the methods often used to facilitate this change. How and what a person chooses to change (i.e., select their change goals) will be explored, as well as factors affecting the extent to which he or she changes. The efficacy and ethics of various approaches to individual change as part of human resources and organization development efforts will be discussed.


ORBH 530. Social Analysis (1)
This course is an introduction to major themes and concepts in sociology that influence the field and to sociological analysis as it relates to the careers of behavioral science practitioners. Students are exposed to major theoretical orientations as well as to summaries of current thinking in several major topic areas in sociology. The studies of sociology, sociologists and the self are combined to help students develop a sociological perspective of their own potential roles in the applied behavioral sciences.


ORBH 540. Social Exchange, Social Networks, and Social Capital in Organizations (1)
In this course we will examine the nature of social exchange relationships in organizations. We will explore how individual perceptions regarding the quality of the relationship they have with their immediate supervisor, their work group, and the organization as an entity can impact their workplace attitudes and behaviors. Additionally, we will learn how the examination of networks of relationships can enhance our understanding of how individuals experience organizational life. The course will also provide a brief introduction to the theory, methods and procedures of social network analysis with an emphasis on applications to individual and organizational social capital.


ORBH 541. Organizational Systems (1)
This course covers the use of general systems theory as a conceptual base for examining organizations from the macro-perspective. The course examines organizational structure and technology, organizations and interorganizational networks in interaction with their societal environments, and large-scale problems of organizational and social power, conflict and change. It is designed to present a large-scale perspective on organization theory and behavior that is complementary to the micro-perspective of organizational behavior.


ORBH 560. Research Methods I (3)
This course concerns itself with issues associated with the conduct of social research. The primary focus is on learning the “craft” of research and its associated technologies. Among the topics that are addressed are: scientific method; research terminology and definitions; search design; laboratory experiments; simulations; field experiments; field studies; measurement, reliability and validity; and sampling. This course is intended to help students acquire the skills necessary in undertaking dissertation-related research.


ORBH 561. Research Methods II: Theory Building (3)
This course is designed as a methodological practicum in theory building through qualitative methods. The process of good theory construction is portrayed as the discovery of theory from data, resulting in the co-construction of knowledge of consequence. The course asserts, in Lewinian fashion, that “there is nothing so practical as good theory.” It then focuses on the methods, personal disciplines, and perspectives needed to bring this dictum alive. Individual research proposals are developed throughout the semester.


ORBH 565. Research in Gender and Diversity in Organizations (1)
Examination of full range of feminist research methods exploring relationship between feminism and methodology involving a plurality of perspectives for conducting research and creating knowledge with an emphasis on collecting and interpreting qualitative materials. Particular attention is paid to understanding gender- and diversity-related phenomenon that occur in the workplace. Classic feminist research from a variety of historical, societal, economic, interpersonal, and organizational paradigms are incorporated. Coreq: ORBH doctoral students only.


ORBH 570. Learning and Development (1)
This course provides an exploration of the learning and development paradigm underlying the human potential development approach to human resource development. The origins of this approach in the naturalist epistemologies John Dewey’s pragmatism, Kurt Lewin’s gestalt psychology, the work of James, Follett, Emerson, Piaget, Maslow, Rogers, and others and current research in adult development, biology and brain/mind research, artificial intelligence, epistemology, moral philosophy and adult learning will be considered. The course will focus on applications of theses ideas to current issues in human resource development such as adult learning in higher education, advanced professional development, and large system learning and development.Coreq: ORBH doctoral students only.


ORBH 572. Thematic Analysis (1)
This course will help students develop the ability to sense themes, or patterns, the ability to apply coding systems in a reliable manner, the ability to develop a coding system, and the ability to design research studies for developing or using codes. Participants will develop and practice these abilities on four types of data which are: conscious and unconscious thought; an individual’s behavior; interaction among people; and historical documents such as speeches, myths, ballads, etc. Assignments will involve reading, practice coding material provided, developing preliminary codes from material selected, and a research project in which development and/or use of a code is required. Appropriate for doctoral students in behavioral or social sciences (Mini-Course, Occasional Offering). Prereq: Doctorate students only.


ORBH 575. Theory and Research in Small Groups (3)
The course is designed to provide doctoral students with broad exposure to the theoretical foundations of research in the area of groups and teams in organizations, and to current and emerging trends in the research within this area. The ultimate objective is to enable students to conduct independent research on topics relevant to groups and teams within organizations. The primary focus will be on task-oriented groups and teams, and in the organizational context. It will draw from basic research in social psychology and sociology in addition to organizational behavior.


ORBH 601. Special Problems and Topics (1 - 18)
This course is offered, with permission, to candidates undertaking reading in a field of special interest.


ORBH 660. Methods of Applied Behavioral Science (3)
This course includes laboratory methods of learning, techniques of design and operation in human relations training, and trainer behavior in group settings. The course is aimed at conceptualizing learning and influence processes in training laboratory settings as well as providing opportunities for the practice of design and operating skills.


ORBH 701. Dissertation Ph.D. (1 - 18)
Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.


Other Course Offerings


MANAGEMENT COURSES (MGMT)


MGMT 001. Supervised Professional Practicum - Semester 1 (0)
A professional practicum is a workplace experience, the primary goal of which is the intellectual, personal and professional growth of the student. It occurs under the sponsorship or supervision of a mentor in the workplace who is committed to seeing that it is an educational as well as a work venture. It requires skills appropriate to the student’s year in college and provides students with new skills, insights and experiences that are transferable back to the academic setting and/or to a future position in the workplace. (Only available to declared Weatherhead Accounting or Management majors.) Prereq: Junior standing or higher.


MGMT 002. Supervised Professional Practicum - Semester 2 (0)
A professional practicum is a workplace experience, the primary goal of which is the intellectual, personal and professional growth of the student. It occurs under the sponsorship or supervision of a mentor in the workplace who is committed to seeing that it is an educational as well as a work venture. It requires skills appropriate to the student’s year in college and provides students with new skills, insights and experiences that are transferable back to the academic setting and/or to a future position in the workplace. (Only available to declared Weatherhead Accounting or Management majors.) Prereq: Junior standing.


MGMT 250. Managing Organizations and People I (3)
The principal goals of this course are to help students understand: 1) The context in which they, as managers, will function; the options they have for careers in management based on their own aptitudes and orientations; and how they can develop the skills they need for success in their chosen fields; and 2) How the effective strategic management of people contributes to organizational performance and the production of value, and that for many organizations, the effective management of people has been the driver of competitive advantage. This is the first course in a two course sequence.


MGMT 251. Managing Organizations and People II (3)
The principal goals of this course are to help students understand: 1) The context in which they, as managers, will function; the options they have for careers in management based on their own aptitudes and orientations; and how they can develop the skills they need for success in their chosen fields; and 2) How the effective strategic management of people contributes to organizational performance and the production of value, and that for many organizations, the effective management of people has been the driver of competitive advantage. This is the second course in a two course sequence. Prereq: MGMT 250.


MGMT 315. International Management Institute (3)
The course provides undergraduate students with a unique overseas visitation, language orientation, and management subject experiences during periods such as spring break, or during interims immediately following the end of the semester. Opportunities for diverse cultural and language experiences which result from the institute are added benefits of these programs. Prereq: ECON 102, ECON 103, ACCT 101 and BAFI 355.


MGMT 360. Special Topics and Issues in Management (1 - 9)
This course option is available to qualified students who are undertaking special projects in a management related field.


MGMT 395. Advanced Seminar (1)
This seminar, for undergraduate students with junior class standing or above, provides an opportunity to consider topics of importance in the community of ideas and activities related to the professional and managerial world. The development of writing and communication skills and in-depth discussion are expected attributes of seminar activity. The topic and scope of the coverage will be defined by the course instructor as consistent with the seminar approach to learning of the university.MGMT 395a, 395b, 395c


MGMT 395. Advanced Seminar (1)
This seminar, for undergraduate students with junior class standing or above, provides an opportunity to consider topics of importance in the community of ideas and activities related to the professional and managerial world. The development of writing and communication skills and in-depth discussion are expected attributes of seminar activity. The topic and scope of the coverage will be defined by the course instructor as consistent with the seminar approach to learning of the university. SAGES Dept Seminar


MGMT 397. Undergraduate Research Project (3 - 6)
This course provides a supervisory structure for students completing and a capstone research project in the Weatherhead School of Management. Arrangements should be made by consultation with a faculty member selected and the Senior Capstone Committee of the School of Management. Open to all management and accounting majors and other qualified students with instructor approval. A written report, presentation to the faculty department most closely related to the student’s topic, and an approved public presentation are required. SAGES Senior Cap


MGMT 398. Action Learning (6)
This is an experiential course built around a live project in a local organization. The project-based course is focused on improving business process. Students will work in teams to analyze the current situation and diagnose its problems or opportunities, creatively envision new possibilities, evaluate potential improvements and recommend appropriate solutions. Students will be evaluated by the professor and the project managers at the client organizations. Prereq: ACCT 202, BAFI 355 and MKMR 301. Coreq: Senior standing. SAGES Senior Cap
MGMT 400-TR. MGMT 400 Level Transfer Course (3 - 99)


MGMT 403. Leadership Assessment and Development (3)
This course is designed to increase competitive attractiveness in the marketplace and maximize the added value of the M.B.A. program. The objective of the course is to have students learn a method for assessing and developing in themselves the knowledge and abilities relevant to management throughout their careers. This is accomplished by helping students develop an individualized learning plan to enhance their level of knowledge in 11 fields and 22 abilities. Students engage in a number of assessment activities, then receive feedback and interpret it. This occurs in the context of an Executive Action Team (i.e., students and a facilitator) in which students help each other assess their current capability and future development needs. This course is limited to students in the M.B.A. program.


MGMT 413. Human Value in Organizations (3)
Examines the behavioral sciences relevant to the effective management of people and the effective design of human resources system, structure and policies. Topics include leadership, change management, motivation and pay systems, team dynamics, staffing, decision making, organizational communications, employee participation, performance appraisal, conflict management, negotiation, work design, organizational design, and organizations culture. A variety of methods, including experiential and interactive learning methods, are used to study these topics.


MGMT 413A. Human Values in Organizations (1)
Classes will explore research in the fields of organizational behavior and human resource management and apply this knowledge in actual situations and cases. They will learn about how to learn from experiences they have in class and in their EATs. Students will be able to directly apply skills learned in class to leadership, project management, task force management, team development, staff meetings, decision making, problem solving, interpersonal relations, environmental analysis, job redesign, organizational change, and labor and human resource policy. Prereq: Open to ACL-MBA students.


MGMT 419. Corporate Field Research (1)
This course is intended for the graduate business student who wishes to gain applied/practical business experience based on his/her intended career path and/or with an organization. This course will assist building required skills and bridge the gap between the classroom and real world application.


MGMT 420A. Dialogues in Top Management I (1.5)
MGMT 420A and MGMT 420B Dialogues in Top Management I and II. Students must take the two courses in sequence. The courses comprise a series of dialogues with teams of top-echelon managers of pre- and post-dialogue student groups; analytic papers based on the content of the dialogues, class discussions, and readings. Readings and class discussions address both the character and dynamics of complex, enterprise-wide management problems and processes of effectively managing them. In open dialogues with practicing top-echelon mangers students explore the practice and theory of effective top-echelon/general management. That is management that involves applying concepts and skill across all functional areas of management. Student groups’ analytical essays after each dialogue stimulate in-depth discussion both of possible conceptual models of the management process and of the relationships to it of the course materials in the graduate programs


MGMT 420B. Dialogues in Top Management II (1.5)
MGMT 420A and MGMT 420B Dialogues in Top Management I and II. Students must take the two courses in sequence. The courses comprise a series of dialogues with teams of top-echelon managers of pre- and post-dialogue student groups; analytic papers based on the content of the dialogues, class discussions, and readings. Readings and class discussions address both the character and dynamics of complex, enterprise-wide management problems and processes of effectively managing them. In open dialogues with practicing top-echelon mangers students explore the practice and theory of effective top-echelon/general management. That is management that involves applying concepts and skill across all functional areas of management. Student groups’ analytical essays after each dialogue stimulate in-depth discussion both of possible conceptual models of the management process and of the relationships to it of the course materials in the graduate programs


MGMT 433. Starting and Managing a Successful Startup Through Critical Phases (1.5)
This course focuses on the key issues in starting and managing a successful startup through the critical phases of growth: Birth, Funding, Pre-Product Launch, Product Launch, Rapid Growth and Exit Strategy. Students will be exposed to prominent alumni who have multiple entrepreneurial experiences enabling future entrepreneurs to avoid pitfalls and communication mistakes that could doom their fledgling company.


MGMT 440. Leadership Assessment and Development II (0)
The exit assessment course (MGMT 440) is aimed at assessing how students’ career goals, values and abilities may have changed since the program began. The course meets for one mandatory half day seminar in the Spring Semester and carries o units of credit. In the MGMT 403 course, students were provided the tools and opportunities for self-assessment and career planning. In the very first semester, they completed several assessment instruments (LSI, POQ, 360-Feedback (ECI-U), ASI, My Values, Career Anchors and others). They had to identify their top values, set a career vision and created an individualized learning plan. The ultimate goal was to assure that their personal development and preparation was relevant to, and in alignment with, the emergent requirements of today’s business management careers. This course is specifically designed to identify if a student’s prior learning plan (completed in the MGMT 403 course) still fits with his/her current career reality and to also identify what has changed for him/her. The activities in the course will include: Viewing the current reality of today’s business environment; Revisiting their experience in the MBA program including any internships/jobs;; Determining if a student’s values, vision and learning plan still fill; Retaking the 360-Feedback (Emotional Intelligence Competencies) to identify development of competencies; Identifying relevant areas of personal development; Committing to a refined learning plan and goals. Through a highly interactive and team based process, students will be able to reflect on their current reality, get feedback on your personal growth and discover what changes would enhance their professional career journey.


MGMT 447. Chief Officer Dialogues on Information and Management (3)
Each week, Chief Level Officers (CIO, CEO, CFO, CMO, CTO, etc.) from major corporations present the class with live problems in which technology, strategy and operational issues must be integrated in a coherent organizational course of action. Students work in teams to design courses of action in response to those problem situations, which Chief Level Officers then review, critique and discuss. Offered as MGMT 447 and MIDS 447. Prereq: MIDS 409.


MGMT 460. Managing in a Global Economy (3)
Managers need new skills to enable them to manage effectively in what is increasingly a global economy. They need a deeper understanding of cultural differences and how these differences may influence communications with foreign employers, employees, customers, suppliers or partners. They need a better understanding of the economic and political mechanics of the world business system. They need to learn how to find out more about potential opportunities and threats that lie outside the United States. This course is designed to address these needs.


MGMT 464. Business Ethics (3)
This course is built around two core learning tracks. The first is extended analyses of case studies, which identifies ethical problems, diagnoses import, and develops strategic programs to address them. The second learning track uses short pieces of fiction to explore issues of ethical character, leadership, and organizational responsibility. Each student keeps an ethics journal over the course of the semester to reflect on ethical issues, both inside and outside the classroom. In addition, small student groups are formed to write case studies focusing on a business ethics problem.


MGMT 465. Perspectives in European Management (3)
The European Summer Institute provides an introduction to international business through a unique combination of class meetings on campus and a two-week excursion to central Europe. While in Europe, students meet with local business people, consulate officials, and university professors to learn the prerequisites for doing business in the region. The trip features a number of site visits to local companies. (This course may be used for perspective course credit.)


MGMT 466. Seminar in International Business (3)
This course is a continuation of MGMT 465 and includes an independent study component. (Approval for course credit in the student’s area of concentration may be approved by the instructor at the time of registration.) (Summer only.)


MGMT 467-1. Commercialization and Intellectual Property Management (0)
This interdisciplinary course covers a variety of topics, including principles of intellectual property and intellectual property management, business strategies and modeling relevant to the creation of start-up companies and exploitation of IP rights as they relate to biomedical-related inventions. The goal of this two-semester course is to address issues relating to the commercialization of biomedical-related inventions by exposing law students, MBA students, and Ph.D. candidates (in genetics and proteomics) to the challenges and opportunities encountered when attempting to develop biomedical intellectual property from the point of early discovery to the clinic and market. Specifically, this course seeks to provide students with the ability to value a given technological advance or invention holistically, focusing on issues that extend beyond scientific efficacy and include patient and practitioner value propositions, legal and intellectual property protection, business modeling, potential market impacts, market competition, and ethical, social, and healthcare practitioner acceptance. The course will meet over two consecutive semesters--fall and spring--and is six credit hours (three credits each semester). During these two semesters, law students, MBA students, and Ph.D. candidates in genomics and proteomics will work in teams of five (two laws students, two MBA students and one Ph.D. candidate), focusing on issues of commercialization and IP management of biomedical-related inventions. The instructors will be drawn from the law school, business school, and technology-transfer office. To be eligible for this course, law students must also have a B.S or equivalent in the life sciences, such as biology, biochemistry, genomics, molecular biology, etc. Offered as LAWS 367, MGMT 467, and GENE 467.


MGMT 467-2. Commercialization and Intellectual Property Management (6)
This interdisciplinary course covers a variety of topics, including principles of intellectual property and intellectual property management, business strategies and modeling relevant to the creation of start-up companies and exploitation of IP rights as they relate to biomedical-related inventions. The goal of this two-semester course is to address issues relating to the commercialization of biomedical-related inventions by exposing law students, MBA students, and Ph.D. candidates(in genetics and proteomics) to the challenges and opportunities encountered when attempting to develop biomedical intellectual property from the point of early discovery to the clinic and market. Specifically, this course seeks to provide students with the ability to value a given technological advance or invention holistically, focusing on issues that extend beyond scientific efficacy and include patient and practitioner value propositions, legal and intellectual property protection, business modeling, potential market impacts, market competition, and ethical, social, and healthcare practitioner acceptance. The course will meet over two consecutive semesters--fall and spring--and is six credit hours (three credits each semester). During these two semesters, law students, MBA students, and Ph.D. candidates in genomics and proteomics will work in teams of five (two law students, two MBA students, and one Ph.D. candidate), focusing on issues of commercialization and IP management of biomedical-related inventions. The instructors will be drawn from the law school, business school, medical school, and technology-transfer office. To be eligible for this course, law students must also have a B.S. or equivalent in the life sciences, such as biology, biochemistry, genomics, molecular biology etc. Offered as MGMT 467, LAWS 367, GENE 467.


MGMT 495-1. Ames Advanced Business Plan Seminar (0)
This two semester 6 credit hour course teaches students to write a strategic business plan. Working in teams, students study a Cleveland area business through meetings with company executives, including the CEO, under the supervision of a faculty member and outside planning expert. In Semester One, multiple leading faculty members will conduct classes which focus on key components of a business plan, including marketing, strategy, finance, supply chain and leadership. Semester One will culminate with a case study of an assigned company written by each team. Semester Two is a practicum experience during which student teams write a strategic business plan for their assigned company, once again under the supervision of faculty and outside mentors. Plans will be presented by teams to a Business Plan Competition jury composed of leading private equity executives, investment bankers and/or corporate CEOs.


MGMT 495-2. Ames Advanced Business Plan Seminar (6)
This two semester 6 credit hour course teaches students to write a strategic business plan. Working in teams, students study a Cleveland area business through meetings with company executives, including the CEO, under the supervision of a faculty member and outside planning expert. In Semester One, multiple leading faculty members will conduct classes which focus on key components of a business plan, including marketing, strategy, finance, supply chain and leadership. Semester One will culminate with a case study of an assigned company written by each team. Semester Two is a practicum experience during which student teams write a strategic business plan for their assigned company, once again under the supervision of faculty and outside mentors. Plans will be presented by teams to a Business Plan Competition jury composed of leading private equity executives, investment bankers and/or corporate CEOs.


MGMT 496. Action Learning Preparation: Introduction to Systems Thinking (1)
In preparation for MGMT 497: Action Learning for M.S.M. students, M.S.M. students, assigned to teams, will participate in intensive seminars to learn strategies to organize the projects for MGMT 497 and work effectively with their client organizations.


MGMT 497. Action Learning Project (3)

This course allows teams of students to integrate functional, core knowledge and apply analysis and strategic management skills in a real-world setting. Students will be evaluated by the instructor and the project managers at the client organizations.


MGMT 498. Action Learning (3)
This course allows teams of students to integrate functional core knowledge from the first year of the M.B.A. program and apply analysis and strategic management skills in a real-world setting. Students will be evaluated by the instructor and the project managers at the client organizations. Recommended preparation: Second year full-time M.B.A. status.


MGMT 499. Strategic Issues and Applications (3)
This course wraps up the M.B.A. core by providing an integrative experience of applying the full range of managerial skills addressed throughout the core in a comprehensive case exercise. Students develop, document, and present comprehensive, implementable strategic and tactical actions programs in groups. Prereq: ACCT 401 and BAFI 402.


MGMT 501. Special Problems and Topics (1 - 18)
This course is offered, with permission, to students undertaking reading in a field of special interest.


MGMT 560. Theoretical Perspectives in Management (3)
This seminar exposes students to management theories from a variety of disciplines. The goal of the course is to help students learn to synthesize and contrast theories to develop hypotheses of their own. Prereq: Ph.D. standing or consent of instructor.


MGMT 570. Research Theory and Method (3)
This seminar explores pertinent issues in the philosophy of social sciences and in the use of quantitative and qualitative research methods. It seeks to clarify pivotal issues in scientific enterprise like the nature of scientific knowledge, the nature of scientific methods, their grounding, issues of ontology and epistemology, rhetoric, and how scientific knowledge relates to the organization of scientific communities. The seminar’s objective is to prepare students to think critically about the underlying assumptions and their day-to-day research practices. Prereq: Ph.D. standing.


MGMT 575. Doctoral Research Project (3)
The objective of the course is to produce a stand-alone piece of scholarship in the academic discipline pursued by the student. The paper or project should be of publishable quality as judged by the instructor. The work of the student is to be accomplished on the independent study basis under the direction of a faculty member. Although there are no specific course prerequisites, the understanding is that all other course work should have been completed to be admitted into the class.Prereq: Ph.D. standing.


MGMT 601. Special Topics (1 - 18)
This course is offered, with permission, to Ph.D. candidates undertaking reading in a field of special interest.


MGMT 602. Advanced Topics (1 - 18)
This is a course of flexible design to meet advanced theoretical and/or methodological needs of doctoral students. Approval is needed from the instructor, and it requires a letter grade.


HEALTH SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT COURSES (HSMC)


HSMC 406. Innovation and Entrepreneurship (2)
The purpose of this module is to acquaint and ultimately engage clinical researchers with the business of innovation and entrepreneurship. Goals include: (1) to provide researchers with many of the skills that they would need to translate academic research into commercial uses; (2) to sensitize clinical researchers to the goals of the business community and facilitate their ability to work with the private sector on technology development; and (3) to make clinical researchers aware of the processes of academic technology development and transfer. Sessions consist of lectures and case discussion facilitated by the instructor. Some sessions include members of the business community as guest lecturers. As an example, students will discuss the financing of new companies with local venture capitalists. Student products include the evaluation of the commercial potential of a university technology in which they apply their new knowledge about commercialization of scientific discoveries. Offered as CRSP 503, ECON 406, and HSMC 406.


HSMC 420. Health Finance (3)
Exploration of economic, medical, financial and payment factors in the U.S. healthcare system sets the framework for the study of decisions by providers, insurers, and purchasers in this course. The mix of students from various programs and professions allows wide discussion from multiple viewpoints. Offered as BAFI 420 and HSMC 420. Prereq: ACCT 401.


HSMC 421. Health Economics and Strategy (3)
This course has evolved from a theory-oriented emphasis to a course that utilizes economic principles to explore such issues as health care pricing, anti-trust enforcement and hospital mergers, choices in adoption of managed care contracts by physician groups, and the like. Instruction style and in-class group project focus on making strategic decisions. The course is directed for a general audience, not just for students and concentration in health systems management. Offered as ECON 421, HSMC 421, and MPHP 421.


HSMC 427. Health Law (3)
The course examines the nature and structure of the health care system; the relationship between patient, provider, and payer; private legal controls on health care delivery such as malpractice and informed consent law; and public controls in the form of government regulatory and payment programs. Offered as HSMC 427 and LAWS 227.


HSMC 432. Health Care Information Systems (3)
This course covers concepts, techniques and technologies for providing information systems to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of health care organizations. Offered as HSMC 432, MIDS 432, and MPHP 532.


HSMC 446. Models of Health Care Systems (1.5)
This course is for professionals who will pursue their careers in, or associated with, the health care industry; and therefore, need to understand the structure, operations and decision influences in the health care delivery system. The course is intended to develop competence and confidence in the participant’s ability to understand and operate in the industry. the largest and, perhaps, the most complex in the United States. It is applicable to the private and public, profit and not-for-profit sectors. In this course students are introduced to: the different systems of care delivery; their organization and operations; their markets and the nature of the demand for their services; and the dynamics of their interoperation among themselves and with other entities in the industry (e.g., payors/insurers, regulators and accreditors, technology and pharmaceuticals suppliers). Offered as HSMC 446 and IIME 446.


HSMC 447. Regulatory Affairs for the Biosciences (1.5)
This mini-course introduces students to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the laws and regulations it enforces. A scientific regulatory agency with far reaching enforcement authority, FDA is the most powerful consumer protection agency in the world. This course will familiarize students with FDA’s mission, philosophy and organizational structure, as well as policy and procedure it uses to ensure the safety and effectiveness of the food, drugs, biologics, cosmetics, medical devices and radiation-emitting products it regulates. Recommended preparation: Enrollment in the MEM Biomedical Entrepreneurship Track. Offered as BIOS 447, HSMC 447, and IIME 447.


HSMC 448. Engineering Statistics for Biosciences (3)
This course provides an introduction to biostatistics, emphasizing experimental design, analysis of data, and special emphasis on statistical and financial aspects of randomized clinical trials for biomedical applications. There will be a final project involving development of a clinical trial protocol including the experimental design, recruitment and retention strategy, analysis plan and budget. Offered as BIOS 448, HSMC 448, and IIME 445.


HSMC 450. Health Care Economics for the Biosciences (1.5)
This course utilizes economic principles to explore such issues as health care pricing, anti-trust enforcement and pharmaceutical economics, choices in adoption of managed care contracts by physician groups, and the like. Instruction style and in-class group project focus on making strategic decisions. The course is directed for a general audience, not just for students and concentration in bioscience or health systems management. Offered as BIOS 450, ECON 450, and HSMC 450.


HSMC 456. Health Policy and Management Decisions (3)
This seminar course combines broad health care policy issue analysis with study of the implications for specific management decisions in organizations. This course is intended as an applied, practical course where the policy context is made relevant to the individual manager. Offered as HSMC 456 and MPHP 456.


HSMC 501. Special Problems and Topics (1 - 18)
This course is offered, with permission, to students undertaking reading in a field of special interest.


HSMC 502. Health Care Executive Education Series (1 - 3)
Students may choose six out of eight all day Friday seminars in the Health Care Executive Education Series, plus completion of a paper covering an aspect of the management of health care systems. Registration is 1 credit for fall semester and 2 credits for the spring semester as seminars begin in the fall and continue through the spring semester. Limited to students admitted to the Health Systems Management Certificate program and those with approval from Mindy Kinnard at 216-368-6405.


HSMC 601. Special Problems and Topics (1 - 18)
This course is offered, with permission, to Ph.D. candidates undertaking reading in a field of special interest.


EXECUTIVE DOCTOR OF MANAGEMENT (EDMP)


EDMP 610. Culture and World Politics (3)
Religion, ethnicity, and nationalism have assumed major political significance in the post Cold-War and post-9/11 eras. The course examines ideas of political democracy and economic liberalism in relation to different cultural and religious ideas and explores relationships among social values, political structures, and economics.


EDMP 611. Theory and Practice of Collective Action (3)
TThe ability of autonomous and interdependent parties to coordinate actions, or to act cooperatively, affects a wide range of organizational and social problems. This course addresses the theory and practice of collective action in local, national and global contexts. Case studies of collective action problems, such as environmental protection, community revitalization, and the mobilization of interest groups will be discussed.


EDMP 612. Identifying a Personal Research Domain (3)
The first course in the E.D.M. inquiry sequence provides an introduction to practitioner scholarship and an opportunity for participants to identify and develop their personal research domains. Participants gain skills in inductive, interpretive modes of research, in literature searching and synthesizing, and in conceptualizing. These skills are put to use by interacting with practitioners and literature in order to conceptualize a research question or issue. This work specifies an “action” or “practice” problem to be addressed during the three years of the program, and it serves as a first draft of a more thorough conceptual model to be completed in the second semester of the first program year. The preliminary conceptual model includes rich narratives and the identification of casual relationships among relevant constructs.


EDMP 613. Leading Change (3)
Sustained, desirable change (SDC) drives adaptation, growth and life itself. In this course, we will attempt to answer two questions: (1) What is the process of sustained, desirable change? and (2) What is the role of a leader? Concepts from complexity theory will be used, including understanding the multilevel nature of SDC at the individual, dyad team, organization, community, country, and global levels. Intentional Change Theory (ICT) will be used as the organizing concept for the changes studied.


EDMP 614. Business as a Dynamic System (3)
This course examines the evolution of large-scale business firms as a result of technological and organizational change. It deals with the role of history, culture and finance in generating business organizations in various countries. This course also studies regional innovation systems, as well as the digital economy: what its main features are, what is genuinely new, and what the implications are for business organizations and industry clusters.


EDMP 616. Global Economic Systems and Issues (3)
This course provides a framework and analytical tools for understanding globalization and international economic relations in the context of the global political system. It analyzes the economic and political forces that are shaping global cooperation on economic matters, the role and impact of international economic institutions such as the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, and the World Trade Organization, and evolving forms of regional governance, such as the European Union. It covers national and international policies and development and the causes and cures of international financial crises. The course revolves around concepts of efficiency, equality, power, and institutions in the making of public policy towards globalization of communications and transportation.


EDMP 617. Technology and Social System Design (3)
Managers are designers who shape the social and technical world we inhabit. This course explores the process of design and asks how managers can become better designers who anticipate and evaluate the social, economic, and political consequences of existing and emerging products, processes organizational forms.


EDMP 620. Synthesis and Application of Knowledge (3)
This capstone inquiry seminar focuses on how different methodological techniques complement and conflict with each other and how they may be used in concert. The seminar emphasizes understanding findings from a variety of studies and translating them into common language, thus permitting decision making and action.


EDMP 621. Applied Research I (3)
The Applied Research component of the E.D.M. Program integrates conceptual analysis with managerial and social policy. This seminar is dedicated to writing the proposal for students’ applied research projects, which are undertaken as independent work during the third year.


EDMP 622. Thematic Elective I (1 - 3)
Participants in the E.D.M. Program take a selected sequence of two coordinated elective courses that provide opportunities for advanced study in topic- or sector-specific areas. Sequences will be designed according to the shared interests of participant groups. For example, a sequence for participants with special interest in Nonprofit Management may consist of courses in Constitutional Issues, Nonprofit Organizations in the Marketplace, or The International Nonprofit Sector. A sequence designed for participants interested in Technology Management may include Foundations for Technology Management Leadership plus an additional course that integrates topics in Information Systems, Management Policy, Operations Management, and Organizational Behavior.


EDMP 623. Thematic Elective II (1 - 3)
(See EDMP 622.)


EDMP 624. Applied Research II (1 - 4)
(See EDMP 621.)


EDMP 625. Thematic Elective III (1 - 6)
(See EDMP 622.)


EDMP 626. Applied Research III (1 - 9)
(See EDMP 621.)


EDMP 627. Applied Research IV (3 - 9)
(See EDMP 621.)


EDMP 638. Qualitative Research Methods I (3)
This course explores ways to conceptualize an object of study and facilitates formulation of students’ conceptual work and production of research reports at the end of the first year of the program. The course conveys how to generate research ideas by critically reviewing literature and developing ideas that contribute to a problem or issue of interest by working with theory and extending previous research. The practicality of conducting certain kinds of research is evaluated and length, intensity and ethical constraints of different research efforts are examined. Each student produces a report communicating and supporting a conceptualization of the phenomenon of interest involving independent, mediating and dependent variables. The paper defines a problem of practice, presents, both visually and in narrative form, concepts shaped by field experience and prior writing that promote understanding of the problem, and includes a research proposal describing sample, data collection and data analysis.


EDMP 640. Social Ethics: Contemporary Issues (3)
While drawing upon intellectual ancestors in moral philosophy and ethics, the primary focus of the course is on current issues and points of view. It provides an analysis of social and ethical questions pertaining to the definition and purpose of contemporary life, the need for moral coherence, and the meaning of living in a global society. It seeks to examine a larger set of questions that have much to do with how we live our personal and professional lives. The unifying theme of the course is Tolstoy’s question, “How then shall we live?” The course objectives are to expand capacity to address the ethical implications of these issues and to come closer to framing the right questions.


EDMP 641. Qualitative Research Methods II (3)
This is the third course in the Qualitative methods sequence. Fieldwork is conducted during the summer and the qualitative data is analyzed in the following fall semester. The students’ conceptual model of the topic or problem of interest is revised. Emphasis is placed on inductive coding of semi-structured interviews and quantification of data and its statistical manipulation, where appropriate. The aim of the semester is to revise and specify one’s conceptual model and to integrate new literature arising as a result of the fieldwork. Hypotheses for third year quantitative analysis are developed. Completed projects are reviewed and assessed for quality and readiness for quantitative evaluation. Prereq: EDMP 638.


EDMP 642. Directed Studies Seminar (1 - 9)
At different times during the Program, EDM students register for Directed Studies courses. The purpose of these courses is to recognize the work the students are doing to conduct and present their individualized research at a high quality level. Activities conducted under the Directed Studies courses are dedicated to the collection of qualitative or quantitative data and the preparation of research reports.


EDMP 643. Foundations for Quantitative Inquiry (3)
This course aims to develop the basic foundations and skills for designing and executing generalizable studies. It focuses on building competence in model building, construct measurement, research design, data collection methodologies, and application of analytical software commonly involved in quantitative inquiry. Covered topics include framing research questions, reliability ad validity of measurement, quasi-experimental research design, and fieldwork for data collection. Classes are designed to balance between the theory and practice of quantitative research design, and will be linked to the participant’s own research projects. Prereq: EDMP 641.


EDMP 644. Multivariate Data Analysis (2)
Building on instruction in univariate statistics, this course covers the fundamental assumptions, principles, and applications of multiple regression and structural equation modeling methodologies for analyzing quantitative data. It focuses on building competence in analytical skills for testing hypotheses guided by a conceptually sound and pragmatically useful model of some real world phenomenon. Analytical software used include SPSS and AMOS. Prereq: EDMP 641.


EDMP 645. Critical Applications and Research Project Issues (4)
Using the multivariate and research design toolkit developed in related courses, this course focuses on critically analyzing selected pieces of published applied and policy research to develop a critical appreciation of issues and debates that have wide applicability and relevance. In addition, this course addresses common application issues that may arise during the participants’ execution of individual research projects. Application of critical analysis and appreciation approach to the participant’s own research work is encouraged and supported by sharing and discussing common themes and problems.


EDMP 646. Advanced Analytical Methods for Generalizable Studies (3)
This course addresses advanced topics in regression and structural equation modeling such as confirmatory factor analysis, mediator/moderator analysis, multiple-group analysis, management of missing data, and analyzing qualitative/categorical data. These analytical methods are intended to enhance the participant’s toolkit to facilitate a strong bridge to the academic literature and the application to specific data based problems that arise in applied research.


EDMP 647. Introduction to Statistics (1)
This course introduces basic statistical concepts and their application in social research building, elementary statistical methods and applications, descriptive statistics, random variables, sampling distribution, estimation, hypothesis tests. The course also provides an introduction to data analysis using SPSS computer software.


EDMP 660. Directed Studies: Qualitative Fieldwork (1 - 3)
This course is part of the qualitative research sequence which began with EDMP 638, Qualitative Research Methods I. In this qualitative fieldwork course, students will conduct a series of interviews based on the research proposal and interview guide which they developed in EDMP 638. Students are expected to complete their interviews and work with faculty to begin initial analysis of the interview data.


EDMP 661. Directed Studies: Qualitative Research Report Preparation (1 - 3)
This course is dedicated to individualized student research. Student research objectives and plans are implemented through qualitative and quantitative fieldwork, report preparation, and manuscript development and submission.


EDMP 662. Directed Studies: Quantitative Fieldwork (1 - 3)
This course is dedicated to the design, development and execution of the student’s individualized research work. Each student will be expected to develop a proposal for research work that aims to empirically test a conceptual model to address a significant substantive problem. Following faculty approval and feedback, each student will be expected to conduct field work for data collection in accord with a research design that yields high quality data. Completion of the course requirements will rest on the satisfactory completion the fieldwork as per guidelines provided in the course.


EDMP 663. Directed Studies: Quantitative Research Report (1 - 3)
This course is dedicated to the execution and completion of student’s individualized research work. Each student will be expected to execute a research study to provide reliable and valid conclusions using rigorous quantitative methodologies and write a publishable quality paper for submission to faculty for approval. It is highly desired that student papers be submitted for presentation and publication at appropriate academic and/or practitioner outlets. Completion of the course requirements will rest on the satisfactory completion and submission of the research paper as per guidelines provided in the course.


EDMP 664. Research Dissemination (3)
This course prepares students to publish their work in academic journals as well as in high quality practitioner outlets.


EDMP 665. Research Methods (3)
This course addresses key conceptual and practical issues in the conduct of both qualitative and quantitative inquiry. These issues include identifying a specific topic of research interest, strategies for literature review, and developing plans and procedures for preliminary data collection from the field. The objective is to prepare students for more advanced theoretical projects as well as actual fieldwork and research projects in later stages of the E.D.M. Program.


EDMP 667. Frontiers of Management Research I (3)
The purpose of this seminar introduces students to a variety of topics in the various fields of management, presents issues at the frontiers of knowledge in each field, and discusses methodological issues as well as the implications of the research for practice/policy. This course draws on expertise from faculty in the Weatherhead School, the university, and EDM alumi.


EDMP 668. Frontiers of Management Research II (3)
This seminar is a continuation of Frontiers in Management I and introduces students to further disciplines in the field of management. Issues at the frontiers of knowledge in a variety of fields are presented and methodological issues as well as the implications of the research for practice/policy are discussed. This course draws on expertise from faculty in the Weatherhead School, the university, and EDM alumni.


EDMP 699. Applied Research Project Continuation (1 - 9)
Program participants who have not successfully completed their Applied Research Projects before the start of the fall semester following their third year of enrollment in the E.D.M. Program will have seven years from the date of their initial matriculation into the Program to complete degree requirements. If their work continues beyond the normal 54 credit hours of designed courses, they will register for Applied Research Project Continuation. Continuation credits may also be used for students enrolling in the Program after August 2000, who have not completed their required course work and research requirements within the Program’s required 54 semester credit hours.


ENTREPRENEURIAL STUDIES (ENTP)


ENTP 301. Entrepreneurial Strategy (3)
This course is designed to show students how to identify potential business opportunities, determine what constitutes a good business model, and to strategically implement a business proposal. Topics of focus include an overview of the entrepreneurial process, determinants of venture success in high tech and other business environments, and strategies for industry entry and venture growth. Prereq: ACCT 101 or ACCT 303. Coreq: At least sophomore standing.


ENTP 310. Entrepreneurial Finance - Undergraduate (3)
This course explores the financing and financial management of entrepreneurial new ventures. The course will focus on issues of financial management of new ventures (forecasting cash flows, cash flow management, capital budgeting, valuation, capital structure) and the various financial methods and mechanisms available to entrepreneurs (bootstrapping, angel investors, venture capitalists, IPOs). Prereq or Coreq: ACCT 101 or ACCT 303 or consent of instructor.


ENTP 311. New Venture Creation (3)
This course explores all aspects of the creation of a new venture from idea through startup, growth, and beyond. Students will learn how to evaluate opportunities, develop strategies, create a business plan and acquire financing for a new venture. In this course students will develop a business plan for a new venture.


ENTP 312. Senior Seminar in Entrepreneurship (3)
The main objective of this course is to meet the advanced needs of our students in honing their entrepreneurial skills. This objective will be achieved through readings and case instruction, presentations by entrepreneurs who are actively engaged in starting new ventures and the commercialization of new technologies, and the successful completion of a research project for an entrepreneurial venture. These projects will be graded by the professor and presented to the class and to the client entrepreneur. Prereq: ENTP 310 and ENTP 311.


ENTP 418. Enterprise Development (3)
Course features new product launch by students and new business idea competition judged by actual venture capitalists. Students will also learn how to acquire control of an existing company, including valuation methods, sources of funding, tactics for finding companies to buy, and how to negotiate the purchase of a business. Also includes actual student negotiation with sellers of a company. Course is designed to accelerate career success through bold entrepreneurial strategies. Offered as ENTP 418 and PLCY 418.


ENTP 419. Entrepreneurship and Personal Wealth Creation (3)
Course explores the accumulation of personal wealth utilizing entrepreneurial strategies. The underlying competencies of successful entrepreneurs are identified and applied to individual lives of students. Active entrepreneurs will be studied, and original case studies of start-ups and acquisitions provide the basis for class exercises. Offered as ENTP 419 and PLCY 419.


ENTP 420. Managing the Family Firm (3)
The vast majority of U.S. firms are family controlled and present special problems in strategic management including the interaction of family and firm objectives, executive succession, management development and motivation, finance, estate planning, etc. This course explores solutions to these problems in the context of guiding the firm’s growth through the threshold between personal and professional management. The course pedagogy is participative and experiential. Offered as ENTP 420 and PLCY 420.


ENTP 422. Managing an Emerging Growth Enterprise (3)
Students are exposed to what it is like to work in an emerging growth company with sales under $100 million. Prospective students might be individuals who are considering employment with middle market company, entrepreneurs who may start a company, or business persons who may buy a middle market company. The learning experience will stem from participating in an actual semester-long project. In-class discussions include: business planning, selling, managing technology transfer, and creativity/innovation, and guest presentations by CEOs from middle market companies. Offered as ENTP 422 and PLCY 422. Prereq: ACCT 401, BAFI 402, MKMR 403 and MIDS 409.


ENTP 425. Managing Human Resource Issues in Entrepreneurial Firms (3)
This course examines how entrepreneurial firms can develop human resource practices and strategies to sustain their vision, grow their businesses, and create value for customers, shareholders, and employees. The first half of the course will be devoted to exploring the distinctive challenges entrepreneurial firms encounter in aligning organizational goals and human resource strategy and practices. Among those practices are staffing, recruitment and selection, compensation, and employee motivation. The second half of the course will explore these issues further in the context of key organizational phases ranging from firm foundings, the transition from entrepreneurial to professional management, the development of “intrepreneurship” in existing organizations, and the spin-off of the new corporate ventures. Offered as ENTP 425 and LHRP 425.


ENTP 426. International Entrepreneurship (3)
This course introduces the area of international entrepreneurship by focusing on various aspects of this area. Topics to be covered include: conditions making small, medium-sized, and new ventures increasingly important in international business; information sources relevant to international entrepreneurship; critical steps in deciding on doing international entrepreneurship, strategic planning and methods in conducting international entrepreneurship; and benefits and problems of going international as a new venture. Offered as ENTP 426 and PLCY 426.


ENTP 427. Entrepreneurial Strategy (3)
Creating and managing a new venture inside or outside a corporation is a task that few individuals are able to accomplish, even though many profess the desire. The primary goal of this course is to provide an understanding of entrepreneurship and the entrepreneurial process. The course will broaden a basic understanding obtained in the functional areas (organization, strategy, finance) as they apply to new venture creation and growth. While most of the examples in class will be drawn from new venture formations, the principles also apply to new business development in corporate settings and to non-profit entrepreneurship. Offered as ENTP 427, PLCY 427.


ENTP 429. New Venture Creation (3)
The primary goal of this course is to provide an understanding of entrepreneurship and the entrepreneurial process. The course will broaden a basic understanding obtained in the functional areas as they apply to new venture creation and growth. Offered as ENTP 429 and PLCY 429.


ENTP 439. Intrapreneurship - Entrepreneurship within the Corporation (3)
Intrapreneurs are the entrepreneurs within corporations who combine innovation, creativity and leadership to develop and launch new products, new product lines, and new business units that grow revenues and profits from within. Intrapreneurial innovation and creativity have never been needed more by U.S. corporations than they are today. Numerous corporations have been increasing revenues through mergers and acquisitions, rather than through internal product innovation and new business creation. Today, many companies are returning to their entrepreneurial roots. Revitalizing existing companies through intrapreneurial activity creates new capital, retains and increases jobs, and creates exciting places to work and achieve. The purpose of this course is to encourage students to research and understand the theories, principles, concepts, and practices of entrepreneurship within organizations--Intrapreneurship. Students will become acquainted with trends, expectations, organizational challenges to innovation, and opportunities in today’s corporate America. Offered as ENTP 439 and PLCY 439.


ENTP 444. Entrepreneurial Finance (3)
The objective of this course is to introduce students to the issues of financial management and capital formation in new ventures. The course will address issues of estimation of cash requirements, development of pro forma financial plans, firm valuation and the process and tools used in raising debt and equity financing. Bootstrapping, angel investing, venture capital, strategic alliances and initial public offerings will be covered. The emphasis is on the entrepreneur and how he/she can assess financial needs and develop a sensible plan for acquiring financial resources in a manner that is consistent with their financial needs and other strategic goals. Offered as BAFI 444 and ENTP 444. Prereq: BAFI 402.


ENTP 446A. Venture Law (2.5)
This course will provide an overview of the legal issues associated with venturing in the life sciences. The course will cover the legal aspects of company formation, management of intellectual property, strategic alliances, compensation, and securities laws. Recommended preparation: Full time M.B.A. status. Offered as BIOS 446A and ENTP 446A. ENTP 446B. Venture Law (3)
This course will provide an overview of the legal issues associated with venturing in the life sciences. The course will cover the legal aspects of company formation, management of intellectual property, strategic alliances, compensation, and securities laws. Recommended preparation: Evening M.B.A. status. Offered as BIOS 446B and ENTP 446B.


ENTP 450. Entrepreneurial Marketing-M.B.A. (3)
This course addresses the entrepreneurial/intrapreneurial process of commercializing an idea for a market opportunity. Students select an opportunity and develop a deployable, one-year market entry program and a five-year strategic marketing program. Emphasis is on the entrepreneurial marketing decision process, including defining the business, defining the market, specifying customer perceived value, assessing competitive capability and advantage, identifying and properly using secondary and primary information, and deploying marketing programs throughout the organization and the supply chain. Offered as ENTP 450 and MKMR 450B.


ENTP 464. Technology Entrepreneurship (3)
This course is designed to help students to identify, evaluate, and obtain control over technology opportunities that they can successfully exploit by starting new companies. The course focuses on four themes: (1) the source, discovery, and evaluation of technological opportunities, (2) the process of organizing innovation to produce new technology that satisfies the needs of customers, (3) the different mechanisms available to appropriate the returns from the exploitation of technological opportunities, and (4) the differences between opportunities and approaches that are valuable and sustainable for independent entrepreneurs and large firms. Students taking this course may not receive credit for both ECON 464 and ENTP 441. Offered as ECON 464 and ENTP 464.


ENTP 501. Special Problems and Topics (1 - 18)


BIOSCIENCE ENTREPRENEURSHIP (BIOS)


BIOS 446A. Venture Law (2.5)
This course will provide an overview of the legal issues associated with venturing in the life sciences. The course will cover the legal aspects of company formation, management of intellectual property, strategic alliances, compensation, and securities laws. Recommended preparation: Full time M.B.A. status. Offered as BIOS 446A and ENTP 446A.


BIOS 446B. Venture Law (3)
This course will provide an overview of the legal issues associated with venturing in the life sciences. The course will cover the legal aspects of company formation, management of intellectual property, strategic alliances, compensation, and securities laws. Recommended preparation: Evening M.B.A. status. Offered as BIOS 446B and ENTP 446B.


BIOS 447. Regulatory Affairs for the Biosciences (1.5)
This mini-course introduces students to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the laws and regulations it enforces. A scientific regulatory agency with far reaching enforcement authority, FDA is the most powerful consumer protection agency in the world. This course will familiarize students with FDA’s mission, philosophy and organizational structure, as well as policy and procedure it uses to ensure the safety and effectiveness of the food, drugs, biologics, cosmetics, medical devices and radiation-emitting products it regulates. Recommended preparation: Enrollment in the MEM Biomedical Entrepreneurship Track. Offered as BIOS 447, HSMC 447, and IIME 447.


BIOS 448. Engineering Statistics for Biosciences (3)
This course provides an introduction to biostatistics, emphasizing experimental design, analysis of data, and special emphasis on statistical and financial aspects of randomized clinical trials for biomedical applications. There will be a final project involving development of a clinical trial protocol including the experimental design, recruitment and retention strategy, analysis plan and budget. Offered as BIOS 448, HSMC 448, and IIME 445.


BIOS 450. Health Care Economics for the Biosciences (1.5)
This course utilizes economic principles to explore such issues as health care pricing, anti-trust enforcement and pharmaceutical economics, choices in adoption of managed care contracts by physician groups, and the like. Instruction style and in-class group project focus on making strategic decisions. The course is directed for a general audience, not just for students and concentration in bioscience or health systems management. Offered as BIOS 450, ECON 450, and HSMC 450. Prereq: ECON 403.


EXECUTIVE MBA (EMBA)


EMBA 412. Stakeholder Management - Leadership (2)
Participants will be challenged to enhance their leadership capacity by assessing and analyzing the knowledge, abilities, values and interests relevant to executives. The course will also explore issues of ethical character, leadership, and organizational responsibility as well as corporate governance. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.


EMBA 415. EMBA Execution - Leadership (4)
The modules in this course will prepare executives to lead their organizations by understanding how to “execute” their plans. Participants will complete the LEAD module. Advanced negotiations will also be covered in this course. The focus is on enhancing individual as well as organizational performance and competitive advantage through “principled negotiation;” “win-win” bargaining; and collaborative approaches to bargaining. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.


EMBA 417. TEAMS (1)
This course enables the formation of E.M.B.A. study groups and classroom learning environment by introducing participants to their adult learning styles, models of group decision-making, theories of team development and rules of engagement for effective learning teams. Prereq: E.M.B.A. students only.


EMBA 425. EMBA Execution - Management (4)
The modules in this course will prepare executives to manage their organizations by understanding how to “execute” their plans. Participants will focus on the role of a Product/Brand Manager in profitably managing a firm’s existing offerings and identify areas for growth. The course also presents first-hand issues in international management. It accomplishes this by means of readings, a written assignment and, most importantly, an international trip designed to witness different management cultures, styles and environments for business in the international community. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.


EMBA 431. Application Project I (.5)
The first year application project is built around a live situation in your organization enabling you to apply the concepts and skills you are learning in the E.M.B.A program immediately. The project should focus on an important opportunity or issue. In undertaking the project, you will learn the generic problem solving approach and how to apply it in your organization. You will also investigate techniques for process analysis and project management. The outcome of your work will be a concrete result for your organization that should provide a return at least equal to the cost of your degree. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.


EMBA 432. Application Project II (.5)
This is an experiential course built around a live project in the student’s organization. The project will focus on improving a business process or making a challenging strategic decision. Students must lead a team to do this project. The team will analyze the current situation and diagnose its problems or opportunities, creatively envision new possibilities, evaluate potential improvements and recommend and begin to implement appropriate solutions. Students will learn the generic problem solving approach used by many major consulting firms and how to apply it in their organizations. They will also investigate techniques for process analysis and project management. The outcome of the project will be a concrete result for the organization.Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.


EMBA 434. EMBA Process - Application Project II (.5)
This is an experiential course built around a live project in the student’s organization. The project will focus on improving a business process or making a challenging strategic decision. Students must lead a team to do this project. The team will analyze the current situation and diagnose its problems or opportunities, creatively envision new possibilities, evaluate potential improvements and recommend and begin to implement appropriate solutions. Students will learn the generic problem solving approach used by many major consulting firms and how to apply it in their organizations. They will also investigate techniques for process analysis and project management. The outcome of the project will be a concrete result for the organization. Students will also serve as coaches for other classmates and practice their consultative skills. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.


EMBA 435. EMBA Execution - Application II (1)
This is an experiential course built around a live project in the student’s organization. The project will focus on improving a business process or making a challenging strategic decision. Students must lead a team to do this project. The team will analyze the current situation and diagnose its problems or opportunities, creatively envision new possibilities, evaluate potential improvements and recommend and begin to implement appropriate solutions. Students will learn the generic problem solving approach used by many major consulting firms and how to apply it in their organizations. They will also investigate techniques for process analysis and project management. The outcome of the project will be a concrete result for the organization. Students will also serve as coaches for other classmates and practice their consultative skills. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.


EMBA 436. Accounting for Business Executives (2.5)
This course is an introduction to financial and managerial accounting, rather than a course in introductory accounting. This course is designed for the business professional and is intended to prepare the student to use the information prepared by accountants. It will not dwell in detail on the technical aspects of accounting or bookkeeping. In addition, this course is designed to help the student become an effective user of cost information, from the perspective of parties internal to the firm. This aspect of accounting is a compilation of techniques rather than a set of rules. Since the information is for private use, the goal is to create the most meaningful and useful data for use by managers. Assignments will be designed to develop the student’s ability to analyze and interpret accounting data and to more effectively utilize accounting data in day to day business decisions. Finally, this course is intended to strengthen abilities to identify problems and opportunities, to search out and analyze desired information leading to a well-reasoned conclusion, and to perform sensitivity analysis around that conclusion, using financial information. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.


EMBA 437. Economic Analysis for Managers (2)
This course, which is limited to students in the Executive M.B.A, program, explores the basic elements of the economic system which the executive needs to know in order to understand how the firm interacts with the system and how economic factors affect decision making. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.


EMBA 438. Business Statistics And Quantitative Analysis (2)
In this course, students study the use of modern quantitative and business statistics to support the executive decision-making process. With the help of computer software,, the models examined assist in describing and analyzing problems and suggesting possible managerial actions. The techniques discussed include tools for decision making under uncertainty including regression analysis.Prereq: E.M.B.A. students only.


EMBA 439. Corporate Finance (3)
The central organizing principle of this course is to familiarize the class with the basics of valuation. This first course in finance introduces the tools and methods employed in valuation of projects and corporate securities. Valuation involves the determination of (i) cash flows of the firm, project or financial assets and (ii) the discount rates that are used to compute the present values of the cash flows. Asset pricing models provide the underpinnings for the development of the discount rates. The material is synthesized in capital budgeting exercises which are cost-benefit analyses of capital project cash flows to evaluate whether they are value enhancing. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.


EMBA 440. System Thinking (1)
The need to deal with ever more complex systems became apparent during the two world wars. Many of the systems developed to aid in the war effort, particularly those that integrated people and technologies, could not be completely understood using the tools of analysis. Breaking a complex system down into its components--which we have been taught to do since childhood--only takes us so far. To understand a system’s purpose and the dynamics that keep it functioning requires another kind of thinking. Drawing on ideas from biology and holistic psychology, systems thinking provides principles and tools to aid in understanding such purposeful systems. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.


EMBA 441. Leadership Assessment and Development (1)
The primary objective of Leadership and Executive Assessment and Development (LEAD) is to learn a method for assessing your knowledge, abilities, values, and interests relevant to leadership and executive management so that you will be able to develop and implement a plan for enhancing your leadership and executive capability throughout your career and life. The enabling objectives are: (a) To systematically identify your current and desired capability (i.e., knowledge, abilities, values, and interests); (b) To develop an individualized learning agenda and plan for the next 3-5 years; and (c) To explore techniques to assist others in doing the same. In this first module of the three-module series you will learn about the concepts of resonant leadership and emotional/social intelligence. You will also draft a personal vision statement, as well as write an essay on your vision and values. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.


EMBA 442. Innovation (1)
Organizations are under continuous pressure to be efficient and productive in order to generate (often short-term) profit. At the same time they must innovate to remain competitive in the long-term. Innovation involves the generation, development, and delivery of new products, processes, or businesses. Intrapreneurs are those who can successfully bring new ideas to fruition in established organizations. Innovation in the context of an established organization requires that intrapreneurs fundamentally understand the dynamics of innovation and innovation management. This course introduces fundamental concepts associated with innovation in the context of an established organization. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.


EMBA 443. Managing Operations (2.5)
This course is a broad-spectrum course with emphasis on Lean production techniques helpful to the practice of management in general and at any level. We will discuss commonly occurring application problems in quality management , just-in-time production, operational flexibility and project management. The methodologies presented are applicable to manufacturing as well as service organizations like health care, insurance, hotel-management, airlines and government related operations. The emphasis will be on the fundamentals of the operations function in an organization but we will explore the interface of operations management with other functional areas such as marketing, finance, accounting, etc. This course is not oriented toward specialists in operations management. Its goal is to introduce students to the environments and help them appreciate the problems that operations managers are confronted with. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.


EMBA 444. Execution/Change (1.5)
The global business landscape is littered with expansive, well intended strategies that failed. Why? Often because leaders fail to identify and invest in the full range of the projects required to support those strategies. Even as strategists break their plans into doable chunks, they seldom work with project leaders effectively. Many leaders neglect to revise their company’s strategic portfolio to fit the demands of the dynamic environment and they lose touch with strategic initiatives long before all ports are transferred and outcomes are realized in operations. In this course, we will expose you to concepts and tools by which you can set the purpose, communicate goals, carved the goes out into discrete projects with measurable outputs that will give clear line of sight or people lower in the organizational hierarchy about what the purpose is. This clarity about the purpose and goal congruence is the critical elements of successful execution. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.


EMBA 445. Corporate Strategy (2)
Topics covered in this course are as follows: Concepts that underlie corporate-wide success; discerning the inimitable capabilities of your organization; recognizing synergies across a firm’s multiple lines of business and leveraging these capabilities in new businesses; developing new markets; identifying markets that have a high probability for success; how to choose between Greenfield entries, joint ventures and acquisitions; techniques for managing acquisitions. Prereq: E.M.B.A.


EMBA 446. Managing Risk (2)
Some of the most profound developments in finance have been in the area of financial engineering and risk management. Financial engineering has resulted in an explosion of new securities, trading strategies, and in risk management programs. Indeed, in today’s economy over two thirds of large U.S. corporations use one type of financial engineering, namely derivatives, as part of their risk management program. The course seeks to help corporate managers understand how financial engineering can be used to advance the goals and strategies of the firm. This class provides an introduction to the basic building blocks of financial engineering, namely call and put options. These products are to finance, what the periodic table is to chemistry. By meshing options together, the financial engineer can create a financial product that exactly meets specific risk management needs. The course focuses on using derivatives to change a firm’s risk profile with respect to equity, interest rate, foreign exchange, and commodity risks. The ideas here extend to all areas of finance including mergers and acquisitions, international finance, capital budgeting and strategic planning. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.


EMBA 447. Leadership Assessment and Development (1.5)
The primary objective of Leadership and Executive Assessment and Development (LEAD) is to learn a method for assessing your knowledge, abilities, values, and interests relevant to leadership and executive management so that you will be able to develop and implement a plan for enhancing your leadership and executive capability throughout your career and life. The enabling objectives are: (a) To systematically identify your current and desired capability (i.e. knowledge, abilities, values, and interests); (b) To develop an individualized learning agenda and plan for the next 3-5 years; and (c) To explore techniques to assist others in doing the same. In this third module of the three-module series you will pull together elements from the first tow modules to construct an individualized learning plan for your future growth and development. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.


EMBA 450. Managerial Marketing (2)
This course is designed with three overarching objectives. The first is an emphasis on decision making in a broad range of market contexts. The second objective builds on the notion that decision making is dynamic; that is, market situations demand not just one good decision but a series of them as a situation unfolds (providing new and varied information for each subsequent decision). Integrating concepts from a number of the courses that you are taking concurrently into decision-making about markets is a final objective. Coreq: E.M.B.A. students only.


EMBA 451. Competitive Strategy and Integrated Case (2.5)
This course will help you understand the keys to successful strategic planning - the capabilities needed for competitive advantage in each and every business of a firm. In particular, the course will help you understand the following. Critical capabilities vs. table stakes, how to position the firm in a market segment to maximize the chance of success and the limits to growth of the core business. All of the analysis will be done within a framework that integrates the core concepts developed in the other functional courses. Coreq: E.M.B.A. students only.


EMBA 452. Supply Chain and LEAN (1)
SC and Lean Operations managers are responsible for designing, running, controlling and improving the systems that accomplish production. This course is a broad-spectrum course with emphasis on techniques and information that are helpful to the practice of management in general and at any level. We will discuss commonly occurring application problems such as process analysis, inventory control, quality management, just-in-time concepts, etc. with applications in manufacturing, health care, insurance, hotel-management, airlines and government related operations. The emphasis will be on the fundamentals of the operations function in an organization. Also we will explore the interface of operations management with other functional areas such as marketing, finance, accounting, etc. Coreq: E.M.B.A. students only.


EMBA 453. Leadership Assessment and Development - II (1)
The primary objective of Leadership and Executive Assessment and Development (LEAD) is to learn a method for assessing your knowledge, abilities, values, and interests relevant to leadership and executive management so that you will be able to develop and implement a plan for enhancing your leadership and executive capability throughout your career and life. The enabling objectives are: (a) To systematically identify your current and desired capability (i.e., knowledge, abilities, values, and interests); (b) To develop an individualized learning agenda and plan for the next 3-5 years; and (c) To explore techniques to assist others in doing the same. In this second module of the three-module series you will receive 360-degree feedback on your emotional/social intelligence competencies. You will also participate in a one-on-one executive coaching session with the instructor. Additionally, working with your group, you will apply the course concepts to the analysis of a current CEO. Coreq: E.M.B.A. students only.


EMBA 454. Cultural Challenges for Global Managers (1)
This course addresses some of the critical cultural issues faced by managers doing business in the global economy, such as: What is Culture? How does it impact business? What opportunities does it present for managers of local, as well as global organizations? Results of cross-cultural research are considered, but the course relies primarily on case analysis and class discussion to engage participants in creating solutions for the thorny issues presented. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.


EMBA 455. Managing in an Emerging Economy (1.5)
This course will prepare executives to add value to their organizations by understanding how to strategically position an organization for global success. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.


EMBA 456. Managing in the New Global Economy (1)
This course focuses on how aspects of today’s globalization (especially the reduction of trade barriers, rise of BRIC economies, and globally distributed product development) are impacting company strategies and operations. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.


EMBA 457. International Trade and Finance (2)
This course consists of two parts. The first part deals with the global trade and direct investment environment. It covers the theories as well as the political economy of international trade and foreign direct investment. Its aim is twofold: (i) to enable an understanding of such technical issues as to how the effects of tariffs and quotas differ or how free trade areas and customs unions differ; and (ii) to provide a systemic view of how government policies and corporate strategies interact in changing the global trade and investment environment of business. The second part of the course deals with regional economic integration and the global monetary system. Its aim is twofold (i) to enable an understanding of such technical issues as to how different stages of economic integration such as free trade areas and customs union differ; how the foreign exchange market functions in terms of different hedging instruments in the context of the international monetary system; and (ii) to provide a systemic view of how government policies and corporate strategies interact in changing the global trade and financial environment of business. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.


EMBA 464. Legal Environment (2)
This course provides a brief overview of the legal system that managers face, with an emphasis on contracts, corporate law, property rights and the modern regulatory apparatus of government. Prereq: E.M.B.A. candidates only.


QUANTITATIVE METHODS IN MANAGEMENT (QUMM)


QUMM 414. Statistics and Decision Modeling (3)
This course provides the foundations of statistical and operations research methodologies for managerial decision-making. Business statistics focuses on statistical thinking as one of the fundamentals of effective management. Topics covered include sampling and the normal distribution, making inferences from data via confidence intervals and hypothesis tests, and analyzing relationships between samples. Decision modeling of organizational systems uses mathematical and computer models to provide a quantitative perspective on identifying, analyzing and solving complex decision problems. This course includes an introduction to linear programming models and applications, simulation techniques in decision-making, and project management.


QUMM 414A. Statistics and Decision Modeling (1)
This class provides a brief look at management science and selected key tools and applications. Topics include modeling, linear programming, simulation and linear regression. Students should have a background in statistics and college-level algebra. Just-in-time statistics review workshops will be available at the beginning of the semester. Prereq: Open to ACL-MBA students.


QUMM 501. Special Problems and Topics (1 - 18)
This course is offered, with permission, to students undertaking reading in a field of special interest.


QUMM 601. Special Problems and Topics (1 - 18)
This is a course of flexible design in which a student, with the agreement of an instructor in quantitative methods, may pursue a special topic or problem. M.B.A. students should enroll in QUMM 501.