(1)
An extension of ANES 485 with emphasis on improving or exercising knowledge of anesthesia-appropriate basic science, the use of more advanced equipment and techniques for uncomplicated surgical cases with an introduction to crisis management. Recommended preparation: ANES 485.


ANES 487. Physiological Model-Based Simulation II (1)
An extension of ANES 486 emphasizing the physical techniques aspects of crisis management, team work and rescue in anesthesia, including support for and review of training in Basic Life Support and Advanced Cardiac Life Support. Recommended preparation: ANES 486.


ANES 490. Ethics, Law and Diversity for Anesthesiologist Assistants (2)
This course will focus on three topics. First, a discussion of legal practice as it applies to health care including basics of medical jurisprudence, negligence, and how to avoid a lawsuit. Second, a discussion of ethical theory including the principles of medical ethics, do not resuscitate, truth telling, and assessment of competence. Last, a discussion on diversity that will focus on the differences and similarities among people and how these factors influence patient care. The final grade will be based on an essay and a multiple choice exam.


ANES 499. Clinical Remediation (1 - 10)
(Credit as arranged.) Course offered to the student one time during the program of study which remediates “C” or below work in a clinical course.


ANES 580. Fundamentals of Anesthetic Sciences II (1)
The second-year equivalent of ANES 480. An examination is administered at the end of each semester. Recommended preparation: ANES 480.


ANES 585. Physiological Model-Based Simulation III (1)
A review of critical crisis management and rescue techniques which are not often seen in practice. (Course will be scheduled either Fall or Spring Semester based on external rotation schedule.) Recommended preparation: ANES 487.


ANES 599. Clinical Remediation (1 - 10)
(Credit as arranged.) Course offered to the student one time during the program of study which remediates “C” or below work in a clinical course.

 

 

Department of Biochemistry


Room W-427, School of Medicine
Phone 216-368-3344
Fax 216-368-3419
http://www.case.edu/med/biochemistry/

Michael Weiss, M.D., Ph.D., Chair

 

Biochemistry is the study of the molecular basis of cellular function, making it a central discipline in the biological sciences. Biochemists ask the question, “How do life processes work at the molecular level?” The Department of Biochemistry offers undergraduate programs leading to the bachelor of arts degree and bachelor of science degree in biochemistry and graduate programs leading to the master of science, doctor of philosophy, and dual-degree programs as follows: doctor of medicine/doctor of philosophy degree; doctor of medicine/masters of science in biomedical investigation; juris doctor/masters of science in biochemistry.


The department also participates in several interdisciplinary and interdepartmental programs in the School of Medicine and at Case Western Reserve University that provide additional avenues of study. Research interests within the department include a spectrum of modern biochemical topics in six broad areas: enzymology, protein chemistry, structural biology, gene expression, cell biology, and molecular medicine/gene therapy. These areas are described in detail later in this section. The department has state-of-the-art equipment and facilities for research in modern biochemistry. More complete information about the undergraduate and graduate programs may be obtained by contacting the departmental office.


GRADUATE PROGRAMS


Masters Degrees


The master of science degree programs provide advanced training for students who wish to continue beyond the B.A. or, B.S. degree without committing themselves to the Ph.D. curriculum. Two lines of study are offered: the three-year research program leading to the master’s of science in biochemical research and the two-year course work program leading to the master’s of science in biochemistry.


Master of Science Degree in Biochemical Research


The program leading to the M.S. degree in biochemical research is uniquely designed to provide interested students with sufficient background and laboratory experience to enable them to function as senior research assistants and eventually as laboratory supervisors in university departments, research institutes, or industrial laboratories. Students in this three-year program receive a stipend, and tuition costs are covered by the department. The students pursue flexible and individually designed schedules, which prepare them for independent research projects in the second and third years of the program. The program simultaneously develops background knowledge and technical skills in modern biochemistry, which can be applied to several career paths. A more complete description of the program, admission policies, and financial aid is available from the departmental office.


Master of Science in Biochemistry Degree


The program leading to the M.S. degree in biochemistry is designed to provide students with knowledge of the latest advancements in biochemistry and related fields. It is intended for students who desire to pursue a career not directly involved with research, such as teaching, or various administrative positions in the pharmaceutical industry. Students typically enroll in three courses for each of four semesters.


REQUIRED COURSES ARE:
BIOC 407 (General Biochemistry) and BIOC 408 (Molecular Biology). Other lecture courses are selected by the students in consultation with academic advisors who are assigned to the students upon matriculation into the program. A more complete description of the program and admission policies is available from the departmental office.


Ph.D. in Biochemistry


The aim of the Ph.D. in biochemistry program is to prepare students for careers in teaching and research in biochemistry. The emphasis of the doctoral program is on research culminating in the completion of an original independent research project under the guidance of a faculty member in the biochemistry program. The research areas in the department are described later in this section. In addition to the research activities, graduate students participate in formal courses both within and outside the department, formal and informal seminars, and discussions of current literature. Schedules are flexible and are individually tailored to each student’s needs. Although students choose from the various tracks within the department, they are broadly trained in modern aspects of biochemistry and become familiar with techniques and literature in a variety of areas. Many collaborative projects with other departments also are available to broaden the spectrum of training offered. Most students select a multidepartmental, integrated curriculum in cellular and molecular biology in addition to specialized courses in biochemistry.


Most Ph.D. students in biochemistry are admitted through the Biomedical Sciences Training Program (BSTP). This program, which combines thirteen graduate programs in the School of Medicine, is described under a separate listing in this General Bulletin. A complete description of the program, including research activities, admission policies, and financial aid, may be obtained from the departmental office or the BSTP coordinator.


Medical Scientist Training Program


Students may pursue a Ph.D. in biochemistry as part of the combined M.D./Ph.D. program. Information on this program may be obtained from the departmental office or the Medical Scientist Training Program coordinator. Please see the separate listing in this publication for information on the MSTP program.


MD/MS in Biomedical Investigation Students may pursue a Master of Science Degree in biochemistry by completing some additional course work in biochemistry and by completing a years worth of research. This program requires five years of study with tuition and stipend provided for the year of research. Please see the separate listing in this General Bulletin for information on the MD/MS program.


J.D./M.S. in Biochemistry


This program allows students admitted to the School of Law an opportunity to pursue a master of science degree in Biochemistry as part of an additional year of study. Such training adds expertise to students who anticipate careers in patent law or in areas related to biotechnology or pharmaceutical research. Please see the separate listing in the publication materials provided by the School of Law on this program.


RESEARCH AREAS


Research of Department of Biochemistry faculty members covers a broad spectrum of topics from events at the level of electron movement in biochemical reactions to the intracellular trafficking of proteins. Research in the department is broadened by collaborations with faculty in other university departments and with scientists at other Cleveland research institutions. The specific areas of active research within the department are outlined below.


Proteins and Enzymes


Proteins are components of all living tissue, and their function is critical for life processes. Understanding the chemical mechanisms of enzymatic catalysis is essential for determining the role of individual proteins in human disease. Biochemistry faculty study a variety of proteins and enzymes ranging from growth factors to oncogenes.


Structural Biology


The function of a protein is determined by its three-dimensional structure and interactions. Faculty apply many modern techniques to the determination of macromolecular structure, including X-ray crystallography, and multidimensional heteronuclear NMR, fluorescence, Raman, and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Macromolecules under investigation Include, transcarboxylase, ribosomes, DNA-protein complexes, and neurochemical enzymes.


Regulation of Gene Expression


The elucidation of mechanisms regulating gene expression is a major goal of modern biology. Biochemistry faculty study the control of transcription by hormones and other regulatory molecules, the interaction between proteins and DNA, the function of oncogenes, the basal and hormone mediated transcriptional machinery, and the processing and translation of RNA.


Cell Biology


The control of the metabolism, differentiation and cell signaling within and between cells is an area of active investigation.


Metabolic Regulation


Biochemistry faculty investigate the control of metabolism in animals, such as dietary and hormonal regulation of gene expression. Transgenic murine technology allows the study of the impact of gene ablation on metabolic processes.


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (BIOC)


BIOC 307. General Biochemistry (4)
Overview of the macromolecules and small molecules key to all living systems. Topics include: protein structure and function; enzyme mechanisms, kinetics and regulation; membrane structure and function; bioenergetics; hormone action; intermediary metabolism, including pathways and regulation of carbohydrate, lipid, amino acid, and nucleotide biosynthesis and breakdown. One semester of biology is recommended. Offered as BIOC 307, BIOC 407, and BIOL 407. Prereq: CHEM 223 and CHEM 224.


BIOC 308. Molecular Biology: Genes and Genetic Engineering (4)
An examination of the flow of genetic information from DNA to RNA to protein. Topics include: nucleic acid structure; mechanisms and control of DNA, RNA, and protein biosynthesis; recombinant DNA; and mRNA processing and modification. Where possible, eukaryotic and prokaryotic systems are compared. Special topics include yeast as a model organism, molecular biology of cancer, and molecular biology of the cell cycle. Current literature is discussed briefly as an introduction to techniques of genetic engineering. Recommended preparation for BIOC 408 and BIOL 408: BIOC 307 or BIOL 214. Offered as BIOC 308, BIOL 308, BIOC 408, and BIOL 408. Prereq: BIOC 307 or BIOL 215.


BIOC 312. Proteins and Enzymes (3)
Aspects of protein and nucleic acid function and interactions are discussed, including binding properties, protein-nucleic acid interactions, kinetics and mechanism of proteins and enzymes, and macromolecular machines. Recommended Preparation: CHEM 301. Offered as BIOC 312 and BIOC 412. Prereq: BIOC 307.


BIOC 334. Structural Biology (3)
Introduces basic chemical properties of proteins and discusses the physical forces that determine protein structure. Topics include: the elucidation of protein structure by NMR and by X-ray crystallographic methods; the acquisition of protein structures from data bases; and simple modeling experiments based on protein structures. Offered as BIOC 334, BIOL 334, BIOC 434, and BIOL 434. Prereq: BIOC 307.


BIOC 373. Biochemistry Sages Seminar (3)
Discussion of current topics in biochemical research using readings from the scientific literature. The goals are for the student: 1) to discuss and critically analyze selections from the biochemical literature; 2) to gain a broader understanding of important topics not formally covered in the didactic courses; and 3) to learn to write in the style of journals in the field of biochemistry. Prereq: BIOC 307 and BIOC 308. Restricted to majors in Biochemistry. SAGES Dept Seminar


BIOC 391. Research Project (1–9)
(Credit as arranged.) Offered on a pass/fail basis only. Maximum 9 hours total credit.


BIOC 393. Senior Capstone Experience (3)
Students will complete their Capstone Projects, begun in BIOC 391. Pertinent research activities will depend on the nature of the student’s project. The student will meet regularly with their Capstone advisor, at least twice monthly, to provide progress reports, discuss the project, and for critique and guidance. By the end of this course, the student will have completed their SAGES Senior Capstone research project, written a project report in the form of a manuscript, and presented their project reports orally in the department and at the Senior Capstone Fair, or its equivalent. Prereq: BIOC 307 and BIOC 308. SAGES Senior Cap


BIOC 401. Impacts of Intellectual Property on Biomedical Research (1)
This course will expose students to the challenges and opportunities related to intellectual property when developing biomedical technologies within the context of nonprofit research institutions. The course will examine the effects that patent law has on research strategy, funding availability and follow-on funding availability. Special attention will be paid to the dynamics between the potential for profit, the need for translational research and institutional and individual conflicts of interest.


BIOC 407. General Biochemistry (4)
Overview of the macromolecules and small molecules key to all living systems. Topics include: protein structure and function; enzyme mechanisms, kinetics and regulation; membrane structure and function; bioenergetics; hormone action; intermediary metabolism, including pathways and regulation of carbohydrate, lipid, amino acid, and nucleotide biosynthesis and breakdown. One semester of biology is recommended. Offered as BIOC 307, BIOC 407, and BIOL 407. Prereq: CHEM 223 or CHEM 224.


BIOC 408. Molecular Biology: Genes and Genetic Engineering (4)
An examination of the flow of genetic information from DNA to RNA to protein. Topics include: nucleic acid structure; mechanisms and control of DNA, RNA, and protein biosynthesis; recombinant DNA; and mRNA processing and modification. Where possible, eukaryotic and prokaryotic systems are compared. Special topics include yeast as a model organism, molecular biology of cancer, and molecular biology of the cell cycle. Current literature is discussed briefly as an introduction to techniques of genetic engineering. Recommended preparation for BIOC 408 and BIOL 408: BIOC 307 or BIOL 214. Offered as BIOC 308, BIOL 308, BIOC 408, and BIOL 408.


BIOC 412. Proteins and Enzymes (3)
Aspects of protein and nucleic acid function and interactions are discussed, including binding properties, protein-nucleic acid interactions, kinetics and mechanism of proteins and enzymes, and macromolecular machines. Recommended Preparation: CHEM 301. Offered as BIOC 312 and BIOC 412.


BIOC 420. Molecular Genetics of Cancer (3)
Cancer is a genetic disease, not only in the Mendelian sense of inheritance, but also in the sense that it is caused by somatic mutation. The targets of mutation are a set of proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes whose products govern cellular proliferation, death and differentiation. The objectives of this course are to examine the types of genes that are the targets of mutational activation or inactivation and the mechanistic outcome of mutational changes that lead to oncogenesis. The course will also probe viral mechanisms of oncogenesis related to the products of cellular proto-oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes. In the course of these examinations we will explore the genetic and molecular genetic approaches used to identify and study oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Students should be prepared to present and discuss experimental design, data and conclusions from assigned publications. There will be no exams or papers but the course will end with a full-day, student-run symposium on topics to be decided jointly by students and instructors. Grades will be based on class participation and symposium presentation. Offered as BIOC 420, MBIO 420, MVIR 420, PATH 422, and PHRM 420. Prereq: CBIO 453 and CBIO 455.


BIOC 430. Advanced Methods in Structural Biology (3)
Provides students with an in-depth introduction to biophysical techniques used to quantify macromolecular structures. A major part of the course will deal with the use of nuclear magnetic resonance to derive a 3-D structures of macromolecules in solution. Other topics include electron spin resonance, absorption, fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopies, Raman and infrared spectroscopies and methods used in modeling. Offered with BIOC 431, “Advanced Methods Biology II” in alternate years. BIOC 430 deals with protein hydrodynamics and thermodynamics, crystallography, and mass spectrometry. The course will be mostly lecture based. This course will provide an extensive overview for graduate students specializing in structural biology. Offered as BIOC 430, CHEM 430, PHOL 430 and PHRM 430.


BIOC 431. Advanced Methods in Structural Biology II (3)
This course provides an introduction to biophysical techniques for graduate students who are interested in structural biology and biophysical chemistry. Offered with BIOC 430, “Advanced Structural Biology I” in alternate years. Advanced Methods I (430) focuses on NMR and optical spectroscopies. Advanced Methods II deals with protein hydrodynamics and thermodynamics, crystallography, and mass spectrometry.


BIOC 434. Structural Biology (3)
Introduces basic chemical properties of proteins and discusses the physical forces that determine protein structure. Topics include: the elucidation of protein structure by NMR and by X-ray crystallographic methods; the acquisition of protein structures from data bases; and simple modeling experiments based on protein structures. Offered as BIOC 334, BIOL 334, BIOC 434, and BIOL 434.


BIOC 452. Nutritional Biochemistry and Metabolism (3)
Mechanisms of regulation of pathways of intermediary metabolism; amplification of biochemical signals; substrate cycling and use of radioactive and stable isotopes to measure metabolic rates. Recommended preparation: BIOC 307 or equivalent. Offered as BIOC 452 and NTRN 452.


BIOC 460. Introduction to Microarrays (3)
Microarray technology is an exciting new technique that is used to analyze gene expression in a wide variety of organisms. The goal of this course is to give participants a hands-on introduction to this technology. The course is intended for individuals who are preparing to use this technique, including students, fellows, and other investigators. This is a hands-on computer-based course, which will enable participants to conduct meaningful analyses of microarray data. Participants will gain an understanding of the principles underlying microarray technologies, including: theory of sample preparation, sample processing on microarrays, familiarity with the use of Affymetrix Microarray Suite software and generation of data sets. Transferring data among software packages to manipulate data will also be discussed. Importation of data into other software (GeneSpring and DecisionSite) will enable participants to mine the data for higher-order patterns. Participants will learn about the rationale behind the choice of normalization and data filtering strategies, distance metrics, use of appropriate clustering choices such as K-means, Hierarchical, Self Organizing Maps. Prereq: CBIO 455.


BIOC 475. Protein Biophysics (3)
This course focuses on in-depth understanding of the molecular biophysics of proteins. Structural, thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of protein function and structure-function relationships will be considered at the advanced conceptual level. The application of these theoretical frameworks will be illustrated with examples from the literature and integration of biophysical knowledge with description at the cellular and systems level. The format consists of lectures, problem sets, and student presentations. A special emphasis will be placed on discussion of original publications. Offered as BIOC 475, CHEM 475, PHOL 475, PHRM 475, and NEUR 475.


BIOC 476. Cellular Biophysics (4)
This course focuses on a quantitative understanding of cellular processes. It is designed for students who feel comfortable with and are interested in analytical and quantitative approaches to cell biology and cell physiology. Selected topics in cellular biophysics will be covered in depth. Topics include theory of electrical and optical signal processing used in cell physiology, thermodynamics and kinetics of enzyme and transport reactions, single ion channel kinetics and excitability, mechanotransduction, and transport across polarized cell layers. The format consists of lectures, problem sets, computer simulations, and discussion of original publications. The relevant biological background of topics will be provided appropriate for non-biology science majors. Offered as BIOC 476, NEUR 477, PHOL 476, PHRM 476.


BIOC 515. Endocrine Pharmacology (3)
Seminar lecture course on regulation at the molecular level of selected interrelated endocrine systems. Offered as BIOC 515 and PHRM 515.


BIOC 519. Molecular Biology of RNA (3)
Selected topics regarding editing, enzymatic function, splicing, and structure of RNA. Offered as BIOC 519, CLBY 519, and MBIO 519.


BIOC 521. Chromatin Structure and Transcription (3)
A critical review of selected topics and current literature on the role of chromatin structure in the regulation of gene expression. Offered as BIOC 521 and GENE 521.


BIOC 555. Emerging Concepts in Cell Regulation (3)
This course will cover the general principles of cell regulation with an emphasis on the emerging novel mechanisms of signal transduction. The traditional areas of receptor tyrosine kinases, G-protein coupled receptors will be examined but the focus will be on the roles novel mechanisms such as regulated proteolysis, ubiquitin proteasomal degradation, protein acetylation etc. in signal transduction and gene expression. This will be a literature-based course which will depend on critical evaluation of research papers, reviews and accompanied with in-depth discussion. Recommended preparation: CBIO 453. Offered as BIOC 555, CLBY 555, and PATH 555.


BIOC 599. RNA Structure and Function (3)
This course will cover fundamental aspects of modern RNA biology with emphasis on the interplay of three dimensional structure of nucleic acids and their function. The main focus of the course is on the recent discoveries that indicate a prominent role of RNA as a major regulator of cellular function. Topics discussed will include an introduction to RNA structure, folding and dynamics, RNA/RNA and RNA-protein interactions, and role of RNA in catalysis of biological reactions in ribosome and the role of other catalytic RNAs in tRNA biogenesis, pre-mRNA splicing, and viral replication. The course also covers the recently discovered RNA regulatory switches, large noncoding regulatory RNAs, and the role of RNA in human diseases and novel, RNA-based therapeutics. Offered as BIOC 599, CLBY 599, and MBIO 599.


BIOC 601. Biochemical Research (1 - 18)
Credit as arranged.


BIOC 605. Independent Project in Biochemical Research (1 - 18)
Credit as arranged. Limited to students in the M.S. program in biochemical research. Prereq: BIOC 407 and BIOC 601.


BIOC 611. Biochemistry Seminar I (1)
Student presentations of topics from the current scientific literature unrelated to the student’s research project. Participants are required to present a seminar.


BIOC 612. Biochemistry Seminar II (1)
Discussion of current research.


BIOC 617. Special Topics in Biochemistry (3)
Special topics courses on areas of current interest in biochemistry.


BIOC 618. Special Topics in Biochemistry (3)
Special topics courses on areas of current interest in biochemistry.


BIOC 620. Transcription and Gene Regulation (3)
This course covers mechanisms of transcription that play critical roles in biological processes. It is designed to develop scientific thinking in designing experiments and evaluating the merits of research papers. Students will be able to present two to three 30-minute talks. Topics include: 1) structure and function of RNA polymerases; 2) accessory factors involved in initiation, elongation, and termination; 3) regulation transcription; 4) transcriptional coactivators and corepressors; 5) regulation of transcription factor activity. A take-home exam will be conducted at the final week. Grades will be based on presentations and take-home exam. Offered as BIOC 620 and MBIO 620.


BIOC 641. Proposition I (2)
Design of research proposal.


BIOC 643. Proposition II (2)
Design of research proposal.


BIOC 651. Thesis M.S. (1 - 6)
(Credit as arranged.)


BIOC 701. Dissertation Ph.D. (1 - 18)
(Credit as arranged.) Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.

 

 

Department of Bioethics


Room TA-200, School of Medicine
Stuart J. Youngner, M.D., Susan E. Watson Professor of Biomedical Ethics and Chair
Phone 216-368-6196
http://www.case.edu/med/bioethics/bioethics.htm

 

The Department of Bioethics provides a forum for the study and discussion of ethical issues in medicine. Its mission is to improve public and professional understanding of the ethical issues involved in health sciences research, health care delivery, and health policy development through teaching, research and community dialogue.


The department has offices at the Case’s School of Medicine and at MetroHealth Medical Center and has faculty from multiple disciplines, including philosophy, religion, law, political science, anthropology, history, sociology, nursing and medicine.


Department faculty teach in both core and elective components of the medical school curriculum, undergraduate courses in ethics, and an intensive course in ethics of scientific work for Ph.D. students in the Biomedical Sciences Training Program. The department also has a highly successful master’s degree program in bioethics.
Department faculty have gained international prominence for research in many areas of biomedical ethics that collectively address the concerns of the School of Medicine’s spectrum of biomedical disciplines.


The Department of Bioethics publishes a newsletter, Bioethics Update. Bioethics Update contains information and articles on a variety of ethical issues of interest to both professional and lay communities. It is published three times a year and features faculty research and activities, department events, and master’s degree alumni information.


The department has a website where visitors can read Bioethics Update online, obtain information about the master’s degree and Ph.D. programs, and learn about department and faculty activities: http://www.case.edu/med/bioethics/bioethics.htm.


Master of Arts in Bioethics Degree


The Department of Bioethics offers a program leading to the Master of Arts degree in bioethics, emphasizing the interdisciplinary and inter-professional nature of the field. This graduate program is designed to provide advance training in bioethics for students and professionals who anticipate encountering ethical issues in the course of their primary careers.


The 27 credit-hour degree can be earned full-time in one year or part-time in up to three years. Core courses are taught by department faculty and are scheduled so that part-time students can continue their professional responsibilities while completing the degree.


The Master of Arts program provides students with a firm understanding of the intellectual content of the study of bioethics, of bioethical literature, and of the underlying philosophical arguments and empirical assumptions that inform it. Students are taught to understand the institutions and structures of health care and the ethical issues that arise in medical practice. They are trained to identify and analyze a range of clinical ethics issues.


All students pursuing a Master of Arts degree in bioethics are required to complete the interdisciplinary core of 12 credit hours (the equivalent of four courses) in the first two semesters of their first year of study.


The courses, BETH 401: Foundations in Bioethics I, and BETH 402: Foundations in Bioethics II, each six credits, examine 10 basic topic areas in bioethics: death and dying, the therapeutic relationship, method and theory in bioethics, organ transplantation, health care justice, defining health care needs, reproduction and fertility, families, babies and children, research ethics and genetics. Classes meet two evenings per week for seminar sessions (two hours per session).


Another required course is BETH 405: Clinical Ethics Rotation (three credits). This course requires a minimum of 8 hours of clinical experience per week during two 10-week rotations. Students spend most of their time observing rounds in relevant services (intensive care units, pediatrics, geriatrics, etc.) with leading clinicians at several area hospital sites. Students must complete rotations at two sites. At the conclusion of each rotation, students are familiar with the clinical, psychological, social, professional, and institutional contexts in which ethical problems arise. Also, they are able to identify, analyze and understand ethical issues as they develop.
In addition, all students must complete 12 credit hours of electives. Electives are selected in consultation with a faculty advisor. Electives must enhance the student’s understanding of bioethical issues and must be relevant to the student’s academic goals.


The department currently offers dual-degree programs with the School of Medicine (M.D./M.A.), the School of Medicine’s Department of Genetics (Ph.D./M.A.), the School of Law (J.D./M.A.), the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing (M.S.N./M.A.) the School of Medicine’s Public Health program (MPH/MA) and Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences (MSSA/MA) at Case. Students must apply and be accepted to each program to qualify.
Commencing in the fall semester of 2007, the department will offer a new research ethics track within the MA program, designed to prepare specialists who will pursue research ethics-related work as a primary career (IRB coordinators, research administration, etc.) or who will use this specialized training to enhance their primary careers (investigators, regulators, etc.). In addition to the core seminars BETH 401 and 402, discussed above, the research ethics track will feature a modified clinical ethics rotation, focused on IRB work and research ethics activities, and four research ethics electives.


Admission policies conform to those of Case Western Reserve University School of Graduate Studies. In general, an applicant for admission and concurrent financial consideration must have completed application forms on file by March 1 for the fall semester.


Ph.D. in Bioethics


The increasing complexity of the health care system has resulted in a growing need for investigators who can conduct research to address pressing social problems in bioethics. The objective of the bioethics doctoral program is to train scholars who will have specific expertise in the conceptualization, design and conduct of empirical research concerning bioethics questions. Graduates will:

Graduates of the program have a wide range of opportunities, including careers as independent investigators, serving as a bridge between colleagues in the traditional medical humanities and those in clinical and basic-science departments, and employment in academic bioethics centers, clinical and basic science departments in medical schools and schools of public health, government agencies, and public policy institutes.


Each student will receive a full scholarship and a $20,000-per-year graduate assistantship.


Course of Study

CORE COURSEWORK
(see course descriptions for more information)

Additional course work: three credit hours each in advanced statistics, methods and study design, and theory from the social sciences, and six credit hours of elective courses


Enrollment in the Doctoral Program


The doctoral program is highly selective. Candidates should have a strong theoretical background in the social sciences or philosophy, preferably in the form of a master’s degree in a relevant discipline or a clinical degree. Candidates also must demonstrate an ability to work with quantitative data and demonstrate promise of integrating theory and empirical application.

 

Applicants must complete an interview and submit:

For more information about the Department of Bioethics and its programs, contact:


DEPARTMENT OF BIOETHICS
Coordinator for Graduate Programs
School of Medicine
10900 Euclid Ave.
Cleveland, Ohio 44106-4976
Phone: 216-368-8718
E-mail: bioethics@case.edu


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (BETH)


BETH 271. Bioethics: Dilemmas (3)
We have the genetic technology to change nature and human nature, but should we? We have the medical technology to extend almost any human life, but is this always good? Should we clone humans? Should we allow doctor-assisted suicide for the terminally ill? This course invites students from all academic disciplines and fields to examine current and future issues in bioethics--e.g., theory and methods in bioethics; death and dying; organ transplantation; genetics; aging and dementia; fertility and reproduction; distributive justice in health care access. The course will include guest lecturers from nationally-known Bioethics faculty. Offered as BETH 271, PHIL 271.


BETH 315. International Bioethics: Policy and Practice (3)
Taught by Case and international faculty, this course will include 7-10 days of intensive didactic and experiential learning in one of several “host” countries. Examples of sites include: Free University of Amsterdam and University of Utrecht in the Netherlands; University of Paris in France; and Ben Gurion University in Israel. It will afford a unique opportunity to gain perspective on important bioethics issues in different societies, i.e., euthanasia, public health policies, access to healthcare, and stem cell research. At the international site, students will spend 6 hours per day (5 days) in seminar (involving didactics, discussion, and guided-observation clinical experience). There will be two 3-hour preparatory sessions, required reading, and two 3-hour post trip sessions. Requirements: preparation, attendance, and class participation, a 12-15 page paper (undergraduate credit) and a 15-20 page paper (graduate credit). Graduate credit will also require students to prepare a presentation for a post-intensive session. Enrollment will be capped at 25. This course has an additional fee to cover costs of travel and lodging. Limited scholarships are available. Offered as BETH 315 and BETH 415.


BETH 401. Foundations in Bioethics I (6)
The first of the two required seminar courses, this course covers five basic topic areas in bioethics: death and dying; health professional-patient relationship; method and theory in bioethics; organ transplantation; and ethics and children. The course meets twice weekly and is taught in seminar format by Center faculty members who are experts on specific topics. Preentry.


BETH 402. Foundations in Bioethics II (6)
This course completes the required seminar core and covers the basic bioethics topic areas: health care justice; defining ‘health care needs;’ reproduction and fertility ethics; research ethics; and ethics in genetics. The course meets twice weekly and is taught in seminar format by Center faculty members who are experts on specific topics. Recommended preparation: BETH 401.


BETH 405. Clinical Ethics Rotation (1.5 - 3)
In this course students will become familiar with the clinical, psychological, social, professional, and institutional context in which ethical problems arise. This course exposes students to clinical cases, to hospital ethics committees and ethics consultation programs, to institutional review boards (IRB), and to hospital policies covering the “do not resuscitate” orders (DNR), advance directives, withdrawal of artificial feeding, organ procurement and transplantation, and medical futility. Requires minimum of 8 total hours of rotation experience per week during two semester 10-week rotations. Locations for this course include: MetroHealth Medical Center, University Hospitals of Cleveland, and the Hospice of the Western Reserve. Recommended preparation: BETH 401 or concurrent enrollment.


BETH 412. Ethical Issues in Genetics/Genomics (3)
This course is designed to familiarize graduate students with the major controversies over the generation and use of new human genetic information. Topics will include the spread of predictive genetic testing, prenatal diagnosis, genetic discrimination, human genetic variation research, eugenics, genetic counseling, and the limits of human gene therapy. The course will be conducted as a seminar, involving discussions of readings, guest speakers, and student presentations.


BETH 414. International Health Research Ethics (3)
This course will introduce students in the health and social sciences to key ethical issues that arise in international health research. The course will include intensive reading and case-based discussion of current ethical and moral quandaries posed by research conducted in the international arena. Five full-day sessions are planned. Each day will be divided into a series of formal presentations and active, group-based discussions around topics that include: the historical context of international health research; current international ethics principles, standards, and declarations; key tools and concepts for unpacking ethical issues in international health research; issues in informed consent and conflict of interest; “reasonable availability” and the conduct of clinical trials; cutting-edge international genetics research; and, the responsibility of researchers to the international health community. Course evaluation is based on class participation, a written exercise, and a case analysis.


BETH 415. International Bioethics: Policy and Practice (3)
Taught by Case and international faculty, this course will include 7-10 days of intensive didactic and experiential learning in one of several “host” countries. Examples of sites include: Free University of Amsterdam and University of Utrecht in the Netherlands; University of Paris in France; and Ben Gurion University in Israel. It will afford a unique opportunity to gain perspective on important bioethics issues in different societies, i.e., euthanasia, public health policies, access to healthcare, and stem cell research. At the international site, students will spend 6 hours per day (5 days) in seminar (involving didactics, discussion, and guided-observation clinical experience). There will be two 3-hour preparatory sessions, required reading, and two 3-hour post trip sessions. Requirements: preparation, attendance, and class participation, a 12-15 page paper (undergraduate credit) and a 15-20 page paper (graduate credit). Graduate credit will also require students to prepare a presentation for a post-intensive session. Enrollment will be capped at 25. This course has an additional fee to cover costs of travel and lodging. Limited scholarships are available. Offered as BETH 315 and BETH 415.


BETH 417. Introduction to Public Health Ethics (3)
The course will introduce students to theoretical and practical aspects of ethics and public health. This course will help students develop the analytical skills necessary for evaluating of ethical issues in public health policy and public health prevention, treatment, and research. Will include intensive reading and case-based discussions. Evaluation based on class participation, a written exercise and a case analysis. Open to graduate students with permission from instructors.


BETH 420. Critical Issues in Research Ethics (3)
This course is open to graduate students with an interest in health-related research ethics. Enrollment preference will be given to Masters-level bioethics students in the Research Ethics Track (RET). The course provides students with a comprehensive study of critical issues in research ethics, including the modern history of research ethics in science and medicine, the ethics of clinical trial design and conduct, advanced issues in informed consent, the ethics of animal experimentation, and key issues in genetics research. Coursework will include case studies and in-depth readings to highlight topic areas. Discussions of ethical and regulatory frameworks that influence decision-making, policy development, and the conduct of biomedical and social-behavioral science research will allow students to explore the nuances, gaps, challenges, and concerns present in research, particularly research involving human subjects. Topics will be addressed within the framework of integrating research ethics into the scientific process. Students are expected to lead class discussions and write a course-relevant paper. Enrollment will be limited to 15 students. Class will meet weekly for 3 hours.


BETH 421. Research Ethics Practicum (1.5)
The Research Ethics Practicum (80 hours,1.5 CREDITS) is designed to complement the theoretical and conceptual training received in the course, Critical Issues in Research Ethics. By way of a series of campus-wide rotations, students learn about the practical, everyday side of research administration, compliance, and scientific review. Students will work with key staff in research ethics centers, and observe their day-to-day operations, as well as attend institutional review board (IRB) and Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) meetings. They will become familiar with human subjects, animal, and tissue research regulations and policies as these are applied in an institutional/academic research context. Students will also spend time in a clinical trials unit and tour animal care facilities. The practicum has the following overall objectives: (1) students will be able to identify, analyze, and understand research ethics issues as they develop in the context of actual institutional research governance (2) students will gain an understanding of methods of ethical research design and implementation.


BETH 422. Clinical Ethics: Theory & Practice (3)
This course will focus on both theoretical and practical issues in clinical ethics. Clinical ethics will be distinguished from other areas of bioethics by highlighting distinctive features of the clinical context which must be taken into account in clinical ethics policy and practice. Fundamental moral and political foundations of clinical ethics will be examined, as will the role of bioethical theory and method in the clinical context. Topical issues to be considered may include informed consent; decision capacity; end of life decision making; confidentiality and privacy; the role and function of ethics committees; ethics consultation; the role of the clinical ethicist; decision making in various pediatric settings (from neonatal through adolescent); the role of personal values in professional life (e.g.,rights of conscience issues, self disclosure and boundary issues); dealing with the chronically non-adherant patient; ethical issues in organ donation and transplant; health professional-patient communication; medical mistakes; and other ethical issues that emerge in clinical settings.


BETH 425. Stem Cells: Ethics and Policy (3)
This graduate-level course addresses major issues in the science, ethics, and politics of stem cell research. Over the past decade, embryonic stem cell research has emerged as one of the world’s most controversial areas of biomedical research. While new forms of stem cell research have emerged recently which appear to sidestep the debate over the use of human embryos, these new forms of stem cell research raise a host of problems in their own right. Furthermore, as stem cell research marches toward clinical applications for patients, the scientific and ethical issues will continue to evolve in evermore complex directions. In order to fully appreciate the ethical and policy issues at the cutting edge of stem cell science, one needs a sound grasp of the science of stem cell research. Thus this course is designed to take a science-based approach to the ethics of stem cell research. (No prior knowledge of stem cell biology is presupposed.)


BETH 440. Science and Society Through Literature (3)
This course will examine the interaction of scientific investigation and discovery with the society it occurred in. What is the effect of science on society and, as importantly, what is the effect of society on science? An introduction will consider the heliocentric controversy with focus on Galileo. Two broad areas, tuberculosis and the Frankenstein myth, will then be discussed covering the period 1800-present. With tuberculosis, fiction, art and music will be examined to understand the changing views of society towards the disease, how society’s perception of tuberculosis victims changed, and how this influenced their treatments and research. With Frankenstein, the original novel in its historical context will be examined. Using fiction and film, the transformation of the original story into myth with different connotations and implications will be discussed. Most classes will be extensive discussions coupled with student presentations of assigned materials. Offered as PHRM 340, BETH 440, PHRM 440, and HSTY 440.


BETH 496. Public Policy and Aging (3)
Overview of aging and the aged. Concepts in the study of public policy. Policies on aging and conditions that they address. The politics of policies on aging. Emergent trends and issues. Offered as ANTH 498, BETH 496, EPBI 408, GERO 496, HSTY 480, MPHP 408, NURS 479, NURS 579, POSC 480, and SOCI 496.


BETH 501. Advanced Seminar in Bioethics (3)
Special topics of interest, such as advanced studies in theory and method in bioethics, ethics and reproduction, the ethics of research with human subjects, religion and medicine, historical perspectives on medical ethics, cross-cultural issues in bioethics, or ethics in applied settings such as hospitals and long term care facilities. Seminar typically taught by visiting professor in intensive format. Consult the term roster of courses for the specific topic. Recommended preparation: BETH 401 or concurrent enrollment.


BETH 504. Critical Readings in Bioethics (3)
This course will focus on both normative (traditional) and descriptive (empirical) approaches to bioethics. It will be co-directed by two faculty members, one with a specialization in normative bioethics and one with a specialization in descriptive bioethics.


BETH 505. Methods in Normative Bioethics I (3)
The first of the two required Methods seminars is designed to give graduate students an intensive introduction to the modes of moral reasoning that have been adopted and adapted by contemporary Bioethics, and the major critical perspectives that have been brought to bear upon them.


BETH 506. Methods in Normative Bioethics II (3)
The second of the two required Methods seminars is designed to give graduate students an intensive introduction to the modes of moral reasoning that have been adopted and adapted by contemporary Bioethics, and the major critical perspectives that have been brought to bear upon them.


BETH 507. Research Design in Bioethics I (3)
The first of two empirical research courses will introduce students to theoretical and methodological approaches in the design and implementation of empirical research on topics in biomedical ethics. Students will be provided with a comprehensive and robust exploration of empirical models for the development of bioethics research and the skills for critically assessing the optimal methods for designing studies relevant to ethical issues in biomedicine.


BETH 508. Research Design in Bioethics II (3)
The second of two empirical research courses will introduce students to theoretical and methodological approaches in the design and implementation of empirical research on topics in biomedical ethics. Students will be provided with a comprehensive and robust exploration of empirical models for the development of bioethics research and the skills for critically assessing the optimal methods for designing studies relevant to ethical issues in biomedicine. Prereq: BETH 507.


BETH 509. Statistical Methods in Bioethics I (3)
The first of two required Statistical Methods will focus on basic concepts of distributions of random variables, point and interval estimation, statistical hypotheses, correlation and regression; and survey of statistical methods in analysis of variance, categorical data analysis, survival data analysis, non-parametric methods, generalized linear model and multivariate techniques. Students will also be introduced to data management strategies and computer applications in database management. Topics in the use of statistical packages will be introduced and used to solve data-intensive problems and projects.


BETH 510. Statistical Methods in Bioethics II (3)
The second of two required Statistical Methods will focus on basic concepts of distributions of random variables, point and interval estimation, statistical hypotheses, correlation and regression; and survey of statistical methods in analysis of variance, categorical data analysis, survival data analysis, non-parametric methods, generalized linear model and multivariate techniques. Students will also be introduced to data management strategies and computer applications in database management. Topics in the use of statistical packages will be introduced and used to solve data-intensive problems and projects. Prereq: BETH 509.


BETH 511. Grant Writing (3)
This course will teach students the fundaments of writing a grant proposal. We will concentrate on NIH-style applications, although the principals of grant writing can be applied to any venue. In the process of working through devising a research question and study design, students will be encouraged to use this as an opportunity to think about their dissertation topic. In addition to applying theoretical and research design knowledge gained through their other core course work, the course will also teach students about how to complete application forms and to create a budget. We will also familiarize students with the peer review process. Each student will produce a draft grant application. The students will form a mock peer review section and will critique the grants.


BETH 512. Clinical Ethics Rotation - Ph.D. (1.5)
In this course students will become familiar with the clinical, psychological, social, professional, and institutional context in which ethical problems arise. This course exposes students to clinical cases, to hospital ethics committees and ethics consultation programs, to institutional review boards (IRB), and to hospital policies covering the “do not resuscitate” orders (DNR), advance directives, withdrawal of artificial feeding, organ procurement an transplantation, and medical futility. Requires minimum of 10 total hours of rotation experience per week during two semester 10-week rotations. Locations for this course include: MetroHealth Medical Center, University Hospitals of Cleveland, and the Hospice of the Western Reserve. Recommended preparation: BETH 520/521 or concurrent enrollment.


BETH 520. Foundations in Bioethics I - Ph.D. (3)
The first of the two required seminar courses, this course covers five basic topic areas in bioethics: death and dying; health professional-patient relationship; method and theory in bioethics; organ transplantation; and ethics and children. The course meets twice weekly and is taught in seminar format by Center faculty members who are experts on specific topics.


BETH 521. Foundations in Bioethics II - Ph.D. (3)
The second of the two required seminar courses, this course covers five basic topic areas in bioethics: death and dying; health professional-patient relationship; method and theory in bioethics; organ transplantation; and ethics and children. The course meets twice weekly and is taught in seminar format by Center faculty members who are experts on specific topics.


BETH 602. Special Topics in Bioethics (1 - 3)
Students will explore particular issues and themes in biomedical ethics in depth through independent study and research under the direction of a faculty member.


BETH 701. Dissertation Ph.D. (1 - 18)
(Credit as arranged.) Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone

 

 

Biomedical Sciences Training Program


Room TG1, School of Medicine
Phone 216-368-3347
E-mail bstp@case.edu
http://www.case.edu/med/BSTP/

 

The Biomedical Sciences Training Program (BSTP) offers graduate studies leading to the Ph.D. degree. The program is designed to prepare qualified and motivated students for careers in research and teaching.
The BSTP comprises twelve graduate programs in the School of Medicine and the College of Arts and Sciences. These programs have more than 200 faculty-based in both basic science and clinical departments. The research of this faculty covers the entire range of biomedical research. Students in the BSTP have the opportunity to study within any research discipline represented in the training programs. This opportunity gives students a tremendous range of research choices. It also provides a distinct advantage over traditional programs, which restrict choices of research area and faculty advisor.


BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES TRAINING PROGRAM (BSTP)


THE FIRST YEAR


Coursework


Students take an integrated series of courses in cell and molecular biology (CBIO 453 and 455). This one-semester course emphasizes the molecular approach that forms the basis of modern biology. Qualified students also may take more specialized elective courses.


Research Rotations


The research rotations allow the student to sample areas of research and become familiar with faculty members and their laboratories. The main purpose of these rotations is to aid the student in selecting a laboratory for the thesis work. Students are encouraged to begin their rotations in July. Doing so gives them the opportunity to complete one rotation during the summer before classes begin at the end of August. A minimum of three rotations must be completed during the year.


Choosing a Thesis Advisor


During the first year, students select an advisor for the dissertation research. Each student also joins the training program with which the advisor is affiliated. Once a student has chosen a program, the specific requirements of that program are followed to obtain the Ph.D. The emphasis of the Ph.D. work is on research, culminating in the completion of an original, independent research thesis.


Participating Training Programs


Training faculty, course offerings and individual degree requirements are described in detail in the separate listings for each of these programs.


Cell Biology Program


Wolstein Research Building 5-532
Phone 216-368-5544
E-mail: amt10@case.edu
http://www.case.edu/med/cellbiology

 

The Cell Biology Program provides educational and research opportunities through its journal clubs and colloquia and through graduate training toward the Ph.D. degree. The research environment includes all the basic science departments of the School of Medicine, the Department of Biology, and several laboratories at University Hospitals of Cleveland and the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. These departments collectively cover a diverse set of areas of contemporary interest in the cell biology of higher animals, plants, yeast and other microorganisms. These include the extra cellular matrix, secretion and endocytosis, cell adhesion, the cytoskeleton, the nuclear envelope, and others. Many of these areas interface with local research in biochemistry, genetics, immunology, molecular biology, neuroscience, pharmacological sciences, and physiology and biophysics.


First-year graduate students follow the Correlated Curriculum in Cell and Molecular Biology (CB10 453 and 455, 8 credit hours) along with students from all graduate departments. They also complete three laboratory rotations (starting July 1) among the laboratories of training faculty, which span the entire campus. The goal of the rotations is to guarantee that the student has sufficient breadth of familiarity with cell biology faculty to allow him or her to make the best choice of a permanent research laboratory. In all cases, this selection must be made, with the consent of the sponsor and his or her department, before nine months have elapsed. First-year students also actively participate in the weekly Cell Biology Journal Club and attend the cell biology colloquia.


During the subsequent years, students devote most of their time to laboratory research, while also attending courses, seminars and journal clubs and participating in occasional national/international Cleveland cell biology symposia organized by the program. Past or planned topics include Membrane Traffic in Health and Disease (1996), Cell Biology of Huntington’s Disease and Related Disorders (2000), Perspectives on the Fragile X Syndrome (2001), and Regulation of Functions of the Nucleus (2004).


The elective courses may be given by any department or program on campus. Students must take a total of 36 credit hours of courses and maintain a B average.


Preparation for the qualifying exam and the writing of research proposals and the dissertation match the norm of the department in which the student elects to do his or her thesis work; however, the content of the exams and proposal(s) must have a clear emphasis on cell biology itself.


All efforts should be made to complete the Ph.D. within four years. It is expected that the student will be the first author of at least two articles accepted for publication in highly regarded scientific journals.


CELL BIOLOGY PROGRAM (CBIO)


REQUIRED (FIRST YEAR)

 

PARTICIPATING FACULTY


Josephine Adams
Erik Andrulis
Susann Brady-Kalnay
Cathleen Carlin
Martha Cathcart
Piet de Boer
Guy Chisolm
Paul DiCorleto
Donna Driscoll
Thomas Egelhoff
Maria Febbraio
Paul Fox
Edward Greenfield
Clifford Harding
Stanley Hazen
Phil Howe
Donald Jacobsen
Michael Kinter
Andrea Ladd
Gary Landreth
Veronique Lefebvre
Alan Levine
Gregory Matera
David McDonald
Thomas McIntyre
Richard Morton
Virgil Muresan
Cathy Patterson
Marc Penn
Sanjay Pimplikar
Arne Rietsch
Ofer Reizes
Iain Robinson
Kurt W. Runge
Steven Sanders
Ruth E. Siegel
Roy Silverstein
Neena Singh
Jonathan Smith
Martin Snider
Alan M. Tartakoff
Patrick Viollier
Amy Wilson-Delfosse
Jo Ann Wise
Alan Wolfman
Alan Zhu
Richard Zigmond


COURSE Descriptions (CBIO)


CBIO 453. Cell Biology I (4)
Part of the first semester curriculum for first year graduate students along with CBIO 455. This course is designed to give students an intensive introduction to prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell structure and function. Topics include membrane structure and function, mechanisms of protein localization in cells, secretion and endocytosis, the cytoskeleton, cell adhesion, cell signaling and the regulation of cell growth. Important methods in cell biology are also presented. This course is suitable for graduate students entering most areas of basic biomedical research. Undergraduate courses in biochemistry, cell and molecular biology are excellent preparation for this course. Recommended preparation: Undergraduate biochemistry or molecular biology.


CBIO 455. Molecular Biology I (4)
Part of the first semester curriculum for first year graduate students along with CBIO 453. This course is designed to give students an intensive introduction to prokaryotic and eukaryotic molecular biology. Topics include protein structure and function, DNA and chromosome structure, DNA replication, RNA transcription and its regulation, RNA processing, and protein synthesis. Important methods in molecular biology are also presented. This course is suitable for graduate students entering most areas of basic biomedical research. Undergraduate courses in biochemistry, cell and molecular biology are excellent preparation for this course. Recommended preparation: Undergraduate biochemistry or molecular biology.


CBIO 518. Signaling via Cell Adhesion (3)
Molecular mechanisms by which cells interact with and are regulated by extracellular matrices and other cells. Offered as CBIO 518, CLBY 518, MBIO 518, and NEUR 518.


CELL BIOLOGY PROGRAM (CLBY)


Master’s Degree Programs


Thesis (Plan A) and non-thesis (Plan B) master of science degree programs are offered to students who have completed an undergraduate degree program from an accredited university or college. Course schedules are arranged to accommodate individuals who wish to enroll on a part-time basis. Both programs require a total of 27 semester hours at the 400 level or higher. A minimum of 27 semester hours of formal course work is required for the non-thesis degree, and a minimum of 18 semester hours is required for the thesis degree. The remaining nine hours required for completion of Plan A must be fulfilled with research credits (EVHS 651). Students enrolled in Plan B must pass a comprehensive examination before being awarded the degree. The requirements for the master’s program must be completed within five consecutive calendar years after matriculation.


Ph.D. Program


Admission to the doctoral degree program may follow successful completion of the undergraduate degree or master’s degree program. A minimum of 36 semester hours of graduate study is required for students entering with an undergraduate degree, and 18 semester hours typically are required for students who have completed an M.S. degree program. A proposal-type examination is required before admission to candidacy. Award of the Ph.D. degree is dependent on completion of the course work requirements, 18 hours of dissertation research credit (EVHS 701 or 702) and an original, independent research project under the guidance of a faculty advisor, as well as the submission and defense of a written dissertation. There is no foreign language requirement.


FINANCIAL SUPPORT


Financial support is available for Ph.D. candidates and for a limited number of full-time master’s degree candidates.


For more information


Those interested in obtaining applications should contact Karen E. Hendershott, department administrator, at 10900 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, Ohio 44106-4940, telephone (216) 368-5959, or e-mail keh2@case.edu, or contact Carole S. Jackson, department assistant, at (216) 368-5961 or csj3@case.edu. For further information, contact Karen E. Hendershott by the aforementioned means or Martina L. Veigl, Ph.D., at 11001 Cedar Ave., Cleveland, Ohio 44106-7047, telephone (216) 844-7525, or e-mail mlv2@case.edu.


Course Descriptions (CLBY)


CLBY 416. Fundamental Immunology (4)
Introductory immunology providing an overview of the immune system, including activation, effector mechanisms, and regulation. Topics include antigen-antibody reactions, immunologically important cell surface receptors, cell-cell interactions, cell-mediated immunity, innate versus adaptive immunity, cytokines, and basic molecular biology and signal transduction in B and T lymphocytes, and immunopathology. Three weekly lectures emphasize experimental findings leading to the concepts of modern immunology. An additional recitation hour is required to integrate the core material with experimental data and known immune mediated diseases. Five mandatory 90 minute group problem sets per semester will be administered outside of lecture and recitation meeting times. Graduate students will be graded separately from undergraduates, and 22 percent of the grade will be based on a critical analysis of a recently published, landmark scientific article. Offered as BIOL 316, BIOL 416, CLBY 416, and PATH 416. Prereq: Graduate standing.


CLBY 417. Cytokines: Function, Structure, and Signaling (3)
Regulation of immune responses and differentiation of leukocytes is modulated by proteins (cytokines) secreted and/or expressed by both immune and non-immune cells. Course examines the function, expression, gene organization, structure, receptors, and intracellular signaling of cytokines. Topic include regulatory and inflammatory cytokines, colony stimulating factors, chemokines, cytokine and cytokine receptor gene families, intracellular signaling through STAT proteins and tyrosine phosphorylation, clinical potential, and genetic defects. Lecture format using texts, scientific reviews and research articles. Recommended preparation: PATH 416 or equivalent. Offered as BIOL 417, CLBY 417, and PATH 417.


CLBY 422. Topics in Cell Biology (3)
This team-taught seminar course focuses on 3-4 distinct areas of contemporary cell biology. Faculty will present context and overview, but most time will be devoted to a close reading of the literature and discussion by students in a round table format. Recommended preparation: CBIO 453 and CBIO 455.


CLBY 435. Seminar in Molecular Biology/Microbiology (1)
Graduate students will attend the departmental seminar given by all graduate students in the Department of Molecular Biology and Microbiology, in the Molecular Virology Program, and in the Cell Biology Program, as well as give a seminar on their own thesis research. Students will be evaluated by the faculty member in charge of that student’s seminar with input from the students’ own thesis committee. After each seminar, the student presenter will meet with other graduate students for peer-review of the content, delivery, and style of the seminar. Peer reviewers will also be evaluated for the quality of their input. Offered as CLBY 435 and MBIO 435 and MVIR 435.


CLBY 466. Cell Signaling (3)
This is an advanced lecture/journal/discussion format course that covers cell signaling mechanisms. Included are discussions of neurotransmitter-gated ion channels, growth factor receptor kinases, cytokine receptors, G protein-coupled receptors, steroid receptors, heterotrimeric G proteins, ras family GTPases, second messenger cascades, protein kinase cascades, second messenger regulation of transcription factors, microtubule-based motility, actin/myosin-based motility, signals for regulation of cell cycle, signals for regulation of apoptosis. Offered as CLBY 466 and PHOL 466 and PHRM 466.


CLBY 468. Membrane Physiology (3)
This student-guided discussion/journal course focuses on biological membranes. Topics discussed include thermodynamics and kinetics of membrane transport, oxidative phosphorylation and bioenergetics, electro-physiology of excitable membranes, and whole and single channel electrophysiology, homeostasis and pH regulation, volume and calcium regulation. Offered as CLBY 468 and PHOL 468.


CLBY 487. Cell Biology of the Nucleus (3)
Discussion of current cell biology research on the structure and functions of the nuclear envelope, the matrix and chromatin. Recommended preparation: CBIO 453 and CBIO 454 or consent of instructor. Offered as CLBY 487 and PATH 487.


CLBY 488. Yeast Genetics and Cell Biology (3)
This seminar course provides an introduction to the genetics and molecular biology of the yeasts S. cerevisiae and S. pombe by a discussion of current literature focusing primarily on topics in yeast cell biology. Students are first introduced to the tools of molecular genetics and special features of yeasts that make them important model eukaryotic organisms. Some selected topics include cell polarity, cell cycle, secretory pathways, vesicular and nuclear/cytoplasmic transport, mitochondrial import and biogenesis, chromosome segregation, cytoskeleton, mating response and signal transduction. Offered as CLBY 488, GENE 488, MBIO 488, and PATH 488.


CLBY 511. Cell Biology Seminar (1)
The Cell Biology Seminar provides a forum for presentation and discussion of contemporary issues in Cell Biology. Students, fellows, local faculty and guest speakers present both research talks and journal clubs.


CLBY 512. Cell Biology Seminar (1)
The Cell Biology Seminar provides a forum for presentation and discussion of contemporary issues in Cell Biology. Students, fellows, local faculty and guest speakers present both research talks and journal clubs.


CLBY 518. Signaling via Cell Adhesion (3)
Molecular mechanisms by which cells interact with and are regulated by extracellular matrices and other cells. Offered as CBIO 518, CLBY 518, MBIO 518, and NEUR 518.


CLBY 519. Molecular Biology of RNA (3)
Selected topics regarding editing, enzymatic function, splicing, and structure of RNA. Offered as BIOC 519, CLBY 519, and MBIO 519.


CLBY 525. Transport and Targeting of Macromolecules in Health and Disease (3)
Each class includes introductory lecture, followed by student participation in interactive discussion of 3 to 5 research publications. At the end of the course, the students are expected to submit a paper or a short research proposal on any of the topics discussed during the course. Recommended preparation: CBIO 453, CBIO 454, CBIO 455, and CBIO 456. Offered as CLBY 525 and PATH 525.


CLBY 555. Emerging Concepts in Cell Regulation (3)
This course will cover the general principles of cell regulation with an emphasis on the emerging novel mechanisms of signal transduction. The traditional areas of receptor tyrosine kinases, G-protein coupled receptors will be examined but the focus will be on the roles novel mechanisms such as regulated proteolysis, ubiquitin proteasomal degradation, protein acetylation etc. in signal transduction and gene expression. This will be a literature-based course which will depend on critical evaluation of research papers, reviews and accompanied with in-depth discussion. Recommended preparation: CBIO 453. Offered as BIOC 555, CLBY 555, and PATH 555.


CLBY 599. RNA Structure and Function (3)
This course will cover fundamental aspects of modern RNA biology with emphasis on the interplay of three dimensional structure of nucleic acids and their function. The main focus of the course is on the recent discoveries that indicate a prominent role of RNA as a major regulator of cellular function. Topics discussed will include an introduction to RNA structure, folding and dynamics, RNA/RNA and RNA-protein interactions, and role of RNA in catalysis of biological reactions in ribosome and the role of other catalytic RNAs in tRNA biogenesis, pre-mRNA splicing, and viral replication. The course also covers the recently discovered RNA regulatory switches, large noncoding regulatory RNAs, and the role of RNA in human diseases and novel, RNA-based therapeutics. Offered as BIOC 599, CLBY 599, and MBIO 599.


CLBY 601. Special Problems (1 - 18)
This is the listing for independent research. Students should enroll in this course once they have selected their laboratory for Ph.D. research. The number of credit hours depends on how many didactic courses they are following at the same time. Once they have passed their qualifying examination they should register for CLBY 701.


CLBY 701. Dissertation Ph.D. (1 - 18)
This is the listing for independent research toward the Ph.D. The number of credit hours depends on how many didactic courses students are following at the same time. Students may register for this course only once they have passed their qualifying examination. Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.

 

 

Department of Environmental Health Sciences


Room W-G19, School of Medicine
Phone (216) 368-5962
http://casemed.case.edu/dept/evhs/evhs.htm

 

The Department of Environmental Health Sciences is devoted to the study of the fundamental mechanisms responsible for disease processes initiated or aggravated by environmental agents. Indoor and outdoor environments consist of complex interacting systems. These systems require the development of new approaches to understanding the basis of their action. This realization was the impetus for the creation of the department. Current research interests of the faculty include chemical and environmental carcinogenesis, genetic and reproductive toxicology, cytogenetics, radiation biology, and clinical and forensic toxicology.


The Department of Environmental Health Sciences participates in the integrated Biological Sciences Training Program (BSTP) and offers M.S. and Ph.D. degrees. In addition to participating in the flexible program and offering research opportunities to medical students, the department sponsors an M.D./M.S. program for students who have received formal acceptance to the School of Medicine and are interested in expanding their training in the area of environmental health sciences. This program allows students to complete the requirements for both degrees within a four-year period.


GRADUATE PROGRAMS


The Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degree programs are designed to increase the student’s knowledge of environmental health science as well as to provide a firm foundation in the life sciences. The programs are multidisciplinary and emphasize cancer biology, environmental toxicology, and nutrition and toxicology. They are based on a core classroom curriculum in the biological sciences, including biochemistry, biostatistics, microbiology, genetics, molecular biology, pharmacology, epidemiology, and toxicology.


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (EVHS)


EVHS 401. Fundamentals of Environmental Health Sciences: Biochemical Toxicology (3)
This course details the fundamentals of biochemical toxicology. Specific topics include oxidation-reduction reactions, Phase I and II xenobiotic metabolism and mechanisms of cellular toxicity. Also, this course focuses on pharmacology. General principles of pharmacology, drug transport and absorption, drug metabolism, neuropharmacology, immunopharmacology and pharmacokinetics are discussed.


EVHS 402. Fundamentals of Environmental Health Sciences: Risk Assessment (3)
This course presents an overview of the scientific approaches used to determine whether environmental agents are potentially dangerous to people. In this course, criteria utilized for establishing exposure limits is presented. A variety of assays which can be employed to assess the impact of environmental exposure on normal and genetically susceptible individuals are studied. These include: numerous animal tests, short term toxicity and mutagenicity tests, functional assays, molecular techniques to delineate mechanisms of action, epidemiology studies and controlled clinical trials. Recommended preparation: EVHS 429.


EVHS 405. Effects of Exposure to Env Toxins (3)
This course provides an introduction to toxic agents found in the environment and presents an overview of chemical and physical agents which have acute toxic and/or genotoxic effects on cells. Toxicity, mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, teratogenicity and the potential for exposure to these agents through environmental, occupational and medicinal routes are discussed. This topic will be covered at both the molecular and the clinical level. Discussion of clinical cases will be included. Prereq: EVHS 401 and EVHS 402.


EVHS 429. Introduction to Environmental Health (3)
This is a survey course of environmental health topics including individual, community, population, and global issues. Introduction to risk management, important biological mechanisms, and age and developmental impacts are covered in an overview fashion. A practical inner city home environment experience is included. Offered as EVHS 429 and MPHP 429.


EVHS 502. Genetic Toxicology II: DNA Damage and Repair (3)
This course provides an in-depth consideration of agents which alter DNA directly or indirectly through effects on its synthesis and examines the mechanisms and repair processes through which cells respond to this damage. The class consists of formal lectures which introduce each topic, and analysis of up-to-date literature on topics representative of major current areas of interest in this field. Topics covered include fidelity of DNA replication, excision repair, mismatch repair, transcription-linked repair, SOS repair and recombinational repair. Other DNA damage responses controlling decision points between DNA repair and apoptosis are also considered. Agent-specific DNA damage, such as that caused by agents leading to bulky adducts, AP sites, base-base mismatches and damage to DNA bases, are considered in the context of specific repair processes responding to these DNA insults in procaryotes and eukaryotes. Recommended preparation: EVHS 401 and 402.


EVHS 506. Independent Study in Environmental Health Sciences (1 - 6)


EVHS 510. Molecular Oncology (3)
This course explores the role of environmental factors in causing alterations in cellular mechanisms which lead to cancer. Emphasis is placed on genetic and other regulatory alterations leading to cell transformation. The possible role of oncogenes and suppressor genes in these processes and the mechanisms through which chemotherapy and immunotherapy manifest toxicity for cancer cells are considered.


EVHS 651. Master’s Thesis Research (1 - 9)


EVHS 701. Dissertation Ph.D. (1 - 9)
(Credit as arranged.) Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.

 


Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics


Room W-G57, School of Medicine
Phone 216-368-3197
http://epbiwww.case.edu/

 

The Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics offers graduate programs leading to the master of science, doctor of philosophy, M.D./Ph.D., and master of public health degrees. Students may select a division in one of the following programs: biostatistics, epidemiology, genetic and molecular epidemiology, health services research, and public health.


Epidemiology is the study of the distribution and determinants of disease in human populations. Epidemiologic studies are concerned with the determination of risk factors for a particular disease, such as cigarette smoking and bladder cancer. After risks are determined, epidemiologists concern themselves with interventions to prevent, treat or change the behavior to reduce the probability of disease.


The study of biostatistics includes design and analysis of experimental studies such as clinical trials and non-experimental studies, theory of probability and statistics, mathematical and statistical modeling, and knowledge of methodology used to evaluate the properties of statistical procedures. It also includes a competency in computers, which encompasses programming, statistical software use, and database management. Biostatistical methods are utilized in almost all medical research.


Genetic and molecular epidemiology encompasses the study of genetic and environmental factors that determine the distributions and dynamics of health outcomes in populations. Investigating such outcomes entails using tools from both the field of human genetics and the field of epidemiology. Numerous human disorders appear to result from the joint action of genes and environment, providing the genetic epidemiologist with ample opportunity for making important contributions to the study of human disease.


According to the Institute of Medicine, health services research is a “multidisciplinary field of inquiry, both basic and applied, that examines the use, costs, quality, accessibility, delivery, organization, financing and outcomes of health care services to increase knowledge and understanding of the structures, processes, and effects of health services for individuals and populations.” The health services research division prepares professionals to design and implement sophisticated studies of complex health services issues and problems using a wide range of quantitative and qualitative analytic techniques. Graduates are prepared for careers in academics, industry, and an array of health-oriented organizations and agencies.


A master of public health degree is designed to prepare students to address the broad mission of public health, defined as “enhancing health in human populations, through organized community effort,” utilizing education, research and community service. Public health practitioners are prepared to identify and assess the health needs of different populations, and then to plan, implement and evaluate programs to meet those needs. It is the task of the public health practitioner to protect and promote the wellness of humankind. For more information about the master of public health degree program, please see “Other Degree Programs” in the medical school section of this General Bulletin or contact the department.


Department faculty are nationally recognized and have more than $9.5 million in grants that support projects including HIV/TB research in Uganda, the search for genes that cause disease, cancer prevention and control, studies of interventions to change human behaviors that promote good health, design of clinical trials, studies to change high-risk behaviors related to AIDS, studies of public policies concerning the health of the elderly, and cost/benefit studies of medical interventions. The department has offices at the university, the Memory and Aging Center, the Louis Stokes Cleveland Department of Veteran’s Affair Medical Center, and MetroHealth Medical Center, the latter nationally recognized as a premier public hospital. The department also maintains a scientific computer center comprised of 15 servers. Several very large national health care and demographic databases (including Medicare, Medicaid, and Vital Statistics databases) are stored on the servers and are used for faculty and student research and educational projects.


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (EPBI)


EPBI 408. Public Policy and Aging (3)
Overview of aging and the aged. Concepts in the study of public policy. Policies on aging and conditions that they address. The politics of policies on aging. Emergent trends and issues. Offered as ANTH 498, BETH 496, EPBI 408, GERO 496, HSTY 480, MPHP 408, NURS 479, NURS 579, POSC 480, and SOCI 496.


EPBI 411. Introduction to Behavioral Health (3)
Using a biopsychosocial perspective, an overview of the measurement and modeling of behavioral, social, psychological, and environmental factors related to disease prevention, disease management, and health promotion is provided. Offered as EPBI 411 and MPHP 411.


EPBI 414. Introduction to Statistical Computing (3)
This course introduces the use of computers in epidemiologic investigations and biostatistical applications. Topics covered include the computer operating system UNIX, the use of the Internet to access and obtain databases, and database and spreadsheet concepts, along with instruction in the use of SAS software for database management, spreadsheet construction, statistical analysis, and graphics, with a cursory review of SPSS. Primary emphasis in on developing the knowledge and familiarity required for running these particular programs in connection with data collection, analysis, and presentation of results in clinical studies. Studies will be required to complete assignments using personal computers and UNIX systems maintained by the department. Knowledge of basic statistics in beneficial, as this course does not teach statistical analysis, but it is not vital to learning the material in this course.


EPBI 419. Topics in Urban Health in the United States (3)
This course examines patterns of urban health and disease across the life course among marginalized populations and communities. We will examine the socio-environmental contexts that impact health status (i.e., racism, health disparities, neighborhood context, and environmental stressors). Readings from epidemiology, sociology, and public health literature will provide a foundation for the multiple factors and processes that impact health. Offered as EPBI 419 and MPHP 419.


EPBI 431. Statistical Methods I (3)
Application of statistical techniques with particular emphasis on problems in the biomedical sciences. Basic probability theory, random variables, and distribution functions. Point and interval estimation, regression, and correlation. Problems whose solution involves using packaged statistical programs. First part of year-long sequence. Offered as ANAT 431, BIOL 431, EPBI 431, and MPHP 431.


EPBI 432. Statistical Methods II (3)
Methods of analysis of variance, regression and analysis of quantitative data. Emphasis on computer solution of problems drawn from the biomedical sciences. Design of experiments, power of tests, and adequacy of models. Offered as BIOL 432, EPBI 432, and MPHP 432. Prereq: EPBI 431 or equivalent.


EPBI 433. Community Interventions and Program Evaluation (3)
This course prepares students to design, conduct, and assess community-based health interventions and program evaluation. Topics include assessment of need, evaluator/stakeholder relationship, process vs. outcome-based objectives, data collection, assessment of program objective achievement based on process and impact, cost-benefit analyses, and preparing the evaluation report to stakeholders. Recommended preparation: EPBI 490, EPBI 431, or MPHP 405. Offered as EPBI 433 and MPHP 433.


EPBI 435. Survival Data Analysis (3)
Basic concepts of survival analysis including hazard function, survival function, types of censoring; non-parametric models; extended Cox models: time dependent variables, piece-wise Cox model, etc; sample size requirements for survival studies. Prereq: EPBI 432.


EPBI 441. Biostatistics I (3)
Sampling techniques and statistical methods applicable to data derived from sampling surveys. Principles of random sampling, stratification, systematic sampling, and cluster sampling. Emphasis on sampling problems encountered in surveying human populations. Recommended preparation: EPBI 432.


EPBI 442. Biostatistics II (3)
This course deals with the basic concepts and applications of nonparametric statistics. Topics will include distribution-free statistics, one sample rank test, the Mann-Whitney and Kruskal Wallis tests, one sample and two sample U-statistics, asymptotic relative efficiency of tests, distribution-free confidence intervals, point estimation and linear rank statistics. Recommended preparation: EPBI 441. Offered as EPBI 442 and MPHP 442.


EPBI 443. Applied Multivariate Analysis (3)
Matrix algebra. Multivariate normal distribution. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and covariance (MANCOVA). Repeated measures, growth curve and profile analysis. Canonical correlation analysis. Principal components analysis. Discrimination/classification and clustering. Prereq: EPBI 432


EPBI 448. Genetic Analysis Programs (3)
Theory underlying software developed specifically for the genetic analysis of family data. The course will focus mainly on the programs in the S.A.G.E. (Statistical Analysis for Genetic Epidemiology) program package, but will also cover other programs that are available. Use of these programs to determine genetic components of complex traits and writing up reports summarizing the results. Recommended preparation: EPBI 452 and EPBI 457.


EPBI 450. Clinical Trials and Intervention Studies (3)
Issues in the design, organization, and operation of randomized, controlled clinical trials and intervention studies. Emphasis on long-term multicenter trials. Topics include legal and ethical issues in the design; application of concepts of controls, masking, and randomization; steps required for quality data collection; monitoring for evidence of adverse or beneficial treatment effects; elements of organizational structure; sample size calculations and data analysis procedures; and common mistakes. Recommended preparation: EPBI 431 or consent of instructor. Offered as EPBI 450 and MPHP 450.


EPBI 451. Principles of Genetic Epidemiology (1 - 3)
A survey of the basic principles, concepts and methods of the discipline of genetic epidemiology, which focuses on the role of genetic factors in human disease and their interaction with environmental and cultural factors. Many important human disorders appear to exhibit a genetic component; hence the integrated approaches of genetic epidemiology bring together epidemiologic and human genetic perspectives in order to answer critical questions about human disease. Methods of inference based upon data from individuals, pairs of relatives, and pedigrees will be considered. The last third of the course (1 credit) is more statistical in nature. Offered as EPBI 451, GENE 451, and MPHP 451. Prereq: EPBI / MPHP 431 and EPBI/MPHP 490 or MPHP 405.


EPBI 452. Statistical Methods for Genetic Epidemiology (1 - 3)
Analytic methods for evaluating the role of genetic factors in human disease, and their interactions with environmental factors. Statistical methods for the estimation of genetic parameters and testing of genetic hypotheses, emphasizing maximum likelihood methods. Models to be considered will include such components as genetic loci of major effect, polygenic inheritance, and environmental, cultural and developmental effects. Topics will include familial aggregation, segregation and linkage analysis, ascertainment, linkage disequilibrium, and disease marker association studies. Recommended preparation: EPBI 431 and EPBI 451.


EPBI 453. Categorical Data Analysis (3)
Descriptive and inferential methods for categorical data with applications: bivariate data; models for binary and multinomial response variables, with emphasis on logit models; loglinear models for multivariate data; model fitting using the maximum likelihood approach; model selection and diagnostics; and sample size and power considerations. Topics in repeated response data as time allows. Recommended preparation: EPBI 441.


EPBI 454. Population Genetics for Genetic Epidemiology (3)
This course will cover basics of population genetics (mutation, migration, natural selection) as well as topics such as random mating populations and inbred populations. Emphasis will be placed on migration studies and on linkage disequilibrium mapping. Measures on linkage disequilibrium, methods for linkage disequilibrium mapping of disease genes and the use of isolated versus outbred population in linkage of disequilibrium mapping will be discussed. Recommended preparation: EPBI 431.


EPBI 457. Genetic Linkage Analysis (3)
Methods of analyzing human data to detect genetic linkage between disease traits, discreet and continuous, and polymorphic markers. Both model-based maximum likelihood (lod score) and model-free robust methods will be discussed. Additional topics covered will include measures of informativeness, multipoint analysis, numerical methods and mod score analysis. Prereq: EPBI 432. Coreq: EPBI 451.


EPBI 458. Statistical Methods for Clinical Trials (3)
This course will focus on special statistical methods and philosophical issues in the design and analysis of clinical trials. The emphasis will be on practically important issues that are typically not covered in standard biostatistics courses. Topics will include: randomization techniques, intent-to-treat analysis, analysis of compliance data, equivalency testing, surrogate endpoints, multiple comparisons, sequential testing, and Bayesian methods. Offered as EPBI 458 and MPHP 458. Prereq: EPBI 432 or MPHP 432.


EPBI 459. Longitudinal Data Analysis (3)
This course will cover statistical methods for the analysis of longitudinal data with an emphasis on application in biological and health research. Topics include exploratory data analysis, response feature analysis, growth curve models, mixed-effects models, generalized estimating equations, and missing data. Prereq: EPBI 432.


EPBI 460. Health Research Methods I (3)
This is a course in research methods focusing on practical issues in the conduct of health services research studies. Topics include: an overview of health services research; ethics in health services research; proposal writing and funding; the relationship between theory and research; formulating research questions; specifying study design and study objectives; conceptualizing and defining variables; validity and reliability of measures; scale construction; operationalizing health research relevant variables using observation, self and other report, and secondary analysis; formatting questionnaires; developing analysis plans; choosing data collection methods; sampling techniques and sample size; carrying out studies; preparing data for analysis; and reporting of findings. Offered as EPBI 460 and MPHP 460.


EPBI 461. Health Research Methods II (3)
Focus on measurement strategies for key health services research concepts including case mix, severity of illness, functional status, and patient outcomes. Examine the interplay between physician practice patterns, geography, standards of care, and practice guidelines and patient management and outcomes. Statistical methods especially useful in health services research (e.g., cost/effectiveness and cost/benefit analysis, conjoint analysis, utility assessment, and meta-analysis) will be introduced as well as examining approaches to the assessment of care quality. Recommended preparation: EPBI 460 or consent of instructor.


EPBI 462. Computation Methods in Genetic Epidemiology (3)
Methods for computing genetic likelihoods and estimating genetic parameters; Elston-Stewart algorithm, IBD computation; Markov chain Monte Carlo methods; Gibbs sampling; Newton-Raphson; E-M algorithm. Prereq: EPBI 457 and EPBI 482.


EPBI 464. Obesity and Cancer: Views from Molecules to Health Policy (3)
This course will provide an overview of the components of energy balance (diet, physical activity, resting metabolic rate, dietary induced thermogenesis) and obesity, a consequence of long term positive energy balance, and various types of cancer. Following an overview of energy balance and epidemiological evidence for the obesity epidemic, the course will proceed with an introduction to the cellular and molecular biology of energy metabolism. Then, emerging research on biologically plausible connections and epidemiological associations between obesity and various types of cancer (e.g., colon, breast) will be presented. Finally, interventions targeted at decreasing obesity and improving quality of life in cancer patients will be discussed. The course will be cooperatively-taught by a transdisciplinary team of scientists engaged in research in energy balance and/or cancer. Didactic lectures will be combined with classroom discussion of readings. The paper assignment will involve application of course principles, lectures and readings. Offered as EBPI 464, MPHP 464.


EPBI 467. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis in Health Care (3)
Evaluation of alternative medical treatments and drug therapies. Topics include cost-benefit, cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis. Measuring cost, benefits and health outcomes. Quality of life and other measures of effectiveness will also be addressed. Emphasis on case studies, course project, and evaluation of publications. Some decision analysis and policy implications will also be included. Offered as EPBI 467 and MPHP 467.


EPBI 468. The Continual Improvement of Healthcare: An Interdisciplinary Course (3)
The focus of this course is on collaborative work for the benefit of patients and community. Seminar classwork is combined with a field project, in which interdisciplinary student teams apply what they have learned to the improvement activities of a local health care organization. Successful completion of the course depends on participation in seminar sessions and completion of the interdisciplinary student team project. Offered as EPBI 468, NURS 468, and MPHP 468.


EPBI 471. Statistical Aspects of Data Mining (3)
Linear regression, least squares, shrinkage, model selection. Scatterplot smoothing, additive models. Generalized linear and generalized additive models. Regression trees, MARS, projection pursuit regression. Decision theory, linear discriminant analysis, logistic regression, classification tree. Aggregating models. Bagging and boosting. Prereq: EPBI 442.


EPBI 472. Special Topics in Statistical Genetics (1 - 4)
Various topics in statistical genetics will be discussed, depending on student interest and needs. Examples of topics are paternity and zygosity testing, path analysis for genetic epidemiology, the analysis of racial admixture and modeling such phenomena as imprinting and anticipation. The course will consist of four modules. A student may, in consultation with the instructor, elect to take 1 - 4 modules for the corresponding amount of credit. Recommended preparation: EPBI 452.


EPBI 473. Integrative Cancer Biology (3)
This is a project-focused research level course in integrative cancer biology, an emergent field in which mathematical models and computer simulations are used to synthesize various forms of cancer data to yield experimentally testable scientific hypotheses. The course is designed for oncologists and cancer biologists who are interested in learning how to apply mathematics and a high level programming language (the freeware R) to analyses of cancer research data. Data on all levels will be considered, ranging from epidemiological datasets to DNA microarray datasets. Recommended preparation: BIOC 407, EPBI 432.


EPBI 474. Principles of Practice-Based Network Research (3)
Practice-based research networks (PBRNs) are organizations of community-based healthcare practices that engage in clinical research and practice improvement. In the U.S., there are more than 100 of these dynamic, collaborative organizations that enable the translation of research into practice and practice into research. They also frequently engage in developing and refining methods to improve healthcare quality. This course is designed to provide students with a foundation in PBRN methods and principles, including: introduction to PBRNs, methods for collaborating with community practices, PBRN-building strategies, PBRN data collections methods, statistical issues in network research, community-based participatory research, human subjects’ protection issues in PBRNs, quality improvement research in PBRNs, funding for PBRN research, and writing PBRN research findings for publication. Each 2.5 hour class session will feature a lecture followed by a discussion of readings from the literature. Students will develop a PBRN research or quality improvement proposal during the semester. Offered as EBPI 474, FAMD 474, MPHP474.


EPBI 477. Internship at Health-Related Government Agencies (3)
This independent study course will incorporate a one-semester-long internship at health-related government agencies (Ohio Department of Health, Ohio Department of Job and Family Services, or Cleveland City Health Department). The choice of the agency will depend on the student’s academic interests and research goals. The objective is to develop a level of familiarity with the organizational and operational aspects of such agencies, and to gain an understanding of agencies’ and bureaus’ interactions with the legislative body, as well as the processes of developing, implementing, managing, and monitoring health initiative. The instructor and the liaison persons at the agencies will be responsible for planning structured encounters of interns with key administrators and policy makers, and to select a research project, based on the intern’s research interests and the agencies’ research priorities. Interns will be required to submit a draft of the report to the instructor at the end of the semester. The approved, final report will be submitted to the agency. The project will be evaluated for its methodological soundness and rigor. Students will be required to be at the agency one day a week. Recommended preparation: EPBI 515. Offered as EPBI 477 and MPHP 477.


EPBI 480. Introduction to Mathematical Statistics (3)
An introduction to statistical inference at an intermediate mathematical level. The concepts of random variables and distributions, discrete and continuous, are reviewed. Topics covered include: expectations, variance, moments, the moment generating function; Bernoulli, binomial, hypergeometric, Poisson, negative binomial, normal, gamma and beta distribution; the central limit theorem; Bayes estimation, maximum likelihood estimators, unbiased estimators, sufficient statistics; sampling distributions (chi-square, t) confidence intervals, Fisher information; hypothesis testing, uniformly most powerful tests and multi-decision problems. Prereq: EPBI 431.


EPBI 481. Theoretical Statistics I (3)

Topics provide the background for statistical inference. Random variables; distribution and density functions; transformations, expectation. Common univariate distributions. Multiple random variables; joint, marginal and conditional distributions; hierarchical models, covariance. Distributions of sample quantities: distributions of sums of random variables, distributions of order statistics. Methods of statistical inference. Graduate students are responsible for mathematical derivations, and full proofs of principal theorems. Recommended preparation: MATH 122 or MATH 223, or concurrent registration in EPBI 431. Offered as EPBI 481 and STAT 445.


EPBI 482. Theoretical Statistics II (3)
Point estimation: maximum likelihood, moment estimators. Methods of evaluating estimators including mean squared error, consistency, “best” unbiased and sufficiency. Hypothesis testing; likelihood ratio and union-intersection tests. Properties of tests including power function, bias. Interval estimation by inversion of test statistics, use of pivotal quantities. Application to regression. Graduate students are responsible for mathematical derivations, and full proofs of principal theorems. Recommended preparation: MATH 223 or STAT 445. Offered as EPBI 482 and STAT 446.


EPBI 484. Geographic Medicine and Epidemiology (1 - 3)
This course focuses on the epidemiology, prevention, treatment, and control of tropical and parasitic diseases. Emphasis will be placed on the triad of agent, host, and environment for infectious disease impacting global health. Three distinct modules will focus on specific examples such as malaria, helminths, bacteria, or viruses. Active class participation is required through discussions, case studies, and group projects. Recommended preparation: EPBI 490, EPBI 491 and a microbiology course or consent of instructor. Offered as EPBI 484, INTH 484, and MPHP 484.


EPBI 488. Gender, Ethnicity, and Health Research (3)
This course is designed to acquaint students with the literature addressing the constructs of race, ethnicity, gender and social class; to examine critically the contexts in which these constructs are often applied; and to assess the relationship between each of these constructs and access to health care, quality of care, and health outcome. Offered as EPBI 488 and MPHP 488.


EPBI 490. Epidemiology: Introduction to Theory and Methods (3)
Epidemiologic principles and methods needed to understand population-based statements of illness and health. Descriptive epidemiology, analytic epidemiology, and epidemiologic inference. Classification, morbidity and mortality rates, sampling, screening, epidemiologic models, field trials, controlled epidemiologic surveys, sources of bias, and causal models. Recommended preparation: STAT 201 or STAT 207 or STAT 312 or equivalent. Offered as EPBI 490 and MPHP 490.


EPBI 491. Epidemiology: Case-Control Study Design and Analysis (3)
This course builds upon EPBI 490 with a comprehensive study of the concepts, principles, and methods of epidemiologic research. The course content specifically focuses on the case-control study design and provides a framework for the design, analysis, and interpretation of case-control studies. Rigorous problem-centered training includes exposure measurement, subject selection, validity, reliability, sample size and power, effect modification, confounding, bias, risk assessment, matching, and logistic regression. Individual and group data projects will be analyzed using SAS statistical software. Offered as EPBI 491 and MPHP 491. Prereq: EPBI/MPHP 431 and EPBI/MPHP 490.


EPBI 492. Epidemiology: Cohort Study Design and Analysis (3)
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the cohort study. Particular emphasis is placed on cohort study design and cohort data analysis. The course will cover the conceptual framework underlying cohort studies, planning and conducting a cohort study, basic concepts of time, exposure and outcome, and methods in the analysis of longitudinally collected data. Analytic methods covered in the class include, but are not limited to: analysis of age, period, and cohort effects, analysis of incidence rates, analysis of repeated measures, and analysis of time-to-event data. Students will have the opportunity to conduct analysis of data obtained from an actual cohort study using a statistical package of their choice. Offered as EPBI 492 and MPHP 492. Prereq: EPBI 431 and EPBI 490 or equivalents.


EPBI 493. Chronic Disease Epidemiology (3)
This course is intended for graduate students in epidemiology and M.P.H. students who are interested in chronic disease epidemiology and prevention. The course will cover: 1) overview of concepts in chronic disease epidemiology and etiology, study design in epidemiologic research, and causal inference; 2) major chronic diseases in the U.S. populations and prevention; and 3) cancer screening. For each specific disease of interest, the lecture is structured according to 4 major components: 1) basic epidemiology; 2) risk factors and etiology; 3) prevention (and screening); and 4) controversies and future research. Offered as EPBI 493 and MPHP 493. Prereq: EPBI 490 or equivalent.


EPBI 494. Infectious Disease Epidemiology (1 - 3)
The epidemiology, prevention and control of representative infectious disease models. Emphasis on the triad of agent, host, and environment and the molecular and genetic basis of agent and host interaction in the population. Recommended preparation: EPBI 490, EPBI 491, and a microbiology course or consent of instructor. Offered as EPBI 494, INTH 494, and MPHP 494.


EPBI 495. Mental Health Epidemiology (3)
This course explores the epidemiology of diseases affecting the brain, including various forms of mental illness and neuro logical disorders. The course utilizes a cross- disciplinary approach and draws on science, sociology, history, and. Offered as EPBI 495 and MPHP 495.


EPBI 497. Cancer Epidemiology (1 - 3)
This is a 1-3 credit modular course in cancer epidemiology and is intended for graduate students in epidemiology and biostatistics, environment health, MPH students and MD or MD/PhD students. The course will consist of 3 five-week modules: 1) introduction to cancer epidemiology (study design, etiology and causal inference, cancer statistics and cancer biology); 2) site-specific discussions of various cancers involving natural history of disease and risk factors and etiology and 3) cancer prevention and screening and cancer survivorship. Each of the modules is worth 1 credit hour for a total of 3 credit hours.


EPBI 499. Independent Study (1 - 18)


EPBI 501. Graduate Seminar (0)
Students and faculty will meet twice a month to listen to local faculty and national researchers and discuss their current work. The students are encouraged to ask questions and challenge the speakers. Some of the talks will offer CME credits. Offered as EPBI 501 and MPHP 501.


EPBI 502. Seminar in Genetic Epidemiology (0)
Presentation of original research or recent journal publications by faculty and students.


EPBI 503. Seminar in Biostatistics (0)
Presentation of original research or recent journal publications by faculty and students in the area of Biostatistics.


EPBI 504. Seminar in Health Services Research and Policy (0)
This seminar is designed to enhance the professional development of students in the Health Services Research and Policy (HSR & P) division of the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and provide them with practical information, experiences and guidance to foster their academic success. Students will 1) develop the ability to critically appraise the health services research literature; 2) gain experience in organizing and delivering oral presentations based on published literature and their own research endeavors; 3) be exposed to role models and receive coaching on career development through lecture and discussion involving experienced faculty from within and outside the division; 4) receive didactic training and hands-on experience with career-related tasks and skills such as grant writing and proposal evaluation, article review, and effective participation in professional meetings; and hear faculty from within and outside the department describe their research. The specific content of the seminar for any given semester will be determined jointly by HSR&P students and faculty. Enrollment is limited to students in the HSR & P division of the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics.


EPBI 505. Seminar in Epidemiology (0)
This seminar is designed to enhance the academic and professional development of students in the Division of Epidemiology in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics. The seminar is comprised of a journal club style in which current and classic research literature in epidemiology is critically evaluated. Also, talks are given by students, faculty, and invited guests. These activities give students the opportunity to improve their ability to: 1) critically evaluate research literature in epidemiology; 2) lead effectively a discussion of a research article; and 3) organize and deliver oral presentations based on published literature and their own research endeavors. Some sessions are devoted to didactic training and hands-on experience with career-related tasks and skills such as grant writing, proposal evaluation, and manuscript review. The specific content of the seminar for any given semester will be determined jointly by the students and faculty in the Division of Epidemiology. Enrollment is limited to students in the Division of Epidemiology of the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics.


EPBI 508. Ethics, Law, and Epidemiology (3)
This course is designed to provide epidemiology students with basic knowledge about the ethical and legal principles underlying epidemiological research. This is not a public health law class. Issue papers are assigned on a weekly basis. Each issue paper requires that the student analyze the situation depicted and apply the principles learned. Some issue papers may require that the student draft a proposed rule, a portion of legislation, or a document such as an informed consent form. Other exercises may require that students critique an existing agency rule or legislation. Offered as EPBI 508 and MPHP 508.Prereq: EPBI 490 and EPBI 491 or equivalents.


EPBI 510. Health Disparities (3)
This course aims to provide theoretical and application tools for students from many disciplinary backgrounds to conduct research and develop interventions to reduce health disparities. The course will be situated contextually within the historical record of the United States, reviewing social, political, economic, cultural, legal, and ethical theories related to disparities in general, with a central focus on health disparities. Several frameworks regarding health disparities will be used for investigating and discussing the empirical evidence on disparities among other subgroups (e.g., the poor, women, uninsured, disabled, and non-English speaking populations) will also be included and discussed. Students will be expected to develop a research proposal (observational, clinical, and/or intervention) rooted in their disciplinary background that will incorporate materials from the various perspectives presented throughout the course, with the objective of developing and reinforcing a more comprehensive approach to current practices within their fields. Offered as CRSP 510, EPBI 510, MPHP 510, NURS 510, and SASS 510.


EPBI 512. Reproductive and Perinatal Epidemiology (1 - 3)
This course provides an overview of the biology, risk factors, and epidemiologic methods related to reproductive and perinatal outcomes. The course will be divided into three one-credit modules: 1) female reproductive health (e.g. puberty, menstrual cycle function, gynecological disorders, menopause); 2) pregnancy (e.g. fecundity, pregnancy complications, birth outcomes, congenital malformations, infant mortality); and 3) male reproductive health (e.g. fecundity, male reproductive malformations, testicular dysgenesis syndrome, erectile dysfunction). The course will be a combination of lectures and class discussions. Recommended preparation: EPBI 490 and EPBI 431 or the equivalent.


EPBI 515. Secondary Analysis of Large Health Care Data Bases (3)
Development of skills in working with the large-scale secondary data bases generated for research, health care administration/billing, or other purposes. Students will become familiar with the content, strength, and limitations of several data bases; with the logistics of obtaining access to data bases; the strengths and limitations of routinely collected variables; basic techniques for preparing and analyzing secondary data bases and how to apply the techniques to initiate and complete empirical analysis. Recommended preparation: EPBI 414 or equivalent; EPBI 431 or EPBI 460 and EPBI 461 (for HSR students).


EPBI 592. Special Topics in Epidemiology (1 - 10)
Short, intensive courses on current research topics, statistical analyses, methodological issues or intervention approaches related to epidemiology, particularly infectious disease, chronic disease, behavioral and social epidemiology. Course hours and requirements vary by topic each semester.


EPBI 601. Master’s Project Research (1 - 18)


EPBI 602. Practicum (1 - 3)


EPBI 651. Thesis M.S. (1 - 18)


EPBI 701. Dissertation Ph.D. (1 - 18)

Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.

 

 

Department of Family Medicine


The Department of Family Medicine offers a master’s degree in family medicine. The program includes basic training in biostatistics, epidemiology and research methods, with a specific emphasis on the family. The department is a national leader in primary care research and is one of three national research centers funded by the American Academy of Family Physicians.


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (FAMD)


FAMD 431. Applied Statistics in Medical Education (3)


FAMD 474. Principles of Practice-Based Network Research (3)
Practice-based research networks (PBRNs) are organizations of community-based healthcare practices that engage in clinical research and practice improvement. In the U.S., there are more than 100 of these dynamic, collaborative organizations that enable the translation of research into practice and practice into research. They also frequently engage in developing and refining methods to improve healthcare quality. This course is designed to provide students with a foundation in PBRN methods and principles, including: introduction to PBRNs, methods for collaborating with community practices, PBRN-building strategies, PBRN data collections methods, statistical issues in network research, community-based participatory research, human subjects’ protection issues in PBRNs, quality improvement research in PBRNs, funding for PBRN research, and writing PBRN research findings for publication. Each 2.5 hour class session will feature a lecture followed by a discussion of readings from the literature. Students will develop a PBRN research or quality improvement proposal during the semester. Offered as EBPI 474, FAMD 474, MPHP474.


FAMD 502. International Health Practice (3)
This course aims to provide practical knowledge to prepare students to serve and study for international health work particularly in complex humanitarian emergencies. The course is organized and discussed from the perspective of health care professional. This course is intended for graduate-level students in medicine, nursing, public health, social work, and medical anthropology. Historical development of the discipline, key methodological issues, and essential principles in key topics will be discussed in multidisciplinary approach. Offered as FAMD 502 and MPHP 502.


FAMD 601. Independent Study (1 - 18)


FAMD 651. Thesis M.S. (1 - 18)


DIVISION FOR ADOLESCENT HEALTH


2027 Cornell Road
Barbara A. Cromer, M.D., Director
and Frederick C. Robbins, M.D., Professor of Child and Adolescent Health
Phone 216-368-3770
http://www.case.edu/med/adolescenthealth/blah.html

 

The School of Medicine established the Center for Adolescent Health in 1990 in recognition of the multidimensional biopsychosocial problems of contemporary youth. It was formed by educators and researchers from a variety of disciplines seeking to bring their expertise to bear on the serious problems facing youth. The center became a Division of Adolescent Health in Family Medicine in 2005. The mission has remained the same. It seeks to address these issues through an integrated, transdisciplinary approach that incorporates research, professional education, programmatic intervention and collaboration between Case and community agencies and programs.


This unique program has four objectives:

  1. To promote and coordinate collaborative research activities relevant to adolescents;
  2. To provide interdisciplinary educational training at undergraduate, post-baccalaureate, and post-graduate levels for professionals interested in adolescent health, including an adolescent track in the Master in Public Health Program at the Medical School;
  3. To serve as a resource for Greater Cleveland community agencies that provide services for adolescents; and
  4. To help promote the development of rational public policies addressing health and social issues that concern youth.

For information about the adolescent health track of the master of public health degree, please see “Other Degree Programs” in the medical school section of this General Bulletin or contact the center. A certificate in adolescent health also is offered; please contact the center for more information.


Although based at the School of Medicine, the division has developed relationships with other schools and departments at Case and the community at large. In addition, the division is the umbrella organization for Cuyahoga County’s Adolescent Consortium, a networking organization for more than 100 local youth-serving agencies. The center also provides program evaluation services and consultation to community-based youth-serving projects, as well as establishing and maintaining a county wide Adolescent Health Risk Behavior database.


Current research interests of the faculty include adolescent health promotion and resilience, sexuality, mental health, substance abuse prevention and violence.


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (ADHT)


ADHT 485. Adolescent Development (3)
Adolescent Development can be viewed as the overriding framework for approaching disease prevention and health promotion for this age group. This course will review the developmental tasks of adolescence and identify the impact of adolescent development on youth risk behaviors. It will build a conceptual and theoretical framework through which to address and change adolescent behavior to promote health. Offered as ADHT 485 and MPHP 485.


ADHT 499. Independent Study in Adolescence (1 - 12)
This course will provide the student interested in adolescent health with the opportunity to work independently and in depth in an area pertaining to adolescence in a community or other institutional setting. The designation ADHT 499 will be used for field placements, internships, or capstone experiences.


DIVISION OF GENERAL MEDICAL SCIENCES


The Division of General Medical Sciences at the School of Medicine was established in 1986 to provide an organizational unit with interdisciplinary research and education objectives. Special centers—with individual directors and missions—currently based in the division include the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, the Center for Adolescent Health, the Center for Bio-architectonics, the Center for Global Health and Diseases, the Center for Psychoanalytic Child Development, the Center for RNA Molecular Biology, and the Center for Science, Health and Society.


CASE COMPREHENSIVE CANCER CENTER
Phone 216-368-8797
http://cancer.case.edu
Stanton L Gerson, M.D., Asa and Patricia Shiverick Professor of Hematological
Oncology and Director of the Center

 

The Case Comprehensive Cancer Center supports and coordinates all of the cancer research conducted by researchers and clinicians at the School of Medicine, the University, University Hospitals of Cleveland, and Cleveland Clinic. By providing a platform for multidisciplinary and transdisciplinary research across these campuses, the Cancer Center promotes the translation of basic science advances as rapidly as possible into research involving humans and human cancers and then into clinical research activities. The goal of the more than 310 members is to discover basic processes in cancer, to develop innovative population based research efforts, and to evaluate patients with cancer to provide new and better options in cancer prevention, diagnosis and treatment to the people of Northeast Ohio. The center is one of the 39 National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer centers.


Researchers and clinicians associated with the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center participate in one or more of nine organized interdisciplinary programs, each focused on a different area of cancer research: Cancer Genetics; Cell Proliferation and Cell Death; Radiation and the Cellular Stress Response, Molecular Basis of Oncogenesis, Stem Cells and Hematologic Malignancies, Genitourinary Malignancies; Developmental Therapeutics; Behavioral Prevention and Population based research; and Aging and Cancer. These research efforts are facilitated by seventeen shared resource facilities supported by the center that provide essential services for cancer center members. The cross-disciplinary interactions catalyzed by these research programs create a rich training environment, and members participate in five National Cancer Institute-sponsored interdisciplinary training programs.


CENTER FOR ADVANCEMENT OF MEDICAL LEARNING
Director, to be announced
For more information, contact Daniel Anker dxa2@case.edu


CENTER FOR BIO-ARCHITECTONICS
Room BRB B-17, School of Medicine
Raymond J. Lasek, Ph.D. (Anatomy), Professor and Director
Phone 216-368-2390

 

Bio-architectonics is the study of complex biological architectures. The center was established in 1986 to explore biological architectures in medicine, and it has focused specifically on the teaching of medical anatomy.


CENTER FOR CLINICAL INVESTIGATION
For more information, contact Daniel Anker dxa2@case.edu


CENTER FOR GLOBAL HEALTH AND DISEASE
Fourth Floor, Iris S. and Bert L. Wolstein Research Building
James W. Kazura, M.D., Professor of International Health, Medicine, and Pathology and Director
Phone 216-368-6321

 

The Center for Global Health and Diseases in the School of Medicine was established in 2002 by the integration of the Division of Geographic Medicine and the Center for International Health. The Center for Global Health and Diseases links the numerous international health resources of the university, its affiliated institutions, and the northern Ohio community in multidisciplinary programs of research and education related to global health. The challenges presented by world health problems are enormous, and the opportunities presented to the university community are great. In meeting these challenges and in responding to these opportunities, those affiliated with the center have the opportunity to promote health in the world and to enrich the community. The Center and its faculty engage in basic and applied biomedical research on diseases of developing countries as well as interdisciplinary studies of microbial threats to the American public, including agents of bioterrorism. Thus, the scope of the center includes education and service as well as basic and clinical investigations of human health and disease.


Faculty members have primary appointments in the center, which is an administratively independent unit within the Division of General Medical Sciences of the School of Medicine. Secondary appointments are held in various departments in the School of Medicine, including medicine, genetics, epidemiology and biostatistics, and pathology and other units within the university. The center endeavors to foster programs that encourage creative people from many disciplines and cultures to work toward solutions of global health and disease issues (e.g., Departments of Anthropology, Biology and Mathematics in the College of Arts and Sciences). Its efforts are thus built on a strong base of specialized strengths from many academic disciplines. The center is currently a national leader in National Institutes of Health-supported studies of the major infectious diseases of developing countries. Faculty use cutting-edge approaches to examine the molecular, genetic and immunologic basis of susceptibility to infectious diseases such as malaria, river blindness, lymphatic filariasis, schistosomiasis and leishmaniasis. Center faculty have been successful in expanding the scope of their work to major viral diseases that threaten not only populations of developing countries but also American civilian and military populations. Examples include smallpox, Rift Valley fever, dengue, HIV and Epstein-Barr virus, the agent that underlies Burkitt’s lymphoma, the major childhood cancer of the tropics. Faculty with primary appointments in the center have major overseas research collaborations in Kenya, Papua New Guinea and Brazil. Faculty with secondary appointments in the center, from the division of infectious diseases in the Department of Medicine, division of pediatric infectious diseases in the Department of Pediatrics, and the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, have long-standing research and educational activities in Uganda and Brazil focused on tuberculosis and HIV infection.


Educational programs sponsored by the center include electives in international health and population biology and genetics of infectious diseases, overseas rotations for medical students, and training programs at the university for visiting students and scholars from developing countries. In the Greater Cleveland community, substantial international expertise and experience exists in corporate, private, institutional and voluntary agency sectors. Citizen interest and commitment is high. The center seeks to provide a focal point for this interest, encouraging cooperative activities among these groups and academic units of the university. Specific objectives of the center:

  1. Linkages. To foster interdisciplinary and intercultural linkages related to international health in the university and the community.
  2. Training. To promote training programs throughout the university that will equip a cadre of scientists from diverse backgrounds to address global health issues.
  3. Research. To conduct and facilitate collaborative, multidisciplinary research programs focused on major diseases of public health significance in developing countries as well as the United States.
  4. Application. To work with institutions and agencies in developing countries to help design and establish research and education programs that meet their needs and function as models of sustainable health systems.

CENTER FOR PROTEOMICS AND MASS SPECTROMETRY
Biomedical Research Building, Ninth Floor
Phone 216-368-1490
Mark R. Chance, Ph.D., Professor of Physiology, and Biophysics, and Director

 

The Center for Proteomics and Mass Spectrometry in the School of Medicine was established in 2005. The Case Proteomics Center (CPC) was created, in part, to strengthen Cleveland’s presence in modern proteomics and mass spectrometry research to make the region a leader in the field. The vision for the Center has been shaped over the past several years by the senior leadership of the School of Medicine, and more recently, has been further developed in conjunction with the Center’s director, Mark Chance, Ph.D., with the Center’s grand opening in February 2006. One of the primary goals of the CPC is to develop an infrastructure of sophisticated equipment that facilitates and maximizes shared equipment usage, as well as to offer a wide array of proteomics services including 2D gel and mass spectrometry analyses.


Proteomics entails the in depth structural analysis of individual proteins in human and animal cells. In studying proteins and their changes, researchers are able to identify the causes of, and therefore the treatments of, human disease. The School of Medicine has established the Center for Proteomics and Mass Spectrometry to perform research to better understand the genetic and environmental bases of disease as well as provide new technologies to diagnose diseases such as cancer, heart disease, and diabetes. New technologies in mass spectrometry are also allowing protein expression, localization, structure, post-translational modifications, and interactions to be studied in increasing detail and on a genome wide scale. The center is also developing and applying state of the art structural proteomics technologies to understand the function and interactions of macromolecular complexes.


The CPC has a wide range of facilities and equipment available for the use of the Case community. These include biochemistry and computation facilities and equipment such as a Thermo-Finnegan Fourier Transform LTQ mass spectrometer, GE/Amersham 2-D gel DIGE system, Applied Biosystems Q-star mass spectrometers, Thermo-Finnegan DECA XP-Plus and LTQ instruments, Beckman Biomec FX robotic liquid handling systems, a Pro-TOF 2000 MALDI mass spectrometer, as well as additional ion trap instruments with LC-systems.
The center also offers a wide range of seminars, workshops, and possibilities for individual training. These activities are posted on the CPC Web site. For a list of services and to explore opportunities to collaborate, please visit the Web site: http://casemed.case.edu/proteomics/ or e-mail: proteomics@case.edu.


CENTER FOR PSYCHOANALYTIC CHILD DEVELOPMENT
Hanna Perkins Center
19910 Malvern Road
Shaker Heights OH 44122-2823
Phone 216-929-0216
Thomas F. Barrett, Ph.D., Director

 

The Center for Psychoanalytic Child Development was created in the Case School of Medicine after Thomas F. Barrett, Ph.D., director of the Hanna Perkins Center for Child Development, was named the John A. Hadden Jr., M.D., Professor in Psychoanalytic Child Development in late 2001. The purpose of the center is to promote the understanding of the emotional development of children, how they experience and deal with feelings and conflicts, how their inner lives interact with the outer world in the process of growing up, and the interaction between emotional development, physical development and the external environment. Activities organized in the center’s initial stages have included an elective course in the medical school curriculum, about the emotional development of children; consultation with the school’s Center for Adolescent Health; and participation in the formative stages of a research project focused on children in whom attention deficit hyperactivity disorder has been diagnosed. In 2003, a child analyst joined a pediatric preceptor to discuss the observations of students conducting well-baby exams in the Family Clinic of University Hospitals of Cleveland. In the future, the center hopes to collaborate in many more joint endeavors to study the emotional and physical interactions of the growing child. For more information, contact Dr. Barrett using the information appearing at the beginning of this write-up or write Elizabeth Fleming at the same address, or call her at 216-929-0220.


CENTER FOR RNA MOLECULAR BIOLOGY
Room W-113, School of Medicine
Timothy W. Nilsen, Ph.D., Professor and Director of Center
Phone 216-368-1606
http://www.rnaresearch.org

 

Formally established in 2001, the goal of the Center for RNA Molecular Biology is to create a focus of excellence in the study of all aspects of RNA metabolism, including molecular biology and cell biology, and to investigate the potential clinical and commercial applications of these studies. The center strives for a national reputation for excellence in research and training of both graduate students and medical students, while maintaining interactions with other departments, centers and programs at Case Western Reserve, University Hospitals of Cleveland, and the Cleveland Clinic.


The primary faculty in the center and secondary faculty housed in other university departments and the Cleveland Clinic Foundation form a highly cohesive group. Current research areas include the roles of protein factors in cis- and trans-splicing of mRNA, mechanisms of cis- and trans-splicing in nematodes, protein-dependent RNA catalysis, RNA-RNA and RNA-protein interactions studied by nuclear magnetic resonance, apolipoprotein B RNA editing, RNA editing in Physarum, the structure and catalytic function of RNA, RNA helicases, alternative pre-mRNA processing, the subcellular organization of RNPs in mammals, mRNA splicing in S. cerevisiae, mRNA transport in S. cerevisiae, pre-mRNA splicing by the major and minor spliceosomes, alternative splicing in Drosophila, and the control of gene expression and protein folding.


Center faculty participate in teaching first-year graduate and medical student courses, as well as special-topics graduate courses. Graduate students are encouraged to apply directly to the Biomedical Sciences Training Program or to the Department of Biochemistry or to the Department of Molecular Biology and Microbiology; see the listings for these areas elsewhere in the School of Medicine section of this publication.


CENTER FOR SCIENCE, HEALTH AND SOCIETY
Case Western Reserve University
School of Medicine
Health Center Library, Robbins Building
Suite R106
216-368-2059
http://www.case.edu/med/cshs/index.htm
Nathan A. Berger, M.D.

Hanna-Payne Professor of Experimental Medicine; Professor of Medicine, Oncology and Biochemistry; Director, Center for Science, Health and Society

 

Recognizing that the successful futures of Case Western Reserve University, the City of Cleveland, and the County of Cuyahoga are integrally related, the Center for Science, Health and Society (CSHS) was created in 2002 to focus the efforts of the University and the city in a significant new collaboration to impact the areas of health and healthcare delivery systems through community outreach, education, and health policy. The Center, based in the School of Medicine, with university wide associations is engaging the many strengths of the University and the community to:

  1. Improve the health of the community
  2. Educate and empower the community to become better consumers of healthcare and more informed and stronger advocates for healthcare policy and legislation in their own interests
  3. Encourage members of the community to enter careers in the biomedical workforce and healthcare professions

The Center has engaged the community at the level of the individual and the neighborhood, in public and private schools, at civic and faith-based organizations, and at the level of governmental agencies and community leadership to identify community problems, perceptions, assets and resources; advise the community of faculty skills, assets and expertise; and, catalyze community service based scholarship that benefits community interests and promotes mutual enhancement.


CENTER FOR HEALTH CARE RESEARCH AND POLICY
Rammelkamp Research and
Education Building, second floor,
MetroHealth Medical Center
Phone: 216-778-3902
Fax: 216-778-3945
Web site: www.chrp.org
Randall D. Cebul, M.D., Director of Center
Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology and Biostatistics

 

The two-fold mission of the Center for Health Care Research & Policy is to: 1) improve the health of the public by conducting research that improves access to health care, increases the quality and value of health care services, and informs health policy and practice; and 2) lead education and training programs that promote these goals. Formally established in 1994, the Center’s mission is carried out by a cross-disciplinary faculty who both lead and collaborate with other scholars in Northeast Ohio and beyond. A core faculty of 17 is extended by affiliated Senior Scholars throughout the university, assisted by an able staff and over 30 grant-supported research associates. The Center’s home at MetroHealth’s Rammelkamp Research and Education Building is an outstanding venue for collaborative research, mentoring of students and junior faculty, and cross-disciplinary seminars.


The Center’s research and training focuses in programmatic areas that reflect national health care priorities as well as high impact problems in adults. Center Programs pertain to chronic conditions, especially stroke, obesity and diabetes, and kidney disease, and to problems in aging. Programs are complemented by methods-focused Units, including biostatistics and evaluation, health care decision making, health economics, and quality measurement and improvement. A recent initiative in clinical research informatics will capitalize on growing institutional capacities in electronic medical records and clinical decision support. Center faculty view Northeast Ohio as a laboratory for research, recognizing the national relevance of regional challenges and opportunities.
Center faculty assume leadership roles in federally-supported degree-granting training programs in Health Services Research and Clinical Investigation and teach in the core curriculum of the School of Medicine. See the listings for related training programs elsewhere in this bulletin or contact the Center.


INTERNATIONAL HEALTH


INTH 301. Fundamentals of Global Health (3)
This course seeks to integrate the multiple perspectives and objectives in global health by investigating how the disciplines of Biology, Medicine, Anthropology, Nursing, Mathematics, Engineering analyze and approach the same set of international health problems. Students will develop a shared vocabulary with which to understand these various perspectives from within their own discipline. The focus sites will emphasize issues related to the health consequences of development projects, emergency response to a health care crisis and diseases of development in presence of underdevelopment. Offered as INTH 301 and INTH 401. Prereq: Junior or senior.


INTH 401. Fundamentals of Global Health (3)
This course seeks to integrate the multiple perspectives and objectives in global health by investigating how the disciplines of Biology, Medicine, Anthropology, Nursing, Mathematics, Engineering analyze and approach the same set of international health problems. Students will develop a shared vocabulary with which to understand these various perspectives from within their own discipline. The focus sites will emphasize issues related to the health consequences of development projects, emergency response to a health care crisis and diseases of development in presence of underdevelopment. Offered as INTH 301 and INTH 401. Prereq: Graduate student.


INTH 484. Geographic Medicine and Epidemiology (1 - 3)
This course focuses on the epidemiology, prevention, treatment, and control of tropical and parasitic diseases. Emphasis will be placed on the triad of agent, host, and environment for infectious disease impacting global health. Three distinct modules will focus on specific examples such as malaria, helminths, bacteria, or viruses. Active class participation is required through discussions, case studies, and group projects. Recommended preparation: EPBI 490, EPBI 491 and a microbiology course or consent of instructor. Offered as EPBI 484, INTH 484, and MPHP 484.


INTH 494. Infectious Disease Epidemiology (1 - 3)
The epidemiology, prevention and control of representative infectious disease models. Emphasis on the triad of agent, host, and environment and the molecular and genetic basis of agent and host interaction in the population. Recommended preparation: EPBI 490, EPBI 491, and a microbiology course or consent of instructor. Offered as EPBI 494, INTH 494, and MPHP 494.


INTH 551. World Health Seminar (1)
This seminar (also called the World Health Interest Group) examines a broad range of topics related to infectious disease research in international settings. Areas of interest are certain to include epidemiology, bioethics, medical anthropology, pathogenesis, drug resistance, vector biology, cell and molecular biology, vaccine development, diagnosis, and socio-cultural factors contributing to or compromising effective health care delivery in endemic countries. Speakers will include a diverse group of local faculty, post-doctoral and graduate student trainees, as well as visiting colleagues from around the world.


OTHER CENTERS


Center for AIDS Research
The Case Western Reserve University/University Hospitals Center for AIDS Research (Case CFAR) has been continually funded by the National Institutes of Health since its initiation in April 1994. There are currently twenty CFAR’s in the United States. The Case CFAR is the only one located in the Midwest. The Case CFAR has a mandate to coordinate basic and clinical research activities and to promote interdisciplinary research in HIV infection and AIDS. Comprising more than 140 faculty researchers at the Schools of Medicine, Nursing, Arts and Sciences, and Law, the Case CFAR provides core resources, seminars, lectureships, publications and developmental funding to promote and strengthen the AIDS research programs at the University and its affiliated institutions. Case CFAR membership includes scientist and clinicians from Case, University Hospitals of Cleveland, MetroHealth Medical Center, The Cleveland Veterans Administration Center, the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, and several international locations. Current key areas of research strength include a) international aspects of AIDS; b) AIDS clinical research; c) HIV immunology; d) molecular virology; e) mycobacterial disease; f) AIDS-related malignancies; and g) HIV prevention.


For more information you may contact Robert Bucklew, Case CFAR Outreach Coordinator at 216-844-2247 or at rob2@case.edu. Additional information may be obtained on the CFAR’s website at www.clevelandactu.org.


Center For Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine
Phone 216-368-3614
http://stemcellcenter.case.edu
Stanton L. Gerson, M.D., Director and Debra S. Grega, Ph.D., Executive Director

 

The Center for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine is a multi-institutional center composed of investigators from Case Western Reserve University, University Hospitals of Cleveland, the Cleveland Clinic, Athersys, Inc., and Ohio State University. Building on the 20 year history of adult stem cell research in northeast Ohio, the Center was created in 2003 with a $19.4 million award from the State of Ohio as a Wright Center of Innovation. An additional $8 million award in 2006 from the State of Ohio’s Biomedical Research and Commercialization Program further validated the Center’s ability to achieve its mission to utilize human stem cell and tissue engineering technologies to treat human disease.


The Center is providing a comprehensive and coordinated “bench to bedside” approach to regenerative medicine, including basic and clinical research programs, biomedical and tissue engineering programs, and the development and administration of new therapies to patients. Center members gain access to an impressive breadth of non-embryonic stem cell types including ASC (adipose stem cells), CTP (Connective Tissue Progenitors), HSC (hematopoietic stem cells), HB1 (hemangioblast (AC133) from umbilical cord blood), MSC (mesenchymal stem cells), MAPC (multi-potent adult stem cells), and NSC (neural stem cells/oligodendrocyte progenitors) as well as a number of core facilities located on the Case, Cleveland Clinic, and University Hospital campuses. Leveraging its investigators’ exceptional track records in stem cell, tissue engineering and “first in the nation” stem cell clinical trials, the Center is promoting cutting-edge research which is translating into clinical and commercial applications. Current clinical applications being investigated include heart disease, adult stem cell transplantation, cancer, genetic disorders, and neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis.


Center for Translational Neuroscience
7th Floor, School of Medicine,
Department of Neurosciences
Phone: 216-368-5473
Fax: 216-368-4650
Web site: http://case.edu/med/CTN/
Robert H. Miller, Ph.D., Director

 

The Center for Translational Neuroscience is an effort to develop scientific interactions between basic scientists and clinicians, with the goal that these interactions will promote understanding of the pathology of neurological diseases and develop novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of those diseases. Monthly Translational Neuroscience Interest Group meetings facilitate discussions about current research in neurological development and diseases. Faculty of the center will eventually span three Cleveland institutions: Case Western Reserve University, University Hospitals of Cleveland, and the Cleveland Clinic Foundation.


The Cleveland Center for Structural Biology
The Cleveland Center for Structural Biology (CCSB) is an association of researchers at different Cleveland institutions who study structure-function relationships and properties of large molecules that are involved in disease states. The center serves as a focal point to bring together researchers with interest in Structural Biology, to generate a stimulating research and educational environment, and to facilitate and promote interactions between structural biologists and medical colleagues. In addition, the CCSB attracts high-caliber faculty, research associates and students to the area and generates resources for major research equipment. In these ways, the CCSB plays a key role in promoting biomedical research in Northern Ohio. For more information, visit http://structuralbiology.case.edu/.


The Heart and Vascular Research Center
The Heart and Vascular Research Center (HVRC) was established to promote excellence in cardiovascular research at MetroHealth Medical Center and Rammelkamp Center for Education and Research. The center was developed using a cross-disciplinary integrative approach to exploit the extraordinary range of outstanding investigative talent of the institution. Our aim is to develop novel insights to mechanisms, diagnosis, and treatment of cardiovascular disease by applying state-of-the-art engineering, molecular, cellular, organ level, and clinical investigative approaches to specific cardiac disease states. A very important aspect of the HVRC is its promotion of an outstanding training environment for developing the next generation of cardiovascular investigators. HVRC faculty are affiliated with the Departments of Biomedical Engineering, Physiology and Biophysics, Developmental Biology, and Neuroscience at Case Western Reserve University.


Mary Ann Swetland Center for Environmental Health
Dorr G. Dearborn, Ph.D., Director
http://casemed.case.edu/swetland/
Mt. Sinai Skills and Simulation Center
http://casemed.case.edu/msssc/

 

The Mt. Sinai Skills and Simulation Center (MSSSC) is one of a few locations worldwide that coordinate a standardized patient program and technical simulation at one location. It will benefit from a unique partnership with the Israeli National Center for Simulation, MSR, at the Chaim Sheba Medical Center. The MSSSC is currently located in a building owned by the Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center and situated at the corner of East 105th Street and Wade Park. This beautiful facility is only temporary. Eventually, the MSSSC will move to the West Quad area. Its permanent location on the site of the Mount Sinai Hospital will be an enduring tribute to our visionary benefactors. The MSSSC occupies the first floor of the building. The VA Medical Center is constructing a Learning X Change on the upper level.


Rammelkamp Center for Education and Research
Providing expert clinical care depends on medical research. Every aspect of treatment is based on this research. From its very start as one of the first public hospitals in our country, the MetroHealth Medical System (formerly Cleveland City Hospital and Cuyahoga County Metropolitan Hospital) has recognized that the fundamental building block for improving patient care is quality medical research-research that investigates the most difficult health problems faced by our community. And that has been the tradition of MetroHealth - what we have done and will continue to do. The MetroHealth System is among the ten largest employers in Cuyahoga County and comprises a 732-bed hospital, ten community health centers, and two nursing homes. The Rammelkamp Center is an 80,000-square-foot research building that houses Case investigators on the Metro campus.


From its beginning as a fledgling city hospital in 1837, the MetroHealth Medical System has been dedicated to the science of improving health care. In 1914, Dr. Roy Scott, a cardiovascular researcher, became noted for his excellence in clinical research and education. Throughout the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s, MetroHealth’s prominent scientists advanced clinical care by conducting meaningful research to improve our community’s health. Dr. Robert Stecher, a prominent researcher in rheumatology; Dr. Frederick Robbins, who received the Nobel prize for research leading to isolation of the polio virus; and Dr. Charles Rammelkamp, a Lasker Award winner whose research led to eradication of rheumatic fever and glomerulonephritis as sequelae of streptococcal infection. Today Hunter Peckham, Ph.D., a member of the National Academy of Engineering, works with investigators in the Departments of Orthopedics and Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation to develop and pilot devices to improve function of spinal cord injury patients. Other prominent programs include centers focused on kidney disease research, heart and vascular disease research, health services research and reducing health disparities. Our ongoing commitment to academic and clinical excellence, coupled with extensive capabilities in biotechnology, bioengineering, genetics, and population science will assure that the Rammelkamp Center for Education and Research continues to grow as one of the major research and training centers in the country. For more information: http://www.metrohealthresearch.org/.


Tuberculosis Research Unit
W. Henry Boom, M.D., Director
http://www.tbresearchunit.org/.

 

 

Department of Genetics


School of Medicine
Biomedical Research Building
Phone 216-368-3431
http://genetics.case.edu/

 

The Department of Genetics embraces a unified program devoted to outstanding research and teaching in all areas of genetics, with particular emphases on genomics, human genetics and animal models, development, and chromosome structure and function. Faculty conduct internationally recognized research programs in each of these areas. The also are committed to training the next generations of leading genetics researchers. The department has three special programs: the Center for Human Genetics, the Center for Computational Genomics, and the Genomic Medicine Institute (descriptions appear later in this narrative).


Programs offered lead to the Ph.D., combined M.D./ Ph.D. degree, or M.S. with a special emphasis in either genetic counseling or bioinformatics and systems biology. Students are encouraged to pursue a program of research and study that meets their goals and interests. Advanced courses are offered in specialized areas as outlined later in this section.


Students participate in ongoing journal clubs, research seminars and grand rounds. A program of departmental and interdepartmental seminars by outstanding visiting scientists provides regular exposure to a broad range of current research in genetics.


The department accepts direct on-line applications (see Genetics Web site) to the doctoral program by those who have significant prior research experience in genetics and are committed to careers in genetics research. Alternatively, the department also participates in the integrated Biomedical Sciences Training Program (BSTP, please see separate listing in this publication and/or BSTP Web site). Students interested in pursuing the combined M.D./Ph.D. program are admitted through the Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP, please see separate listing in this publication). Those students interested in careers in genetic counseling may apply directly to the Genetic Counseling Training Program in the department.


The Center for Human Genetics is an integral part of the Department of Genetics and consists of both research and clinical laboratories involved in human and clinical genetics. This center supports research and clinical programs focusing on the molecular basis of inherited disease, human genetic disease mapping, and the genetic dissection of complex disease, as well as providing clinical care and training for postdoctoral fellows and genetic counseling students.


The Center for Computational Genomics is an interdisciplinary research and training program involving faculty in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics in the School of Medicine and in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in the School of Engineering. The center provides opportunities to combine research in genetics, genomics, epidemiology, biostatistics, computer science, and systems biology.
The Genomic Medicine Institute is a joint program involving the Cleveland Clinic Foundation and Case. Its emphasis involves translating discoveries in basic and clinical research to clinical practice. The mission is to exploit the discoveries in genomics, epidemiology, ethics, pharmacology, genetics and physiology to revolutionize the practice of medicine.


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (GENE)


GENE 367-1. Commercialization and Intellectual Property Management (0)
This interdisciplinary course covers a variety of topics, including principles of intellectual property and intellectual property management, business strategies and modeling relevant to the creation of start-up companies and exploitation of IP rights as they relate to biomedical-related inventions. The goal of this two-semester course is to address issues relating to the commercialization of biomedical-related inventions by exposing law students, MBA students, and Ph.D. candidates (in genetics and proteomics) to the challenges and opportunities encountered when attempting to develop biomedical intellectual property from the point of early discovery to the clinic and market. Specifically, this course seeks to provide students with the ability to value a given technological advance or invention holistically, focusing on issues that extend beyond scientific efficacy and include patient and practitioner value propositions, legal and intellectual property protection, business modeling, potential market impacts, market competition, and ethical, social, and healthcare practitioner acceptance. The course will meet over two consecutive semesters--fall and spring--and is six credit hours (three credit each semester). During these two semesters, law students, MBA students, and Ph.D. candidates in genomics and proteomics will work in teams of five (two laws students, two MBA students and one Ph.D. candidate), focusing on issues of commercialization and IP management of biomedical-related inventions. The instructors will be drawn from the law school, business school, and technology-transfer office. To be eligible for this course, law students must also have a B.S or equivalent in the life sciences, such as biology, biochemistry, genomics, molecular biology, etc. Offered as LAWS 367, MGMT 467, and GENE 467.


GENE 367-2. Commercialization and Intellectual Property Management (6)
This interdisciplinary course covers a variety of topics, including principles of intellectual property and intellectual property management, business strategies and modeling relevant to the creation of start-up companies and exploitation of IP rights as they relate to biomedical-related inventions. The goal of this two-semester course is to address issues relating to the commercialization of biomedical-related inventions by exposing law students, MBA students, and Ph.D. candidates(in genetics and proteomics) to the challenges and opportunities encountered when attempting to develop biomedical intellectual property from the point of early discovery to the clinic and market. Specifically, this course seeks to provide students with the ability to value a given technological advance or invention holistically, focusing on issues that extend beyond scientific efficacy and include patient and practitioner value propositions, legal and intellectual property protection, business modeling, potential market impacts, market competition, and ethical, social, and healthcare practitioner acceptance. The course will meet over two consecutive semesters--fall and spring--and is six credit hours(three credits each semester). During these two semesters, law students, MBA students, and Ph.D. candidates in genomics and proteomics will work in teams of five (two law students, two MBA students, and one Ph.D. candidate), focusing on issues of commercialization and IP management of biomedical-related inventions. The instructors will be drawn from the law school, business school, medical school, and technology-transfer office. To be eligible for this course, law students must also have a B.S. or equivalent in the life sciences, such as biology, biochemistry, genomics, molecular biology etc. Offered as MGMT 467, LAWS 367, GENE 467.


GENE 451. Principles of Genetic Epidemiology (1 - 3)
A survey of the basic principles, concepts and methods of the discipline of genetic epidemiology, which focuses on the role of genetic factors in human disease and their interaction with environmental and cultural factors. Many important human disorders appear to exhibit a genetic component; hence the integrated approaches of genetic epidemiology bring together epidemiologic and human genetic perspectives in order to answer critical questions about human disease. Methods of inference based upon data from individuals, pairs of relatives, and pedigrees will be considered. The last third of the course (1 credit) is more statistical in nature. Offered as EPBI 451, GENE 451, and MPHP 451.


GENE 467-1. Commercialization and Intellectual Property Management (0)
This interdisciplinary course covers a variety of topics, including principles of intellectual property and intellectual property management, business strategies and modeling relevant to the creation of start-up companies and exploitation of IP rights as they relate to biomedical-related inventions. The goal of this two-semester course is to address issues relating to the commercialization of biomedical-related inventions by exposing law students, MBA students, and Ph.D. candidates (in genetics and proteomics) to the challenges and opportunities encountered when attempting to develop biomedical intellectual property from the point of early discovery to the clinic and market. Specifically, this course seeks to provide students with the ability to value a given technological advance or invention holistically, focusing on issues that extend beyond scientific efficacy and include patient and practitioner value propositions, legal and intellectual property protection, business modeling, potential market impacts, market competition, and ethical, social, and healthcare practitioner acceptance. The course will meet over two consecutive semesters--fall and spring--and is six credit hours (three credit each semester). During these two semesters, law students, MBA students, and Ph.D. candidates in genomics and proteomics will work in teams of five (two laws students, two MBA students and one Ph.D. candidate), focusing on issues of commercialization and IP management of biomedical-related inventions. The instructors will be drawn from the law school, business school, and technology-transfer office. To be eligible for this course, law students must also have a B.S or equivalent in the life sciences, such as biology, biochemistry, genomics, molecular biology, etc. Offered as LAWS 367, MGMT 467, and GENE 467.


GENE 467-2. Commercialization and Intellectual Property Management (6)
This interdisciplinary course covers a variety of topics, including principles of intellectual property and intellectual property management, business strategies and modeling relevant to the creation of start-up companies and exploitation of IP rights as they relate to biomedical-related inventions. The goal of this two-semester course is to address issues relating to the commercialization of biomedical-related inventions by exposing law students, MBA students, and Ph.D. candidates(in genetics and proteomics) to the challenges and opportunities encountered when attempting to develop biomedical intellectual property from the point of early discovery to the clinic and market. Specifically, this course seeks to provide students with the ability to value a given technological advance or invention holistically, focusing on issues that extend beyond scientific efficacy and include patient and practitioner value propositions, legal and intellectual property protection, business modeling, potential market impacts, market competition, and ethical, social, and healthcare practitioner acceptance. The course will meet over two consecutive semesters--fall and spring--and is six credit hours(three credits each semester). During these two semesters, law students, MBA students, and Ph.D. candidates in genomics and proteomics will work in teams of five (two law students, two MBA students, and one Ph.D. candidate), focusing on issues of commercialization and IP management of biomedical-related inventions. The instructors will be drawn from the law school, business school, medical school, and technology-transfer office. To be eligible for this course, law students must also have a B.S. or equivalent in the life sciences, such as biology, biochemistry, genomics, molecular biology etc. Offered as MGMT 467, LAWS 367, GENE 467.


GENE 488. Yeast Genetics and Cell Biology (3)
This seminar course provides an introduction to the genetics and molecular biology of the yeasts S. cerevisiae and S. pombe by a discussion of current literature focusing primarily on topics in yeast cell biology. Students are first introduced to the tools of molecular genetics and special features of yeasts that make them important model eukaryotic organisms. Some selected topics include cell polarity, cell cycle, secretory pathways, vesicular and nuclear/cytoplasmic transport, mitochondrial import and biogenesis, chromosome segregation, cytoskeleton, mating response and signal transduction. Offered as CLBY 488, GENE 488, MBIO 488, and PATH 488.


GENE 500. Advanced Eukaryotic Genetics I (3)
Fundamental principles of modern genetics; transmission, recombination, structure and function of the genetic material in eukaryotes, dosage compensation, behavior and consequences of chromosomal abnormalities, mapping and isolation of mutations, gene complementation and genetic interactions. Recommended preparation: BIOL 362.


GENE 503. Readings and Discussions in Genetics (0 - 3)
(Credit as arranged.) In-depth consideration of special selected topics through critical evaluation of classic and current literature.


GENE 504. Advanced Eukaryotic Genetics II (3)
Fundamental principles of modern genetics: population and quantitative genetics, dissection of genome organization and function, transgenics, developmental genetics, genetic strategies for dissecting complex pathways in organisms ranging from Drosophila and C. elegans to mouse and human. Recommended preparation: GENE 500 or permission of instructor.


GENE 505. Genetics Journal Club (1)
Genetics Journal Club is a graduate level course designed to facilitate discussion of topics in Genetics. Students choose “hot” papers in Genetics and present them to their peers. Group presentations are designed to encourage audience participation. The intent of this class is to expose students to cutting edge topics in Genetics and to instill teaching and leadership skills.


GENE 508. Bioinformatics and Computational Genomics (3)
The course is designed to provide an understanding of theory and application of computational methods for molecular biology research. The course will be divided into four primary sections: DNA methods, protein methods, structure analysis (RNA and protein) and phylogenetic analysis. Special emphasis will be placed on the use and development of tools to search and analyze large amounts of sequence data generated as part of the Genome Projects in human, Drosophila and other eukaryotic organisms. The course offers extensive hands-on computational training using UNIX, Web and PC-based software. As such, for every hour of lecture material there will be two corresponding hours of computational laboratory time. In the initial year, enrollment will be limited to five students. Preference will be given to senior-level genetics graduate students or post-doctoral fellows. Recommended preparation: GENE 500 and GENE 504 or permission of instructor.


GENE 511. Grant Writing and Reviewing Skills Workshop (3)
This is an introductory graduate course in grant writing and reviewing skills. During this course each student will write a research grant on a topic of his or her choice. Proposals may form the basis for the written component of the preliminary examination in the Genetics Department. Students will also participate in editing and reviewing the proposals of their classmates. Prereq: GENE 500 and GENE 504 or consent of instructor.


GENE 513. Developmental Genetics (3)
This course focuses on the genetic control of animal development. Topics covered include the organization of genetic regulatory circuits which govern the determination of embryonic axes, germ layers and cell fates as well as the cell interactions and cell movements which lead to emergence of the basic body plan of the organism. Emphasis is placed on the use of the genetic approach and genetic tools to uncover the molecular basis of these developmental processes. Recommended preparation: GENE 500 and GENE 504.


GENE 516. Introduction to Clinical Genetics (3)
The major focus of this course is to allow graduate students in Human Genetics to become familiar with the medical genetics and counseling aspect of the genetics evaluation and counseling process. It provides the student an opportunity to see an application of bench research in the clinical arena as well as to observe and appreciate the various functions, roles and responsibilities of different members of the medical genetics team. Course includes seminars and clinical observations.


GENE 521. Chromatin Structure and Transcription (3)
A critical review of selected topics and current literature on the role of chromatin structure in the regulation of gene expression. Offered as BIOC 521 and GENE 521.


GENE 523. Embryonic Patterning in Development (3)
This course will focus on current understanding of patterning mechanisms in animal development. The seminal contributions of Turning Stern, Crick, Lawrence, Wolpert, and Lewis will be covered, as will the most recent advances in the field. Models and theory will be considered, in addition to experimental analysis and the identification of patterning molecules. The course will end with a consideration of how development changes to create different adult morphologies over the course of evolution.


GENE 524. Advanced Medical Genetics: Cytogenetics (2 - 3)
Fundamental principles regarding clinical cytogenetics including discussion of autosomal numerical and structural abnormalities; sex chromosome abnormalities; population cytogenetics; mosaicism; uniparental disomy; contiguous gene deletions, and cancer cytogenetics.


GENE 525. Advanced Medical Genetics: Clinical Genetics (2 - 3)
Fundamental principles regarding congenital malformations, dysmorphology and syndromes. Discussion of a number of genetic disorders from a systems approach: CNS malformations, neurodegenerative disorders, craniofacial disorders, skeletal dysplasias, connective tissue disorders, hereditary cancer syndromes, etc. Discussions also include diagnosis, etiology, genetics, prognosis and management.


GENE 526. Advanced Medical Genetics: Molecular and Quantitative Genetics (2 - 3)
Molecular: Fundamental principles of gene structure; mechanisms, detection and effects of mutations; imprinting; triplet repeat disorders; X-chromosome inactivation; application of molecular analysis to genotype/phenotype correlations and gene therapy. Quantitative: Fundamental principles of pedigree analysis, segregation analysis, Bayes theorem; linkage analysis and disequilibrium; risk assessment and consanguinity.


GENE 527. Advanced Medical Genetics: Biochemical Genetics (2 - 3)
Fundamental principles of metabolic testing; amino acid disorders; organic acid disorders; carbohydrate disorders; peroxisomal disorders; mitochondrial disorders; etc. Discussion of screening principles and newborn screening as well as approaches to diagnosis, management and therapy for metabolic diseases.


GENE 528. Principles and Practices of Genetic Counseling (3)
Fundamental principles needed for the practicing genetic counselor. Topics include skills in obtaining histories (prenatal, perinatal, medical, developmental, psychosocial and family); pedigree construction and analysis, physical growth and development; the genetic evaluation; the physical examination and laboratory analyses; prenatal issues, prenatal screening and diagnosis; and teratogenicity.


GENE 529. Psychosocial Issues in Genetic Counseling (3)
Fundamental principles regarding the psychosocial aspects of genetic disease and birth defects, its psychological and social impact on the individual and family. Topics include the genetic counseling interview process, issues regarding pregnancy and prenatal diagnosis, chronicity, death and loss. Cultural issues and their impact on the genetic counseling session are addressed. Resources for families are also explored. Basic interviewing skills are presented. Students will have an opportunity for practice of skills through role play and actual interviewing situations.


GENE 530. Ethical and Professional Issues in Genetic Counseling (2)
Professional issues inherent in medical genetics and genetic counseling are addressed, including ethical, legal, religious, and cultural concepts. Fundamental principles of ethics are explored in some depth as they relate to genetic issues, such as autonomy and informed consent; use of the NSGC Code of Ethics is emphasized. Genetic counseling roles and responsibilities and aspects of a career as a professional are explored.


GENE 532. Clinical Practicum in Genetic Counseling (1 - 6)
This clinical practicum provides the student an opportunity to function as a genetic counselor by preparing for cases; obtaining appropriate histories; determining risks; performing psychosocial assessments; discussing disease characteristics, inheritance, and natural history; providing anticipatory guidance and supportive counseling; using medical and community resources; and follow-up. Students rotate through four clinical areas and one laboratory and will register for a total of 12 hours over the course of the program. Recommended preparation: Admission to Genetic Counseling Training Program.


GENE 534. Neurogenetics (3)
This course will explore how principles of genetics can be used as tools to study the complex organization of the nervous system. Examples will be drawn from all relevant model organisms including nematode, fruit fly, mouse, and human. Meant primarily for students with an interest in neuroscience, this course will offer a strong foundation in genetic principles using examples drawn from the neuroscience literature. Students in other disciplines, especially genetics, will benefit from the examples to learn important aspects of the neurosciences ranging from behavior to development. These interdisciplinary features make this course unique in its offerings and a valuable addition to many students’ course of study. Recommended preparation: CBIO 453 and CBIO 455. Offered as GENE 534 and NEUR 534.


GENE 537. Microscopy-Principles and Applications (3)
This course provides an introduction to various types of light microscopy, digital and video imaging techniques, and their applications to biological and biomedical sciences via lectures and hands-on experience. Topics covered include geometrical and physical optics; brightfield, darkfield, phase contrast, DIC, fluorescence and confocal microscopes; and digital image processing. Offered as GENE 537, MBIO 537, and PHOL 537.


GENE 601. Research in Genetics (1 - 9)
(Credit as arranged.)


GENE 651. Thesis M.S. (1 - 9)
(Credit as arranged.) Master’s Thesis Plan A.


GENE 701. Dissertation Ph.D. (1 - 9)
(Credit as arranged.) Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.

 

Integrated Biological Sciences


Room T-401, School of Medicine
Phone 216-368-3404

 

These courses are open only to students in combined M.D./Ph.D. programs such as the Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP) and the Health Services Research Program. These courses use the curriculum of the first two years of the School of Medicine to provide a general education in biomedical science and medicine for graduate credit. The courses do not provide specialized research training, which is provided by the curricula of specific graduate programs. Please see the separate listings for these programs in this General Bulletin. For more information, contact:


MEDICAL SCIENTIST TRAINING PROGRAM
Program Manager
School of Medicine
10900 Euclid Ave.
Cleveland, Ohio 44106-4936
Phone: 216-368-3404
E-mail: mstp@case.edu


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (IBIS)


IBIS 401. Integrated Biological Sciences I (1 - 9)
A four-semester sequence encompassing anatomy, biochemistry, physiology, pharmacology, pathology, and microbiology.


IBIS 402. Integrated Biological Sciences II (1 - 9)
A continuation of IBIS 401.


IBIS 403. Integrated Biological Sciences III (1 - 9)
A continuation of IBIS 402.


IBIS 404. Integrated Biological Sciences IV (0 - 9)
A continuation of IBIS 403.


IBIS 405. Integrated Biological Sciences I (1 - 9)


IBIS 406. Integrated Biological Sciences II (1 - 9)


IBIS 407. Integrated Biological Sciences III (1 - 9)


IBIS 408. Integrated Biological Sciences IV (1 - 9)


IBIS 411. Clinical Science I (2)


IBIS 412. Clinical Science II (2)


IBIS 413. Clinical Science III (2)


IBIS 414. Clinical Science IV (0 - 2)


IBIS 415. Clinical Science I (1 - 9)


IBIS 416. Clinical Science II (1 - 9)


IBIS 417. Clinical Science III (1 - 9)


IBIS 418. Clinical Science IV (1 - 9)


IBIS 424. Integrated Biological Sciences in Medicine (6)

This course is open only to candidates enrolled in the M.D./M.S. program (University plan). Registration is for the Spring semester of the second year in medical school. The course will cover the areas of cardiology, pulmonary, hematology, renal physiology and gastroenterology. Assessment will be by examination (to include quizzes, multiple choice questions, and essays). Recommended preparation: First three semesters of medical school and currently a medical student in good standing.


IBIS 434. Integrated Biological Sciences in Medicine (6)
This course is open only to candidates enrolled in the M.D./M.S. program (College plan). Registration is for the Spring semester of the second year in medical school. The course content includes the areas of hematology, gastroenterology and renal physiology. Students will also be required to participate in Process of Discovery. Assessment of performance will be through reaching required levels of competency for the medical areas identified above and by the evaluation of a term paper. Recommended preparation: First three semesters of medical school and currently a medical student in good standing.


IBIS 435. Integrated Biological Science in Medicine-University (6)
This course is open only to candidates in the MD/MS program (University Plan). Registration is typically for the Spring semester of the second year in medical school. The course content includes the areas of hematology, gastroenterology and renal physiology. (Students will also be required to participate in Process of Discovery.) Assessment of performance will be through reaching required levels of competency for the medical areas identified above and by the evaluation of a term paper. Recommended preparation: First three semesters of medical school and currently a medical student in good standing.


IBIS 451. Clinical Science (for M.D./M.A. Bioethics Students) (3)


IBIS 461. Clinical Science (for M.P.H./M.D. Students) (1 - 6)


IBIS 466. Medical School Electives (for M.P.H./M.D. Students) (1 - 6)

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (IBMS)


IBMS 500. Being a Professional Scientist (0)
The goal of this course is to provide graduate students with an opportunity to think through their professional ethical commitments before they are tested, on the basis of the scientific community’s accumulated experience with the issues. Students will be brought up to date on the current state of professional policy and federal regulation in this area, and, through case studies, will discuss practical strategies for preventing and resolving ethical problems in their own work. The course is designed to meet the requirements for “instruction about responsible conduct in research” for BSTP and MSTP students supported through NIH/ADAMHA institutional training grant programs at Case. Attendance is required.


IBMS 600. Exam in Biomedical Investigation (0)
Students are required to pass an examination established for each student, generally reflecting the preparation and oral defense of a written report on the project. Prereq: Must be enrolled in MD/MS Biomedical Investigation program.

 


Department of Molecular Biology and Microbiology


Room W200, School of Medicine
Phone 216-368-3420
http://www.case.edu/med/microbio/index.htm

 

The Department of Molecular Biology and Microbiology provides a focus within the School of Medicine for the study of the growth and development of microorganisms at the molecular level. Many of the research programs in the department concern fundamental mechanisms using the tools of molecular biology: How is gene expression controlled? What is the role of RNA processing and surveillance in gene expression? How do surface molecules regulate molecular signaling events? Other questions under investigation are specific to microorganisms: How do bacteria and viruses survive in their chosen environment? How do they deal with the host’s potent immune response? What genes are responsible for their pathogenesis? How is the latency and reactivation of infection achieved? How can we use our results to improve prevention, diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases?


We study microbial systems both for the insights that they bring to the study of molecular and cellular biology and to improve our understanding of infectious diseases. Viruses provide exquisitely adapted probes of the host cell’s normal functions. Historically, studies of viruses have provided numerous insights into the control of gene expression at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and translational levels. Fundamental processes, such as repression of gene expression, splicing, reverse transcription, capping of messenger RNA, internal initiation of protein synthesis, processing of membrane proteins through the Golgi apparatus, and the identification of oncogenes, were all initially uncovered through studies of viruses. Despite the availability of potent antimicrobial drugs, microbial pathogenesis gives rise to severe complications including blindness, paralysis, and neurological defects and can lead to chronic diseases including cancer, heart, lung or kidney disease. Recently, the challenges posed by infectious disease have been exacerbated by the emergence of not only new pathogens, such as the SARS, AIDS and West Nile Viruses, but also of generation of new bacterial and viral strains that display increased resistance to antimicrobial drugs. It is only by developing a thorough understanding of the biology of pathogenic microbes, their host organisms, and how the two interact during infection that improved strategies for prevention and treatment of infectious diseases can be achieved.


Current faculty in the department and our distinguished adjunct faculty all have nationally-funded research programs. Many of our faculty serve on study sections of national agencies, publish in the most prestigious journals, serve as editors of journals, and take leadership positions in throughout Case School of Medicine. We also enjoy numerous collaborations with faculty in the Departments of Biochemistry, Neuroscience, and Genetics, the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, the Center for AIDS Research, and the Center for RNA Molecular Biology, because of our shared research interests. All these activities create a vibrant scientific environment.


The department is currently in a period of rapid expansion. The School of Medicine has made a strong commitment to faculty recruitment the areas of molecular virology and in bacterial development and pathogenesis. There is a tremendous opportunity for synergy among our faculty as we initiate new programs in microbial pathogenesis and virology that utilize genetic and molecular analysis of microorganisms. With the completion of the genome sequence for a vast array of organisms, including man, the availability of transgenic animals with specific immunological defects, and advances in bacterial and viral genetics, we are in a unique position to understand the genetic basis for bacterial and viral pathogenesis. The development of multidisciplinary programs that provide for productive interactions with our clinical colleagues studying infectious diseases and exploit genetics, microbiology, and modern biochemistry, including structural biology, in the study of micro-organisms will be the key to our long-term success.


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (MBIO)


MBIO 399. Undergraduate Research (1 - 3)
Permits qualified undergraduates to work in a faculty member’s laboratory.


MBIO 420. Molecular Genetics of Cancer (3)
Cancer is a genetic disease, not only in the Mendelian sense of inheritance, but also in the sense that it is caused by somatic mutation. The targets of mutation are a set of proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes whose products govern cellular proliferation, death and differentiation. The objectives of this course are to examine the types of genes that are the targets of mutational activation or inactivation and the mechanistic outcome of mutational changes that lead to oncogenesis. The course will also probe viral mechanisms of oncogenesis related to the products of cellular proto-oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes. In the course of these examinations we will explore the genetic and molecular genetic approaches used to identify and study oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Students should be prepared to present and discuss experimental design, data and conclusions from assigned publications. There will be no exams or papers but the course will end with a full-day, student-run symposium on topics to be decided jointly by students and instructors. Grades will be based on class participation and symposium presentation. Offered as BIOC 420, MBIO 420, MVIR 420, PATH 422, and PHRM 420.Prereq: CBIO 453 and CBIO 455.


MBIO 434. Mechanisms of Drug Resistance (3)
Resistance to drugs is an important health concern in the new millennium. Over the past century, modern medicine has developed and prescribed drugs for various ailments and diseases with known therapeutic benefit. Since the discovery of antibiotics by Dr. Fleming, we have struggled with a new complication in infectious diseases, development of drug resistance. This course will focus on and compare the drug resistant mechanisms selected by viruses, bacteria, parasites, fungi, and tumor cells. Topics to be covered include antiretroviral resistance (e.g., AZT and protease inhibitors), antibiotic resistance (e.g., B-lactams), resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, and resistance to anti-malarial drugs (e.g., chloroquinone). Offered as MBIO 434, MVIR 434, and PHRM 434.


MBIO 435. Seminar in Molecular Biology/Microbiology (1)
Graduate students will attend the departmental seminar given by all graduate students in the Department of Molecular Biology and Microbiology, in the Molecular Virology Program, and in the Cell Biology Program, as well as give a seminar on their own thesis research. Students will be evaluated by the faculty member in charge of that student’s seminar with input from the students’ own thesis committee. After each seminar, the student presenter will meet with other graduate students for peer-review of the content, delivery, and style of the seminar. Peer reviewers will also be evaluated for the quality of their input. Offered as CLBY 435 and MBIO 435 and MVIR 435. Prereq: CBIO 453 and CBIO 455.


MBIO 445. Molecular Biology and Pathogenesis of RNA and DNA Viruses (3)
Through a combination of lectures by Case faculty and guest lecturers, along with student discussion of current literature, this course emphasizes mechanisms of viral gene expression and pathogenesis. RNA viruses to be discussed include positive, negative, and retroviruses. DNA viruses include SV40, adenovirus, herpes, papilloma, and others. Important aspects of host defense mechanisms, antiviral agents, and viral vectors will also be covered. Students will be evaluated based on their quality of presentation of course papers assigned to them and their overall participation in class discussions. Offered as MBIO 445 and MVIR 445.


MBIO 446. Virus-Host Interactions (3)
Viruses and their hosts have co-evolved for millions of years and, as a result, viruses have evolved intricate and fascinating mechanisms for evading host defenses. Understanding how viruses interact with the host is fundamental to counteracting or preventing viral infections. For example, viruses that fail to block host defenses are avirulent and candidates for vaccines. Emerging viral infections are a major public health concern and a subject of this course. The course consists of lectures and in-depth analysis of published studies on virus-host interactions. Outstanding local and external lecturers from across the U.S. will participate in teaching this course. In addition, students will deliver one presentation to the class during the course. Offered as MBIO 446 and MVIR 446.


MBIO 486. HIV Immunology (3)
This course will examine the unique immunology of HIV disease. The course content will include the study of HIV pathogenesis, immune control, immune dysfunctions, HIV prevention and immune restoration. Students will be expected to attend lectures and participate in class discussions. A strong emphasis will be placed on reviewing scientific literature. Students will be asked to help organize and to administer an HIV immunology journal club and will be asked to prepare a written proposal in the area of HIV immunology. Offered as PATH 486 and MBIO 486.


MBIO 488. Yeast Genetics and Cell Biology (3)
This seminar course provides an introduction to the genetics and molecular biology of the yeasts S. cerevisiae and S. pombe by a discussion of current literature focusing primarily on topics in yeast cell biology. Students are first introduced to the tools of molecular genetics and special features of yeasts that make them important model eukaryotic organisms. Some selected topics include cell polarity, cell cycle, secretory pathways, vesicular and nuclear/cytoplasmic transport, mitochondrial import and biogenesis, chromosome segregation, cytoskeleton, mating response and signal transduction. Offered as CLBY 488, GENE 488, MBIO 488, and PATH 488.


MBIO 513. Bacterial Virulence and Host Interactions (2)
The goal of this seminar course is to familiarize students with bacterial virulence mechanisms and how they interact with the host. The focus will be on current literature pertaining to this field. While the molecular basis of bacterial virulence mechanisms will be the main focus, some time will be spent on the host immune response. Topics covered will include adhesins/pili, secretion mechanisms, AB toxins, bacterial invasion and intracellular survival, regulation of virulence gene expression. Prereq: CBIO 453 and CBIO 455 or equivalent courses.


MBIO 518. Signaling via Cell Adhesion (3)
Molecular mechanisms by which cells interact with and are regulated by extracellular matrices and other cells. Offered as CBIO 518, CLBY 518, MBIO 518, and NEUR 518. Prereq: CBIO 453 and CBIO 455.


MBIO 519. Molecular Biology of RNA (3)
Selected topics regarding editing, enzymatic function, splicing, and structure of RNA. Offered as BIOC 519, CLBY 519, and MBIO 519.


MBIO 520. Principles of Microbiology (3)
This course provides lectures and small group discussions of the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which certain bacteria, viruses, and parasites execute normal and pathologic conditions in human hosts. The biology, genetics, and physiological properties of these infectious agents are considered in light of the mechanisms by which they induce pathogenic conditions in their human hosts. The course is intended for graduate students advanced beyond the core curriculum of course work in molecular biology and microbiology areas of specialization. Prereq: CBIO 453 and CBIO 455.


MBIO 521. HIV and AIDS: Research and Care (3)
AIDS and HIV disease represent a continuing medical challenge both here in the U.S. and abroad. Currently there are over 25 million people worldwide who are living with AIDS. Basic research into HIV also represents one of the major focuses of contemporary virus and immunological research. This course is designed to expose both M.D. and Ph.D. students to the major problems in HIV research. Because of the multidisciplinary nature of AIDS research, the course will span the spectrum from fundamental molecular biology to clinical translational research. All students (no matter what their degree course) will be given an opportunity to participate in outpatient HIV care and also to participate in a scientific research project. Offered as MBIO 521 and MVIR 521. Prereq: CBIO 453 and CBIO 455.


MBIO 522. Protein Phosphorylation and Cell Regulation (3)
This intensive seminar course will emphasize signaling pathways mediated by protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation. Bacterial signaling mediated by histidine/aspartate phosphorylation and regulation of cellular physiological events will be reviewed. Then eucaryotic cell signaling will be reviewed from the surface of the cell and into the nucleus. This includes receptor-dependent phosphorylation/dephosphorylation reactions, cytoplasmic signaling intermediates, protein translation processes dependent upon phosphorylation, and nuclear regulatory events with emphasis on transcriptional mechanisms. In addition to faculty lectures, students will be reviewing the current literature and will present a research proposal based on the current concepts in the field that they choose to cover. Offered as MBIO 522 and MVIR 522. Prereq: CBIO 453 and CBIO 455.


MBIO 524. Trends in Prokaryotic Cell and Developmental Biology (3)
Did you know the (i) all building blocks for the eukaryotic cytoskeleton are also present in prokaryotes, that (ii) bacteria rely on dynamic actin-like structures to segregate chromosomes/plasmids and regulate cell polarity, that (iii) oscillating waves of cyclin-like regulators control progression of the bacterial cell cycle, that (iv) a novel secondary messenger, cyclic di-GMP, has been identified that triggers a physiological and morphological transition in bacteria and (v) that bacterial cell-cell interactions can elicit morphological changes that bear remarkable similarities to organogenesis in flies, worms, and vertebrates? In this advanced graduate course, recent insights on the cell and developmental biology of prokaryotes will be discussed and analogies drawn to those that exist in eukaryotes. Studies on the bacterial model organisms Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Caulobacter crescentus, Vibrio spp, Myxococcus xanthus and Streptomyces coelicolor have altered our view of the bacterial cell, demonstrating that at the most fundamental level cells operate in a remarkable similar way, regardless of whether they contain a nucleus or not.


MBIO 525. Advances in Biological Imaging (3)
Sometimes the smallest fish can make the biggest splash. Aequorea victoria is a tiny jellyfish that likes to turn blue light into green, and in doing so has inspired arguably the greatest renaissance in Cell Biology since the invention of the electron microscope. The green fluorescent protein (GFP) from this bioluminescent hydromedusa has been used to light up everything from Christmas trees to bunny rabbits to viral particles. If a picture is worth a thousand words a movie is worth at least a few hundred pictures and GFP, as well as its many derivatives, affords the average molecular biologist the opportunity to direct the movie of his life’s study. This advanced graduate course will focus on the theory and application of fluorescent microscopy to modern Biology. Lectures will discuss microscope technologies, fluorescent probes, live cell reagents and practical limitations to current technologies. Student run sessions will review current literature and discuss innovative applications of the technology. Prereq: CBIO 453 and CBIO 455.


MBIO 537. Microscopy-Principles and Applications (3)
This course provides an introduction to various types of light microscopy, digital and video imaging techniques, and their applications to biological and biomedical sciences via lectures and hands-on experience. Topics covered include geometrical and physical optics; brightfield, darkfield, phase contrast, DIC, fluorescence and confocal microscopes; and digital image processing. Offered as GENE 537, MBIO 537, and PHOL 537.


MBIO 599. RNA Structure and Function (3)
This course will cover fundamental aspects of modern RNA biology with emphasis on the interplay of three dimensional structure of nucleic acids and their function. The main focus of the course is on the recent discoveries that indicate a prominent role of RNA as a major regulator of cellular function. Topics discussed will include an introduction to RNA structure, folding and dynamics, RNA/RNA and RNA-protein interactions, and role of RNA in catalysis of biological reactions in ribosome and the role of other catalytic RNAs in tRNA biogenesis, pre-mRNA splicing, and viral replication. The course also covers the recently discovered RNA regulatory switches, large noncoding regulatory RNAs, and the role of RNA in human diseases and novel, RNA-based therapeutics. Offered as BIOC 599, CLBY 599, and MBIO 599.


MBIO 601. Research in Molecular Biology and Microbiology (1 - 18)


MBIO 620. Transcription and Gene Regulation (3)

This course covers mechanisms of transcription that play critical roles in biological processes. It is designed to develop scientific thinking in designing experiments and evaluating the merits of research papers. Students will be able to present two to three 30-minute talks. Topics include: 1) structure and function of RNA polymerases; 2) accessory factors involved in initiation, elongation, and termination; 3) regulation transcription; 4) transcriptional coactivators and corepressors; 5) regulation of transcription factor activity. A take-home exam will be conducted at the final week. Grades will be based on presentations and take-home exam. Offered as BIOC 620 and MBIO 620. Prereq: CBIO 453 and CBIO 455.


MBIO 651. Thesis M.S. (1 - 18)


MBIO 701. Dissertation Ph.D. (1 - 18)

Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.


MOLECULAR MEDICINE PROGRAM


Lerner Research Institute/ NA2-05
Phone 216-445-4593
E-mail: ticknoc@ccf.org
http://www.lerner.ccf.org/education/grad/case_molecmed.php

 

The Molecular Medicine Program provides educational and research opportunities leading to the Ph.D. degree. This program is designed to integrate clinical knowledge into a rigorous basic science curriculum and to foster translational research endeavors.


First-year graduate students follow the progressive Core Curriculum consisting of MMED 410 through 416, 501, and 612. They will complete three laboratory rotations (starting mid-July) among the laboratories of training faculty, which span the entire campus. Students will be exposed to trainer research projects during the Frontiers of Molecular Medicine seminar and journal club series taken the first summer and each semester thereafter. The goal of the rotations and the Frontiers of Molecular Medicine seminar series in the first year is to guarantee that the student has sufficient breadth of familiarity with Molecular Medicine faculty to allow him or her to make the best choice of a permanent research laboratory. In all cases, this selection must be made by the end of the second semester of year 1.


During subsequent years, students will devote the majority of their time to thesis research, while attending advanced graduate courses, seminars, and journal clubs. Advanced elective courses may be chosen from any department or program on campus, with the approval of the graduate program director and the student’s thesis committee. Students must take a total of 36 semester hours of courses and maintain a B average.
The qualifying exam will be comprised of preparing and defending a grant application in the NIH/NRSA format. The topic of the grant can be in a related area of investigation to the student’s research but cannot resemble projects that are ongoing in the laboratory of the Research Advisor. At least one aim of this proposal will consist of a specific translational or clinical aim.


All efforts should be made to complete the Ph.D. within four years. All students are expected to submit two or more first-authored primary research publications in peer-reviewed scientific journals. At least one manuscript should be accepted for publication prior to the thesis defense.

 

PH.D. PROGRAM


COURSEWORK
Students begin in July by first taking MMED410 Human Physiology and Disease. The student will follow a progressive curriculum including Proteins, Membranes, and Bioenergetics; Metabolism and Pharmacology; Nucleic Acids, Gene Expression, and Gene Regulation; Mammalian Genetics; Cell Biology; and Infection and Immunity. The core series concludes with a course in Principles of Clinical Research for the Ph.D. Investigator, and a one-semester mentored Clinical Experience.


RESEARCH ROTATIONS
The research rotations allow the student to sample areas of research and become familiar with faculty members and their laboratories. The main purpose of these rotations is to aid the student in selecting a laboratory for the thesis work. Students will begin their rotations in July. A minimum of three rotations must be completed during the year.


CHOOSING A THESIS ADVISOR
After the second semester of the first year students select an advisor for the dissertation research. The emphasis of the Ph.D. work is on research, culminating in the completion of an original, independent research thesis.


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (MMED)


MMED 400. Research Rotations (0)
Research rotations are conducted to expose the student to several laboratory environments, a variety of research problems and numerous laboratory techniques as well as to assist them in the selection of their Research Advisor. Rotations will begin immediately upon enrollment and continue through the second semester of the first year. Usually rotations will last 12 weeks, however if a student decides that he/she is not interested in the assigned laboratory a shorter rotation is appropriate. The student is responsible for arranging each rotation with an approved trainer with the consultation of the graduate program director. To assist in this endeavor, the graduate program director will provide a list of approved trainers who have space, time and money to support a graduate student. During the rotation, students are expected to participate in all lab and departmental activities, e.g., lab meetings and seminars. At the completion of a rotation the student is required to submit a written Rotation Report including an outline of the problem being studied, a description of the experimental approaches, a discussion of the results of performed experiments as well as future directions.


MMED 401. Fundamentals of Molecular Medicine and Translational Research (8)
Overview of Molecular Biology and Cell Biology with emphasis on areas of relevance to human health and disease. Topics include: basic cell structure; protein structure and function; genomic organization and expression, including basic genetics, DNA repair and recombination, transcriptional regulation, RNA processing and translation; membrane structure and function, including membrane protein biosynthesis and function; cell signaling pathways, including hormone and drug action; metabolism and energetics.


MMED 404. Frontiers in Molecular Medicine Seminar (1)
In the Frontiers in Molecular Medicine Seminar series, faculty from the department of Molecular Medicine and guest lecturers will discuss ongoing translational research.


MMED 410. Introduction to Human Physiology and Disease (4)
The purpose of this course is to give an introduction to the physiology of the major human organ systems, as well as selected associated pathophysiologies. The course will provide a physiological basis for subsequent study and research in Molecular Medicine. The integration of clinical faculty into the course will emphasize the importance of bringing scientific knowledge to bear on clinical problems, a theme which will be stressed throughout the Molecular Medicine curriculum. The course will also acquaint students with medical terminology.


MMED 411. Lipids, Membranes and Proteins (2)
The course will include a combination of interactive lectures and problem-based interactive seminars. Each week will conclude with at least one clinical correlation where the weekly topic is presented in the context of a clinical problem. Topics to be covered include: protein structure, function, and enzymology; protein synthesis, modification and turnover; biological membranes and transport through membranes; and bioenergetics.


MMED 412. Metabolism and Introduction to Principles of Pharmacology (2)
The course will include a combination of interactive lectures and problem-based interactive seminars. Each week will conclude with at least one clinical correlation where the weekly topic is presented in the context of a clinical problem. Topics to be covered include: carbohydrate metabolism; amino acid and nucleotide metabolism; lipid metabolism and lipoproteins; regulation of metabolism; and principals of pharmacology.


MMED 413. Nucleic Acids, Gene Expression, and Gene Regulation (2)
The course will include a combination of interactive lectures and problem-based learning. Each week will conclude with at least one clinical correlation where the weekly topic is presented in the context of a clinical problem. Topics to be covered include: DNA structure, chromosome structure, replication and repair; RNA synthesis and RNA processing, the organization of eukaryotic genes and the genetic code and translation; and gene regulation.


MMED 414. Mammalian Genetics (2)
The course focuses on genetics, genomics, and bioinformatics, and it will include a combination of interactive lectures, problem-based learning and a week-long group project. Topics to be covered include: genetic variation; linkage studies; association studies; complex traits, linkage disequilibrium, the Hap Map, pharmacogenetics; genome-wide expression studies; and mouse models for human disease, and bioinformatics.


MMED 415. Cell Biology (2)
The course will include a combination of interactive lectures and problem-based learning. Each week will conclude with at least one clinical correlation where the weekly topic is presented in the context of a clinical problem. Topics to be covered include: cell structure and organelles, prokaryotes/eukaryotes; intracellular compartments and protein sorting; receptors/endocytosis/rafts; the nucleus; cell communication; and mechanics of cell division.


MMED 416. Host Defense: Infection and Immunity (2)
The course will include a reading program, lectures, and weekly problem-based student-led presentations. Weeks 1 and 2 are dedicated to establishing the scope of the field and forming vocabulary. Week 3 and part of Week 4 will cover immune mechanisms. The remainder of the course will deal with clinical aspects of immunobiology. On a regular basis Clinical Correlations, relevant to weekly topics, are integrated into the material. Topics to be covered include: biology and molecular biology of infectious agents; fundamentals of immunology; innate and adaptive responses to infection, immune effector mechanisms; and clinical aspects of immunobiology.


MMED 501. Principles of Clinical and Translational Research for Laboratory-Based Investigators (4)
To give an introduction to the ethical, statistical, methodologic and informatics basis of clinical and translational research. Topics will include the history of clinical and translational research, regulatory aspects of human subjects research, clinical trials study design, conflicts of interest, human subjects recruitment, research and publication ethics, technology transfer, biobank construction and utilization, and clinical and research database construction and utilization. In addition, students will be introduced to principles of biostatistics and clinical epidemiology relevant to clinical and translational research and gain expertise in statistical tool using problem based learning sets.


MMED 504. Seminars in Advanced Research in Medicine (1)
The goal of Advanced Research in Medicine 2, Friday Research Seminars (ARM2), is to facilitate student understanding of the bidirectional nature of research and to instill excitement about the way in which novel research results in advances in clinical medicine. A series of 18 accomplished, well-respected researchers will interact with students for 60 minutes per week, challenging the students to think about novel research questions and their relationships to current clinical challenges linked thematically to the theme of the week. The emphases of ARM2 Friday Research Seminar is on the content of the research and how this research may impact and change clinical practice in the future. Each week, a student from the class will be assigned to moderate the session. The student moderator will introduce the speaker and will be responsible for assuring that adequate interactive discussion occurs. In addition, four sets of 2-week sessions each will be devoted to small group sessions. The goal of the 2-week sessions is for the students to develop a research plan directly related to the organ system featured in the presentations.


MMED 601. Dissertation Research (1 - 9)
Research leading toward the Ph.D. dissertation in Molecular Medicine.


MMED 612. Clinical Experience (2)
Each student will be assigned a Clinical Mentor who will co-advise the student and serve on both the Qualifying Examination Committee and Thesis Committee. The Clinical Mentor will develop an individualized curriculum for the student in consultation with the thesis research mentor and program director. The curriculum will be organized around the integrated, multidisciplinary disease groups at the Clinic. The students will attend and actively participate in the regularly scheduled multidisciplinary clinical conference organized by their disease group (most meet for one hour every week or every other week), usually involving a combination of case presentations and research presentations. At the conclusion of the semester the student will make a presentation to the group focused on a relevant translational research problem. The Clinical Mentor will also organize a series of supervised site visits (with Mentor) to various locations where students will observe clinician interactions with patients to better understand the disease from the patient perspective and to disease-related diagnostic and research laboratories.


MMED 701. Dissertation Ph.D. (1 - 9)
Research leading toward the Ph.D. dissertation in Molecular Medicine. Recommended preparation: Advancement to candidacy in MMED. Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.

 

MOLECULAR VIROLOGY PROGRAM


The last two decades have witnessed the development of molecular virology as one of the most productive, rewarding and clinically important avenues of biomedical research. The study of viruses has never been more important than it is today due to the recognition of human immunodeficiency virus as the etiological agent of AIDS and to the role of viruses, such as other retroviruses and human papillomaviruses, in causing cancer. Molecular virology, however, is no less exciting on a purely scientific level. The relatively small sizes of viral genomes coupled with their use of most cellular machinery to replicate has led to the selection of viruses as model systems to study biological processes such as transcription, translation, splicing, and DNA replication. Furthermore, because viruses introduce genetic material into cells as part of their life cycle, they are being used as vectors for gene therapy. Areas of strength of molecular virology program faculty include viral replication; virus-cell interactions, including mechanisms of interferon action; viral oncogenesis; and the use of viral vectors for gene therapy. Advanced-course subjects include RNA viruses, DNA viruses, immunology of infectious diseases, and RNA and DNA biosynthesis.


The Molecular Virology Program is part of the Biomedical Sciences Training Progra.m. For more information about the Molecular Virology Program, please visit the Biomedical Sciences Training Program website at http://www.case.edu/med/BSTP/index.html;


Write: Biomedical Sciences Training Program, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Ave., Cleveland Ohio 44106-4934


call: 216-368-3347; or


e-mail Deborah Noureddine, BSTP coordinator, at drn2@case.edu.


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (MVIR)

MVIR 420. Molecular Genetics of Cancer (3)
Cancer is a genetic disease, not only in the Mendelian sense of inheritance, but also in the sense that it is caused by somatic mutation. The targets of mutation are a set of proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes whose products govern cellular proliferation, death and differentiation. The objectives of this course are to examine the types of genes that are the targets of mutational activation or inactivation and the mechanistic outcome of mutational changes that lead to oncogenesis. The course will also probe viral mechanisms of oncogenesis related to the products of cellular proto-oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes. In the course of these examinations we will explore the genetic and molecular genetic approaches used to identify and study oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Students should be prepared to present and discuss experimental design, data and conclusions from assigned publications. There will be no exams or papers but the course will end with a full-day, student-run symposium on topics to be decided jointly by students and instructors. Grades will be based on class participation and symposium presentation. Offered as BIOC 420, MBIO 420, MVIR 420, PATH 422, and PHRM 420. Prereq: CBIO 453 and CBIO 455.


MVIR 434. Mechanisms of Drug Resistance (3)
Resistance to drugs is an important health concern in the new millennium. Over the past century, modern medicine has developed and prescribed drugs for various ailments and diseases with known therapeutic benefit. Since the discovery of antibiotics by Dr. Fleming, we have struggled with a new complication in infectious diseases, development of drug resistance. This course will focus on and compare the drug resistant mechanisms selected by viruses, bacteria, parasites, fungi, and tumor cells. Topics to be covered include antiretroviral resistance (e.g., AZT and protease inhibitors), antibiotic resistance (e.g., B-lactams), resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, and resistance to anti-malarial drugs (e.g., chloroquinone). Offered as MBIO 434, MVIR 434, and PHRM 434.


MVIR 435. Seminar in Molecular Biology/Microbiology (1)
Graduate students will attend the departmental seminar given by all graduate students in the Department of Molecular Biology and Microbiology, in the Molecular Virology Program, and in the Cell Biology Program, as well as give a seminar on their own thesis research. Students will be evaluated by the faculty member in charge of that student’s seminar with input from the students’ own thesis committee. After each seminar, the student presenter will meet with other graduate students for peer-review of the content, delivery, and style of the seminar. Peer reviewers will also be evaluated for the quality of their input. Offered as CLBY 435 and MBIO 435 and MVIR 435.


MVIR 445. Molecular Biology and Pathogenesis of RNA and DNA Viruses (3)
Through a combination of lectures by Case faculty and guest lecturers, along with student discussion of current literature, this course emphasizes mechanisms of viral gene expression and pathogenesis. RNA viruses to be discussed include positive, negative, and retroviruses. DNA viruses include SV40, adenovirus, herpes, papilloma, and others. Important aspects of host defense mechanisms, antiviral agents, and viral vectors will also be covered. Students will be evaluated based on their quality of presentation of course papers assigned to them and their overall participation in class discussions. Offered as MBIO 445 and MVIR 445. Prereq: CBIO 453 and CBIO 454 and CBIO 455 and CBIO 456.


MVIR 446. Virus-Host Interactions (3)
Viruses and their hosts have co-evolved for millions of years and, as a result, viruses have evolved intricate and fascinating mechanisms for evading host defenses. Understanding how viruses interact with the host is fundamental to counteracting or preventing viral infections. For example, viruses that fail to block host defenses are avirulent and candidates for vaccines. Emerging viral infections are a major public health concern and a subject of this course. The course consists of lectures and in-depth analysis of published studies on virus-host interactions. Outstanding local and external lecturers from across the U.S. will participate in teaching this course. In addition, students will deliver one presentation to the class during the course. Offered as MBIO 446 and MVIR 446. Prereq: MVIR 445


MVIR 481. Immunology of Infectious Diseases (3)
Lectures and discussion on the immune response to infectious organisms, including bacteria, viruses and parasites. Emphasis on human responses but includes discussions of animal models. Other topics include vaccines and infections in immuno-compromised hosts. Recommended preparation: PATH 416 or consent of instructor. Offered as MVIR 481 and PATH 481.


MVIR 521. HIV and AIDS: Research and Care (3)
AIDS and HIV disease represent a continuing medical challenge both here in the U.S. and abroad. Currently there are over 25 million people worldwide who are living with AIDS. Basic research into HIV also represents one of the major focuses of contemporary virus and immunological research. This course is designed to expose both M.D. and Ph.D. students to the major problems in HIV research. Because of the multidisciplinary nature of AIDS research, the course will span the spectrum from fundamental molecular biology to clinical translational research. All students (no matter what their degree course) will be given an opportunity to participate in outpatient HIV care and also to participate in a scientific research project. Offered as MBIO 521 and MVIR 521.


MVIR 522. Protein Phosphorylation and Cell Regulation (3)
This intensive seminar course will emphasize signaling pathways mediated by protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation. Bacterial signaling mediated by histidine/aspartate phosphorylation and regulation of cellular physiological events will be reviewed. Then eucaryotic cell signaling will be reviewed from the surface of the cell and into the nucleus. This includes receptor-dependent phosphorylation/dephosphorylation reactions, cytoplasmic signaling intermediates, protein translation processes dependent upon phosphorylation, and nuclear regulatory events with emphasis on transcriptional mechanisms. In addition to faculty lectures, students will be reviewing the current literature and will present a research proposal based on the current concepts in the field that they choose to cover. Offered as MBIO 522 and MVIR 522.


MVIR 601. Research (1 - 18)
Grade of S/U only.


MVIR 701. Dissertation Ph.D. (1 - 18)
Grade of S/U only. Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.

 


Department of Neurosciences


Room E-653, School of Medicine
Phone 216-368-6251
http://neurowww.case.edu/

 

Neurosciences are the last great frontier in the biological sciences. How the nervous system functions to process information and mediate behavior, and how it forms during embryonic development and is modified to encode experience, are central questions in the neurosciences. Answering these questions requires a multidisciplinary approach combining the tools of electrophysiology, anatomy, biochemistry and molecular biology in studies of animals and tissue culture models.


The department offers a Ph.D. program that provides interdisciplinary training in modern neurosciences through a combination of course work, seminars and research experience. Medical students are encouraged to pursue research projects with neurosciences faculty and/or to make neurosciences an area of concentration.
Neuroscientists at Case are using state-of-the-art techniques and instrumentation to study several aspects of nervous system function, including neural circuitry and plasticity, development and regeneration, and cellular and molecular neurobiology. Techniques used include patch and voltage clamping neuronal membranes to study ion channels, gene cloning, sequencing and other molecular and genetic approaches to study the structure, function and regulation of neuronal proteins; electron microscopy, confocal and other imaging methods to study development and function of synapses; immunocytochemical techniques to study the molecular and biochemical basis of nervous system development and plasticity; and traditional anatomical, biochemical and physiological techniques.


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (NEUR)


NEUR 402. Principles of Neural Science (3)
Lecture/discussion course covering concepts in cell and molecular neuroscience, principles of systems neuroscience as demonstrated in the somatosensory system, and fundamentals of the development of the nervous system. This course will prepare students for upper level Neuroscience courses and is also suitable for students in other programs who desire an understanding of neurosciences. Recommended preparation: CBIO 453. Offered as BIOL 402 and NEUR 402.


NEUR 405. Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology (3)
Cell biology of nerve cells, including aspects of synaptic structure physiology and chemistry. The application of molecular biological tools to questions of synaptic function will be addressed. Recommended preparation: BIOL 473.


NEUR 408. Functional Neuroanatomy (3)
This course is designed to give students a broad appreciation of the various subdivisions, nuclear groups, and axon tracts in the human brain and spinal cord. There will not only be an emphasis on the understanding of the 3-dimensional arrangement of neuroanatomical pathways that constitute the major circuits in the CNS but also a current perspective of their functions. Lectures in this course will be a selected subgroup of those that constitute the Nervous System Committee of the 2nd year medical school curriculum. Students taking NEUR 408 will also participate in selected review session, small group conferences as well as lab, which includes a dissection of a human brain.


NEUR 411. Neurobiology of Disease (3)
Designed to show how basic research in neuroscience has contributed to the management of clinical problems in human neurology and to discuss some of the further challenges posed by human disease for research in neurobiology. The general format will include clinical descriptions of patient presentation, discussion of the disease mechanisms and an analysis of contributions of cellular and systems neuroscience to understanding of the human disorder. Specific topics to be discussed include Ischemia and Stroke, Neurodegenerative Diseases such as Alzheimer’s Parkinson’s Brain Tumors, Mood Disorders, and Demyelinating diseases such as Multiple Sclerosis. Recommended preparation: NEUR 402 or NEUR 405.


NEUR 415. Neuroscience Seminars (1)
Current topics of interest in neurosciences. Students attend weekly seminars. From this series, students prepare critiques. No credit is given for less than 75% attendance.


NEUR 425. Stem Cell Biology and Therapeutics (3)
This course is intended to teach current understanding of stem cells as it relates to their characterization, function, and physiologic and pathological states. The course will expose students to the current understanding of various types of stem cells, including embryonic and adult stem cells of various tissues, techniques for their isolation and study. Experimental models and potential biomedical therapeutic applications will be discussed. The course will be taught by the faculty of the “Center for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine” who are affiliated with multiple departments of Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland Clinic Foundation and the partnering biomedical companies. Offered as NEUR 425 and PATH 425.


NEUR 427. Neural Development (3)
Topics include cell commitment, regulation of proliferation and differentiation, cell death and trophic factors, pathfinding by the outgrowing nerve fiber, synapse formation, relationships between center and periphery in development and the role of activity. Offered as BIOL 427 and NEUR 427.


NEUR 432. Biochemical and Molecular Aspects of Vision (3)
Increasingly, progress in the study of visual science is requiring multidisciplinary approaches that draw from the areas of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, neuroscience and pathology. We have recognized this fact and have adapted this course to fit the needs of tomorrow’s scientists. This course encompasses the basic science aspects of the eye. Subjects include retinal anatomy and function; biochemical, molecular aspects of retinal disease and cataract; cellular and molecular neuroscience aspects pertinent to the visual system. Offered as NEUR 432, PATH 432, and PHRM 432.


NEUR 435. Vision: Molecules to Perception (3)
The organization, physiology, and function of the vertebrate visual system are considered in detail. The visual pathway from retina to LGN and visual cortex is described with an emphasis on circuits that produce successively more complex receptive field properties. Classic papers and current literature form the basic course material. Assessment is based on student presentations, class participation, and a term paper. Recommended preparation: NEUR 402 or consent of department.


NEUR 473. Introduction to Neurobiology (3)
How nervous systems control behavior. Biophysical, biochemical, and molecular biological properties of nerve cells, their organization into circuitry, and their function within networks. Emphasis on quantitative methods for modeling neurons and networks, and on critical analysis of the contemporary technical literature in the neurosciences. Term paper required for graduate students. Offered as BIOL 373, BIOL 473, and NEUR 473.


NEUR 474. Neurobiology of Behavior (3)
In this course, students will examine how neurobiologists interested in animal behavior study the linkage between neural circuitry and complex behavior. Various vertebrate and invertebrate systems will be considered. Several exercises will be used in this endeavor. Although some lectures will provide background and context on specific neural systems, the emphasis of the course will be on classroom discussion of specific journal articles. In addition, students will each complete a project in which they will observe some animal behavior and generate both behavioral and neurobiological hypotheses related to it. In lieu of examinations, students will complete three written assignments, including a theoretical grant proposal, a one-page Specific Aims paper related to the project, and a final project paper. These assignments are designed to give each student experience in writing biologically-relevant documents. Classroom discussions will help students understand the content and format of each type document. They will also present their projects orally to the entire class. Recommended preparation: BIOL 216. Offered as BIOL 374, BIOL 474, and NEUR 474.

 

SAGES Dept Seminar

NEUR 475. Protein Biophysics (3)
This course focuses on in-depth understanding of the molecular biophysics of proteins. Structural, thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of protein function and structure-function relationships will be considered at the advanced conceptual level. The application of these theoretical frameworks will be illustrated with examples from the literature and integration of biophysical knowledge with description at the cellular and systems level. The format consists of lectures, problem sets, and student presentations. A special emphasis will be placed on discussion of original publications. Offered as BIOC 475, CHEM 475, PHOL 475, PHRM 475, and NEUR 475.


NEUR 476. Neurobiology Laboratory (3)
Introduction to the basic laboratory techniques of neurobiology. Intracellular and extracellular recording techniques, forms of synaptic plasticity, patch clamping, immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. During the latter weeks of the course students will be given the opportunity to conduct an independent project. One laboratory and one discussion session per week. Recommended preparation for BIOL 476 and NEUR 476: BIOL 216. Offered as BIOL 376, BIOL 476 and NEUR 476.


NEUR 477. Cellular Biophysics (4)
This course focuses on a quantitative understanding of cellular processes. It is designed for students who feel comfortable with and are interested in analytical and quantitative approaches to cell biology and cell physiology. Selected topics in cellular biophysics will be covered in depth. Topics include theory of electrical and optical signal processing used in cell physiology, thermodynamics and kinetics of enzyme and transport reactions, single ion channel kinetics and excitability, mechanotransduction, and transport across polarized cell layers. The format consists of lectures, problem sets, computer simulations, and discussion of original publications. The relevant biological background of topics will be provided appropriate for non-biology science majors.Offered as BIOC 476, NEUR 477, PHOL 476, PHRM 476.


NEUR 478. Computational Neuroscience (3)
Computer simulations and mathematical analysis of neurons and neural circuits, and the computational properties of nervous systems. Students are taught a range of models for neurons and neural circuits, and are asked to implement and explore the computational and dynamic properties of these models. The course introduces students to dynamical systems theory for the analysis of neurons and neural learning, models of brain systems, and their relationship to artificial and neural networks. Term project required. Students enrolled in MATH 478 will make arrangements with the instructor to attend additional lectures and complete additional assignments addressing mathematical topics related to the course. Recommended preparation: MATH 223 and MATH 224 or BIOL 300 and BIOL 306. Offered as BIOL 378, COGS 378, MATH 378, BIOL 478, EBME 478, EECS 478, MATH 478 and NEUR 478.


NEUR 479. Seminar in Computational Neuroscience (3)
Readings and discussion in the recent literature on computational neuroscience, adaptive behavior, and other current topics. Offered as BIOL 479, EBME 479, EECS 479, and NEUR 479.


NEUR 482. Drugs, Brain, and Behavior (3)
This course is concerned with the mechanisms underlying neurochemical signaling and the impact of drugs on those mechanisms. The first half of the course emphasizes the fundamental mechanisms underlying intra- and extracellular communication of neurons and the basic principles of how drugs interact with the nervous system. The second half of the course emphasizes understanding the neural substrates of disorders of the nervous system, and the mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects of drugs at the cellular and behavioral levels. This course will consist of lectures designed to give the student necessary background for understanding these basic principles and class discussion. The class discussion will include viewing video examples of behavioral effects of disorders of the nervous system, and analysis of research papers. The goal of the class discussions is to enhance the critical thinking skills of the student and expose the student to contemporary research techniques. Offered as BIOL 382, BIOL 482, and NEUR 482.


NEUR 518. Signaling via Cell Adhesion (3)
Molecular mechanisms by which cells interact with and are regulated by extracellular matrices and other cells. Offered as CBIO 518, CLBY 518, MBIO 518, and NEUR 518.


NEUR 534. Neurogenetics (3)
This course will explore how principles of genetics can be used as tools to study the complex organization of the nervous system. Examples will be drawn from all relevant model organisms including nematode, fruit fly, mouse, and human. Meant primarily for students with an interest in neuroscience, this course will offer a strong foundation in genetic principles using examples drawn from the neuroscience literature. Students in other disciplines, especially genetics, will benefit from the examples to learn important aspects of the neurosciences ranging from behavior to development. These interdisciplinary features make this course unique in its offerings and a valuable addition to many students’ course of study. Recommended preparation: CBIO 453 and CBIO 455. Offered as GENE 534 and NEUR 534.


NEUR 540. Advanced Topics in Neuroscience Ethics (0)
This course offers continuing education in responsible conduct of research for advanced graduate students. The course will cover the nine defined areas of research ethics through a combination of lectures, on-line course material and small group discussions. Six 2-hr meetings per semester. Maximum enrollment of 15 students with preference given to graduate students in the Neurosciences program. All neurosciences graduate students must complete this course during their 3rd or 4th year.


NEUR 601. Research in Neuroscience (1 - 18)


NEUR 651. Master’s Thesis (M.S.) (1 - 6)

(Credit as arranged.) Recommended preparation: M.S. candidates only.


NEUR 701. Dissertation Ph.D. (1 - 18)
Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.

 

 

Department of Nutrition


School of Medicine, Room WG 48
Henri Brunengraber, M.D., Ph.D., Chair
Edith Lerner, Ph.D., Vice Chair
Phone 216-368-2440
Fax 216-368-6644
http://www.case.edu/med/nutrition/home.html

 

The department’s focus is on human nutrition and the application of the science of nutrition to the maintenance and improvement of health. Undergraduate programs are designed for students interested in nutritional biochemistry and metabolism, molecular nutrition, professional study in dietetics, public health nutrition, medicine, dentistry or nursing. Graduate programs emphasize dietetics, public health nutrition, nutritional biochemistry and molecular nutrition.
The Department of Nutrition offers programs leading to the bachelor of science degree in nutrition, bachelor of arts degree in nutrition, bachelor of arts degree in nutritional biochemistry and metabolism, bachelor of science degree in nutritional biochemistry and metabolism, master of science degree in nutrition, master of science degree in public health nutrition, and doctor of philosophy degree. A nutrition minor is available. Specialty programs are available in areas such as maternal and child nutrition or gerontology. The specialty is in addition to the basic graduate degree.
Special announcements describing the various programs and providing additional information are available from the department.


FACULTY


Henri Brunengraber, M.D., Ph.D. (Université de Liege)
Professor and Chair of Department


Edith Lerner, Ph.D. (University of Wisconsin Madison)
Associate Professor and Vice Chair of Department


Hope Barkoukis, Ph.D. (Case Western Reserve University)
Assistant Professor


Colleen Croniger, Ph.D. (Case Western Reserve University)
Assistant Professor


Paul Ernsberger, Ph.D. (Northwestern University)
Associate Professor


Maria Hatzoglou, Ph.D. (University of Athens)
Professor


Takhir Kasumov, Ph.D. (Moscow State)
Instructor


Mary Beth Kavanagh, M.S. (Case Western Reserve University)
Instructor


Janos Kerner, Ph.D. (Hungarian Academy of Sciences)
Assistant Professor


Jane Korsberg, M.S. (Case Western Reserve University)
Instructor


Danny Manor, Ph.D. (Yeshiva University)
Associate Professor


Duna Massillon, Ph.D. (Montreal)
Assistant Professor


Isabel M. Parraga, Ph.D. (Case Western Reserve University)
Associate Professor


Stephen Previs, Ph.D. (Case Western Reserve University)
Assistant Professor


Tamara Randall, M.S. (Case Western Reserve University)
Instructor


Alison Steiber, Ph.D. (Michigan State University)
Assistant Professor


James Swain, Ph.D. (Iowa State University)
Assistant Professor


Kou-Yi Tserng, Ph.D. (Illinois at Chicago)
Associate Professor


Jonathan Whittaker, M.R.C.P. (University College School of Medicine, London, U.K.)
Associate Professor


Associate Faculty

 

SECONDARY APPOINTMENTS


Saul Genuth, M.D. (Case Western Reserve University)
Professor


Sharon Groh-Wargo, Ph.D. (Case Western Reserve University)
Assistant Professor


Richard W. Hanson, Ph.D. (Brown University)
Professor


Douglas S. Kerr, M.D., Ph.D. (Case Western Reserve University)
Professor


John Kirwan, Ph.D. (Ball State)
Associate Professor


Laura Nagy, Ph.D. (University of California – Berkeley)
Professor


William Stanley, Ph.D. (University of California-Berkeley)
Associate Professor


Anthony Tavill, M.D. (Manchester-England)
Professor


Adjunct/Clinical Appointments


Phyllis Allen, M.S. (Case Western Reserve University)
Adjunct Instructor


Janet Anselmo, M.S. (Case Western Reserve University)
Adjunct Instructor


Johanna Asarian-Anderson, M.P.H. (University of California -Los Angeles)
Adjunct Instructor


Casey Atkinson, B.S. (Youngstown State University)
Adjunct Instructor


Joan Atkinson, M.S. (Case Western Reserve University)
Adjunct Instructor


Anika Avery-Grant, M.S. (Case Western Reserve University)
Adjunct Instructor


Cynthia Bayerl, M.A. (Boston University)
Adjunct Instructor


Cynthia Blackburn, M.S. (Kent State University)
Adjunct Instructor


Carmen Blakely-Adams (Michigan State University)
Adjunct Instructor


Elizabeth Boone, B.S. (Ohio University)
Adjunct Instructor


Josephine Ann Cialone, M.S. (Case Western Reserve University)
Adjunct Instructor


Nenita Clemente, M.S. (Case Western Reserve University)
Adjunct Instructor


Cheri Collier, M.S. (Case Western Reserve University)
Adjunct Instructor


Susan Comfort, M.S. (Case Western Reserve University)
Adjunct Instructor


Janice Davis, M.S. (Case Western Reserve University)
Adjunct Instructor


Helen Dumski, B.S. (Ohio State University)
Adjunct Instructor


Denise Ferris, Ph.D. (University of Pittsburgh)
Adjunct Instructor


Karen M. Fiedler, Ph.D. (University of Tennessee)
Adjunct Associate Professor


Evangeline Fowler, M.S. (Case Western Reserve University)
Adjunct Instructor


Lorna Fuller, M.S. (Kent State University)
Adjunct Instructor


Deborah Gammell, M.S. (Miami University of Ohio)
Adjunct Instructor


Brenda Garritson, M.S. (Texas Women’s University)
Adjunct Instructor


Peggy Gates, M. Ed. (Cleveland State University)
Adjunct Instructor


Melinda Gedeon, B.S. (Ohio State University)
Adjunct Instructor


Martha Halko, M.S. (University of Akron)
Adjunct Instructor


Cathy Hastings, M.P.H. (South Florida)
Adjunct Instructor


Valerie Heimbach, M.S. (Indiana University of Pennsylvania)
Adjunct Instructor


Karen Horvath, B.S. (University of Akron)
Adjunct Instructor


Claire Hughes, Dr.PH (University of Hawaii)
Adjunct Instructor


Lisa Isham, M.S. (Case Western Reserve University)
Adjunct Instructor


Elvira Jarka, M.P.H. (University of Illinois)
Adjunct Instructor


Jan Kallio, M.S. (Case Western Reserve University)
Adjunct Instructor


Jennifer Kernc, B.S. (University of Akron)
Adjunct Instructor


Natalia Kliszczuk-Smolio, B.S. (University of Cincinnati)
Adjunct Instructor


Richard Koletsky, M.D.

Adjunct Assistant Clinical Professor


Jennifer Kravec, B.S. (Ohio State University)
Adjunct Instructor


Perri Kushan, B.S. (University of Akron)
Adjunct Instructor


Lois Lenard, B.S. (Kent State University)
Adjunct Instructor


Mary A. McGuckin, M.S. (Case Western Reserve University)
Adjunct Instructor


Anita Martin, M.P.H. (University of North Carolina)
Adjunct Instructor


Linda Novak-Eedy, B.S. (Bowling Green State University)
Adjunct Instructor


Lisa Ogg, B.S. (Kent State University)
Adjunct Instructor


Michelle Ogurwale, B.S. (Bluffton College)
Adjunct Instructor


Punam Ohri-Vashaspati, Ph.D. (Tufts University)
Adjunct Instructor


Christine Polisena, M.S. (Case Western Reserve University)
Adjunct Instructor


Barbara Pryor, M.S. (Ohio State University)
Adjunct Instructor


Anne Raguso, Ph.D. (Case Western Reserve University)
Adjunct Assistant Professor


Anna Rostafinski, M.S. (Case Western Reserve University)
Adjunct Instructor


Jo Ann Ruggeri, B.S. (Ohio State University)
Adjunct Instructor


Joanne Samuels, B.S. (State University of New York)
Adjunct Instructor


Miriam Seidel, M.S. (Boston University)
Adjunct Instructor


Najeeba Shine, M.S. (Case Western Reserve University)
Adjunct Instructor


Ruth Shrock, M.S. (Ohio State University)
Adjunct Instructor


Suzanne Silverstein, M.A. (George Washington University)
Adjunct Instructor


Donna Skoda, M.S. (Case Western Reserve University)
Adjunct Instructor


Sara Snow, M.S. (Case Western Reserve University)
Adjunct Instructor


Lura Beth Spinks, M.S. (Ohio State University)
Adjunct Instructor


Margaret Tate, M.S. (Colorado State)
Adjunct Instructor


Norliza Tayag, B.S. (San Diego State University)
Adjunct Instructor


Anita Ullman, M.S. (Case Western Reserve University)
Adjunct Instructor


Melissa Wilson, B.S. (Mercyhurst College)
Adjunct Instructor


Diane Ohama Yates, B.S. (Hawaii)
Adjunct Instructor


Mary Zyga, B.S. (Ohio State University)
Adjunct Instructor


UNDERGRADUATE (NTRN)


Major Programs


The undergraduate degree in nutrition is appropriate for students who wish to: (1) pursue graduate programs in nutritional biochemistry, molecular nutrition, dietetics, public health nutrition or other biomedical sciences; (2) enter professional schools of dentistry, medicine, or nursing; (3) apply to dietetic internships or approved experience programs in order to prepare for the professional practice of dietetics; (4) pursue technical careers in the food or pharmaceutical industry. This major offers flexibility in course selection within a framework of general program requirements. The selection of courses depends on the student’s choice of emphasis. Students wishing to qualify for admission to professional or graduate programs need to include specific courses considered prerequisites for admission. Students interested in applying to dietetic internships must meet specific course requirements (Didactic Program in Dietetics) as required by the Commission on Accreditation for Dietetics Education of the American Dietetic Association. These requirements are met in the courses that comprise the Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD). The DPD at Case Western Reserve University is currently granted Accreditation by the Commission on Accreditation for Dietetics Education of the American Dietetic Association, 216 W. Jackson Blvd., Chicago, IL 60606-6995, 312-899-5400. A department advisor should be consulted in the freshman year to plan the dietetics course work.


Nutrition

Bachelor of Science degree requires the completion of SAGES, PHED 101, 102, and the following courses:
NTRN 201, 342, 343, 363, 364, 397, 398, and three NTRN electives
CHEM 105, 106, 113, 223
BIOL 214; BIOL 216 or BIOL 348; BIOC 307; STAT 201 or 243 or 312 or 313 or ANTH 319 or PSCL 282 or EPBI 431
Bachelor of Arts degree requires the completion of SAGES, PHED 101, 102, and the following courses:
NTRN 201,342, 343, 363, 364, 397, 398 and two NTRN electives
CHEM 105, 106, 223
BIOL 214; BIOL 216 or BIOL 348
BIOC 307


Nutritional Biochemistry and Metabolism

Bachelor of Arts degree requires the completion of SAGES, PHED 101, 102, and the following courses:
NTRN 201, 342, 363, 364, 397, 398, 452 and one NTRN elective: 3hrs at 300-level or above
MATH 125, 126 (or 121, 122)
CHEM 105, 106, 113, 223 (or 323), 224 (or 324), 233, 234
BIOL 214, 215
BIOL 216 or BIOL 348
PHYS 115, 116
BIOC 307, 334
Bachelor of Science degree requires the completion of SAGES, PHED 101, 102, and the following courses:
NTRN 201, 342, 363, 364, 397, 398, 452 and one NTRN elective: 3 hours at 300-level or above
MATH 121 (or 123), 122 (or 124), 223 (or 227), 224 (or 228)
ENGR 131
CHEM 105, 106, 113, 223 (or 323), 224 (or 324), 233, 234
BIOL 214, 215
BIOL 216 or BIOL 348; PHYS 121 and 122 or 123 and 124; 221 or 223
BIOC 307, 334


Minor Programs
The basic sequence for a minor program consists of NTRN 201, Nutrition (3); NTRN 343, Dietary Patterns (3); and an additional 9 hours of nutrition courses, selected from: NTRN 328, 342, 351, 363, 364, 365, 388, 435, 437, 440, 452, 454, 455, 460.


Master of Science in Nutrition Degree
This degree program offers two options. For those pursuing the thesis option, 30 semester hours of a planned program of study are required, including six to nine semester hours of research, as well as a final oral defense of the thesis. The non-thesis option requires 30 semester hours and a final written, comprehensive examination.
All candidates are required to take 15 semester hours of nutrition, including six hours of advanced human nutrition. In addition, students are encouraged to pursue complementary studies in the biomedical, social and behavioral sciences. The plan of study may vary considerably depending on the education, goals and specific interests of each student. Students may elect to focus on nutritional biochemistry and metabolism, and molecular nutrition. The individual program also may be planned to fulfill the academic requirements for dietetic registration (Didactic Program in Dietetics).


Master of Science in Public Health Nutrition/Internship Degree
The primary goal of this program is to prepare nutrition specialists to function in public health/community agencies. A minimum of 30 semester hours of combined academic work and field experience is required to earn the degree. Course work focuses on human nutrition, dietetics, and the public health sciences. Field experience is concurrent with course work utilizing local community agencies for direct application of theory to practice. The final phase of the program is an eight-week, full-time experience with a public health agency that has a strong nutrition component. The student works closely with an advisor throughout the program, on an individual basis.


In addition to the general public health program, students may elect to specialize in maternal and child nutrition or gerontology. The gerontology specialty is certified through the Center on Aging and Health located on campus. Each specialty requires additional semester hours of academic work. A portion of the field experience is specified for either population group.


For students wishing to become eligible to take the registered dietitian (R.D.) examination, the program also currently is granted accreditation by the Commission on Accreditation for Dietetics Education (CADE) of the American Dietetic Association as an internship. CADE is a specialized accrediting body recognized by the Commission on Recognition of Postsecondary Accreditation and the United States Department of Education.


Coordinated Dietetic Internship/Master’s Degree Program
The Coordinated Dietetic Internship/Master’s Degree Program combines academic work with clinical practice at either of the dietetic internships at University Hospitals of Cleveland or the Louis Stokes Cleveland Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center. A minimum of 27 semester hours is required. Admission is contingent on the student’s being selected and matched to one of the hospitals. Appointment to these internships follows the admission procedure outlined by the Commission on Accreditation for Dietetics Education of the American Dietetic Association. Contact the Department of Nutrition for information regarding application.


Doctor of Philosophy in Nutrition Degree
The Doctor of Philosophy degree in nutrition is awarded for study and research in nutrition. Areas of concentration are nutritional biochemistry and metabolism, and molecular nutrition.
Additional information about graduate degree programs may be obtained from the department.


Course Descriptions (NTRN)


NTRN 201. Nutrition (3)
The nutrients, their functions, food sources, and factors affecting human needs throughout life.


NTRN 328. Child Nutrition, Development and Health (3)
The relationship between nutrition and physical/cognitive growth and development of the child from the prenatal period through adolescence, including individuality, maturation and biological needs. Nutritional influences (nutrient requirements, food choices, and nutritional/feeding problems) and effects on health are emphasized.


NTRN 342. Food Science (3)
Chemical, physical and biological properties of food constituents and their interactions in food preparation and processing and practical application of processing methods and their effect on nutritional quality and acceptability. Laboratory and lecture. Prereq: CHEM 106.


NTRN 343. Dietary Patterns (3)
Examination of the food supply in the United States as it is affected by production, processing, marketing, government programs, regulation, and consumer selection. Nutritional evaluation of dietary patterns of different cultures. Recommended preparation: NTRN 201 or consent.


NTRN 351. Food Service Systems Management (3)
The application of organizational theory and skills in the preparation and service of quantity food. Laboratory experience in professional food services are included. Graduate students will analyze one aspect of food service management in depth. Offered as NTRN 351 and NTRN 451. Prereq: Nutrition major or consent of instructor.


NTRN 360. Guided Study in Nutrition Practice (3)
Methods for the provision of nutrition services to individuals and groups. Principles of professional practice including ethics, standards, and regulatory issues. Recommended preparation: NTRN 363 or NTRN 433 or consent.


NTRN 363. Human Nutrition I: Energy, Protein, Minerals (3)
Chemical and physiological properties of specific nutrients, including interrelationships and multiple factors, in meeting nutritional needs throughout the life cycle. Recommended preparation: NTRN 201, CHEM 223 and BIOL 348 or equivalent.


NTRN 364. Human Nutrition II: Vitamins (3)
Chemical and physiological properties of vitamins, including interrelationships and multiple factors, in meeting nutritional needs throughout the life cycle. Prereq: NTRN 363.


NTRN 365. Nutrition in Disease (4)
Application of nutrition principles to the problems of diet in disease. Prereq: NTRN 363 and BIOC 307 or equivalent or consent of instructor.


NTRN 371. Special Problems (1–3)
Independent reading, research, or special projects supervised by a member of the nutrition faculty. Prereq: Junior or senior standing.


NTRN 372. Special Problems (1–3)
Independent reading, research, or special projects supervised by a member of the nutrition faculty. Prereq: Junior or senior standing.


NTRN 388. Seminar in Nutrition (1–3)
Prereq: Junior or senior standing.


NTRN 390. Undergraduate Research (3–9)
Guided laboratory research in nutritional biochemistry or molecular nutrition under the sponsorship of a nutrition faculty member.


NTRN 397. Capstone Proposal Seminar (3)
In this departmental seminar course, students will conceptualize, develop and prepare a written plan, known as the “Capstone Proposal,” for their senior Capstone project (NTRN 398: Senior Capstone Experience). Discussion will include, but not be limited to basic research principles, different types of research, ethics and IRB procedures. The Capstone Proposal shall include the project design, aims, methodology, budget, data analysis and presentation. Upon completion of this course, students will have confirmed student/Capstone advisor and, if applicable, mentor relationships, written a Capstone proposal and given an oral presentation of their proposal at a departmental colloquium. Prereq: NTRN 201 and NTRN 342. SAGES Dept Seminar


NTRN 398. Senior Capstone Experience (3)
Students will implement their “Capstone Proposal” projects as designed in NTRN 397: Capstone Proposal Seminar. Pertinent research activities will depend on the nature of the student’s “Capstone Proposal” project. The student will meet regularly with their Capstone advisor, at least twice monthly, to provide progress reports, discuss the project, and for critique and guidance. By the end of this course, the student will have completed their SAGES Senior Capstone research project and presented their project results/findings orally at the Senior Capstone Fair and at a departmental colloquium. Prereq: NTRN 397. SAGES Senior Cap


NTRN 399. Senior Project (3)
Formal investigation of a topic in nutrition culminating in a paper and oral presentation. Requires definition of a problem, evaluation of the scientific literature and delineation of problem-solving approaches. Recommended preparation: Twenty-one hours of Nutrition.


NTRN 433. Advanced Human Nutrition I (4)
Emphasis on reading original research literature in energy, protein and minerals with development of critical evaluation and thinking skills. Recommended preparation: NTRN 201 and CHEM 223 and BIOL 348 or equivalent.


NTRN 434. Advanced Human Nutrition II (3)
Emphasis on reading original research literature on vitamins with development of critical evaluation and thinking skills. Recommended preparation: NTRN 433 or consent.


NTRN 435. Maternal and Child Nutrition (3)
Study of current research literature on nutrition for pregnancy, lactation, infancy and childhood, including assessment and requirements. Recommended preparation: Nutrition major or consent of instructor.


NTRN 437. Evaluation of Nutrition Information for Consumers (3)
Reading and appraisal of food and nutrition literature written for the general public, including books, periodicals, and audio and visual sources.
Prereq: Graduate standing and Nutrition or Public Health Nutrition major or consent of instructor.


NTRN 438. Trends in Diet Therapy (3)
Evaluation and interpretation of modern concepts of nutrition related to abnormalities requiring dietary modifications. Prereq: NTRN 365.


NTRN 440. Nutrition for the Aging and Aged (3)
Consideration of the processes of aging and needs which continue throughout life. The influences of food availability, intake, economics, culture, physical and social conditions and chronic disease as they affect the ability of the aged to cope with living situations. Recommended preparation: Nutrition major or consent of instructor.


NTRN 446. Advanced Maternal Nutrition: Special Topics (3)
Analysis of the problems commonly associated with high-risk pregnancies and fetal outcome. Discussion of causes, mechanisms, management and current research. Recommended preparation: NTRN 435 or consent.


NTRN 451. Food Service Systems Management (3)
The application of organizational theory and skills in the preparation and service of quantity food. Laboratory experience in professional food services are included. Graduate students will analyze one aspect of food service management in depth. Offered as NTRN 351 and NTRN 451. Prereq: Nutrition major.


NTRN 452. Nutritional Biochemistry and Metabolism (3)
Mechanisms of regulation of pathways of intermediary metabolism; amplification of biochemical signals; substrate cycling and use of radioactive and stable isotopes to measure metabolic rates. Recommended preparation: BIOC 307 or equivalent. Offered as BIOC 452 and NTRN 452.


NTRN 454. Isotope Tracer Methodology (3)
Stable and radioactive isotopes in metabolic research concentrating on the design of in-vitro and in-vivo investigative protocols using mostly stable isotopes and mass spectrometric analysis; critical interpretation of data from the recent literature; and pathway identification and kinetics. Recommended preparation: BIOC 407.


NTRN 455. Molecular Nutrition (3)
Nutrient control of gene expression in mammalian cells and deregulation of expression of these genes. The molecular basis of nutrition-related diseases, such as diabetes mellitus, PKU, and LDL-receptor deficiency, will be discussed. The application of genetic manipulation to metabolism and nutrition will be evaluated. Recommended preparation: BIOC 407.


NTRN 460. Sports Nutrition (3)
Study of the relationships of nutrition and food intake to body composition and human performance. Laboratory sessions include demonstrations of body composition and fitness measurements and participation in a research project. Recommended preparation: NTRN 363 or NTRN 433 or consent.


NTRN 516. Seminar in Dietetics I (4)
Study of scientific basis for clinical and community nutrition practice and developments in food service systems management. Recommended preparation: Dietetic internship.


NTRN 517. Seminar in Dietetics II (4)
Study of scientific basis for clinical and community nutrition practice and developments in food service systems management. Recommended preparation: Dietetic internship.


NTRN 528. Introduction to Public Health Nutrition (3)
Philosophy, objectives, organization, and focus of government and voluntary agencies with emphasis on nutrition components. Recommended preparation: Public health nutrition majors only.


NTRN 529. Nutritional Epidemiology (3)
This course uses epidemiology as a tool for assessing potential causal associations between dietary excesses, deficiencies and imbalances to the prevalent chronic diseases. It addresses the epidemiologic aspects of nutrition related chronic diseases, for example, the multi-factorial nature of etiology. Recommended preparation: Statistics and Public Health Nutrition students only.


NTRN 530. Public Health Nutrition (3)
Analysis of public health programs in government and voluntary health agencies and the effect of legislation. Emphasis on integration with other disciplines working in public health settings and the role of a public health nutritionist.


NTRN 531. Public Health Nutrition Field Experience (1 - 6)
Individually planned public health experience. May be concurrent with course work in local agencies or in blocks of full-time work with a city, county, or state health agency. Prereq: Open to public health nutrition students only. Consent of instructor.


NTRN 532A. General Nutrition Care (1 - 3)
Individually arranged clinical experience.


NTRN 532C. Specialized Public Health Nutrition Field Experience (1 - 3)
Individually arranged clinical experience. Prereq: Public Health Nutrition students only. Consent of instructor.


NTRN 532D. Hospital Dietetics (1 - 3)
Individually arranged clinical experience.


NTRN 532E. Clinical Research: Methods in Nutrition and Metabolism (3)
Individually arranged.


NTRN 533. Nutritional Care of Neonate (3)
Nutritional assessment and management of high-risk newborns with emphasis on prematurity and low birth weight. Review of current literature coordinated with clinical experience in the neonatal intensive care unit. Issues on follow-up included. Recommended preparation: NTRN 435 or consent.


NTRN 534. Advanced Public Health Nutrition Field Experience (1 - 6)
Individually planned advanced public health experience. Prereq: Open to public health nutrition students only.


NTRN 550A. Advanced Community Nutrition (3)
Development of skills needed by the community dietitian. Emphasis on effective tools for service development and delivery. Recommended courses of action for the professional.


NTRN 550B. Seminar: Dietetics (1)


NTRN 551. Seminar in Advanced Nutrition (1)
Ph.D. students meet weekly to discuss topical journal articles. Students gain experience in critical evaluation of research and develop presentation/communication skills. Discussion of research integrity and ethics. Students participate in departmental seminars with invited speakers.


NTRN 561. Investigative Methods in Nutrition (1 - 4)
Research methods appropriate for nutrition. Methods for conducting research in nutrition and food sciences, food service management and dietetics. Designing research proposals. Prereq: Nutrition major.


NTRN 601. Special Problems (1 - 18)


NTRN 651. Thesis M.S. (1 - 18)


NTRN 701. Dissertation Ph.D. (1 - 18)

Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.

 

 

Department of Pathology


Case Western Reserve University
School of Medicine
Department of Pathology
10900 Euclid Avenue
Cleveland, OH 44106-7288
216-368-3611
http://www.case.edu/med/pathology/

 

The clinical, research, and educational activities of the Case Department of Pathology are located in several primary locations. Four are situated in University Circle, the cultural center of Northeast Ohio, located minutes from the heart of downtown Cleveland. These four include the Basic Science component of the department at Case School of Medicine, the Clinical Services component of the department at University Hospitals of Cleveland, the Cuyahoga County Coroner’s Office, and the Veteran’s Administration Hospital. Research laboratories of the department are located in theWolstein Research Building (completed in 2003), and in the Institute of Pathology. Both are situated adjacent to University Hospitals of Cleveland, the primary teaching hospital of the Case School of Medicine and the location of the department’s Pathology Residency Program. Affiliations with educational and research relevance include the Pathology Department at MetroHealth Medical Center in downtown Cleveland. Also close by are several outstanding libraries, including the Health Science Library, the Allen Memorial Medical Library, the Kelvin Smith Library, and the department’s own library.


World-class research is conducted in the department in biomaterials biocompatibility, cancer biology, immunology, neurobiology, outcomes research, and tissue injury and healing. The department’s research activities are characterized by highly cooperative and collaborative interactions within the department, and the Case community. In 2005, the department’s annual NIH research support totaled $ 10,783,617, placing the Department of Pathology 20th nationally, amongst 95 medical school pathology departments. For information about graduate programs, please see http://www.case.edu/med/pathology/grad_prog/gradprogmenu.htm.


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (PATH)


PATH 390. Undergraduate Research in Cancer Biology, Immunology, or Pathology (1 - 3)
Students undertake a research project directly related to ongoing research in the investigator’s/instructor’s laboratory. Written proposal outlining research topic, a schedule of meetings and format and length of final written report to be prepared prior to registration for credit. Recommended preparation: One year of college chemistry and consent of instructor.


PATH 395. Selected Readings in Immunology, Cancer Biology, or Pathology (1 - 3)
Relevant readings and literature search on particular immunology, cancer biology or pathology topic(s) chosen by the student and directed by the instructor. Written proposal outlining chosen topic, type of work to be done, a schedule of meetings and format and length of final written report to be prepared prior to registration for credit.


PATH 410. Aging and the Nervous System (1)
Lectures and discussion on aspects of neurobiology of aging in model systems; current research on Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and Huntington’s diseases.


PATH 412. Theories of Aging and Longevity (1)
Insight into current theories of aging of molecules, cells, extracellular elements and their relationship to lifespan in human beings and other vertebrates. Lecture/journal club format.


PATH 415. Cytoskeleton and Disease (1)
Discussion of recent papers that have added to knowledge of normal cytoskeletal functions and their alterations in disease.


PATH 416. Fundamental Immunology (4)
Introductory immunology providing an overview of the immune system, including activation, effector mechanisms, and regulation. Topics include antigen-antibody reactions, immunologically important cell surface receptors, cell-cell interactions, cell-mediated immunity, innate versus adaptive immunity, cytokines, and basic molecular biology and signal transduction in B and T lymphocytes, and immunopathology. Three weekly lectures emphasize experimental findings leading to the concepts of modern immunology. An additional recitation hour is required to integrate the core material with experimental data and known immune mediated diseases. Five mandatory 90 minute group problem sets per semester will be administered outside of lecture and recitation meeting times. Graduate students will be graded separately from undergraduates, and 22 percent of the grade will be based on a critical analysis of a recently published, landmark scientific article. Offered as BIOL 316, BIOL 416, CLBY 416, and PATH 416. Prereq: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.


PATH 417. Cytokines: Function, Structure, and Signaling (3)
Regulation of immune responses and differentiation of leukocytes is modulated by proteins (cytokines) secreted and/or expressed by both immune and non-immune cells. Course examines the function, expression, gene organization, structure, receptors, and intracellular signaling of cytokines. Topic include regulatory and inflammatory cytokines, colony stimulating factors, chemokines, cytokine and cytokine receptor gene families, intracellular signaling through STAT proteins and tyrosine phosphorylation, clinical potential, and genetic defects. Lecture format using texts, scientific reviews and research articles. Recommended preparation: PATH 416 or equivalent. Offered as BIOL 417, CLBY 417, and PATH 417.


PATH 419. Reproductive Immunology (3)
This will be a lecture and literature-based course that will include classic and recent publications. The course will cover subjects related to the cellular and molecular biology of fertilization and development of the placenta and fetus in humans and how this process is affected by the maternal immune system. Specific areas of discussion will include mechanisms by which the antigenically foreign placenta and fetus create an apparent state of maternal immune tolerance, the physiologic role of endogenous retroviruses in trophoblast differentiation, the participation of maternal and placental cytokines in pregnancy, the effects of maternal alloimmune and autoimmune responses on differentiation of the trophoblast and development of the placenta/fetus, the development and effects of fetal lymphocyte microchimerism in maternal tissues, and a variety of current controversies in Reproductive Immunology. Recommended preparation: PATH 416 or equivalent, or permission of the instructor.


PATH 420. The Rhetoric of Science (3)
In this course, we shall analyze both written and oral communication of scientific results in order to understand the principles of effective exposition. The students will be expected to attend selected seminars and to participate in writing and speaking exercises. The goal of the course is to improve the written and oral communication skills of the students. Instructor approval is required for registration. Recommended preparation: Completion of the first year of the Biomedical Scientist Training Program.


PATH 422. Molecular Genetics of Cancer (3)
Cancer is a genetic disease, not only in the Mendelian sense of inheritance, but also in the sense that it is caused by somatic mutation. The targets of mutation are a set of proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes whose products govern cellular proliferation, death and differentiation. The objectives of this course are to examine the types of genes that are the targets of mutational activation or inactivation and the mechanistic outcome of mutational changes that lead to oncogenesis. The course will also probe viral mechanisms of oncogenesis related to the products of cellular proto-oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes. In the course of these examinations we will explore the genetic and molecular genetic approaches used to identify and study oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Students should be prepared to present and discuss experimental design, data and conclusions from assigned publications. There will be no exams or papers but the course will end with a full-day, student-run symposium on topics to be decided jointly by students and instructors. Grades will be based on class participation and symposium presentation. Offered as BIOC 420, MBIO 420, MVIR 420, PATH 422, and PHRM 420. Prereq: CBIO 453 and CBIO 455.


PATH 425. Stem Cell Biology and Therapeutics (3)
This course is intended to teach current understanding of stem cells as it relates to their characterization, function, and physiologic and pathological states. The course will expose students to the current understanding of various types of stem cells, including embryonic and adult stem cells of various tissues, techniques for their isolation and study. Experimental models and potential biomedical therapeutic applications will be discussed. The course will be taught by the faculty of the “Center for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine” who are affiliated with multiple departments of Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland Clinic Foundation and the partnering biomedical companies. Offered as NEUR 425 and PATH 425.


PATH 430. Oxidative Stress and Disease Pathogenesis (1)
Oxidative stress and free radicals are implicated in a number of disease processes including aging, arthritis, emphysema, Alzheimer’s disease and cancer. Lecture course with discussion of recent studies concerning the formation and destructive mechanisms of free radicals in the context of various disease processes. Students read assigned papers and discuss these in class.


PATH 432. Biochemical and Molecular Aspects of Vision (3)
Increasingly, progress in the study of visual science is requiring multidisciplinary approaches that draw from the areas of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, neuroscience and pathology. We have recognized this fact and have adapted this course to fit the needs of tomorrow’s scientists. This course encompasses the basic science aspects of the eye. Subjects include retinal anatomy and function; biochemical, molecular aspects of retinal disease and cataract; cellular and molecular neuroscience aspects pertinent to the visual system. Offered as NEUR 432, PATH 432, and PHRM 432.


PATH 435. Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine (3)
This course will provide advanced coverage of tissue engineering with a focus on stem cell-based research and therapies. Course topics of note include stem cell biology and its role in development, modeling of stem cell function, controlling stem cell behavior by engineering materials and their microenvironment, stem cells’ trophic character, and state-of-the-art stem cell implementation in tissue engineering and other therapeutic strategies. Offered as EBME 425 and PATH 435. Prereq: EBME 325 or equivalent and graduate standing.


PATH 444. Neurodegenerative Diseases: Pathological, Cell. & Molecular Perspectives (3)
This course, taught by several faculty members, encompasses the full range of factors that contribute to the development of neurodegeneration. Subjects include pathological aspects, neurodegeneration, genetic aspects, protein conformation and cell biology in conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and prion diseases. Students read assigned primary literature and present and discuss these in class.


PATH 477. Cellular and Molecular Basis of Immune Dysfunction (3)
Lectures and student presentations focusing on immunologic mechanisms of tissue injury, disorders of the immune response and diseases of immunocompetent cells. Hypersensitivity, allergy, immune complex disease, immune deficiency, lymphoma and multiple myeloma discussed from chemical, cellular and physiological perspectives. Recommended preparation: PATH 416 or consent of instructor.


PATH 480. Logical Dissection of Biomedical Investigations (3)
Path 480 is an upper level graduate course encompassing discussion and critical appraisal of both published and pre-published research papers, book chapters, commentaries and review articles. Emphasis will be placed on evaluating the logical relationships connecting hypotheses to experimental design and experimental data to conclusions drawn. Thus, the course will aim to develop students’ capacities for independent thinking and critical analysis. Half of the course will be devoted to an analysis of fundamental conceptual issues pertaining to immunology, but this material will be applicable to a wide variety of fields. The other half of the course will be devoted to the analysis of papers that have been submitted for publication ( with the students acting as primary reviewers of these papers). Our expectation is that this course will have practical relevance for students by providing them with methods to review their own prepublication manuscripts and eliminate common errors. It should also give students the tools to question widely held beliefs in diverse biomedical fields. Recommended preparation is completion of the C3MB curriculum and 2nd year or higher graduate school training. Previous exposure to immunology and molecular biology will be helpful but not required.


PATH 481. Immunology of Infectious Diseases (3)
Lectures and discussion on the immune response to infectious organisms, including bacteria, viruses and parasites. Emphasis on human responses but includes discussions of animal models. Other topics include vaccines and infections in immuno-compromised hosts. Recommended preparation: PATH 416 or consent of instructor. Offered as MVIR 481 and PATH 481.


PATH 486. HIV Immunology (3)
This course will examine the unique immunology of HIV disease. The course content will include the study of HIV pathogenesis, immune control, immune dysfunctions, HIV prevention and immune restoration. Students will be expected to attend lectures and participate in class discussions. A strong emphasis will be placed on reviewing scientific literature. Students will be asked to help organize and to administer an HIV immunology journal club and will be asked to prepare a written proposal in the area of HIV immunology. Offered as PATH 486 and MBIO 486. Prereq: PATH 416 or permission from the instructor.


PATH 487. Cell Biology of the Nucleus (3)
Discussion of current cell biology research on the structure and functions of the nuclear envelope, the matrix and chromatin. Recommended preparation: CBIO 453 and CBIO 454 or consent of instructor. Offered as CLBY 487 and PATH 487.


PATH 488. Yeast Genetics and Cell Biology (3)
This seminar course provides an introduction to the genetics and molecular biology of the yeasts S. cerevisiae and S. pombe by a discussion of current literature focusing primarily on topics in yeast cell biology. Students are first introduced to the tools of molecular genetics and special features of yeasts that make them important model eukaryotic organisms. Some selected topics include cell polarity, cell cycle, secretory pathways, vesicular and nuclear/cytoplasmic transport, mitochondrial import and biogenesis, chromosome segregation, cytoskeleton, mating response and signal transduction. Offered as CLBY 488, GENE 488, MBIO 488, and PATH 488.


PATH 510. Basic Pathologic Mechanisms (4)
An interdisciplinary introduction to the fundamental principles of molecular and cellular biology as they relate to the pathologic basis of disease. Lectures, laboratories, conferences.


PATH 511. Experimental Pathology Seminar I (1)
Weekly discussions of current topics and research by students, staff and distinguished visitors.


PATH 512. Experimental Pathology Seminar II (1)
Weekly discussions of current topics and research by students, staff and distinguished visitors.


PATH 520. Basic Cancer Biology and the Interface with Clinical Oncology (3)
This is an introductory cancer biology course that is intended to give students a broad and basic overview of Cancer Biology and Clinical Oncology. The course will cover not only fundamental principles of cancer biology, but will also highlight advances in the pathobiology and therapeutics of cancer. Classes will be of lecture and discussion format, with emphasis on critically reading original journal articles. The specific topics presented will include carcinogenesis, oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, genetic epidemiology, DNA repair, growth factor action/signal transduction, apoptosis, cell cycle control, cell adhesion, angiogenesis, tumor cell heterogeneity, metastasis, chemotherapy, photodynamic therapy, gene therapy, signal transduction inhibitor therapy, chemoprevention, and clinical oncology of the breast, prostate, lymphatic tissue, colon and other related malignancies. Course grades will be from participation/discussion, presentation and mid-term/final exams. Recommended preparation: CBIO 453 and CBIO 455. Offered as PATH 520 and PHRM 520.


PATH 521. Special Topics in Cancer Biology and Clinical Oncology (1)
This one credit hour course in Cancer Biology is intended to give students an opportunity to do independent literature research while enrolled in PHRM 520/PATH 520. Students must attend weekly Hematology/Oncology seminar series and write a brief summary of each of the lectures attended. In addition, students must select one of the seminar topics to write a term paper which fully reviews the background related to the topic and scientific and clinical advances in that field. This term paper must also focus of Clinical Oncology, have a translational research component, and integrate with concepts learned in PHRM 520/PATH 520. Pharmacology students must provide a strong discussion on Therapeutics, while Pathology students must provide a strong component on Pathophysiology of the disease. Recommended preparation: CBIO 453 and CBIO 455, or concurrent enrollment in PHRM 520 or PATH 520. Offered as PATH 521 and PHRM 521.


PATH 523. Histopathology of Organ Systems (3)
Comprehensive course covering the underlying basic mechanisms of injury and cell death, inflammation, immunity, infection, and neoplasia followed by pathology of specific organ systems. Material will include histological (‘structure’) and physiological (‘function’) aspects related to pathology (human emphasis). Recommended preparation: ANAT 412 or permission of instructor. Offered as ANAT 523 and PATH 523.


PATH 525. Transport and Targeting of Macromolecules in Health and Disease (3)
Each class includes introductory lecture, followed by student participation in interactive discussion of 3 to 5 research publications. At the end of the course, the students are expected to submit a paper or a short research proposal on any of the topics discussed during the course. Recommended preparation: CBIO 453, CBIO 454, CBIO 455, and CBIO 456. Offered as CLBY 525 and PATH 525.


PATH 555. Emerging Concepts in Cell Regulation (3)
This course will cover the general principles of cell regulation with an emphasis on the emerging novel mechanisms of signal transduction. The traditional areas of receptor tyrosine kinases, G-protein coupled receptors will be examined but the focus will be on the roles novel mechanisms such as regulated proteolysis, ubiquitin proteasomal degradation, protein acetylation etc. in signal transduction and gene expression. This will be a literature-based course which will depend on critical evaluation of research papers, reviews and accompanied with in-depth discussion. Recommended preparation: CBIO 453. Offered as BIOC 555, CLBY 555, and PATH 555.


PATH 601. Special Problems (1 - 18)
Research on the nature and causation of disease and on host factors which tend to protect against disease. Special courses and tutorials in subspecialty areas of general and/or systemic anatomic and/or clinical pathology.


PATH 651. Thesis M.S. (1 - 18)


PATH 701. Dissertation Ph.D. (1 - 18)

Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.

 


Department of Pharmacology


Room W-357, School of Medicine
Phone 216-368-4617
http://pharmacology.case.edu/

 

The Department of Pharmacology offers training leading to M.S, Ph.D. or M.D./Ph.D. degrees for highly qualified post-undergraduate candidates committed to academic research careers in the biomedical sciences. Adequate preparation in the biological sciences, mathematics, organic chemistry, and physics or physical chemistry is a prerequisite for admission.


Multidisciplinary training, carried out by faculty in pharmacology and other basic science departments, emphasizes molecular, cellular, physiological, and clinical aspects of the pharmacological sciences. Areas of faculty expertise include drug/xenobiotic metabolism; receptor-ligand interactions, and biochemical reaction mechanisms; cell biology of signaling pathways; structure-function of membrane components; endocrine and metabolic regulation; cell surface and nuclear receptors, hormonal regulation of gene expression; cancer biology and therapeutics, bacterial and viral pathogenesis, neuroscience/neuropharmacology, and drug resistance.


Students seeking the Ph.D. degree are admitted directly into the Department of Pharmacology through the Molecular Therapeutics Training Program or through the Biomedical Sciences Training Program (BSTP, please see separate entry in this publication), each of which provides an introduction to many related training areas within the biomedical field during the first year.


The training program is divided into three phases. The first phase allows students to follow an integrated first-year sequence of course work that involves a core curriculum in cell and molecular biology. In addition, the first year includes three research rotations that allow the students to sample areas of research and become familiar with faculty members and their laboratories. Selection of a specific training program and thesis advisor is made before the end of the first year. The second phase involves a two part course in intensive Pharmacology study, oral presentations and laboratory experience, which cumulates in a comprehensive written exam designed to challenge students to apply key concepts in new context.


After advancing to Ph.D. candidacy by passing the comprehensive written exam, students select one of four advanced tracks in Pharmacology. Choice among the tracks is based on the area of research expertise of the thesis advisor and the student’s interest in specific coursework. The four tracks are: Cancer Therapeutics, Membrane Biology and Pharmacology, Molecular Pharmacology and Cell Regulation, and Translational Therapeutics.


The Ph.D. degree is awarded to students who complete a research project leading to two original and meritorious scientific contributions that are submitted for publication to leading journals in the field of study. At least one manuscript must be accepted for publication before scheduling the Ph.D. thesis defense.


Students who desire the combined M.D./Ph.D. degrees are admitted to the Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP, please see separate listing in this publication). These students participate in the two-year integrated preclinical curriculum of the School of Medicine (University Program), which features clinical correlation of basic biologic concepts. Combined degree students who select the Ph.D. in pharmacology undertake a series of advanced courses, research rotations, preliminary examinations and dissertation research in the same manner as that described above.


Although training efforts by the Department of Pharmacology are primarily directed toward the award of the Ph.D. degree, training for the M.S. degree is offered also in a variety of contexts. For example, research assistants in the Department who seek educational advancement may pursue the M.S. degree via Plan A (thesis) or Plan B (coursework only). Medical students who seek to specialize in Pharmacology during the scholarly research component of their preclinical program may pursue the M.S. degree. Employees in the Biotechnology Industry may seek advanced training in Pharmacology by pursuing the M.S. degree at Case. Finally, a Ph.D. candidate who is unable to complete the Ph.D. requirements for extraordinary reasons may petition to have earned credits transferred to fulfill M.S. degree requirements.


Facilities


The Department of Pharmacology occupies about 25,000 net square feet distributed among several locations, namely the Biomedical Research Building, the School of Medicine Harland Goff Wood Building and the adjacent Wood Research Tower. Facilities include extensive chromatographic and tissue culture facilities, a transgenic mouse laboratory, imaging and confocal microscopy equipment, and ready access to specialized research techniques, including various aspects of recombinant DNA and hybridoma technology, in situ hybridization histochemistry, fluorescence cell sorting, NMR and mass spectroscopy, and X-ray crystallography.


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (PHRM)


PHRM 301. Undergraduate Research (1 - 18)


PHRM 340. Science and Society Through Literature (3)

This course will examine the interaction of scientific investigation and discovery with the society it occurred in. What is the effect of science on society and, as importantly, what is the effect of society on science? An introduction will consider the heliocentric controversy with focus on Galileo. Two broad areas, tuberculosis and the Frankenstein myth, will then be discussed covering the period 1800-present. With tuberculosis, fiction, art and music will be examined to understand the changing views of society towards the disease, how society’s perception of tuberculosis victims changed, and how this influenced their treatments and research. With Frankenstein, the original novel in its historical context will be examined. Using fiction and film, the transformation of the original story into myth with different connotations and implications will be discussed. Most classes will be extensive discussions coupled with student presentations of assigned materials. Offered as PHRM 340, BETH 440, PHRM 440, and HSTY 440.


PHRM 400. Research Experience in Pharmacology (0 - 1)
Research rotation in pharmacology.


PHRM 401. Principles of Pharmacology I (3)
This course focuses on human physiology of organ systems that are involved in determining the time course of drug action in vivo (pharmacokinetics). Emphasis will be placed on fundamental principles of pharmacokinetics, including the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of drugs. Mathematical concepts needed to understand appropriate administration of drugs and maintaining therapeutic concentrations of drugs in the body will be discussed. A second broad area of emphasis is on fundamental principles of drug action within the body (pharmacodynamics), including drug-receptor theory, log dose-response relationships, therapeutic index, receptor turnover, and signal transduction mechanisms. This is a highly interactive course in which faculty lectures are minimized and student-directed learning in emphasized. An animal laboratory explores the actions of cardiovascular drugs in an in vivo setting. This 3-credit hour course meets 6 hours per week during the first half of the Spring semester (January through mid-February).


PHRM 402. Principles of Pharmacology II: The Molecular Basis of Therapeutics (3)
This course focuses on the chemical and biochemical properties of therapeutic agents, molecular mechanisms of therapeutic action including kinetic and thermodynamic principles of enzyme catalysis and drug-receptor interactions, signal transduction, the genetic basis of disease states, and interindividual variation in response to drugs. The primary learning objective is to develop a self-directed, critical approach to the evaluation and design of experimental research in the broad context of specific diseases. This is a team-taught course involving focal lectures by faculty followed by student-directed learning experiences including discussion, problem solving applications, and primary literature presentations. A laboratory exercise introduces experimental methodologies widely applied during the study of molecular interactions between therapeutic agents and receptor targets to reinforce fundamental principles of molecular drug action. This 3 credit hour course meets 6 hours per week mid-February through April.


PHRM 403. Public and Professional Views of Modern Therapeutics (3)
This course will present the students with headline news stories from the popular press along with pertinent published articles from the scientific literature. The object is to engage the students in critical evaluation of the scientific literature and news reports to discern the scientific basis for decisions such as removal of drugs from the market. The course will focus on topics such as Cox-2 Inhibitors and Heart Disease, Antidepressant Use for Adolescents, and Parkinson’s Disease and Stem Cell Therapy, among others. Evaluation will be based on participation in student-led discussion sessions, weekly topical quizzes, and on written critiques of the primary literature.


PHRM 412. Membrane Transport Processes (3)
Membranes and membrane transporters are absolutely required for all cells to take up nutrient, maintain membrane potential and efflux toxins. This course will consider the classification and structure of membrane transport proteins and channels, examine the common mechanistic features of all systems and the specific features of different classes of transporter. Understanding the physiological integration of transport processes into cell homeostasis and consideration of transporters and channels as drug targets will be a goal. Course format is minimal lecture, primarily student presentations of primary literature papers. Offered as PHOL 412, PHRM 412. Prereq: CBIO 453 and CBIO 455.


PHRM 420. Molecular Genetics of Cancer (3)
Cancer is a genetic disease, not only in the Mendelian sense of inheritance, but also in the sense that it is caused by somatic mutation. The targets of mutation are a set of proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes whose products govern cellular proliferation, death and differentiation. The objectives of this course are to examine the types of genes that are the targets of mutational activation or inactivation and the mechanistic outcome of mutational changes that lead to oncogenesis. The course will also probe viral mechanisms of oncogenesis related to the products of cellular proto-oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes. In the course of these examinations we will explore the genetic and molecular genetic approaches used to identify and study oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Students should be prepared to present and discuss experimental design, data and conclusions from assigned publications. There will be no exams or papers but the course will end with a full-day, student-run symposium on topics to be decided jointly by students and instructors. Grades will be based on class participation and symposium presentation. Offered as BIOC 420, MBIO 420, MVIR 420, PATH 422, and PHRM 420. Prereq: CBIO 453 and CBIO 455.


PHRM 430. Advanced Methods in Structural Biology (3)
Provides students with an in-depth introduction to biophysical techniques used to quantify macromolecular structures. A major part of the course will deal with the use of nuclear magnetic resonance to derive a 3-D structures of macromolecules in solution. Other topics include electron spin resonance, absorption, fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopies, Raman and infrared spectroscopies and methods used in modeling. Offered with BIOC 431, “Advanced Methods Biology II” in alternate years. BIOC 430 deals with protein hydrodynamics and thermodynamics, crystallography, and mass spectrometry. The course will be mostly lecture based. This course will provide an extensive overview for graduate students specializing in structural biology. Offered as BIOC 430, CHEM 430, PHOL 430 and PHRM 430.


PHRM 432. Biochemical and Molecular Aspects of Vision (3)
Increasingly, progress in the study of visual science is requiring multidisciplinary approaches that draw from the areas of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, neuroscience and pathology. We have recognized this fact and have adapted this course to fit the needs of tomorrow’s scientists. This course encompasses the basic science aspects of the eye. Subjects include retinal anatomy and function; biochemical, molecular aspects of retinal disease and cataract; cellular and molecular neuroscience aspects pertinent to the visual system. Offered as NEUR 432, PATH 432, and PHRM 432.


PHRM 434. Mechanisms of Drug Resistance (3)
Resistance to drugs is an important health concern in the new millennium. Over the past century, modern medicine has developed and prescribed drugs for various ailments and diseases with known therapeutic benefit. Since the discovery of antibiotics by Dr. Fleming, we have struggled with a new complication in infectious diseases, development of drug resistance. This course will focus on and compare the drug resistant mechanisms selected by viruses, bacteria, parasites, fungi, and tumor cells. Topics to be covered include antiretroviral resistance (e.g., AZT and protease inhibitors), antibiotic resistance (e.g., B-lactams), resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, and resistance to anti-malarial drugs (e.g., chloroquinone). Offered as MBIO 434, MVIR 434, and PHRM 434.


PHRM 440. Science and Society Through Literature (3)
This course will examine the interaction of scientific investigation and discovery with the society it occurred in. What is the effect of science on society and, as importantly, what is the effect of society on science? An introduction will consider the heliocentric controversy with focus on Galileo. Two broad areas, tuberculosis and the Frankenstein myth, will then be discussed covering the period 1800-present. With tuberculosis, fiction, art and music will be examined to understand the changing views of society towards the disease, how society’s perception of tuberculosis victims changed, and how this influenced their treatments and research. With Frankenstein, the original novel in its historical context will be examined. Using fiction and film, the transformation of the original story into myth with different connotations and implications will be discussed. Most classes will be extensive discussions coupled with student presentations of assigned materials. Offered as PHRM 340, BETH 440, PHRM 440, and HSTY 440.


PHRM 466. Cell Signaling (3)
This is an advanced lecture/journal/discussion format course that covers cell signaling mechanisms. Included are discussions of neurotransmitter-gated ion channels, growth factor receptor kinases, cytokine receptors, G protein-coupled receptors, steroid receptors, heterotrimeric G proteins, ras family GTPases, second messenger cascades, protein kinase cascades, second messenger regulation of transcription factors, microtubule-based motility, actin/myosin-based motility, signals for regulation of cell cycle, signals for regulation of apoptosis. Offered as CLBY 466 and PHOL 466 and PHRM 466.


PHRM 475. Protein Biophysics (3)
This course focuses on in-depth understanding of the molecular biophysics of proteins. Structural, thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of protein function and structure-function relationships will be considered at the advanced conceptual level. The application of these theoretical frameworks will be illustrated with examples from the literature and integration of biophysical knowledge with description at the cellular and systems level. The format consists of lectures, problem sets, and student presentations. A special emphasis will be placed on discussion of original publications. Offered as BIOC 475, CHEM 475, PHOL 475, PHRM 475, and NEUR 475.


PHRM 476. Cellular Biophysics (4)
This course focuses on a quantitative understanding of cellular processes. It is designed for students who feel comfortable with and are interested in analytical and quantitative approaches to cell biology and cell physiology. Selected topics in cellular biophysics will be covered in depth. Topics include theory of electrical and optical signal processing used in cell physiology, thermodynamics and kinetics of enzyme and transport reactions, single ion channel kinetics and excitability, mechanotransduction, and transport across polarized cell layers. The format consists of lectures, problem sets, computer simulations, and discussion of original publications. The relevant biological background of topics will be provided appropriate for non-biology science majors. Offered as BIOC 476, NEUR 477, PHOL 476, PHRM 476.


PHRM 506. Central Nervous System Pharmacology (3)
Principles of neurotransmission in the central nervous system: the pharmacology of drug-induced alterations in these central systems and neurochemical basis of behavior and selected neurological and psychiatric diseases. Lecture seminar.


PHRM 511. Pharmacology Seminar Series (0 - 1)
Current topics of interest in the pharmacologist sciences.


PHRM 513. Structural Journal Club (1)
Current topics of interest in structural biology, and protein biophysics. Offered as PHOL 513 and PHRM 513.


PHRM 515. Endocrine Pharmacology (3)
Seminar lecture course on regulation at the molecular level of selected interrelated endocrine systems. Offered as BIOC 515 and PHRM 515.


PHRM 520. Basic Cancer Biology and the Interface with Clinical Oncology (3)
This is an introductory cancer biology course that is intended to give students a broad and basic overview of Cancer Biology and Clinical Oncology. The course will cover not only fundamental principles of cancer biology, but will also highlight advances in the pathobiology and therapeutics of cancer. Classes will be of lecture and discussion format, with emphasis on critically reading original journal articles. The specific topics presented will include carcinogenesis, oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, genetic epidemiology, DNA repair, growth factor action/signal transduction, apoptosis, cell cycle control, cell adhesion, angiogenesis, tumor cell heterogeneity, metastasis, chemotherapy, photodynamic therapy, gene therapy, signal transduction inhibitor therapy, chemoprevention, and clinical oncology of the breast, prostate, lymphatic tissue, colon and other related malignancies. Course grades will be from participation/discussion, presentation and mid-term/final exams. Recommended preparation: CBIO 453 and CBIO 455. Offered as PATH 520 and PHRM 520.


PHRM 521. Special Topics in Cancer Biology and Clinical Oncology (1)
This one credit hour course in Cancer Biology is intended to give students an opportunity to do independent literature research while enrolled in PHRM 520/PATH 520. Students must attend weekly Hematology/Oncology seminar series and write a brief summary of each of the lectures attended. In addition, students must select one of the seminar topics to write a term paper which fully reviews the background related to the topic and scientific and clinical advances in that field. This term paper must also focus of Clinical Oncology, have a translational research component, and integrate with concepts learned in PHRM 520/PATH 520. Pharmacology students must provide a strong discussion on Therapeutics, while Pathology students must provide a strong component on Pathophysiology of the disease. Recommended preparation: CBIO 453 and CBIO 455, or concurrent enrollment in PHRM 520 or PATH 520. Offered as PATH 521 and PHRM 521.


PHRM 525. Topics in Cell and Molecular Pharmacology (0 - 18)
Individual library research project under the guidance of a pharmacology sponsor. Projects will reflect the research interest of the faculty sponsor, including molecular endocrinology, neuropharmacology, receptor activation and signal transduction, molecular mechanisms of enzyme action and metabolic regulation.


PHRM 527. Pathways to Personalized Medicine (3)
This is a course of independent study designed to take the student from the bedside to the bench and back again. Students will select a problem from a list of important therapeutic issues related to variability in drug responsiveness and design a research program to leucidate its molecular, biochemical, genetic and pathophysiological basis. The resulting research proposal is expected to be multidimensional and include molecular, cellular, whole animal and clinical investigations. To guide the process students will assemble a mentoring group including at least one member of the Translational Therapeutics Track Faculty, a clinician working in the clinical realm in which the problem originates and a basic scientist with relevant experience. The written proposal will be defended orally. Recommended preparation: 1st year Pharm Graduate required courses.


PHRM 528. Classic and Contemporary Approaches to Drug Discovery (3)
This course will provide the student with a deeper understanding of the mechanism of drug action and target validation. The first portion of the course will describe the basis for classical approaches in drug discovery that include kinetic and thermodynamic analyses for small molecule interactions with enzymes and receptors. The second portion of the course will describe new technologies and agents such as interference RNA and peptoids as therapeutic agents. The final section will describe pre-clinical and clinical trials as well as practical issues for start-up companies and licensing agreements.


PHRM 555. Current Proteomics (3)
This course is designed for graduate students across the university who wish to acquire a better understanding of fundamental concepts of proteomics and hands-on experience with techniques used in current proteomics. Lectures will cover protein/peptide separation techniques, protein mass spectrometry, bioinformatics tools, and biological applications which include quantitative proteomics, protein modification proteomics, interaction proteomics, structural genomics and structural proteomics. Laboratory portion will involve practice on the separation of proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, molecular weight measurement of proteins by mass spectrometry, peptide structural characterization by tandem mass spectrometry and protein identification using computational tools. The instructors’ research topics will also be discussed. Recommended preparation: CBIO 453 and CBIO 455.


PHRM 601. Independent Study and Research (1 - 18)


PHRM 651. Thesis M.S. (1 - 18)


PHRM 701. Dissertation Ph.D. (1 - 18)
Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.

 


Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation


Phone 216-778-3205
Gary S. Clark, M.D., C.P.E.
Professor, Chair, and
Residency Program Director

 

Physical medicine and rehabilitation (P M & R) is a medical specialty devoted to restoring people’s maximal functional ability following a wide variety of disabling medical conditions, from traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury to acute and chronic back or knee pain. In 1995, the Center for Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation was created to coordinate and expand the research and training activities of the medical school that are devoted to the rehabilitation of people with disabling conditions and injuries. In 2002, a full academic department was established in recognition of the significant growth in the scope of education and research in the field.
The goals of the department:

  1. To foster high-quality, innovative research that concerns impairments, disabilities and handicaps resulting from illness, injury and developmental processes and that focuses on health-related improvement (physical, cognitive, behavioral and social) in human functioning and quality of life.
  2. To promote and conduct effective teaching and training of principles and methods for rehabilitation of people with disabling chronic conditions and injuries at the undergraduate, graduate and post-graduate levels of medical education.
  3. To enhance the quality and access to physical medicine and rehabilitation clinical services at university-affiliated medical centers.
  4. To foster collaborative rehabilitation training and research among clinicians and basic scientists from a wide range of disciplines within the university.

The department’s faculty includes physicians and psychologists with varied backgrounds who have a broad array of clinical and research interests. Current areas of research focus include 1) enhancing motor recovery and functional ability following paralysis from spinal cord injury, brain injury and stroke; 2) improving methods for managing bladder and bowel dysfunction following spinal cord injury; and 3) outcomes research related to health and human functioning, from specific functional abilities that can be enhanced by individual therapy methods to the cost-benefit of integrated trauma and rehabilitation care systems. Many opportunities are available for physicians, graduate students and allied health trainees to gain knowledge and skills related to clinical rehabilitation and/or related research areas.

 


Department of Physiology and Biophysics


Room E-541, School of Medicine
Phone 216-368-5529
http://physiology.case.edu/


GRADUATE PROGRAMS


The Department of Physiology and Biophysics at Case is a multidisciplinary department ranked among the top in the country. The department includes 60 active faculty members, more than 100 post-doctoral associates, and sixty, full-time Ph.D., M.D./Ph.D., and Master of Science degree students. The training programs are designed to provide a mentored training environment that maximizes faculty-student interaction.
As outlined below, the department offers Ph.D., M.D./Ph.D. and Master of Science degrees. These programs are tailored to prepare students for successful careers in biomedical, pharmaceutical and industrial research. The department offers multiple graduate-level programs, each of which uses state-of-the-art molecular, cell biology, and biophysical approaches to study physiological questions at a variety of different organizational levels. The goal is to provide an outstanding training opportunity. The major goals of the Ph.D. programs are to provide students with a broad knowledge base in organ systems and integrated physiology and in-depth expertise and outstanding research potential in the fields of cellular and molecular physiology and molecular and cellular biophysics. These goals are accomplished using a series of foundation and advanced topic courses, skill development courses, laboratory rotations and thesis research.


ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PH.D. PROGRAMS


Applications to the program are available from and should be submitted to the Department of Physiology and Biophysics. Typically, entering students will have a B.A., B.S. or M.Sc. degree in physical or life sciences. Requirements for admission:

Status of admission to the program is determined by a committee of faculty members based on application information and (often) candidate interviews. Normally, students enter the program in the fall semester.


Students apply for financial assistance when they apply to the program. A majority of admitted students receive cost-of-living stipend support, health insurance and full tuition remission for the duration of their studies in the program.


PH.D. AND M.S. PROGRAMS


New students are advised and mentored by the Physiology Graduate Education Committee until they pass their Ph.D. qualifying exam (usually at the end of their second fall semester). After passing the qualifying exam, the student initiates thesis research under the direction of a specific mentor. Progress is then monitored by a graduate thesis committee.


The program of study consists of a core of courses that are completed during the first year. In addition, the students participate in three laboratory rotations by the end of their first full year of study. These rotations enable the student to sample the diverse research areas represented in the program and assist the student in making a well-informed choice of a thesis laboratory. Students also are required to attend the seminar series of either or both of the sponsoring departments throughout the duration of their studies, to gain wide exposure to cutting-edge research.


Elective courses provide an opportunity for advanced study relevant to the student’s particular research interest.
Near the beginning of their second year of study, students in good standing (>3.1 G.P.A. and a maximum of 1 “C”) choose their research preceptor and take their Ph.D. qualifying exam, a written/oral exam. The written segment involves preparing a qualifying exam research proposal, the topic for which is chosen from several provided by the faculty. The oral exam tests the student on general course knowledge, understanding of laboratory rotation research, and a defense of the qualifying exam research grant.


Following satisfactory completion of the qualifying exam, the student and research advisor submit a list of four to six faculty to serve on the student’s thesis committee. This list is submitted to the director of graduate education for approval/revision in consultation with the Committee on Graduate Education. The research progress of the student is then overseen by this committee through a series of periodic progress report meetings.
Specific requirements for graduation include satisfactory general knowledge in cell and molecular biology, and molecular/cellular biophysics, specific expertise in the student’s chosen area of research, completion of the thesis dissertation, and completion and acceptance of two first authored manuscripts in an excellent to outstanding peer-reviewed scientific journal.


Ph.D. in Cell and Molecular Physiology
This program is designed to provide students with training in state-of-the-art molecular and cellular technologies including gene cloning, transgenic methodology, and advanced microscopy. Research programs within the department span diverse fields focusing on fundamental cell and molecular biological questions in the context of normal cell physiology and pathology of disease states.


Ph.D. in Molecular and Cellular Biophysics
This program emphasizes quantitative methods and equips students to study cell and protein structure and function using state-of-the-art instrumentation and computing.The Department hosts outstanding research programs in the areas of structural biology and on cellular ion channels and ion transporters.


Ph.D. in Systems and Integrated Physiology
This program focuses on studies of the response of cells and organs in the whole-body environment. Researchers apply state-of-the-art methodologies to study cardiovascular, neuronal, gastrointestinal, renal, integumental, immune biology. The program supports a thriving graduate training program designed to train the next generation of systems biologists.


Ph.D. for M.D.s
To address the need to train M.D.-scientists, the Department of Physiology and Biophysics has instituted an accelerated Ph.D. program specifically geared to physicians interested in research. The key features of the program are its selectivity in terms of admissions qualifications—it is open only to those holding medical degrees—and its accelerated nature based on accelerated course learning and research training. The program is subdivided into advanced specialty courses (cell physiology electives) and hands-on research training and problem-solving (laboratory rotations, departmental seminars, qualifying examination, and thesis research). All students enrolled in the program must fulfill the general academic regulations for doctoral degrees as set forth by the School of Graduate Studies. Application is open to any individual holding a medical degree or expecting to receive one before entry into the program. Selection for admission is based on the applicant’s potential for independent and innovative research as evidenced by an outstanding academic record in basic science disciplines, previous research experience, and three letters of recommendation. The full-time plan of study consists of a minimum of 22 semester hours of course work and 18 semester hours of thesis research. The program can be linked to research-oriented residency programs such as the Clinical Investigator Pathway, approved by the American Board of Internal Medicine, and similar programs in pediatrics and surgery.


M.D./Ph.D.
This program consists of the core medical training in the Case School of Medicine with advanced graduate research training in any of the disciplines outlined above, leading to a combined M.D./Ph.D. degree. The program consists of the core medical training plus advanced graduate courses during the first two to three years, and finally clinical training leading to the M.D. degree. The combined degree program strives to optimize coursework and research experience for future physicians interested in medical research and academic careers.


Master of Science in Physiology
This program offers an excellent foundation for future careers in biomedical professions, academic or pharmaceutical research, by providing cell, molecular, and systems levels coursework and research experience. The program includes one year of advanced coursework and hands-on laboratory experience, followed by a year of intensive laboratory investigation in a mentored environment. Students help choose their own research focus from a wide array of research areas represented within the Department. The program also is intended to serve as a stepping-stone for individuals seeking preparation for entry into Ph.D. or M.D. programs.


Program of Study for Ph.D. in Cell and Molecular Physiology

 

FIRST YEAR FALL

 

COURSE (CREDIT HOURS)

FIRST YEAR SPRING

Program of Study for Ph.D. in Molecular and Cellular Biophysics


FIRST YEAR FALL


COURSE (CREDIT HOURS)

FIRST YEAR SPRING

Program of Study for Ph.D. in Systems and Integrated Physiology


FIRST YEAR FALL


COURSE (CREDIT HOURS)

FIRST YEAR SPRING

Program of Study for Master of Science in Physiology


YEAR 1 FALL:


COURSE (CREDIT HOURS)

YEAR 1 SPRING:


COURSE (CREDIT HOURS)

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (PHOL)


PHOL 351. Independent Study (1 - 6)
This course is a guided program of study in physiology textbooks, reviews, and original articles. Guided laboratory projects to reproduce and extend classical physiological experiments are offered to the undergraduate science major. This course is being offered in conjunction with the Graduate level course PHOL 451. Students are required to consult with the faculty member whose work they have interest in and plan their individual experience.


PHOL 398. Physiology and Biophysics Departmental Seminar (1)
Weekly one-hour reviews from invited speakers describing their research. Students will present literature reviews or summaries of their research.


PHOL 412. Membrane Transport Processes (3)
Membranes and membrane transporters are absolutely required for all cells to take up nutrient, maintain membrane potential and efflux toxins. This course will consider the classification and structure of membrane transport proteins and channels, examine the common mechanistic features of all systems and the specific features of different classes of transporter. Understanding the physiological integration of transport processes into cell homeostasis and consideration of transporters and channels as drug targets will be a goal. Course format is minimal lecture, primarily student presentations of primary literature papers. Offered as PHOL 412, PHRM 412.


PHOL 419. Applied Probability and Stochastic Processes for Biology (3)
Applications of probability and stochastic processes to biological systems. Mathematical topics will include: introduction to discrete and continuous probability spaces (including numerical generation of pseudo random samples from specified probability distributions), Markov processes in discrete and continuous time with discrete and continuous sample spaces, point processes including homogeneous and inhomogeneous Poisson processes and Markov chains on graphs, and diffusion processes including Brownian motion and the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. Biological topics will be determined by the interests of the students and the instructor. Likely topics include: stochastic ion channels, molecular motors and stochastic ratchets, actin and tubulin polymerization, random walk models for neural spike trains, bacterial chemotaxis, signaling and genetic regulatory networks, and stochastic predator-prey dynamics. The emphasis will be on practical simulation and analysis of stochastic phenomena in biological systems. Numerical methods will be developed using both MATLAB and the R statistical package. Student projects will comprise a major part of the course. Offered as BIOL 319, EECS 319, MATH 319, BIOL 419, EBME 419, and PHOL 419.


PHOL 430. Advanced Methods in Structural Biology (3)
Provides students with an in-depth introduction to biophysical techniques used to quantify macromolecular structures. A major part of the course will deal with the use of nuclear magnetic resonance to derive a 3-D structures of macromolecules in solution. Other topics include electron spin resonance, absorption, fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopies, Raman and infrared spectroscopies and methods used in modeling. Offered with BIOC 431, “Advanced Methods Biology II” in alternate years. BIOC 430 deals with protein hydrodynamics and thermodynamics, crystallography, and mass spectrometry. The course will be mostly lecture based. This course will provide an extensive overview for graduate students specializing in structural biology. Offered as BIOC 430, CHEM 430, PHOL 430 and PHRM 430.


PHOL 432. Cell Structure and Function (3)
This course provides knowledge regarding cell structure and function, chiefly in mammalian cells but also in relevant model systems. The basic structure of the cell is discussed, as are various systems that regulate this structure. Topics to be covered include DNA transcription, translation and protein synthesis, intracellular transport, cell interaction with the external environment, cell cycle regulation, cell death and differentiation, signal transduction, and cell specialization and organization into tissues. The course emphasizes lectures and problem-based discussions with an emphasis on faculty-directed student self-learning. The major goals of this course are to provide students with a working knowledge of the cell to facilitate understanding of the scientific literature, and to familiarize students with current techniques in cell biology.


PHOL 451. Independent Study (1 - 18)
Guided program of study using physiology textbooks, research reviews, and original research articles. An independent laboratory research project may also be included.


PHOL 456. Proteins and Nucleic Acids (3)
The goal of this course is to provide a basic working knowledge of protein structure/function and molecular biology. The course begins with a discussion of protein structure and enzyme catalysis followed by protein purification and characterization. The course then addresses concepts relating to the application of modern molecular biology techniques. Students are taught how to clone genes and use these clones in animal and cell-based studies. The overall goal is to provide students with an understanding of proteins and genetic approaches that can be used in experimental work and to facilitate comprehension of the scientific literature. Offered as BIOL 457 and PHOL 456.


PHOL 466. Cell Signaling (3)
This is an advanced lecture/journal/discussion format course that covers cell signaling mechanisms. Included are discussions of neurotransmitter-gated ion channels, growth factor receptor kinases, cytokine receptors, G protein-coupled receptors, steroid receptors, heterotrimeric G proteins, ras family GTPases, second messenger cascades, protein kinase cascades, second messenger regulation of transcription factors, microtubule-based motility, actin/myosin-based motility, signals for regulation of cell cycle, signals for regulation of apoptosis. Offered as CLBY 466 and PHOL 466 and PHRM 466.


PHOL 468. Membrane Physiology (3)
This student-guided discussion/journal course focuses on biological membranes. Topics discussed include thermodynamics and kinetics of membrane transport, oxidative phosphorylation and bioenergetics, electro-physiology of excitable membranes, and whole and single channel electrophysiology, homeostasis and pH regulation, volume and calcium regulation. Offered as CLBY 468 and PHOL 468.


PHOL 475. Protein Biophysics (3)
This course focuses on in-depth understanding of the molecular biophysics of proteins. Structural, thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of protein function and structure-function relationships will be considered at the advanced conceptual level. The application of these theoretical frameworks will be illustrated with examples from the literature and integration of biophysical knowledge with description at the cellular and systems level. The format consists of lectures, problem sets, and student presentations. A special emphasis will be placed on discussion of original publications. Offered as BIOC 475, CHEM 475, PHOL 475, PHRM 475, and NEUR 475.


PHOL 476. Cellular Biophysics (4)
This course focuses on a quantitative understanding of cellular processes. It is designed for students who feel comfortable with and are interested in analytical and quantitative approaches to cell biology and cell physiology. Selected topics in cellular biophysics will be covered in depth. Topics include theory of electrical and optical signal processing used in cell physiology, thermodynamics and kinetics of enzyme and transport reactions, single ion channel kinetics and excitability, mechanotransduction, and transport across polarized cell layers. The format consists of lectures, problem sets, computer simulations, and discussion of original publications. The relevant biological background of topics will be provided appropriate for non-biology science majors. Offered as BIOC 476, NEUR 477, PHOL 476, PHRM 476.


PHOL 480. Physiology of Organ Systems (3)
This course presents an advanced introduction to the fundamental physiological principles governing the major organ systems in mammals. The function of the nervous, endocrine, digestive, muscle, circulatory, respiratory, and urinary systems are discussed. At the conclusion of the semester, integrative aspects of the major organ systems will be illustrated through consideration of exercise and high altitude physiology. Offered as BIOL 480 and PHOL 480.


PHOL 498. Physiology and Biophysics Departmental Seminar (1)
Weekly one-hour reviews by invited speakers of their research. Students present literature reviews or summaries of their research.


PHOL 505. Laboratory Research Rotation (3)
One-semester experience in a selected faculty research laboratory designed to introduce the student to all aspects of modern laboratory research including the design, execution and analysis of original experimental work. Recommended preparation: Consent of instructor and scheduled laboratory.


PHOL 512. Skeletal Biology (3)
This is an advanced graduate level course for students interested in the morphogenesis, structure, function, and maintenance of the skeletal system taught jointly by faculty from Case Western Reserve University (CWRU), Cleveland Clinic Foundation (CCF), and the Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine (NEOUCOM). It will meet twice per week for 90 minutes per session. The format will include an overview of the topic by the responsible faculty, followed by a discussion of important papers on the topic. The students will be expected to discuss the papers for each session and grading will be based on those discussions. The intent of the course is to enable students to understand the important problems in skeletal biology and both classical and modern approaches for solving them.


PHOL 513. Structural Journal Club (1)
Current topics of interest in structural biology, and protein biophysics. Offered as PHOL 513 and PHRM 513.


PHOL 514. Cardiovascular Physiology (3)
The goal of this course is to provide the student with a solid foundation in cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology. The course will begin by providing a solid foundation in the structure, phenotype and function of cardiac and vascular muscle. In addition, electrophysiology and metabolism will be addressed. Both basic physiology and more advanced topics, such as pathophysiology, will be covered using a journal club format. (Twice weekly; 1.5hrs/class.) Student participation is required.


PHOL 519. Cardio-Respiratory Physiology (3)
This course is designed to integrate systemic, cellular and molecular aspects of cardio-respiratory systems in physiological and pathophysiological states. The course requires prior knowledge of basic physiology of the cardiovascular systems. Extensive student participation is required. Instructors provide a brief overview of the topic followed by presentation and critical appraisal of recent scientific literature by students.


PHOL 522. Special Topics in Cardiac Electrophysiology (3)
Introduction to current topics in cellular cardiac electrophysiology and cardiac ion channel structure, function, and regulation. The format includes informal lectures as well as student presentations and class discussion of current literature.


PHOL 530. Technology in Physiological Sciences (3)
This lecture/discussion/journal course focuses on techniques in the physiological sciences. Topics include spectroscopy, microscopy, and electrophysiology. The theory and practice are covered with an emphasis on examples taken from the scientific literature.


PHOL 537. Microscopy-Principles and Applications (3)
This course provides an introduction to various types of light microscopy, digital and video imaging techniques, and their applications to biological and biomedical sciences via lectures and hands-on experience. Topics covered include geometrical and physical optics; brightfield, darkfield, phase contrast, DIC, fluorescence and confocal microscopes; and digital image processing. Offered as GENE 537, MBIO 537, and PHOL 537.


PHOL 601. Research (1 - 18)
Cellular physiology laboratory research activities that are based on faculty and student interests.


PHOL 610. Oxygen and Physiological Function (3)
Lecture/discussion course which explores the significance and consequences of oxygen and oxygen metabolism in living organisms. Topics to be covered include oxygen transport by blood tissues, oxygen toxicity, and mitochondrial metabolism. Emphasis will be placed on mammalian physiology with special reference to brain oxidative metabolism and blood flow as well as whole body energy expenditure and oxidative stress related to disease. Offered as ANAT 610 and PHOL 610.


PHOL 651. Thesis M.S. (1 - 18)


PHOL 701. Dissertation Ph.D. (1 - 18)

Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.