ed from basic studies of mechanics of skeletal tissues and skeletal structures, experimental investigation of prosthetic joints and implants, measurement of musculoskeletal motion and forces, and theoretical modeling of mechanics of musculoskeletal systems. Many studies are collaborative, combining the forces of engineering, biology, biochemistry, and surgery. The Biomechanics Test labs include Instron mechanical test machines with simultaneous axial and torsional loading capabilities, a non-contacting video extensometer for evaluation of biological materials and engineering polymers used in joint replacements, acoustic emission hardware and software, and specialized test apparatus for analysis of joint kinematics. The Bio-imaging Laboratory includes microscopes and three-dimensional imaging equipment for evaluating tissue microstructure and workstations for three-dimensional visualization, measurement and finite element modeling. An Orthopaedic Implant Retrieval Analysis lab has resources for characterization and analysis of hard tissues and engineering polymers, as well as resources to maintain a growing collection of retrieved total hip and total knee replacements that are available for the study of implant design. The Soft Tissue Biomechanics lab includes several standard and special test machines. Instrumentation and a Histology facilities support the activities within the Musculoskeletal Mechanics and Materials Laboratories.


National Center for Space Exploration Research


The National Center for Space Exploration Research (NCSER) is a collaborative effort between the Universities Space Research Association (USRA), Case Western Reserve University (CWRU), and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) that provides GRC with specialized research and technology development capabilities essential to sustaining its leadership role in NASA missions. Expertise resident at NCSER includes reduced gravity fluid mechanics, reduced gravity combustion processes; heat transfer, two-phase flow, micro-fluidics, and phase change processes; computational multiphase fluid dynamics, heat and mass transfer, computational simulation of physico-chemical fluid processes and human physiological systems. This expertise has been applied to:

nanoEngineering Laboratory


The nanoEngineering Laboratory focuses on research related to various nanotechnology applications with particular emphasis on energy conversion, generation and storage in nanostructured and bio-inspired materials. Synthesis of polymer-based nanocomposites, nanofluids and individual nanostructures is accomplished with tools available in the laboratory. Furthermore, the laboratory houses various pieces of equipment for thermal and electrical characterization of these materials. Research projects include investigation of nanocomposites for thermoelectric devices, molecular simulation of thermal transport across interfacial regions, characterization of nanomaterials for thermal management as well as thermal insulation applications, and biomimetic research on a protein-based shark gel.


Other Experimental Facilities


The department facilities also include several specialized laboratories.


The GM Engines Laboratory is a modern facility for measuring the dynamic performance of internal combustion engines while monitoring behavioral parameters such as pressures, temperatures and exhaust emissions. The test cells can be operated completely by remote control with all data collected by digital computers.
Engineering Services Fabrication Center offers complete support to assist projects from design inception to completion of fabrication. Knowledgeable staff is available to assist Faculty, Staff, Students, Researchers, and personnel associated with Case Western Reserve University.


The Harry A. Metcalf Computational Laboratory offers 28 Dell Pentium IV computers ranging from 2.5 to 3.4GHz, running Windows XP Professional attached to 3 Dell dual processor servers, running Windows NT 4.0 Server or Windows Server 2003, via local area network running at 1Gb/s. The computer lab also offers 29 UTP connections for Laptops running at 10/100 Mb/s.


The Harry A. Metcalf Computational Laboratory provides access to a number of software packages. Some of these include SolidWorks 2008 SP4.0; Abaqus CAE 6.8 for FEA; Microsoft Visual C++; MatLab 2008A; Microsoft Office 2007 Professional; Mathematica 6.0.1; MathType 6.0; and LabView 8.5. All of the laboratory’s computers are directly linked to the campus network giving students access to a large variety of software on different libraries across campus. The lab is open for student use 24 hours a day 7 days a week via card access.


The Bingham Student Workshop, BSW, is a 2380 sq.ft. facility complete with machining, welding, metal fabrication, and woodworking equipment. This facility is available for the Case undergrads in Mechanical Engineering. Before gaining access to the shop all ME students are required to take the EMAE 172, Mechanical Manufacturing course. This course gives the student a foundation in basic machining, welding, sheet metal fabrication, and safety. Manual drafting, design, and computer-aided drafting is also included in the course. After completion the student can use the shop for other Mechanical Engineering courses requiring prototypes. The BSW, is also, used for senior projects and student organizations, such as, the SAE Baja and Formula and the Design Build and Fly.


The Reinberger Design Studio includes a total of 33 computers consisting of 18 Dell 1GHz Pentium III, 10 Dell 3.4 GHz Pentium IV, and 5 Dell 2.6GHz Pentium IV workstations for Undergraduate Student design use. These machines are connected via a Gigabit local area network to a Dell Dual 500MHz Pentium III server running Windows NT 4.0 and a Dell Dual 800MHz Pentium III server running Windows NT 4.0. The Studio is tied directly to the campus network allowing information to be shared with the HAMCL and other network resources. The Studio is used for the instruction of the SolidWorks 2005 CAD software, MasterCam 9.0 CAM software, Solidworks CAD/CAM/FEA software, and Algor 16.1 FEA software. The RDS also offers a 3D Systems SLA 250 and a Dimension machine for generating SLA models from CAD models.


The Reinberger Product and Process Development Laboratory is 1600 square feet of laboratory and office space dedicated to computer-aided engineering activities. The computer numerical control (CNC) laboratory includes both two industrial sized machine tools with additional space for lecture and group project activities. The CNC machine tools located in the laboratory are; a HAAS VF3 4 axis-machining center, a HAAS 2 axis lathe. A Mitutoyo coordinate measuring machine (CMM) located in its own laboratory space completes the facilities. The CMM enables students to inspect their manufactured components to a very degree of precision. The laboratory is used to support both undergraduate and graduate manufacturing courses (EMAE 390, EMAE 490).


High Performance computing:


For high performance computing the department uses the CWRU high performance computing cluster (HPCC). The HPCC consists of 112 compute nodes with Intel Pentium 4 Xeon EM64T processors. All nodes are interconnected with Gigabit Ethernet for MPI message passin and all nodes are interconnected by a separate Ethernet for the purpose of out-of-band cluster management. The MAE Department also has a direct access to all the Ohio Supercomputing Center and all NSF supercomputing centers, primarily to the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center. Computing-intensive research projects can obtain an account on those supercomputers through their advisors. Research projects carried on in cooperation with the NASA Glenn Research Center can have access to NASA computing facilities. Sophisticated, extensive, and updated general and graphics software are available for applications in research and classroom assignments.


Research


The research in the department encompasses many areas of modern technology. Among them:


Aerospace Technology and Space Exploration


Flow in turbomachinery, molecular dynamics simulation of rarefied gas flow, two phase flow, supersonic combustion and propulsion, thermoacoustic refrigeration, in-situ resource utilization from space. Gravitational effects on transport phenomena, fluids and thermal processes in advance life support systems for long duration space travel, interfacial processes, g-jitter effects on microgravity flows, two phase flow in zero and reduced gravity.


Combustion and Energy


Synthetic and alternative fuels, chemical kinetic models and pollutant formation, hydrogen ignition and safety, catalytic combustion, coal combustion, Flame spread, fire research and protection, combustion in micro- and partial gravity, microgravity combustion.


Dynamics of Rotating Machinery


Forced and instability vibration of rotor/bearing/seal systems, nonlinear rotor dynamics, torsional rotor vibration, rotor dynamic characteristics of bearings and seals (computational and experimental approach), control of rotor system dynamics, rub-impact studies on bearings and compressor/turbine blading systems. Advanced rotating machinery monitoring and diagnostics.


Engineering Design


Optimization and computer-aided design, feasibility studies of kinematic mechanisms, kinematics of rolling element-bearing geometries, mechanical control systems, experimental stress analysis, failure analysis, development of biologically inspired methodologies.


Manufacturing


Agile manufacturing work cells developed to facilitate quick change over from assembly of one object to assembly of other objects contains multiple robots, a conveyor system and flexible parts feeders.


Materials


Development of novel experimental techniques to investigate material response at elevated temperatures and high rates of deformation. Constitutive modeling of damage evolution, shear localization and failure of advanced engineering materials. Fabrication of mechanical properties of composite materials; creep, rupture, and fatigue properties of engineering materials at elevated temperatures.


Microgravity Research


Combustion phenomena in microgravity, spacecraft fire safety.


Multiphase Flow Research


Application of non-intrusive laser based diagnostic techniques to study solid-liquid, solid-gas, liquid-gas and solid-liquid-gas, multiphase flows encountered in slurry transport, and bio-fluid mechanics.


Nanotechnology


Research related to various nanotechnology applications with particular emphasis on energy conversion, generation and storage in nanostructured materials including the synthesis of polymer-based nanocomposites. Current research projects include investigation of nanocomposites for thermoelectric devices, molecular simulation of thermal transport across interfacial regions, and biomimetic research on protein-based shark gel.


Orthopaedic Engineering


Kinematics and mechanical joint dynamics of the knee, hip, ankle, and spine; dynamic stability of the human spine; mechanics of injuries; gait analysis; design and failure analysis of medical prostheses and material selection; biomechanical measurements, tools and instrumentation; mechanical properties of, and transport processes in, bone and soft tissue.


Robotics


Biologically inspired and biologically based design and control of legged robots. Dynamics, control and simulation of animals and robots.


Tribology and Seals


Time-resolved friction on nano- and microsecond time scale with applications to high speed machining and mechanics of armor penetration. Study of gas lubricated foil bearing systems with application to oil-free turbomachinery. Evaluation of advanced seal concepts and configurations for high temperature applications in gas turbine engines.


Turbomachinery


Vibration characteristics of seals and bearings and measurement of chaotic motion. Rub impact studies of blade tip/casing interactions, particle-blade/casing interactions in centrifugal pumps.


Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Course Descriptions (EMaE)


EMAE C100. Co-Op Seminar I for Mechanical Engineering (1)
Professional development activities for students returning from cooperative education assignments. Recommended preparation: COOP 001.


EMAE C200. Co-Op Seminar II for Mechanical Engineering (2)
Professional development activities for students returning from cooperative education assignments. Recommended preparation: COOP 002 and EMAE C100.


EMAE 172. Mechanical Manufacturing (4)
The course is taught in two sections (Graphics and Manufacturing Processes) through a series of lectures, laboratory sessions and weekly engineering workshop classes. The course aim is to provide a solid manufacturing engineering foundation. The course includes: manual and computer-aided drafting and design (CAD), primary and secondary engineering processes, engineering materials and a field trip to a local company. Laboratory sessions will provide hands-on experience using Pro/ENGINEER CAD software.


EMAE 181. Dynamics (3)
Elements of classical dynamics: particle kinematics and dynamics, including concepts of force, mass, acceleration, work, energy, impulse, momentum. Kinetics of systems of particles and of rigid bodies, including concepts of mass center, momentum, mass moment of inertia, dynamic equilibrium. Elementary vibrations. Recommended preparation: MATH 122 and PHYS 121 and ENGR. 200


EMAE 250. Computers in Mechanical Engineering (3)
Numerical methods including analysis and control of error and its propagation, solutions of systems of linear algebraic equations, solutions of nonlinear algebraic equations, curve fitting, interpolation, and numerical integration and differentiation. Recommended preparation: ENGR 131 and MATH 122.


EMAE 271. Kinematic Analysis and Synthesis (3)
Graphical, analytical, and computer techniques for analyzing displacements, velocities, and accelerations in mechanisms. Analysis and synthesis of linkages, cams, and gears. Laboratory projects include analysis, design, construction, and evaluation of students’ mechanisms. Recommended preparation: EMAE 181.


EMAE 282. Mechanical Engineering Laboratory I (2)
Techniques and devices used for experimental work in mechanical engineering and fluid and thermal science. Lectures on topics in the theory of experimentation. Laboratory includes typical experiments, measurements, analysis, and report writing. Recommended preparation: EMAE 181 and ENGR 225.


EMAE 283. Mechanical Engineering Laboratory II (2)
Application of techniques developed in EMAE 282 to solution of individual semester-long experimental projects, including complete report on results. Recommended preparation: EMAE 282.


EMAE 290. Computer-Aided Manufacturing (3)
A manufacturing engineering course covering a wide range of topics associated with the application of computers to the product design and manufacturing process. Topics include: Computer-aided design (CAD) using Pro/ENGINEER software, design methodology, the design/manufacturing interface, introduction to computer numerical control (CNC), manual part-programming for CNC milling and CNC turning machine tools. Significant time will be spent in both CAD and CNC laboratories. Recommended preparation: EMAE 172.


EMAE 325. Fluid and Thermal Engineering II (4)
The continuation of the development of the fundamental fluid and thermal engineering principles introduced in ENGR 225, Introduction to Fluid and Thermal Engineering. Applications to heat engines and refrigeration, chemical equilibrium, mass transport across semi-permeable membranes, mixtures and air conditioning, developing external and internal flows, boundary layer theory, hydrodynamic lubrication, the role of diffusion and convection in heat and mass transfer, radiative heat transfer and heat exchangers. Recommended preparation: ENGR 225.


EMAE 350. Mechanical Engineering Analysis (3)
Methods of problem formulation and application of frequently used mathematical methods in mechanical engineering. Modeling of discrete and continuous systems, solutions of single and multi-degree of freedom problems, boundary value problems, transform techniques, approximation techniques. Recommended preparation: MATH 224.


EMAE 352. Thermodynamics in Energy Processes (3)
Thermodynamic properties of liquids, vapors and real gases, thermodynamic relations, non-reactive mixtures, psychometrics, combustion, thermodynamic cycles, compressible flow. Prereq: ENGR 225.


EMAE 355. Design of Fluid and Thermal Elements (3)
Synthesis of fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, and heat transfer. Practical design problems originating from industrial experience. Recommended preparation: ENGR 225 and EMAE 325.


EMAE 356. Aerospace Design (3)
Interactive and interdisciplinary activities in areas of fluid mechanics, heat transfer, solid mechanics, thermodynamics, and systems analysis approach in design of aerospace vehicles. Projects involve developing (or improving) design of aerospace vehicles of current interest (e.g., hypersonic aircraft) starting from mission requirements to researching developments in relevant areas and using them to obtain conceptual design. Senior standing required.


EMAE 359. Aero/Gas Dynamics (3)
Review of conservation equations. Potential flow. Subsonic airfoil. Finite wing. Isentropic one-dimensional flow. Normal and oblique shock waves. Prandtl-Meyer expansion wave. Supersonic airfoil theory. Recommended preparation: ENGR 225 and EMAE 325.


EMAE 360. Engineering Design (3)
This is a capstone senior course focused on mechanical engineering design, comprised of the following two major components, (a) advanced mechanical design analysis methods and tools, (b) a design-and-build semester team project. The advanced design analysis portion covers an introduction to elasticity theory with application to finite-element analyses, friction and wear design analysis methods, bearing and seal undertaken by teams of five persons, each team building and demonstrating its design. Prereq: ECIV 310 and Senior standing required. SAGES Senior Cap


EMAE 370. Design of Mechanical Elements (3)
Application of mechanics and mechanics of solids in machine design situations. Design of production machinery and consumer products considering fatigue and mechanical behavior. Selection and sizing of basic mechanical components: fasteners, springs, bearings, gears, fluid power elements. Recommended preparation: ECIV 310 and EMAE 271.


EMAE 372. Relation of Materials to Design (4)
The design of mechanical and structural elements considering static failure, elastic stability, residual stresses, stress concentration, impact, fatigue, creep and environmental conditions on the mechanical behavior of engineering materials. Rational approaches to materials selection for new and existing designs of structures. Laboratory experiments coordinated with the classroom lectures. Prereq: ECIV 310.


EMAE 376. Aerostructures (3)
Mechanics of thin-walled aerospace structures. Load analysis. Shear flow due to shear and twisting loads in open and closed cross-sections. Thin-walled pressure vessels. Virtual work and energy principles. Introduction to structural vibrations and finite element methods. Recommended preparation: ECIV 310.


EMAE 377. Biorobotics Team Research (3)
Many exciting research opportunities cross disciplinary lines. To participate in such projects, researchers must operate in multi-disciplinary teams. The Biorobotics Team Research course offers a unique capstone opportunity for undergraduate students to utilize skills they developed during their undergraduate experience while acquiring new teaming skills. A group of eight students form a research team under the direction of two faculty leaders. Team members are chosen from appropriate majors through interviews with the faculty. They will research a biological mechanism or principle and develop a robotic device that captures the actions of that mechanism. Although each student will cooperate on the team, they each have a specific role, and must develop a final paper that describes the research generated on their aspect of the project. Students meet for one class period per week and two 2-hour lab periods. Initially students brainstorm ideas and identify the project to be pursued. They then acquire biological data and generate robotic designs. Both are further developed during team meetings and reports. Final oral reports and a demonstration of the robotic device occur in week 15. Offered as BIOL 377, EMAE 377, BIOL 477, and EMAE 477. SAGES Senior Cap


EMAE 378. Mechanics of Machinery I (3)
Comprehensive treatment of design analysis methods and computational tools for machine components. Emphasis is on bearings, seals, gears, hydraulic drives and actuators, with applications to machine tools. Recommended preparation: EMAE 370. Offered as EMAE 378 and EMAE 478.


EMAE 379. Mechanics of Machinery II (3)
The focus of this course is Rotating Machinery Vibration, and it is comprised of four major components: 1) modeling, 2) analyses, 3) measurement techniques, and 4) physical insights into rotor vibration phenomena. Recommended preparation: EMAE 181. Offered as EMAE 379 and EMAE 479.


EMAE 381. Flight and Orbital Mechanics (3)
Aircraft performance: take-off and landing, unaccelerated flight, range and endurance, flight trajectories, static stability and control, simple maneuvers. Orbital mechanics: the solar system, elements of celestial mechanics, orbit transfer under impulsive thrust, continuous thrust, orbit transfer, decay of orbits due to drag, elements of lift-off and re-entry. Recommended preparation: ENGR 225. EMAE 359


EMAE 382. Propulsion (3)
Energy sources of propulsion. Performance criteria. Review of one-dimensional gas dynamics. Introduction of thermochemistry and combustion. Rocket flight performance and rocket staging. Chemical, liquid, and hybrid rockets. Airbreathing engine cycle analysis. Recommended preparation: ENGR 225.


EMAE 387. Vibration Problems in Engineering (4)
Free and forced vibration problems in single and multi-degree of freedom damped and undamped linear systems. Vibration isolation and absorbers. Modal analysis and approximate solutions. Introduction to vibration of continuous media. Noise problems. Laboratory projects to illustrate theoretical concepts and applications. Recommended preparation: MATH 224 and EMAE 181.


EMAE 390. Computer-Integrated Manufacturing (3)
The course is taught through a series of lectures, class discussions, group projects, and laboratory sessions. The course aim is to provide a solid understanding of the many aspects of the engineering processes and systems associated with the integration of product design through to manufacture. Laboratory sessions will provide hands-on experience using a number of Pro/ENGINEER modules to become aware of the integration of manufacturing issues. Recommended preparation: EMAE 290.


EMAE 396. Special Topics in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (1 - 18)
(Credit as arranged.)


EMAE 397. Independent Laboratory Research (1 - 3)
Independent research in a laboratory.


EMAE 398. Senior Project (3)
Individual or team design or experimental project under faculty supervisor. Requirements include periodic reporting of progress, plus a final oral presentation and written report. Recommended preparation: Senior standing, EMAE 360, and consent of instructor. SAGES Senior Cap


EMAE 399. Advanced Independent Laboratory Research/Design (1 - 3)
Students perform advanced independent research or an extended design project under the direct mentorship of the instructor. Typically performed as an extension to EMAE 397 or EMAE 398. Prereq: EMAE 397.


EMAE 400T. Graduate Teaching I (0)
This course will engage the Ph.D. candidate in a variety of teaching experiences that will include direct contact (for example, teaching recitations and laboratories, guest lectures, office hours) as well non-contact preparation (exams, quizzes, demonstrations) and grading activities. The teaching experiences will be conducted under the supervision of the faculty member(s) responsible for coordinating student teaching activities. All Ph.D. candidates enrolled in this course sequence will be expected to perform direct contact teaching at some point in the sequence. Recommended preparation: Ph.D. student in Mechanical Engineering.


EMAE 401. Mechanics of Continuous Media (3)
Vector and tensor calculus. Stress and traction, finite strain and deformation tensors. Kinematics of continuous media, general conservation and balance laws. Material symmetry groups and observer transformation. Constitutive relations with applications to solid and fluid mechanics problems.


EMAE 402. Muscles, Biomechanics, and Control of Movement (4)
Quantitative and qualitative descriptions of the action of muscles in relation to human movement. Introduction to rigid body dynamics and dynamics of multi-link systems using Newtonian and Lagrangian approaches. Muscle models with application to control of multi-joint movement. Forward and inverse dynamics of multi-joint, muscle driven systems. Dissection, observation and recitation in the anatomy laboratory with supplemental lectures concentrating on kinesiology and muscle function. Recommended preparation: EMAE 181 or equivalent. Offered as EBME 402 and EMAE 402.


EMAE 403. Aerophysics (3)
The course introduces the physical and chemical topics of basic importance in modern fluid mechanics, plasma dynamics, and combustion sciences: statistical calculations of thermodynamic properties of gases; quantum mechanical analysis of atomic and molecular structure; transport phenomena; propagation, emission, and absorption of radiation; chemical and physical equilibria; adiabatic flame temperatures of complex reacting systems; and reaction kinetics.


EMAE 415. Introduction to Musculo-skeletal Biomechanics (3)
Structural behavior of the musculo-skeletal system. Function of joints, joint loading, and lubrication. Stress-strain properties of bone and connective tissue. Analysis of fracture and repair mechanisms. Viscoplastic modeling of skeletal membranes. Recommended preparation: EMAE 181 and ECIV 310.


EMAE 424. Introduction to Nanotechnology (3)
An exploration of emerging nanotechnology research. Lectures and class discussion on 1) nanostructures: superlattices, nanowires, nanotubes, quantum dots, nanoparticles, nanocomposites, proteins, bacteria, DNA; 2) nanoscale physical phenomena: mechanical, electrical, chemical, thermal, biological, optical, magnetic; 3) nanofabrication: bottom up and top down methods; 4) characterization: microscopy, property measurement techniques; 5) devices/applications: electronics, sensors, actuators, biomedical, energy conversion. Topics will cover interdisciplinary aspects of the field. Offered as EECS 424 and EMAE 424.


EMAE 453. Advanced Fluid Dynamics I (3)
Derivation and discussion of the general equations for conservation of mass, momentum, and energy using tensors. Several exact solutions of the incompressible Newtonian viscous equations. Kinematics and dynamics of inviscid, incompressible flow including free streamline theory developed using vector, complex variable, and numerical techniques.


EMAE 454. Advanced Fluid Dynamics II (3)
Continuation of EMAE 453. Low Reynolds number approximations. Matching techniques: inner and outer expressions. High Reynolds number approximations: boundary layer theory. Elements of gas dynamics: quasi one-dimensional flow, shock waves, supersonic expansion, potential equation, linearized theory, and similarity rules. Recommended preparation: EMAE 453.


EMAE 457. Combustion (3)
Chemical kinetics and thermodynamics; governing conservation equations for chemically reacting flows; laminar premixed and diffusion flames; turbulent flames; ignition; extinction and flame stabilization; detonation; liquid droplet and solid particle combustion; flame spread, combustion-generated air pollution; applications of combustion processes to engines, rockets, and fire research.


EMAE 458. Propulsion (3)
Energy sources of propulsion. Momentum theorems and performance criteria. Air breathing systems and their components; chemical rockets--liquid and solid propellant; nuclear rockets--solid core, liquid core and gaseous core; rocket heat transfer and heat protection; electric propulsion--electrothermal, electrostatic and plasma thrustors; thermonuclear propulsion. Recommended preparation: Consent of instructor.


EMAE 459. Advanced Heat Transfer (3)
Analysis of engineering heat transfer from first principles including conduction, convection, radiation, and combined heat and mass transfer. Examples of significance and role of analytic solutions, approximate methods (including integral methods) and numerical methods in the solution of heat transfer problems. Recommended preparation: EMAE 453.


EMAE 460. Theory and Design of Fluid Power Machinery (3)
Fluid mechanic and thermodynamic aspects of the design of fluid power machinery such as axial and radial flow turbomachinery, positive displacement devices and their component characterizations. Recommended preparation: Consent of instructor.


EMAE 471. Design Methods (3)
An advanced course on design methodologies. Conceptualization, preliminary design, detail design, and manufacturing. Failure analysis, materials selection, methods of design optimization, and current approaches in computer-aided design. Recommended preparation: EMAE 360.


EMAE 477. Biorobotics Team Research (3)
Many exciting research opportunities cross disciplinary lines. To participate in such projects, researchers must operate in multi-disciplinary teams. The Biorobotics Team Research course offers a unique capstone opportunity for undergraduate students to utilize skills they developed during their undergraduate experience while acquiring new teaming skills. A group of eight students form a research team under the direction of two faculty leaders. Team members are chosen from appropriate majors through interviews with the faculty. They will research a biological mechanism or principle and develop a robotic device that captures the actions of that mechanism. Although each student will cooperate on the team, they each have a specific role, and must develop a final paper that describes the research generated on their aspect of the project. Students meet for one class period per week and two 2-hour lab periods. Initially students brainstorm ideas and identify the project to be pursued. They then acquire biological data and generate robotic designs. Both are further developed during team meetings and reports. Final oral reports and a demonstration of the robotic device occur in week 15. Offered as BIOL 377, EMAE 377, BIOL 477, and EMAE 477. SAGES Senior Cap


EMAE 478. Mechanics of Machinery I (3)
Comprehensive treatment of design analysis methods and computational tools for machine components. Emphasis is on bearings, seals, gears, hydraulic drives and actuators, with applications to machine tools. Recommended preparation: EMAE 370. Offered as EMAE 378 and EMAE 478.


EMAE 479. Mechanics of Machinery II (3)
The focus of this course is Rotating Machinery Vibration, and it is comprised of four major components: 1) modeling, 2) analyses, 3) measurement techniques, and 4) physical insights into rotor vibration phenomena. Recommended preparation: EMAE 181. Offered as EMAE 379 and EMAE 479.


EMAE 480. Fatigue of Materials (3)
Fundamental and applied aspects of metals, polymers and ceramics. Behavior of materials in stress and strain cycling, methods of computing cyclic stress and strain, cumulative fatigue damage under complex loading. Application of linear elastic fracture mechanics to fatigue crack propagation. Mechanisms of fatigue crack initiation and propagation. Case histories and practical approaches to mitigate fatigue and prolong life.


EMAE 481. Advanced Dynamics I (3)
Particle and rigid-body kinematics and dynamics. Inertia tensor, coordinate transformations and rotating reference frames. Application to rotors and gyroscopes. Theory of orbital motion with application to earth satellites. Impact dynamics. Lagrange equations with applications to multi-degree of freedom systems. Theory of small vibrations. Recommended preparation: EMAE 181.


EMAE 486. Stress Waves in Solids (3)
Stress waves in one-dimension, problem formulation for 3-D waves. Reflection and refraction at a plane boundary stress pulses and Raleigh surface waves. Wave guides and dispersion relationships. Solutions of mixed initial and boundary value problems for isotropic linear elastic materials. Scattering of elastic waves. Elastic plastic waves.


EMAE 487. Vibration Problems in Engineering (3)
Free and forced-vibration problems in single and multi-degree of freedom damped and undamped linear systems. Vibration isolation and absorbers. Modal analysis and approximate solutions. Introduction to vibration of continuous media. Noise problems. Laboratory projects to illustrate theoretical concepts and applications. Recommended preparation: EMAE 181 and MATH 224.


EMAE 489. Robotics I (3)
Orientation and configuration coordinate transformations, forward and inverse kinematics and Newton-Euler and Lagrange-Euler dynamic analysis. Planning of manipulator trajectories. Force, position, and hybrid control of robot manipulators. Analytical techniques applied to select industrial robots. Recommended preparation: EMAE 181.Offered as EECS 489 and EMAE 489.


EMAE 500T. Graduate Teaching II (0)
This course will engage the Ph.D. candidate in a variety of teaching experiences that will include direct contact (for example, teaching, recitations and laboratories, guest lectures, office hours) as well non-contact preparation (exams, quizzes, demonstration) and grading activities. The teaching experience will be conducted under the supervision of the faculty member(s) responsible for coordinating student teaching activities. All Ph.D. candidates enrolled in this course sequence will be expected to perform direct contact teaching at some point in the sequence. Recommended preparation: Ph.D. student in Mechanical Engineering.


EMAE 540. Advanced Dynamics II (3)
Using variational approach, comprehensive development of principle of virtual work, Hamilton’s principle and Lagrange equations for holonomic and non-holonomic systems. Hamilton’s equations of motion, canonical transformations, Hamilton-Jacobi theory and special theory of relativity in classical mechanics. Modern dynamic system formulations.


EMAE 552. Viscous Flow Theory (3)
Compressible boundary layer theory. Blowing and suction effects. Three-dimensional flows; unsteady flows. Introduction to real gas effects. Recommended preparation: EMAE 454.


EMAE 554. Turbulent Fluid Motion (3)
Mathematics and physics of turbulence. Statistical (isotropic, homogeneous turbulence) theories; success and limitations. Experimental and observational (films) evidence. Macrostructures and microturbulence. Other theoretical approaches. Recommended preparation: EMAE 454.


EMAE 557. Convection Heat Transfer (3)
Energy equation of viscous fluids. Dimensional analysis. Forced convection; heat transfer from non-isothermal and unsteady boundaries, free convection and combined free and forced convection; stability of free convection flow; thermal instabilities. Real gas effects, combined heat and mass transfer; ablation, condensation, boiling. Recommended preparation: EMAE 453 and EMAE 454.


EMAE 558. Conduction and Radiation (3)
Fundamental law, initial and boundary conditions, basic equations for isotropic and anisotropic media, related physical problems, steady and transient temperature distributions in solid structures. Analytical, graphical, numerical, and experimental methods for constant and variable material properties. Recommended preparation: Consent of instructor.


EMAE 570. Computational Fluid Dynamics (3)
Finite difference, finite element, and spectral techniques for numerical solutions of partial differential equations. Explicit and implicit methods for elliptic, parabolic, hyperbolic, and mixed equations. Unsteady incompressible flow equations in primitive and vorticity/stream function formulations. Steady and unsteady transport (passive scalar) equations.


EMAE 587. Experimental Stress Analysis (3)
Length, displacement and strain measurements. Electric strain gage, moire, photoelasticity and caustic techniques and their applications to stress analysis. Time and spatially resolved measurements using laser interferometry. Loading devices for studying the mechanical response of engineering materials under static, quasistatic and dynamic loading conditions. Recommended preparation: EMAE 401 or ECIV 411.


EMAE 600T. Graduate Teaching III (0)
This course will engage the Ph.D. candidate in a variety of teaching experiences that will include direct (for example, teaching recitations and laboratories, guest lectures, office hours) as well non-contact preparation (exams, quizzes, demonstrations) and grading activities. The teaching experience will be conducted under the supervision of the faculty member(s) responsible for coordinating student teaching activities. All Ph.D. candidates enrolled in this course sequence will be expected to perform direct contact teaching at some point in the sequence. Recommended preparation: Ph.D. student in Mechanical Engineering.


EMAE 601. Independent Study (1 - 18)


EMAE 651. Thesis M.S. (1 - 18)


EMAE 657. Experimental Techniques in Fluid and Thermal Engineering Sciences (3)
Exposure to experimental problems and techniques provided by the planning, design, execution, and evaluation of an original project. Lectures: review of the measuring techniques for flow, pressure, temperature, etc.; statistical analysis of data: information theory concepts of instrumentation; electrical measurements and sensing devices; and the use of digital computer for data acquisition and reduction. Graduate standing or consent of instructor required.


EMAE 689. Special Topics (1 - 18)


EMAE 701. Dissertation Ph.D. (1 - 18)

Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.


Bachelor of Science in Engineering Degree
Major in Aerospace Engineering


First Year Class-Lab-Credit Hours
Fall
CHEM 111 Properties and Structure of Matter I (4-0-4)
MATH 121 Calculus for Science and Engineering I e (4-0-4)
PHYS 121 General Physics I d, e (4-0-4)
ENGR 131 Elementary Computer Programming
b, e (2-2-3)
PHED 101 Physical Education Activities (0-3-0)
FSCC 100 First Seminar (3-0-3)
Total (17-5-18)


Spring
MATH 122 Calculus for Science and Engr. II e (4-0-4)
PHYS 122 General Physics II b, e (4-0-4)
ENGR 145 Chemistry of Materials b, e (4-0-4)
University Seminar e (3-0-3)
PHED 102 Physical Education Activities (0-3-0)
Total (15-3-15)


Second Year
Fall
EMAE 172 Mechanical Manufacturing e (3-3-4)
EMAE 181 Dynamics e (3-0-3)
ENGR 200 Introduction to Mechanics b, e (3-0-3)
MATH 223 Calculus for Science & Engineering III e (3-0-3)
EMAE 250 Computers in Mechanical Engineering e (2-2-3)
Total (14-5-16)


Spring
University Seminar (3-0-3)
ENGR 210 Electronic Circuits b, e (3-2-4)
PHYS 221 General Physics III e (3-0-3)
MATH 224 Elementary Differential Equations b, e (3-0-3)
ENGR 225 Introduction to Fluid & Thermal Engr a (4-0-4)
Total (16-2-17)


Third Year Class-Lab-Credit Hours
Fall
Humanities or Social Science elective (3-0-3)
EMAE 325 Fluid and Thermal Engineering II (4-0-4)
EMAE 282 Mechanical Engineering Lab I (1-3-2)
ECIV 310 Strength of Materials e (3-0-3)
EMAE 350 Mechanical Engineering Analysis (3-0-3)
Total (14-3-15)


Spring
Humanities or Social Science elective (3-0-3)
EMAE 283 Mechanical Engineering Laboratory II (1-3-2)
EMAE 359 Aero/Gas Dynamics (3-0-3)
EMAE 376 Aerostructures (3-0-3)
Open elective e (3-0-3)
Technical elective e (3-0-3)
Total (16-3-17)


Fourth Year
Fall
Humanities or Social Science elective (3-0-3)
EECS 246 Signals and Systems (3-2-4)
EMAE 381 Flight and Orbital Mechanics (3-0-3)
EMAE 355 Design of Fluid and Thermal Elements (3-0-3)
EMAE 360 Engineering Design (3-0-3)
Total (15-2-16)


Spring
Humanities or Social Science elective (3-0-3)
EMAE 356 Aerospace Design (3-0-3)
EMAE 382 Propulsion (3-0-3)
EMAE 398 Senior Project b, e (1-6-3)
ENGL 398N/ENGR398 Professional Communication e (2-1-3) (Dept. Seminar)
Total (13-6-17)


Hours required for graduation: 129
b. Engineering Core Course
d. Selected students may be invited to take PHYS 123-124, General Physics I, II-Honors (3) in place of PHYS 121-122, General Physics I, II (4).
e. May be taken fall or spring semester.


Bachelor of Science in Engineering Degree
Major in Mechanical Engineering


First Year Class-Lab-Credit Hours
Fall
CHEM 111 Properties and Structure of Matter I (4-0-4)
MATH 121 Calculus for Science and Engineering I e (4-0-4)
PHYS 121 General Physics I d, e (4-0-4)
ENGR 131 Elementary Computer Programming b, e (2-2-3)
FSCC 100 First Seminar (3-0-3)
PHED 101 Physical Education Activities (0-3-0)
Total (17-5-18)


Spring
MATH 122 Calculus for Science and Engr. II e (4-0-4)
PHYS 122 General Physics II d, e (4-0-4)
University Seminar e (3-0-3)
ENGR 145 The Chemistry of Materials b, e (4-0-4)
PHED 102 Physical Education Activities (0-3-0)
Total (15-3-15)


Second Year
Fall
University Seminar (3-0-3)
ENGR 200 Introduction to Mechanics b, e (3-0-3)
EMAE 172 Mechanical Manufacturing e (3-3-4)
MATH 223 Calculus for Science & Engineering III (3-0-3)
EMAE 250 Computers in Mechanical Engineering e (2-2-3)
Total (14-5-16)


Spring
Open elective (3-0-3)
EMAE 181 Dynamics e (3-0-3)
MATH 224 Elementary Differential Equations e (3-0-3)
ENGR 225 Introduction to Fluid & Thermal Engr b, e (4-0-4)
Science elective e (3-0-3)
Total (16-0-16)


Third Year Class-Lab-Credit Hours
Fall
Humanities or Social Science elective (3-0-3)
EMAE 325 Fluid and Thermal Engineering II (4-0-4)
EMAE 282 Mechanical Engineering Lab I (1-3-2)
ECIV 310 Strength of Materials e (3-0-3)
EMAE 350 Mechanical Engineering Analysis (3-0-3)
Total (14-3-15)


Spring
Humanities or Social Science elective (3-0-3)
ENGR 210 Electronic Circuits b, e (3-2-4)
EMAE 271 Kinematic Analysis and Synthesis (2-2-3)
EMAE 283 Mechanical Engineering Laboratory II (1-3-2)
EMAE 370 Design of Mechanical Elements (3-0-3)
Technical elective e (3-0-3)
Total (15-7-18)


Fourth Year
Fall
Humanities or Social Science elective (3-0-3)
EECS 246 Signals and Systems (3-2-4)
EMAE 355 Design of Fluid and Thermal Elements e (3-0-3)
EMAE 360 Engineering Design (3-0-3)
OPRE 345 Engineering Economics and Decision Theory e (3-0-3)
Total (15-2-16)


Spring
Humanities or Social Science elective (3-0-3)
Technical elective e (3-0-3)
EMAE 398 Senior Project b, e (1-6-3)
ENGL 398N Professional Communication e (2-1-3) (Dept. Seminar)
Technical elective e (3-0-3)
Total (13-6-15)


Hours required for graduation: 129
b. Engineering Core Course
d. Selected students may be invited to take PHYS 123-124, General Physics I, II-Honors (3) in place of PHYS 121-122, General Physics I, II (4).
e. May be taken fall or spring semester.


Technical Electives By Program


Aerospace engineering

Mechanical Engineering

Both Programs

Aerospace

Biomechanics

Digital Electronics and Control

Dynamics and Vibration

Fluid and Thermal Engineering

Fluid and Thermal Sciences

Mathematics and Statistics

Materials

Mechanical Design

Mechanical Manufacturing

Solid Mechanics

Polymer Engineering and Processing