t (1 credit hour). There is no limit on the number of students for the class as a whole. However, there is a limit of 12 students on the laboratory component (other students will do term papers).


EMAC 404. Polymer Foundation Course IV: Engineering (3)
This class is an introduction to the engineering and technology of polymeric materials. Topics include: additives, blends and composites, natural polymers and fivers, thermoplastics, elastomers, and thermosets, polymer degradation and stability, polymers in the environment, polymer rheology and polymer processing, and polymers for advanced technologies (membrane science, biomedical engineering, applications in electronics, photonic polymers). The lecture portion of this course (2 credit hours) is integrated with a laboratory or term paper component (1 credit hour). There is no limit on the number of students for the class as a whole. However, there is a limit of 12 students on the laboratory component (other students will do term papers).


EMAC 410. Polymers Plus Self - Assembly and Nanomaterials (2)
The course focuses on the concepts of supramolecular chemistry and self-assembly specifically as it applies to nano-polymeric systems. After dealing with many of the fundamental aspects of supramolecular chemistry the focus of the class deals with how to access/utilize nano-scale features using such processes, namely the ‘bottom-up’ approach to nanomaterials/systems. Areas which will be addressed include block copolymers, DNA assemblies, nanotubes and dendrimers. Prereq: EMAC 401 or EMAC 370.


EMAC 412. Polymers Plus Inorganic/Coordination Chemistry (2)
The course focuses on the concepts of inorganic and coordination chemistry specifically as they apply to polymeric systems. The fundamental aspects of coordination chemistry, including coordinative saturation, kinetics and mechanism will be presented and used as a vehicle to descript coordination polymerizations and supramolecular coordination phenomena. The chemistry and physics of nanoscale inorganic modification of polymers by clays, silsesquioxianes, metal oxides and metalparticles will also be discussed. Prereq: EMAC 401 or EMAC 370 or EMAC 470.


EMAC 420. Polymers Plus Advanced Physical Chemistry (2)
The course focuses on the principles of physical chemistry that are most relevant to macromolecular science. Prereq: EMAC 402, EMAC 403.


EMAC 421. Polymer Plus Hierarchical Structures and Properties (2)
Discuss the hierarchical solid state structure of synthetic and naturally occurring polymeric systems and relate these structures to their properties. Particular emphasis will be on natural systems containing collagen(s) and carbohydrate(s), and on synthetic crystalline, liquid crystalline, and reinforced composite polymeric materials. In order to prepare students for application of these concepts we will determine how mechanical, transport and optical (photonic) behavior can be controlled by structure manipulation. Prereq: EMAC 403 and EMAC 404 or EMAC 474 or EMAC 476.


EMAC 422. Polymers Plus X-ray and Microscopy (2)
This course focuses on the theory and application of X-ray and microscopy techniques to the analysis of the microstructure of polymeric materials. The X-ray section covers theoretical and experimental aspects for semicrystalline and amorphous polymers and includes small-angle scattering and neutron & electron diffraction. Techniques, such as atomic force microscopy, transmission and scanning electron microscopy, and optical microscopy, will also be discussed. Practical aspects of these techniques will be applied to a variety of systems, including block copolymers, nanocomposites, LC polymers, and multi-layered films. Prereq: EMAC 403 or EMAC 474.


EMAC 423. Polymers Plus Adhesives, Sealants and Coatings (2)
An introduction to the technology of adhesives, sealants and coatings. Relevant adhesion theories and practices. Resin Structure and Reactivity. Principles of film formation and rheology control. Pigment Dispersion and Color Measurement. Test methods for mechanical properties and durability. Materials technology to comply with environmental regulations. Prereq: EMAC 402 or EMAC 370.


EMAC 444. Polymers Plus Optoelectronics (2)
The course focuses on the design, synthesis and structure-property relationship of polymers with unusual optic and electronic properties and the application of these advanced materials in emerging technologies. Topics include (1) introduction to the interaction of polymers with electromagnetic radiation, (2) Conjugated Polymers: Chemistry & Physics, (3) Intrinsically Conducting Polymers, (4) Ionically Conducting Polymers, (5) Light Emitting Polymers, (6) Polymer Field Effect Transistors and other Semiconductor Devices, (7) Optoelectronic Polymers in Sensors, (8) Nonlinear Optical Polymers, and (9) Latest Developments. Prereq: EMAC 401 or EMAC 370.


EMAC 450. The Business of Polymers (2)
This course will link polymer technology to business and management issues that need to be considered for successful technology commercialization. Topics include project management, finance, opportunity assessment, the voice of the customer, and protection of intellectual property. Case studies from both large and small companies will be used to illustrate key concepts. Recommended preparation: EMAC 270, EMAC 276.


EMAC 451. Polymer Product Design (2)
This course introduces the fundamentals of successful product design and development with specific attention to products based on polymeric materials. Topics covered include the voice of the customer, idea generation and screening, concept selection, prototyping, manufacturing, marketing, and launch. The importance of good design beyond simple form and function will be stressed. Each student will complete a product design portfolio that considers all of these issues. Recommended preparation: EMAC 270, EMAC 276, EMAC 450.


EMAC 471. Polymers in Medicine (3)
This course covers the important fundamentals and applications of polymers in medicine, and consists of three major components: (i) the blood and soft-tissue reactions to polymer implants; (ii) the structure, characterization and modification of biomedical polymers; and (iii) the application of polymers in a broad range of cardiovascular and extravascular devices. The chemical and physical characteristics of biomedical polymers and the properties required to meet the needs of the intended biological function will be presented. Clinical evaluation, including recent advances and current problems associated with different polymer implants. Recommended preparation: EBME 306 or equivalent. Offered as EBME 406 or EMAC 471.


EMAC 475. Introduction to Rheology (3)
This course will involve study of rheology from several perspectives; rheological property measurements, phenomenological and molecular models, and applicability to polymer processing. Students will be introduced to experimental methods of rheology with quantitative descriptions of associated flows and data analyses. Application of models, both phenomenological and molecular, to prediction of rheological behavior and extraction of model parameters from real data sets will be examined. The relevance of rheological behavior of different systems to practical processing schemes will be discussed, particularly with respect to plastics manufacturing. Recommended preparation: ENGR 225. Offered as EMAC 375 and EMAC 475.


EMAC 477. Elementary Steps in Polymer Processing (2)
This course is an application of principles of fluid mechanics and heat transfer to problems in polymer processing. In the first part of the course, basic principles of transport phenomena will be reviewed. In the second part, the elementary steps in polymer processing will be described and analyzed with application to a single screw extruder.


EMAC 478. Polymer Engineer Design Product (3)
Uses material taught in previous and concurrent courses in an integrated fashion to solve polymer product design problems. Practicality, external requirements, economics, thermal/mechanical properties, processing and fabrication issues, decision making with uncertainty, and proposal and report preparation are all stressed. Several small exercises and one comprehensive process design project will be carried out by class members. Offered as EMAC 378 and EMAC 478.


EMAC 490. Polymers Plus Professional Development (1)
This course focuses on graduate student professional development. The course involves weekly meetings and oral presentations with attention on the content and style of the presentation materials (PowerPoint, posters, etc.), oral presentation style and project management skills. This course can be taken for the total of 3 credits over three different semesters.


EMAC 491. Polymers Plus Literature Review (1)
This course involves weekly presentations of the current polymer literature. It involves at least one presentation by the enrolled student and participation in all literature reviews (at least 10/semester). The course will focus on presentation skills (both oral and written), scientific interpretation, and development of peer-review skills. This course can be taken for a total of 3 credits over three different semesters.


EMAC 500T. Graduate Teaching II (0)
This course will engage the Ph.D. students in teaching experiences that will include non-contact (such as preparation and grading of homework and tests) and direct contact (leading recitations and monitoring laboratory works, lectures and office hours) activities. The teaching experience will be conducted under the supervision of the faculty. All Ph.D. students will be expected to perform direct contact teaching during the course sequence. The proposed teaching experiences for EMAC Ph.D. students are outlined below in association with graduate classes. The individual assignments will depend on the specialization of the students. The activities include grading, recitation, lab supervision and guest lecturing. Recommended preparation: Ph.D. student in Macromolecular Science.


EMAC 600T. Graduate Teaching III (0)
This course will engage the Ph.D. students in teaching experiences that will include non-contact and direct contact activities. The teaching experience will be conducted under the supervision of the faculty. The proposed teaching experiences for EMAC Ph.D. student in this course involve instruction in the operation of major instrumentation and equipment used in the daily research activities. The individual assignments will depend on the specialization of the students. Recommended preparation: Ph.D. student in Macromolecular Science.


EMAC 601. Independent Study (1 - 18)
(Credit as arranged.)


EMAC 651. Thesis M.S. (1 - 18)
(Credit as arranged.)


EMAC 673. Selected Topics in Polymer Engineering (2 - 3)
Timely issues in polymer engineering are presented at the advanced graduate level. Content varies, but may include: mechanisms of irreversible deformation: failure, fatigue and fracture of polymers and their composites; processing structure-property relationships; and hierarchical design of polymeric systems. Recommended preparation: EMAC 376 or EMAC 476.


EMAC 677. Colloquium in Macromolecular Science and Engineering (0 - 1)
Lectures by invited speakers on subjects of current interest in polymer science and engineering. This course can be taken for 3 credits over three different semesters.


EMAC 690. Special Topics in Macromolecular Science (1 - 18)


EMAC 701. Dissertation Ph.D. (1 - 18)
(Credit as arranged.) Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.


Bachelor of Science in Engineering Degree
Major in Polymer Science and Engineering (standard track)


First Year Class-Lab-Credit Hours
Fall
Humanities/Social Science (3-0-3)
CHEM 111 Principles of Chemistry for Engineers a (4-0-4)
ENGR 131 Elementary Computer Programming a (2-2-3)
MATH 121 Calculus for Science and Engineering a (4-0-4)
FSCC 100 Sages First Seminar a (4-0-4)
PHED 101 Physical Education Activities (0-3-0)
Total (17-5-18)


Spring
SAGES University Seminar I b (3-0-3)
ENGR 145 Chemistry of Materials a (4-0-4)
MATH 122 Calculus for Science and Engineering II a (4-0-4)
PHYS 121 General Physics I a (4-0-4)
EMAC 125 Freshman Research on Polymers (1-0-1)
PHED 102 Physical Education Activities (0-3-0)
Total (16-3-16)


Second Year
Fall
SAGES University Seminar II b (3-0-3)
CHEM 223 Organic Chemistry I (3-0-3)
EMAC 270 Introduction to Polymer Science and Engineering a (3-0-3)
MATH 223 Calculus for Science and Engineering III a (3-0-3)
PHYS 122 General Physics II a (4-0-4)
Total (16-0-16)


Spring
Humanities or Social Science (3-0-3)
CHEM 224 Organic Chemistry II (3-0-3)
EMAC 276 Polymer Properties and Design
(SAGES Departmental Seminar) (3-0-3)
MATH 224 Elementary Differential Equations (3-0-3)
or
MATH 234 Introduction to Dynamic Systems a (3-0-3)
ENGR 225 Thermodynamics, Fluid Mechanics, and Heat and Mass Transfer (4-0-4)
Total (16-0-16)


Third Year Class-Lab-Credit Hours
Fall
Humanities or Social Sciences (3-0-3)
Natural Science elective c (3-0-3)
CHEM 290 Chemistry Laboratory Methods for Engineers (1-5-3)
or CHEM 321 (1-5-3)
EMAC 351 Physical Chemistry for Engineers I (3-0-3)
ENGR 200 Statics and Strength of Materials a (3-0-3)
Technical elective I d,e (2-0-2)
Total (15-5-17)


Spring
Humanities or Social Sciences (3-0-3)
EMAC 355 Polymer Analysis Laboratory (2-4-3)
EMAC 376 Polymer Engineering (3-0-3)
ENGL 398N Professional Communication (3-0-3)
Technical elective II e (3-0-3)
Total (14-4-15)


Fourth Year
Fall
ENGR 210 Introduction to Circuits & Instrumentation a (4-0-4)
EMAC 370 Polymer Chemistry and Industry (3-0-3)
EMAC 377 Polymer Processing (3-0-3)
EMAC 398 Polymer Science & Engineering Project (SAGES Capstone Course) a,f (0-9-3)
Technical elective III e (3-0-3)
Total (13-9-16)


Spring
Open elective (3-0-3)
EMAC 372 Polymer Processing Laboratory (2-4-3)
EMAC 378 Polymer Production and Technology (3-0-3)
Technical elective III e (3-0-3)
Technical elective IV e (3-0-3)
Total (14-4-15)


Hours required for graduation: 129

  1. Engineering Core Courses.
  2. Choice of USNA, USSO, or USSY course focused on thinking about the natural, social, or symbolic “world.”
  3. Approved Natural Science electives: PHYS 221 or 223, General Physics III; BIOL 210, Molecular Cell Biology; BIOL 205, Chemical Biology; STAT 312, Basic Statistics for Eng. & Soc.; PHYS 349, Methods of Mathematical Physics; BIOC 307, General Biochemistry.
  4. EMAC 325 may be taken as a technical elective.
  5. Technical sequence must be approved by department advisor.
  6. Preparation for the polymer science project should commence in the previous semester.


Bachelor of Science in Engineering Degree
Major in Polymer Science and Engineering (biomaterials track)


First Year Class-Lab-Credit Hours
Fall
Humanities or Social Sciences a (3-0-3)
CHEM 111 Principles of Chemistry for Engineers a (4-0-4)
ENGR 131 Elementary Computer Programming a (2-2-3)
MATH 121 Calculus for Science and Engineering a (4-0-4)
FSCC 100 Sages First Seminar a (4-0-4)
PHED 101 Physical Education Activities (0-3-0)
Total (17-5-18)


Spring
SAGES University Seminar I b (3-0-3)
ENGR 145 Chemistry of Materials a (4-0-4)
MATH 122 Calculus for Science and Engineering II a (4-0-4)
PHYS 121 General Physics I a (4-0-4)
PHED 102 Physical Education Activities (0-3-0)
Total (15-3-15)


Second Year
Fall
SAGES University Seminar II b (3-0-3)
EBME 201 Physiology - Biophysics I (3-0-3)
EMAC 270 Introduction to Polymer Science and Engineering a (3-0-3)
MATH 223 Calculus for Science and Engineering III a (3-0-3)
PHYS 122 General Physics II a (4-0-4)
Total (16-0-16)


Spring
Humanities or Social Sciences II a (3-0-3)
EBME 202 Physiology - Biophysics II d (3-0-3)
EMAC 276 Polymer Properties and Design (SAGES Departmental Seminar) (3-0-3)
MATH 224 Elementary Differential Equations (3-0-3)
or
MATH 234 Introduction to Dynamic Systems a (3-0-3)
ENGR 225 Thermodynamics, Fluid Mechanics, and Heat and Mass Transfer a (4-0-4)
Total (16-0-16)


Third Year Class-Lab-Credit Hours
Fall
Humanities or Social Sciences a (3-0-3)
CHEM 223 Organic Chemistry I d (3-0-3)
CHEM 290 Chemistry Laboratory Methods for Engineers (1-5-3)
or CHEM 321 (1-5-3)
EBME 306 Introduction to Biomedical Materials (3-0-3)
EMAC 351 Physical Chemistry for Engineers I (3-0-3)
ENGR 200 Statics and Strength of Materials a (3-0-3)
Total (16-5-18)


Spring
Natural Science elective c (3-0-3)
CHEM 224 Organic Chemistry II d (3-0-3)
EMAC 376 Polymer Engineering (3-0-3)
EMAC 303 Structure of Biological Materials (3-0-3)
EMAC 351 Polymer Analysis Laboratory or Technical elective I e,f (3-0-3)
Total (15-0-15)


Fourth Year
Fall
Humanities or Social Sciences a (3-0-3)
ENGR 210 Introduction to Circuits & Instrumentation a (4-0-4)
EMAC 370 Polymer Chemistry and Industry (3-0-3)
EMAC 377 Polymer Processing (3-0-3)
Technical elective I or EMAC 372 Polymer Processing Laboratory e, f(3-0-3)
Total (16-0-16)


Spring
EMAC 378 Polymer Production and Technology (3-0-3)
EMAC 398 Polymer Science & Engineering Project (SAGES Capstone Course) a,g (3-0-3)
ENGL 398N Professional Communication a (3-0-3)
Technical elective II f (3-0-3)
Technical elective III f (3-0-3)
Total (15-0-15)


Hours required for graduation: 129

  1. Engineering Core Courses.
  2. Choice of USNA, USSO, or USSY course focused on thinking about the natural, social, or symbolic “world.”
  3. Approved Natural Science electives: BIOL 214, Genes and Evolution (d); BIOL 215, Cells and Proteins (d); BIOC 307, General Biochemistry (d); BIOL 362, Developmental Biology.
  4. Suggested for pre-med students.
  5. Students are required to take either EMAC 355 or EMAC 372.
  6. The three technical electives have to be taken from: EBME 315, Applied Tissue Engineering; EBME 316, Introduction to Drug Delivery; EBME 325, Introduction to Tissue Engineering; EBME 350, Quantitative Molecular Bioengineering; EBME 405, Materials for Prosthetics and Orthotics, EBME 408, Tissue and Cell Engineering; EBME 426, Gene and Drug Delivery; EMAC 471 / EBME 406, Polymers in Medicine; a three-credit research sequence of EMAC 125 and/or EMAC 325.
  7. Preparation for the polymer science project should commence in the previous semester.