mni 3-6 years after graduation:

  1. Our graduates will successfully enter and complete post baccalaureate advanced degree programs, including those in biomedical engineering
  2. Our graduates will obtain jobs in the biomedical arena and advance to positions of greater responsibility.

To achieve these post-graduation objectives, we have defined the following program outcomes. These are skills that graduates of our program are expected to be proficient in at the time of graduation:

  1. An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering appropriate to the biomedical engineering
  2. An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
  3. An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability
  4. An ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams
  5. An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
  6. An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
  7. An ability to communicate effectively
  8. The ability to communicate the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context
  9. A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning
  10. A knowledge of contemporary issues
  11. An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice

Biomedical Engineering Specialty Electives


Common BME specialties are biomaterials (orthopaedic, polymeric) and tissue engineering, biomechanics, bioelectric engineering, biomedical instrumentation (devices and sensors), biomedical computing and imaging, and biomedical systems and control. Courses for these specialties are presented in the table. Complete descriptions and suggested schedules are available on the department’s web page (http://bme.case.edu/current_students/undergrad/program/specialty_sequences.html). These specialties provide the student with a solid background in a well-defined area of biomedical engineering. To meet specific educational needs, students may choose alternatives from among the suggested electives or design unique specialties subject to departmental guidelines and faculty approval.


Co-op and Internship Programs


Opportunities are available for students to alternate studies and work in industry as a co-op student, which is integrated in a five-year program. Alternatively, students may obtain employment as summer interns.


Minor in Biomedical Engineering


A minor in biomedical engineering is offered to students who have taken the Engineering Core requirements. The minor consists of an approved set of five EBME courses.


B.S./M.S. Program


Undergraduates with a strong academic record may apply in their junior year for admission to the integrated B.S./M.S. program. A senior research project that begins in the summer after the junior year is designed to expand into an M.S. thesis. Also, the student begins to take graduate courses in the senior year. With continuous progress in research during three summers and the academic years, this program can lead to both the B.S. and M.S. in five years.


BME SPECIALTY SEQUENCE CLASSES


To ensure depth in a particular area, students take one of the eight specialty sequences listed below. Students should consult the Web site of the Department of Biomedical Engineering to learn more about the educational program and to determine the best order for taking courses in a particular sequence.


Biomechanics
EMAE 181, ECIV 310, EMAE 250, EMAE 271, EBME 307, and EMAE 372; and technical electives from EMAE 172, EMAE 370, EMAE 350, EMAE 415, EBME 402, ECIV 420


Bioelectric Engineering
EECS 245, EECS 309, EBME 317, EBME 327; and technical electives from EECS 281, EECS 311, EECS 321, EECS 322, EECS 344, EECS 382, EBME 418, EECS 233, EECS 304, EECS 324, EECS 337, EECS 338, EECS 340, EECS 351, EECS 354, EECS 355, EECS 346, EBME 378, EBME 401, EBME 407, EBME 408, EBME 320, EBME 350


Biomaterials (polymeric)
EMAC 270, CHEM 223, CHEM 233, EMAC 351, and EBME 303; and technical electives from EBME 316, EBME 315, EBME 325, EBME 350, EBME 405, EMAC 377, ECHE 360, EMAC 376, EBME 406, EBME 408, EBME 425, EMAC 276, EMAC 370, and EMAC 352.


Biomaterials (orthopaedic)
EMSE 201, ECIV 310, EMSE 303, and EMAC 270; and technical electives from EBME 405, EMSE 316, EBME 416, EMSE 202, EMAE 172, EMSE 270, EMSE 313, EMSE 411, EMAE 372, EMAC 276, EMAE 250, EBME 303, EBME 307, EBME 406, EMAE 415, EMSE 301, EMSE 307, and EMSE 203


Biomedical Computing and Imaging
EECS 233, EECS 337, and EBME 320; and technical electives from EECS 281, EBME 431, EECS 375, EECS 398M, EECS 340, EECS 313, MIDS 329, EBME 461, EECS 375, EECS 341, EECS 338, EECS 391, and MATH 304


Biomedical Instrumentation (devices)
EECS 245, EECS 281, and EECS 344; and technical electives from EECS 382, EECS 309, EBME 403, EBME 320, EECS 321, EECS 311, EBME 418, PHYS 326, EECS 282, EECS 322, EECS 344, ECHE 370, ECHE 380, and ECHE 381.


Biomedical Systems and Control
EECS 304, EECS 313, EECS 322, and EMAE 181; and technical electives EECS 306, MATH 201, MATH 338, OPRE 345, EBME 402, EBME 407, EBME 320, EBME 461, EMBE 307, and EECS 346.


Notes: This gives 129 credits. Varies from sequence to sequence.

 

Tissue Engineering

CHEM 223, CHEM 233, BIOL 362, EBME 325, EMAC 270, and; and technical electives from EBME 315, EBME 316, EBME 405, EBME 416, EBME 425, EMAC 351, EMAC 377, EBME 406, EBME 408, ECHE 364, ECHE 360, ECHE 474, EMAC 376, EBME 303, and ECHE 340.


Graduate Programs


The objective of the graduate program in biomedical engineering is to educate biomedical engineers for careers in industry, academia, health care, and government and to advance research in biomedical engineering. The department provides a learning environment that encourages students to apply biomedical engineering methods to advance basic scientific discovery; integrate knowledge across the spectrum from basic cellular and molecular biology through tissue, organ, and whole-body physiology and pathophysiology; and to exploit this knowledge to design diagnostic and therapeutic technologies that improve human health. The unique and rich medical, science, and engineering environment at Case enables research projects ranging from basic science through engineering design and clinical application.


Numerous fellowships and research assistantships are available to support graduate students in their studies.


M.S. Programs


The M.S. program in biomedical engineering provides breadth in biomedical engineering and biomedical sciences with depth in an engineering specialty. In addition, students are expected to develop the ability to work independently on a biomedical research or design project. The M.S. requires a minimum of 30 credit hours. With an M.S. research thesis (Plan A), a minimum of 21 credits hours is needed in regular course work and 9 hours of thesis research (EBME 651). With an M.S. project (Plan B), a minimum of 27 credits hours is needed in regular course work, and three hours of project research (EBME 601).


Master of Engineering and Management - Biomedical Entrepreneurship


Biomedical engineering students may apply for the Biomedical Entrepreneurship concentration in the Master of Engineering (MEM) program. The MEM is a degree offered by The Institute for Management and Engineering (TiME), a joint program between the Case School of Engineering and the Weatherhead School of Management. The objective of this program is to provide biomedical engineers with the business and management context required to enable them to drive innovation within biomedical companies while serving in a technical capacity.
Students can enter the program as undergraduates. The program does not interfere with undergraduate degree requirements. The curriculum includes courses integrating engineering and management, as well as industrial internships. By making use of summers for both course work and internships, the M.E.M. degree is completed in one additional year beyond the B.S., i.e., for a total of five years for the B.S. and M.E.M. degrees. Students should apply through TiME.


M.D./M.S. Program


Medicine is undergoing a transformation based on the rapid advances in science and technology that are combining to produce more accurate diagnoses, more effective treatments with fewer side effects, and improved ability to prevent disease. The goal of the M.D./M.S. in Engineering is to prepare medical graduates to be leaders in the development and clinical deployment of this technology and to partner with others in technology based translational research teams. Current Case medical students in either the University Program (UP) or the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine (CCLCM) may apply to the M.D./M.S. in Engineering program.
Students must complete the normal requirements in their particular M.D. program. Portions of the medical school curriculum earn graded credit toward the M.D./M.S. degree. Specifically, six credit hours of the medical school curriculum can be applied to the M.S. component of the joint degree.


The balance of 12 credit hours (4 courses) must be graduate level engineering concentration courses that provide rigor and depth in a field of engineering relevant to the area of research.


A required thesis serves a key integration role for the joint degree, with both medical and engineering components. The thesis also fulfills the research requirement of the UP or CCLCM programs.


Students should apply through the BME department admissions office.


Ph.D. Program in Biomedical Engineering


For those students with primary interest in research, the Ph.D. in biomedical engineering provides additional depth and breadth in engineering and the biomedical sciences. Under faculty guidance, students are expected to undertake original research motivated by a biomedical problem. Research possibilities include the development of new theory, devices, or methods for diagnostic or therapeutic applications, as well as for measurement and evaluation of basic biological mechanisms.


The Ph.D. program requires a minimum of 12 courses beyond the B.S. degree. There are four required core courses (EBME 403, 409, 451, 452). The balance of the courses can be chosen with significant flexibility to meet the career goals of the student, and to satisfy requirements of depth and breadth. Programs of study must include three graduate level courses in biomedical sciences and two courses whose content is primarily mathematical. Two semesters of departmental seminar attendance (EBME 611, 612) and three semesters of teaching experience (EBME 400T, 500T, 600T) are also required. Ph.D. programs of study are reviewed and must be accepted by the Graduate Education Committee and the department chair. Eighteen hours of EBME 701 registration are required.


Ph.D. candidacy requires passing certain milestones. A student is advanced to Ph.D. candidacy after: (1) passing the Ph.D. Qualifying Exam; (2) obtaining an M.S. degree (or equivalent); and (3) obtaining approval of the Ph.D. short proposal. The Ph.D. is completed when the dissertation has been written and defended, and when at least two manuscripts have been submitted for publication and at least one of the two is accepted.


M.D./Ph.D. Programs


Students with outstanding qualifications may apply to either of two M.D./Ph.D. programs. Students interested in obtaining a combined M.D./Ph.D., with an emphasis on basic research in biomedical engineering, are strongly encouraged to explore the Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP), administered by the School of Medicine. Alternatively, the Physician Engineer Training Program (PETP) was established to train future physicians who also possess expertise in state-of-the-art engineering medical technologies, with a research focus on applied biomedical engineering. It is expected that graduates of the PETP will have a strong interest in the biomedical industrial sector, clinical medicine, or in academic positions in biomedical engineering, rather than the traditional M.D./Ph.D. career pathway in academic medicine.


Both M.D./Ph.D. programs require approximately 7-8 years of intensive study after the B.S. Interested students should apply for either program through the MSTP office in the Medical School.


Research Areas


Several research thrusts are available to accommodate various student backgrounds and interests. Strong research collaborations with clinical and basic science departments of the university and collaborating medical centers bring a broad range of opportunities, expertise, and perspective to student research projects.


Biomaterials/Tissue Engineering/Drug and Gene Delivery


Fabrication and analysis of materials for implantation, including neural, orthopaedic, and cardiovascular tissue engineering, biomimetic materials, liposomal and other structures for controlled, targeted drug delivery, and biocompatible polymer surface modifications. Analysis of synthetic and biologic polymers by AFM, nanoscale structure-function relationships of biomaterials. Applications in the nervous system, the cardiovascular system, the musculoskeletal system, and cancer.


Biomedical Imaging


MRI, PET, SPECT, CT, ultrasound, acoustic elastography, optical coherence tomography, cardiac electrical potential mapping, human visual perception, image-guided intervention, contrast agents. In vivo microscopic and molecular imaging, and small animal imaging.


Biomedical Sensing


Optical sensing, electrochemical and chemical fiber-optic sensors, chemical measurements in cells and tissues, endoscopy.


Neural Engineering and Neural Prostheses


Neuronal mechanisms; neural interfacing for electric and magnetic stimulation and recording; neural dynamics, ion channels, second messengers; neural prostheses for control of limb movement, bladder, bowel, and respiratory function; computational modeling of neural structures


Transport and Metabolic Systems Engineering


Modeling and analysis of tissue responses to heating (e.g., tumor ablation) and of cellular metabolism related to organ and whole-body function in health (exercise) and disease (cardiac).


Biomechanical Systems


Computational musculoskeletal modeling, bone biomechanics, soft tissue mechanics, control of neuroprostheses for motor function, neuromuscular control systems, human locomotion, cardiac mechanics.


Cardiovascular Systems


Normal cardiac physiology, pathogenesis of cardiac diseases, therapeutic technologies; electrophysiological techniques, imaging technologies, mathematical modeling, gene regulation, molecular biology techniques; cardiac bioelectricity and cardiac biomechanics.


Facilities


The home of the Department of Biomedical Engineering is the Wickenden Building, with offices for all primary faculty and most of the non-clinical research laboratories and centers. Major interdisciplinary centers include the Center for Cardiovascular Biomaterials (CCB), the Center for Biomolecular and Nanoscale Engineering for Targeted Therapeutics (BioNETT), the Neural Engineering Center (NEC), the Center for Modeling Integrated Metabolic Systems (MIMS), and the In-situ Imaging Center. The CCB includes laboratories for biomaterials microscopy, biopolymer and biomaterial interfaces, and molecular simulation. The BioNETT Center develops technologies for physical and chemical targeting of therapeutics, and imaging their distribution within the body. The NEC is a major facility for basic research and animal experimentation, with a focus on recording and controlling neural activity to increase our understanding of the nervous system and to develop neural prostheses. The MIMS Center combines mathematical modeling, computer simulation, and in vivo experimentation to quantify relationships between cellular metabolism and physiological responses of tissue-organ systems and the whole body. The Biomedical Imaging Laboratories, housed in the Case Center for Imaging Research and the Radiology department at University Hospitals, image structure and function from the molecular level to the tissue-organ level, using many modalities, including ultrasound, MRI, CT, PET, SPECT, bioluminescence, and light,. Biomedical Sensing Laboratories include facilities for electrochemical sensing, chemical measurements in individual cells, and minimally invasive physiological monitoring.


Primary BME faculty also have laboratories and Centers in other locations. The Endoscopy Research Laboratory in University Hospitals is the center for work on optical coherence tomography and biophotonics. The FES (Functional Electrical Stimulation) Center, with laboratories in three medical centers, develops techniques for restoration of movement in paralysis, control of the nervous system, and implantable technology. Also, it promotes technology transfer and disseminates information about functional electrical stimulation, and evaluates clinical functionality of neuroprostheses. The APT (Advanced Platform Technology) Center develops advanced technologies that serve the clinical needs of veterans and others with motor and sensory deficits and limb loss.


The Coulter-Case Translation and Innovation Partnership (CCTIP) is a department-based collaboration with the Wallace H. Coulter Foundation. The partnership’s mission is to accelerate theintroduction of new technologies into patient care through translational research and commercialization.


The department faculty and students have access to the facilities and major laboratories of the Case School of Engineering and of the School of Medicine. Faculty have numerous collaborations at University Hospitals, MetroHealth Medical Center, VA Medical Center, and the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. These provide extensive research resources in a clinical environment for both undergraduate and graduate students.


Biomedical Engineering Course Descriptions (EBME)

EBME 105. Introduction to Biomedical Engineering (3)
This course is intended to introduce Freshmen to a wide variety of biomedical engineering fields including: biomaterials, tissue engineering, drug delivery systems, biomedical imaging and processing, cardiac measurement and analysis, neural engineering, neuromuscular control, and systems biology. Topics span research, development, and design for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Prereq: Freshmen standing.


EBME 201. Physiology-Biophysics I (3)
This course (1) teaches cell physiology from an engineering perspective - basics covered include cell structures and functions, genes and protein synthesis, diffusion fundamentals, electrical properties of neural and muscle cells, sensory transduction, and integration of function on the micro and macro scale; (2) teaches how to use engineering tools to model different cell functions and predict, measure, and control cell behavior; (3) introduces mathematical and graphical analysis of specific physiological systems emphasizing applied modeling and simulation.


EBME 202. Physiology-Biophysics II (3)
This course is an extension of EBME 201 that will extend the application of system modeling and simulation to complex physiological systems in a clinical environment. The course will cover models of biochemical systems with pathology, muscle, the cardiovascular system, respiratory system, renal and hepatic systems with pathology and clinical applications. Prereq: EBME 201 or consent of instructor.


EBME 300. Dynamics of Biological Systems: A Quantitative Introduction to Biology (3)
This course will introduce students to dynamic biological phenomena, from the molecular to the population level, and models of these dynamical phenomena. It will describe a biological system, discuss how to model its dynamics, and experimentally evaluate the resulting models. Topics will include molecular dynamics of biological molecules, kinetics of cell metabolism and the cell cycle, biophysics of excitability, scaling laws for biological systems, biomechanics, and population dynamics. Mathematical tools for the analysis of dynamic biological processes will also be presented. Students will manipulate and analyze simulations of biological processes, and learn to formulate and analyze their own models. This course satisfies a laboratory requirement for the biology major. Offered as BIOL 300 and EBME 300.


EBME 303. Structure of Biological Materials (3)
Structure of proteins, nucleic acids, connective tissue and bone from molecular to microscopic levels. Principles and applications of instruments for imaging, identification, and measurement of biological materials. Recommended preparation: EBME 202. Offered as EBME 303 and EMAC 303.


EBME 306. Introduction to Biomedical Materials (3)
Biomaterials design and application in different tissue and organ systems. The relationship between the physical and chemical structure of biomaterials, functional properties, and biological response. Recommended preparation: EBME 201 and EBME 202.


EBME 307. Biomechanical Prosthetic Systems (3)
Introduction to the basic biomechanics of human movement and applications to the design and evaluation of artificial devices intended to restore or improve movement lost due to injury or disease. Measurement techniques in movement biomechanics, including motion analysis, electromyography, and gait analysis. Design and use of upper and lower limb prostheses. Principles of neuroprostheses with applications to paralyzed upper and lower extremities. Recommended preparation: Consent of instructor and senior standing.


EBME 308. Biomedical Signals and Systems (4)
Quantitative analysis of biomedical signals and physiological systems. Time domain and frequency domain analysis of linear systems. Fourier and Laplace transforms. A/D conversion and sampling. Filter design. Computational laboratory experiences with biomedical applications. Recommended preparation: EBME 201, EBME 202, MATH 224, ENGR 210.


EBME 309. Modeling of Biomedical Systems (3)
Mathematical modeling of biomedical systems. Lumped and distributed models of electrical, mechanical, and chemical processes applied to cells, tissues, and organ systems. Numerical methods for solving equations to simulate system models. Recommended preparation: EBME 308. Coreq: EBME 359.


EBME 310. Principles of Biomedical Instrumentation (3)
Physical, chemical and biological principles for biomedical measurements. Modular blocks and system integration. Sensors for displacement, force, pressure, flow, temperature, biopotentials, chemical composition of body fluids and biomaterial characterization. Patient safety. Recommended preparation: EBME 308. Coreq: EBME 360.


EBME 315. Applied Tissue Engineering (3)
This course is designed to provide students with understanding and expertise of the basic tools in tissue engineering research. Through lectures the students will be introduced to the array of methods and materials available to tissue engineering researchers, learn how to rationally determine suitable choices for their applications, and receive instruction on how to implement those designs. Much of the course will be spent in the BME Tissue Engineering Laboratory getting hands-on experience (1) on the materials end with materials selection, characterization, and scaffold fabrication; (2) on the cell end with cell culture, tissue characterization and bioreactor design. The class will be assessed by a weekly grading of the students’ lab notebooks, as well as a final exam based on the content learned throughout the semester.


EBME 317. Excitable Cells: Molecular Mechanisms (3)
Ion channels are the molecular basis of membrane excitability in all cell types, including neural, heart, and muscle cells. This course presents the structure and the mechanism of function of ion channels at the molecular level. It introduces the basic principles and methods in the ion channel study including the ionic basis of membrane excitability, thermodynamic and kinetic analysis of channel function, voltage clamp and patch clamp techniques, and molecular and structural biology approaches. The course will cover structure of various potassium, calcium, sodium, and chloride channels and their physiological function in neural, cardiac, and muscle cells. Exemplary channels that have been best studied will be discussed to illustrate the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms of channel gating and permeation. Graduate students will present exemplary papers in the journal club style. Recommended preparation: EBME 201 or equivalent. Offered as EBME 317 and EBME 417.


EBME 318. Biomedical Engineering Laboratory I (1)
Experiments for measurement, assisting, replacement, or control of various biomedical systems. Students choose a few lab experiences from a large number of offerings relevant to all BME sequences. Experiments are conducted primarily in faculty labs with 3-8 students participating. Recommended preparation: EBME 201, EBME 202, ENGR 210.


EBME 319. Biomedical Engineering Laboratory II (1)
Experiments for measurement, assisting, replacement, or control of various biomedical systems. Students choose a few lab experiences from a large number of offerings relevant to all BME sequences. Experiments are conducted primarily in faculty labs with 3-8 students participating. Recommended preparation: EBME 201, EBME 202, and ENGR 210.


EBME 320. Medical Imaging Fundamentals (3)
General principles, instrumentation, and biomedical applications of medical imaging. Topics include: x-ray, ultrasound, MRI, nuclear imaging, image reconstruction, and image quality. Recommended preparation: EBME 308, ENGR 210, and EBME 202 or equivalent.


EBME 322. Applications of Biomedical Imaging (3)
This course will provide an introduction to biomedical imaging and its applications in measurements of physiological function, stem cell biology, and drug delivery. Students will learn about imaging technologies including basic principles of imaging (resolution and contrast), optical microscopy and in vivo imaging, and magnetic resonance imaging. Emerging techniques in cellular and molecular imaging, including targeted imaging agents and reporter gene imaging will be discussed. Biomedical applications will include such topics as tumor characterization in drug assessment, functional brain mapping, targeted drug delivery, functional cardiovascular measurements, and stem cell research will be demonstrated. Prereq: EBME 201, EBME 202, EBME 308, PHYS 121, PHYS 122.


EBME 325. Introduction to Tissue Engineering (3)
The goal of this course is to present students with a firm understanding of the primary components, design principles, and engineering concepts central to the field of tissue engineering. First, the biological principles of tissue formation during morphogenesis and wound repair will be examined. The cellular processes underlying these events will be presented with an emphasis on microenvironment regulation of cell behavior. Biomimetic approaches to controlling cell function and tissue formation via the development of biomaterial systems will then be investigated. Case studies of regeneration strategies for specific tissues will be presented in order to examine the different tissue-specific engineering strategies that may be employed. Special current topics in tissue engineering will also be covered. Recommended preparation: EBME 306, BIOL 362, and CHEM 223.


EBME 327. Bioelectric Engineering (3)
Quantitative bioelectricity: action potentials and cable equations. Origins of biopotentials, biopotential recording, electrical stimulation of excitable tissue, electrodes/electrochemistry and cardiac electrophysiology. Overview of major biomedical devices. Recommended preparation: EBME 201, EBME 317 and ENGR 210.


EBME 328. Biomedical Engineering R&D Training I (1)
This course will provide research and development in the laboratory of a mentoring faculty member. Varied R&D experiences will include activities in biomedical instrumentation, tissue engineering, imaging, drug delivery, and neural engineering. Each Student must identify a faculty mentor, and together they will create description of the training experience prior to the first class. Prereq: EBME 201 and EBME 202.


EBME 329. Biomedical Engineering R&D Training II (1)
This course will provide research and development training in the laboratory of a mentoring faculty member. Varied R&D experiences will include activities in biomedical instrumentation, tissue engineering, imaging, drug delivery, and neural engineering. Each student must identify a faculty mentor, and together will create a description of the training experience prior to the first class. Recommended preparation EBME 328. Prereq: EBME 201 and EBME 202.


EBME 350. Quantitative Molecular Bioengineering (3)
The objective of this course is to equip the students with a “molecular toolbox”--a set of quantitative skills that permit rational designs for engineering tissues starting at the molecular level. The course will build on the physical and chemical principles in equilibrium, kinetics, and mass transport. Specific examples in bioengineering systems will be used throughout the course to illustrate the importance of understanding and application of these principles to tissue engineering. Recommended preparation: ENGR 225. Offered as EBME 350 and ECHE 355.


EBME 359. Biomedical Computer Simulation Laboratory (1)
Computer simulation of mathematical models of biomedical systems. Numerical methods with MATLAB applications. Coreq: EBME 309.


EBME 360. Biomedical Instrumentation Laboratory (1)
A laboratory which focuses on the basic components of biomedical instrumentation and provides hands-on experience for students in EBME 310, Biomedical Instrumentation. The purpose of the course is to develop design skills and laboratory skills in analysis and circuit development. Coreq: EBME 310.


EBME 370. Principles of Biomedical Engineering Design (2)
The design process required to produce biomedical devices, research equipment, and clinical tools is developed. Topics include identification of need; requirements specification; project management; working in teams; solutions conceptualization, refinement, and selection; hazard and risk analysis and mitigation; verification; validation; regulatory requirements; and medical device pathways to the market. Through critical examination of contemporary medical research and clinical problems, students, working in teams, will identify a need to develop a specific problem statement, project plan, input requirements, solution concept and risk analysis. Students will provide periodic oral progress reports and a final oral presentation with a written design report. Recommended preparation: EBME 310.


EBME 380. Biomedical Engineering Design Experience (3)
This course is the culmination of the BME educational experience in which the student will apply acquired skills and knowledge to create a working device or product to meet a medical need. Students will learn how to apply engineering skills to solve problems and physically realize a project design. The course structure includes regular meetings with a faculty project advisor, regular reports of accomplished activity, hands on fabrication of devices, and several lectures from leading engineers from industry and academia that have first hand experience in applying the principles of design to Biomedical Engineering. Students will also provide periodic oral progress reports and a final oral presentation with a written design report. Prereq: EBME 370.


SAGES Senior Cap
EBME 396. Special Topics in Undergraduate Biomedical Engineering I (1 - 18)

(Credit as arranged.)


EBME 398. Senior Project Laboratory I (3)
Students learn and implement the design process to produce working prototypes of medical devices with potential commercial value to meet significant clinical needs. Critical examination of contemporary medical problems is used to develop a specific problem statement. The class is divided into teams of 3 to 4 students. Each team integrates their knowledge and skills to design a device to meet their clinical need. Project planning and management, including resource allocation, milestones, and documentation, are required to ensure successful completion of projects within the allotted time and budget. Formal design reviews by a panel of advisors and outside medical device experts are required every four weeks. Every student is required to give oral presentations at each formal review and is responsible for formal documentation of the design process, resulting in an executive summary and complete design history file of the project. The course culminates with a public presentation of the team’s device to a panel of experts. This course is expected to provide the student with a real-world, capstone design experience. Recommended preparation: EBME 310.


SAGES Senior Cap
EBME 399. Senior Project Laboratory II (3)

Continuation of EBME 398. Recommended preparation: EBME 398 and consent of department.


SAGES Senior Cap
EBME 400T. Graduate Teaching I (0)

This will provide the Ph.D. candidate with experience in teaching undergraduate or graduate students. The experience is expected to consist of direct student contact, but will be based upon the specific departmental needs and teaching obligations. This teaching experience will be conducted under the supervision of the faculty member who is responsible for the course, but the academic advisor will assess the educational plan to ensure that it provides an educational opportunity for the student. Recommended preparation: UNIV 400, BME Ph.D. student.


EBME 401. Bioelectric Phenomena (3)
The goal of this course is to provide working knowledge of the theoretical methods that are used in the fields of electrophysiology and bioelectricity for both neural and cardiac systems. These methods will be applied to describe, from a theoretical and quantitative perspective, the electrical behavior of excitable cells, the methods for recording their activity and the effect of applied electrical and magnetic fields on excitable issues. A team modeling project will be required. Recommended preparation: differential equations, circuits. Prereq: Graduate standing or Undergraduate with Junior or Senior standing and a cumulative GPA of 3.2 or above.


EBME 402. Muscles, Biomechanics, and Control of Movement (4)
Quantitative and qualitative descriptions of the action of muscles in relation to human movement. Introduction to rigid body dynamics and dynamics of multi-link systems using Newtonian and Lagrangian approaches. Muscle models with application to control of multi-joint movement. Forward and inverse dynamics of multi-joint, muscle driven systems. Dissection, observation and recitation in the anatomy laboratory with supplemental lectures concentrating on kinesiology and muscle function. Recommended preparation: EMAE 181 or equivalent. Offered as EBME 402 and EMAE 402. Prereq: Graduate standing or Undergraduate with Junior or Senior standing and a cumulative GPA of 3.2 or above.


EBME 403. Biomedical Instrumentation (3)
Analysis and design of biomedical instruments with special emphasis on transducers. Body, system, organ, tissue, cellular, molecular, and nano-level measurements. Applications to clinical problems and biomedical research. Prereq: Graduate standing.


EBME 405. Materials for Prosthetics and Orthotics (3)
Fundamental concepts of metallic and ceramic materials. Wear, corrosion, and failure of implants. Properties of hard tissues and joints. Characterization of biomaterials. Biocompatibility of materials. Orthopaedic and dental applications. Recommended preparation: EBME 306. Prereq: Graduate standing or Undergraduate with Junior or Senior standing and a cumulative GPA of 3.2 or above.


EBME 406. Polymers in Medicine (3)
This course covers the important fundamentals and applications of polymers in medicine, and consists of three major components: (i) the blood and soft-tissue reactions to polymer implants; (ii) the structure, characterization and modification of biomedical polymers; and (iii) the application of polymers in a broad range of cardiovascular and extravascular devices. The chemical and physical characteristics of biomedical polymers and the properties required to meet the needs of the intended biological function will be presented. Clinical evaluation, including recent advances and current problems associated with different polymer implants. Recommended preparation: EBME 306 or equivalent. Offered as EBME 406 or EMAC 471. Prereq: Graduate standing or Undergraduate with Junior or Senior standing and a cumulative GPA of 3.2 or above.


EBME 407. Neural Interfacing (3)
Neural interfacing refers to the principles, methods, and devices that bridge the boundary between engineered devices and the nervous system. It includes the methods and mechanisms to get information efficiently and effectively into and out of the nervous system to analyze and control its function. This course examines advanced engineering, neurobiology, neurophysiology, and the interaction between all of them to develop methods of connecting to the nervous system. The course builds on a sound background in Bioelectric Phenomenon to explore fundamental principles of recording and simulation, electrochemistry of electrodes in biological tissue, tissue damage generated by electrical stimulation, materials and material properties, and molecular functionalization of devices for interfacing with the nervous system. Several examples of the state-of-art neural interfaces will be analyzed and discussed. Recommended preparation: EBME 401. Prereq: Graduate standing or Undergraduate with Junior or Senior standing and a cumulative GPA of 3.2 or above.


EBME 408. Engineering Tissues/Materials - Learning from Nature’s Paradigms (3)
This course aims to provide students with a foundation based on “nature’s” design and optimization” criteria for engineering tissues and biomaterials. This will be achieved through focused review of the principles of development, wound healing, regeneration, and repair through remodeling, using nature as a paradigm. Principles of transport will be explored quantitatively and in relation to multi-organismal evolution. Cellular engineering principles will be explored, including current state of the art in stem cell physiology and therapeutic applications. Endogenous engineering approaches to surgical tissue reconstruction will be analyzed. An overview of contemporary approaches to tissue and cell engineering will be given, including tissue scaffold design, use of bioreactors in tissue engineering, and molecular surface modifications for integration of engineered tissues in situ. Fundamental engineering principles will be augmented through case studies involving specific applications. Ethical considerations related to clinical non-clinical application of tissue and cell engineering technology will be integrated into each lecture. Prereq: Graduate standing or Undergraduate with Junior or Senior standing and a cumulative GPA of 3.2 or above.


EBME 409. Systems and Signals in Biomedical Engineering (3)
Modeling and analysis of dynamic systems. Processing and analysis of signals and images in time and frequency domains. Spatially lumped and distributed linear and nonlinear models. Feedback systems. Optimal parameter estimation. Matrix methods. Initial-and boundary-value problems. Laplace and Fourier transforms. Spectral analysis. Sampling. Filtering. Biomedical applications include enzyme kinetics, hemodialysis, respiratory control, drug delivery, and cell migration. Numerical methods using MATLAB. Prereq: EBME 308 and EBME 309 or equivalent.


EBME 410. Medical Imaging Fundamentals (3)
Physical principles of medical imaging. Imaging devices for x-ray, ultrasound, magnetic resonance, etc. Image quality descriptions. Patient risk. Recommended preparation: EBME 308 and EBME 310 or equivalent. Prereq: Graduate standing or Undergraduate with Junior or Senior standing and a cumulative GPA of 3.2 or above.


EBME 417. Excitable Cells: Molecular Mechanisms (3)
Ion channels are the molecular basis of membrane excitability in all cell types, including neural, heart, and muscle cells. This course presents the structure and the mechanism of function of ion channels at the molecular level. It introduces the basic principles and methods in the ion channel study including the ionic basis of membrane excitability, thermodynamic and kinetic analysis of channel function, voltage clamp and patch clamp techniques, and molecular and structural biology approaches. The course will cover structure of various potassium, calcium, sodium, and chloride channels and their physiological function in neural, cardiac, and muscle cells. Exemplary channels that have been best studied will be discussed to illustrate the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms of channel gating and permeation. Graduate students will present exemplary papers in the journal club style. Recommended preparation: EBME 201 or equivalent. Offered as EBME 317 and EBME 417. Prereq: Graduate standing or Undergraduate with Junior or Senior standing and a cumulative GPA of 3.2 or above.


EBME 418. Electronics for Biomedical Engineering (3)
Fundamental concepts of analog design with special emphasis on circuits for biomedical applications. Analysis and design of discrete and integrated circuit amplifiers; application, high CMRR biomedical amplifiers, implantable circuits, circuits for electrochemistry and circuits for optical recordings, circuits for recording neural activity, electrical safety and telemetry. A team project will be required for all students. Recommended preparation: EECS 344 or consent of instructor. Prereq: Graduate standing or Undergraduate with Junior or Senior standing and a cumulative GPA of 3.2 or above.


EBME 419. Applied Probability and Stochastic Processes for Biology (3)
Applications of probability and stochastic processes to biological systems. Mathematical topics will include: introduction to discrete and continuous probability spaces (including numerical generation of pseudo random samples from specified probability distributions), Markov processes in discrete and continuous time with discrete and continuous sample spaces, point processes including homogeneous and inhomogeneous Poisson processes and Markov chains on graphs, and diffusion processes including Brownian motion and the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. Biological topics will be determined by the interests of the students and the instructor. Likely topics include: stochastic ion channels, molecular motors and stochastic ratchets, actin and tubulin polymerization, random walk models for neural spike trains, bacterial chemotaxis, signaling and genetic regulatory networks, and stochastic predator-prey dynamics. The emphasis will be on practical simulation and analysis of stochastic phenomena in biological systems. Numerical methods will be developed using both MATLAB and the R statistical package. Student projects will comprise a major part of the course. Offered as BIOL 319, EECS 319, MATH 319, BIOL 419, EBME 419, and PHOL 419.


EBME 420. Biomedical Ultrasound Technologies (3)
Biomedical ultrasound technologies including both ultrasound for imaging and as a therapeutic tool. Fundamentals of ultrasound physics, instrumentation, and imaging. Novel imaging techniques with high resolution ultrasound. Ultrasound contrast agents for in vivo targeted imaging. Biomedical effects on cells and tissues. High intensity focused ultrasound for tumor ablation. Ultrasound mediated targeted intracellular drug/gene delivery.


EBME 425. Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine (3)
This course will provide advanced coverage of tissue engineering with a focus on stem cell-based research and therapies. Course topics of note include stem cell biology and its role in development, modeling of stem cell function, controlling stem cell behavior by engineering materials and their microenvironment, stem cells’ trophic character, and state-of-the-art stem cell implementation in tissue engineering and other therapeutic strategies. Offered as EBME 425 and PATH 435. Prereq: EBME 325 or equivalent and graduate standing.


EBME 427. Movement Biomechanics and Rehabilitation (3)
Introduction to the basic biomechanics of human movement and applications to the design and evaluation of artificial devices intended to restore or improve movement lost due to injury or disease. Measurement techniques in movement biomechanics, including motion analysis, electromyography, and gait analysis. Design and use of upper and lower limb prostheses. Principles of neuroprostheses with applications to paralyzed upper and lower extremities. Term paper required. Recommended preparation: Consent of instructor and graduate standing. Prereq: Graduate standing or Undergraduate with Junior or Senior standing and a cumulative GPA of 3.2 or above.


EBME 431. Physics of Imaging (3)
Description of physical principles underlying the spin behavior in MR and Fourier imaging in multi-dimensions. Introduction of conventional, fast, and chemical-shift imaging techniques. Spin echo, gradient echo, and variable flip-angle methods. Projection reconstruction and sampling theorems. Bloch equations, T1 and T2 relaxation times, rf penetration, diffusion and perfusion. Flow imaging, MR angiography, and functional brain imaging. Sequence and coil design. Prerequisite may be waived with consent of instructor. Recommended preparation: PHYS 122 or PHYS 124 or EBME 410. Offered as EBME 431 and PHYS 431.


EBME 440. Translational Research for Biomedical Engineers (3)
Translation of laboratory developments to improve biomedical and clinical research and patient care. Interdisciplinary and team communication. Evaluation of technology and research planning with clinical and engineering perspectives. Discussing clinical situations, shadowing clinicians, attending Grand Rounds and Morbidity-Mortality conferences. Validation study design. Regulatory/oversight organization. Protocol design and informed consent for Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval. NIH requirements for human subject research. Special project reports to produce IRB protocol or NIH-style proposal. Prereq: Graduate standing or Undergraduate with Junior or Senior standing and a cumulative GPA of 3.2 or above.


EBME 447. Rehabilitation for Scientists and Engineers (3)
Medical, psychological, and social issues influencing the rehabilitation of people with spinal cord injury, stroke, traumatic brain injury, and limb amputation. Epidemiology, anatomy, pathophysiology and natural history of these disorders, and the consequences of these conditions with respect to impairment, disability, handicap and quality of life. Students will directly observe the care of patients in each of these diagnostic groups throughout the full continuum of care starting from the acute medical and surgical interventions to acute and subacute rehabilitation, outpatient medical and rehabilitation management and finally to community re-entry.


EBME 451. Molecular and Cellular Physiology (3)
This course is the first in the pair of BME physiology core courses EBME 451 and 452. The emphasis of EBME 451 is on the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying physiological processes. Structure-function relationship will be addressed throughout the course. The primary goal of the course is to develop understanding of the principles of the physiological processes at molecular and cellular level and to promote independent thinking and ability to solve unfamiliar problems. Prereq: Graduate standing or Undergraduate with Junior or Senior standing and a cumulative GPA of 3.2 or above.


EBME 452. Tissue and Organ Systems Physiology (3)
Mechanisms of membrane and capillary-tissue transport, tissue mechanics, electrical propagation, signaling, control and regulation processes. Cardiac vascular, renal, respiratory, gastro-intestinal, neural, sensory, motor, musculoskeletal, and skeletal systems. Basic engineering analysis for quantitative understanding of physiological concepts. Prereq: Graduate standing or Undergraduate with Junior or Senior standing and a cumulative GPA of 3.2 or above.


EBME 460. Advanced Topics in NMR Imaging (3)
Frontier issues in understanding the practical aspects of NMR imaging. Theoretical descriptions are accompanied by specific examples of pulse sequences, and basic engineering considerations in MRI system design. Emphasis is placed on implications and trade-offs in MRI pulse sequence design from real-world versus theoretical perspectives. Recommended preparation: EBME 431 or PHYS 431. Offered as EBME 460 and PHYS 460. Prereq: Graduate standing or Undergraduate with Junior or Senior standing and a cumulative GPA of 3.2 or above.


EBME 461. Biomedical Image Processing and Analysis (3)
Principles of image processing and analysis with applications to biomedical images from the nano-scale to 3D whole organ imaging. Topics include image filtering, enhancement, restoration, registration, morphological processing, and segmentation. Recommended preparation: EBME 409 or equivalent. Prereq: Graduate standing or Undergraduate with Junior or Senior standing and a cumulative GPA of 3.2 or above.


EBME 462. Cellular and Molecular Imaging (3)
Frontier issues in biomedical imaging that address problems at the cellular and molecular levels. Topics include endogenous methods to assess molecular compositions, imaging agents, reporter genes and proteins, and drug delivery, which will be discussed in the context of applications in cancer, cardiology, central nervous system, ophthalmology, musculoskeletal diseases, pulmonary diseases, and metabolic diseases. Emphasis is placed on an interdisciplinary problem-based approach to investigate the application of biomedical imaging to biological and disease areas. Recommended preparation: EBME 410 and EBME 451 or consent of instructor. Prereq: Graduate standing or Undergraduate with Junior or Senior standing and a cumulative GPA of 3.2 or above.


EBME 474. Biotransport Processes (3)
Biomedical mass transport and chemical reaction processes. Basic mechanisms and mathematical models based on thermodynamics, mass and momentum conservation. Analytical and numerical methods to simulate in vivo processes as well as to develop diagnostic and therapeutic methods. Applications include transport across membranes, transport in blood, tumor processes, bioreactors, cell differentiation, chemotaxis, drug delivery systems, tissue engineering processes. Recommended preparation: EBME 350 and EBME 409 or equivalent. Offered as EBME474 and ECHE 474. Prereq: Graduate standing or Undergraduate with Junior or Senior standing and a cumulative GPA of 3.2 or above.


EBME 478. Computational Neuroscience (3)
Computer simulations and mathematical analysis of neurons and neural circuits, and the computational properties of nervous systems. Students are taught a range of models for neurons and neural circuits, and are asked to implement and explore the computational and dynamic properties of these models. The course introduces students to dynamical systems theory for the analysis of neurons and neural learning, models of brain systems, and their relationship to artificial and neural networks. Term project required. Students enrolled in MATH 478 will make arrangements with the instructor to attend additional lectures and complete additional assignments addressing mathematical topics related to the course. Recommended preparation: MATH 223 and MATH 224 or BIOL 300 and BIOL 306. Offered as BIOL 378, COGS 378, MATH 378, BIOL 478, EBME 478, EECS 478, MATH 478 and NEUR 478.


EBME 479. Seminar in Computational Neuroscience (3)
Readings and discussion in the recent literature on computational neuroscience, adaptive behavior, and other current topics. Offered as BIOL 479, EBME 479, EECS 479, and NEUR 479.


EBME 500T. Graduate Teaching II (0)
This course will provide the Ph.D. candidate with experience in teaching undergraduate or graduate students. The experience is expected to consist of direct student contact, but will be based upon the specific departmental needs and teaching obligations. This teaching experience will be conducted under the supervision of the faculty member who is responsible for the course, but the academic advisor will the assess the educational plan to ensure that it provides an educational opportunity for the students. Recommended preparation: EBME 400T, BME Ph.D. student.


EBME 503. Biomolecular Forces (3)
Advanced course on the theory, measurement, and analysis of the intermolecular physical forces that dominate cell and molecular interactions in dynamic aqueous systems. The aim of this course is to provide students involved in biomaterials engineering and studies on cell and molecular interactions with (i) a quantitative and fundamental understanding of the intermolecular forces (electrostatic, van der Walls, solvation forces) that direct cell and molecular adhesion, self-assembling systems (bilayers, cell membranes) and specific and non-specific receptor-ligand binding; (ii) the ability to develop mechanistic models for surface adhesion, self-assembly, cell surface binding and signal transduction; and (iii) skills for measurement and quantitative analysis of forces (nano- to pico-Newton levels) in the “near-surface” (1-10 nm) domain by atomic force microscopy and related force measurement techniques. Recommended preparation: EBME 405 or EBME 406, undergraduate electricity and magnetism, undergraduate physical chemistry, or consent of instructor.


EBME 504. Transport Processes of Biomedical Systems (3)
Mass and heat transport processes in dispersive, convective, and reactive systems. Applications include cell metabolism, drug delivery, tumor growth and ablation, cell migration and adhesion, ventilation inhomogeneity, tissue responses to heating. Critical analysis of journal articles. Simulation projects related to student research. Recommended preparation: EBME 409. Offered as EBME 504 and ECHE 504. Prereq: Graduate standing.


EBME 507. Motor System Neuroprostheses (3)
Fundamentals of neural stimulation and sensing, neurophysiology and pathophysiology of common neurological disorders, general implantation and clinical deployment issues. Specialist discussions in many application areas such as motor prostheses for spinal cord injury and stroke, cochlear implants, bladder control, simulation for pain management, deep brain stimulation, and brain computer interfacing. Prereq: Graduate standing.


EBME 513. Biomedical Optical Diagnostics (3)
Engineering design principles of optical instrumentation for medical diagnostics. Elastic and inelastic light scattering theory and biomedical applications. Confocal and multiphoton microscopy. Light propagation and optical tomographic imaging in biological tissues. Design of minimally invasive spectroscopic diagnostics. Recommended preparation: EBME 403 or PHYS 326 or consent. Prereq: Graduate standing.


EBME 519. Parameter Estimation for Biomedical Systems (3)
Linear and nonlinear parameter estimation of static and dynamic models. Identifiability and parameter sensitivity analysis. Statistical and optimization methods. Design of optimal experiments. Applications include control of breathing, iron kinetics, ligand-receptor models, drug delivery, tumor ablation, tissue responses to heating. Critical analysis of journal articles. Simulation projects related to student research. Recommended preparation: EBME 409. Prereq: Graduate standing.


EBME 523. Biomedical Sensing (3)
Analysis and design of biosensors are discussed in the context of biomedical measurements. Base sensors using electrochemical, optical, piezoelectric, and other principles are introduced. Binding equilibria, enzyme kinetics, and mass transport modalities are then analyzed. Adding the “bio” element to base sensors results including mathematical aspects of data evaluation. Prereq: Graduate standing.


EBME 600T. Graduate Teaching III (0)
This course will provide the Ph.D. candidate with experience in teaching undergraduate or graduate students. The experience is expected to consist of direct student contact, but will be based upon the specific departmental needs and teaching obligations. This teaching experience will be conducted under the supervision of the faculty member who is responsible for the course, but the academic advisor will the assess the educational plan to ensure that it provides an educational opportunity for the students. Recommended preparation: EBME 500T, BME Ph.D. student.


EBME 601. Research Projects (1 - 18)


EBME 602. Special Topics (1 - 18)


EBME 607. Neural Engineering Topics (1)

The goal of this class is to explore topics in Neural Engineering not covered in the curriculum. A single topic will be chosen per semester. Four speakers with expertise in the chosen area will be invited to the campus. Each speaker will give a seminar and participate in a 2-hour workshop/journal club on the specific topic. The students will be assigned one or two seminal papers written by the speaker prior to the visit. Students will take turns presenting these papers to the rest of the class. The paper and the topic will then be open for discussion. At the end of the semester, the students will collaborate to write a single review article in a publishable format on the topic of the semester.


EBME 611. BME Departmental Seminar I (0)


Required of all first-year graduate students in BME.


EBME 612. BME Departmental Seminar II (0)
Continuation of EBME Departmental Seminar I. Required of all first-year graduate students in BME.


EBME 621. BME Research Rotation I (0)
Opportunity for trainees to participate in BME research under supervision of faculty.


EBME 651. Thesis M.S. (1 - 18)


EBME 701. Dissertation Ph.D. (1 - 18)

Ph.D. candidates only. Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.


Bachelor of Science in Engineering Degree
Major in Biomedical Engineering


Majors in Biomedical Engineering choose a specialization sequence, with sequence-specific courses. The listing below is a generic description of requirements for a B.S. Degree in BME. Refer to the BME Web site: http://bme.case.edu


First Year Class-Lab-Credit Hours
Fall
EBME 105, Introduction to Biomedical Engineering b (3-0-3)
CHEM 111, Chemistry for Engineers (4-0-4)
MATH 121, Calculus for Science and Engineering I (4-0-4)
ENGR 131, Elementary Computer Programming (2-2-3)
FSCC 100, The Life of the Mind (4-0-4)
PHED 101, Physical Education (0-3-0)
Total (17-5-18)


Spring
ENGR 145, Chemistry of Materials (4-0-4)
MATH 122, Calculus for Science and Engineering II (4-0-4)
PHYS 121, General Physics I (4-0-4)
USXX University Seminar c (3-0-3)
PHED 102, Physical Education (0-3-0)
Total (15-3-15)


Second Year
Fall
EBME 201, Physiology - Biophysics I (3-0-3)
MATH 223, Calculus for Science and Engineering III (3-0-3)
PHYS 122, General Physics II (4-0-4)
BME Specialty Sequence d or Science elective e (3-0-3)
USXX University Seminar c (3-0-3)
Total (16-0-16)


Spring
EBME 202, Physiology - Biophysics II (3-0-3)
MATH 234, Intro to Dynamic Systems (3-0-3)
ENGR 210, Intro to Circuits & Instrumentation (3-3-4)
BME Specialty Sequence d or Science elective e (3-0-3)
H/SS (3-0-3)
Total (15-3-16)


Third Year Class-Lab-Credit Hours
Fall
EBME 306, Introduction to Biomaterials (3-0-3)
EBME 318, Biomedical Engineering Lab I (0-3-1)
ENGL 398, Professional Communication f (2-0-2)
ENGR 398 Professional Communication for Engineers f (1-0-1)
EBME 308, Biomedical Systems & Signals (3-3-4)
ENGR 225, Thermo, Fluids, Heat & Mass Transfer (4-0-4)
Total (13-6-15)


Spring
EBME 319, Biomedical Engineering Lab II (0-3-1)
EBME 310, Principles of Biomedical Instrumentation (3-0-3)
EBME 360, BME Instrumentation Lab (0-3-1)
ENGR 200, Mechanics and Materials (3-0-3)
H/SS (3-0-3)
BME Specialty Sequence d (3-0-3)
BME Specialty Sequence d (3-0-3)
Total (15-6-17)


Fourth Year
Fall
EBME 398, Senior Project g (0-9-3)
or Open elective (3-0-3)
EBME 370, Principles of Biomedical Engineering Design (2-0-2)
BME Specialty Sequence d (3-0-3)
BME Specialty Sequence d (3-0-3)
Statistics h (3-0-3)
H/SS (3-0-3)
Total (14-9-17) or (17-0-17)


Spring
EBME 309, Modeling of Biomedical Systems (3-0-3)
EBME 359, BME Computer Simulation Lab (0-3-1)
EBME 380, Design in BME (1-6-3)
BME Specialty Sequence d (3-0-3)
BME Specialty Sequence c (3-0-3)
H/SS (3-0-3)
Total (13-9-16) or (15-3-16)

  1. This is a typical program. Specialty sequences are designed with courses in a desired order that might vary from the one here. Programs must be planned with a faculty advisor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering.
  2. This optional course is limited to freshmen. This can be replaced by an open elective.
  3. University Seminars (6 semester hours, minimum of 2 seminars selected from different thematic groups and different thematic group from that of FSCC 100).
  4. Courses are chosen depending on the BME specialty sequence as listed below.
  5. Students take at least one math or science course approved by BME department.
  6. SAGES BME Departmental Seminar, ENGL 398 and ENGR 398 must be taken together.
  7. STAT 312, STAT 333, or STAT 332 fulfill the statistics requirement. Check with sequence advisor to determine the most appropriate class.