ticism (3)
This course is an introduction to the three major approaches to cinema that together constitute the field of film studies. The course will be broken into three units: film theory; film criticism; and film history. Screening one film per week, we will consider each film in light of the particular unit’s and week’s focus. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100.
Offered as ENGL 368A, WLIT 368A, ENGL 468A, and WLIT 468A.


WLIT 368C. Topics in Film (3)
Individual topics in film, such as a particular national cinema, images of women in film, film comedy, New Wave film, literature and film. Maximum 12 credits.
Offered as ENGL 368C, WLIT 368C, ENGL 468C, and WLIT 468C.


WLIT 375. Russian Literature in Translation (3)
Topics vary according to student and faculty interest. May include Russian classical and modern literature, cinema, women writers, individual authors. May count towards Russian minor. No knowledge of Russian required.
Offered as RUSN 375 and WLIT 375.


WLIT 385. Hispanic Literature in Translation (3)
Critical analysis and appreciation of representative literary masterpieces from Spain and Latin America, and by Hispanics living in the U.S. Texts cover a variety of genres and a range of literary periods, from works by Cervantes to those of Gabriel Garcia Marquez. The course will examine the relationship between literature and other forms of artistic production, as well as the development of the Hispanic literary text within the context of historical events and cultural production of the period. Counts toward Spanish major only as related course. No knowledge of Spanish required.
Offered as ETHS 385, ETHS 485, SPAN 385, SPAN 485, WLIT 385, and WLIT 485.


WLIT 387. Literary and Critical Theory (3)
A survey of major schools and texts of literary and critical theory. May be historically or thematically organized. Maximum 6 credits.
Offered as ENGL 387, WLIT 387, ENGL 487, and WLIT 487.


WLIT 388. Translation (3)
Literary translation forms the basis of most readers’ familiarity with world literature. In an age of globalization, translation will be of increasing importance. The practice of translation has long been the province of creative writers. This course complements and draws together creative writers and students of foreign languages, showing that their practices overlap. Students should have knowledge of one language other than English to the 202 (intermediate) level.
Offered as WLIT 388 and WLIT 488.
Prereq: Language other than English to the 202 level.


WLIT 390. Topics in World Literature (3)
In-depth examination of specific critical and literary theories and of their relevance for literature and culture studies. Authors, works and instructor may vary.
Offered as WLIT 390 and WLIT 490.


WLIT 391. Introduction to Text Semiotics (3)
Introduction to Text Semiotics addresses both students of Literature and students in Cognitive Science. Most of the authors included in the reading list extend their linguistic approach towards fields that intersect literature, psychology, philosophy, aesthetics, and anthropology. The scholarly traditions of text analysis and structural theory of meaning, including authors from classical formalism, structuralism, structural semiotics, and new criticism will be connected to cognitive theories of meaning construction in test, discourse, and cultural expressions in general. The focus of this course, taught as a seminar, is on empirical studies, specific text analyses, discourse analyses, speech act analyses, and other studies of speech, writing, and uses of language in cultural contexts. This course thus introduces to a study of literature and cultural expressions based on cognitive science and modern semiotics--the new view that has be coined Cognitive Semiotics.
Offered as COGS 391 and WLIT 391.


WLIT 395. French Literature in Translation (3)
Topics vary according to student and faculty interest. May include Francophone literature, literature and cinema, women writers, contemporary literature. Counts toward French major only as related course. No knowledge of French required.
Offered as FRCH 395, WLIT 395, FRCH 495, and WLIT 495.


WLIT 397. Honors Thesis I (3)
Intensive study of a literary, linguistic, or cultural topic with a faculty member, leading to the writing of a research paper.
Prereq: Senior status.


WLIT 398. Honors Thesis II (3)
Continuation of WLIT 397.
Prereq: WLIT 397 and senior status.


WLIT 399. Independent Study (1-3)
For majors and advanced students under special circumstances.


WLIT 400. The City in Literature (3)
Focus on major cities of the world as catalysts and reflections of cultural and historical change. Interdisciplinary approach utilizing the arts, literature, social sciences. Examples include Berlin at the turn of the century; Paris in literature and film; Tokyo in history and literature.
Offered as WLIT 300 and WLIT 400.
Prereq: Graduate standing.


WLIT 408. The Paris Experience (3)
Three-week immersion learning experience living and studying in Paris. The focus of the course is the literature and culture of the African, Arab, and Asian communities of Paris. Students spend a minimum of fifteen hours per week visiting cultural centers and museums and interviewing authors and students about the immigrant experience. Assigned readings complement course activities. Students enrolled in FRCH 308 do course work in French. WLIT 308 students have the option of completing course work in English. Graduate students have additional course requirements than those of undergraduates.
Offered as FRCH 308, WLIT 308, FRCH 408, and WLIT 408.
Prereq: Graduate standing.
Global & Cultural Diversity


WLIT 415. Mysticism and Literature (3)
This co-taught seminar will explore and compare mystical elements in selected literary and theoretical works from the West and the East. Comparisons will focus on a number of interrelated sub-themes such as mind, language, alienation, innocence, experience, life, death, cosmogony, cosmology, good, evil, God/gods, and nature (the ecosystem).
Offered as MLIT 315, MLIT 415.


WLIT 416. Greek Tragedy (3)
This course provides students the opportunity to read a significant number of ancient Greek tragedies in modern English translations. We shall read, study, and discuss selected works by Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, and attempt to understand the plays as literature composed for performance. We shall study literary elements within the plays and theatrical possibilities inherent in the texts. As we read the plays, we shall pay close attention to the historical context and look for what each play can tell us about myth, religion, and society in ancient Athens. Finally, we shall give occasional attention to the way these tragic dramas and the theater in which they were performed have continued to inspire literature and theater for thousands of years. Lectures will provide historical background on the playwrights, the plays, the mythic and historical background, and possible interpretation of the texts as literature and as performance pieces. Students will discuss in class the plays that they read. The course has three examinations and a final project that includes a short essay and a group presentation. Offered as CLSC 316, WLIT 316, WLIT 416.


WLIT 435. Women in Developing Countries (3)
This course will feature case studies, theory, and literature of current issues concerning women in developing countries primarily of the French-speaking world. Discussion and research topics include matriarchal traditions and FGM in Africa, the Tunisian feminist movement, women, Islam, and tradition in the Middle East, women-centered power structures in India (Kerala, Pondichery), and poverty and women in Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia. Guest speakers and special projects are important elements of the course. Seminar-style format, taught in English, with significant disciplinary writing in English for WGST, ETHS, and some WLIT students, and writing in French for FRCH and WLIT students. Writing assignments include two shorter essays and a substantial research paper.
Offered as ETHS 335, FRCH 335, WLIT 335, WGST 335, FRCH 435 and WLIT 435.
SAGES Dept Seminar
Global & Cultural Diversity


WLIT 438. The Cameroon Experience (3)
Three-week immersion learning experience living and studying in Cameroon. The focus of the course is the culture, literature, and language of Francophone Cameroon, with some emphasis on Anglophone Cameroon. Students spend a minimum of fifteen hours per week visiting cultural sites and attending arranged courses at the University of Buea. Students will prepare a research paper. Course work is in French. To do course work in English, students should enroll in WLIT 338 or ETHS 338.
Offered as ETHS 338, FRCH 338, WLIT 338, ETHS 438, FRCH 438, and WLIT 438.
Global & Cultural Diversity


WLIT 463H. African-American Literature (3)
A historical approach to African-American literature. Such writers as Wheatley, Equiano, Douglas, Jacobs, DuBois, Hurston, Hughes, Wright, Baldwin, Ellison, Morrisonis. Topics covered may include slave narratives, African-American autobiography, the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Aesthetic, literature or protest and to assimilation. Maximum 6 credits. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100.
Offered as ENGL 363H, ETHS 363H, WLIT 363H, ENGL 463H, and WLIT 463H.
Global & Cultural Diversity


WLIT 465E. The Immigrant Experience (3)
Study of fictional and/or autobiographical narrative by authors whose families have experienced immigration to the U.S. Among the ethnic groups represented are Asian-American, Jewish-American, Hispanic-American. May include several ethnic groups or focus on a single one. Attention is paid to historical and social aspects of immigration and ethnicity. Maximum 6 credits. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100.
Offered as ENGL 365E, WLIT 365E, ENGL 465E, and WLIT 465E.
Global & Cultural Diversity


WLIT 465N. Topics in African-American Literature (3)
Selected topics and writers from nineteenth and twentieth-century African-American literature. May focus on a genre, a single author or a group of authors, a theme or themes. Maximum 6 credits. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100.
Offered as ENGL 365N, ETHS 365N, WLIT 365N, ENGL 465N, and WLIT 465N.
Global & Cultural Diversity


WLIT 465Q. Post-Colonial Literature (3)
Readings in national and regional literatures from former European colonies such as Australia and African countries. Maximum 6 credits. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100.
Offered as ENGL 365Q, ETHS 365Q, WLIT 365Q, ENGL 465Q, and WLIT 465Q.
Global & Cultural Diversity


WLIT 466G. Minority Literatures (3)
A course dealing with literature produced by ethnic and racial minority groups within the U.S. Individual offerings may include works from several groups studied comparatively, or focus on a single group, such as Native Americans, Chicanos/Chicanas, Asian-Americans, Caribbean-Americans. African-American works may also be included. May cover the entire history of the U.S. or shorter periods. Maximum 6 credits. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100.
Offered as ENGL 366G, WLIT 466G, ENGL 466G, and WLIT 466G.
Global & Cultural Diversity


WLIT 468A. Film History, Theory, and Criticism (3)
This course is an introduction to the three major approaches to cinema that together constitute the field of film studies. The course will be broken into three units: film theory; film criticism; and film history. Screening one film per week, we will consider each film in light of the particular unit’s and week’s focus. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100.
Offered as ENGL 368A, WLIT 368A, ENGL 468A, and WLIT 468A.


WLIT 468C. Topics in Film (3)
Individual topics in film, such as a particular national cinema, images of women in film, film comedy, New Wave film, literature and film. Maximum 12 credits.
Offered as ENGL 368C, WLIT 368C, ENGL 468C, and WLIT 468C.


WLIT 485. Hispanic Literature in Translation (3)
Critical analysis and appreciation of representative literary masterpieces from Spain and Latin America, and by Hispanics living in the U.S. Texts cover a variety of genres and a range of literary periods, from works by Cervantes to those of Gabriel Garcia Marquez. The course will examine the relationship between literature and other forms of artistic production, as well as the development of the Hispanic literary text within the context of historical events and cultural production of the period. Counts toward Spanish major only as related course. No knowledge of Spanish required.
Offered as ETHS 385, ETHS 485, SPAN 385, SPAN 485, WLIT 385, and WLIT 485.
Prereq: Graduate standing.


WLIT 487. Literary and Critical Theory (3)
A survey of major schools and texts of literary and critical theory. May be historically or thematically organized. Maximum 6 credits.
Offered as ENGL 387, WLIT 387, ENGL 487, and WLIT 487.


WLIT 488. Translation (3)
Literary translation forms the basis of most readers’ familiarity with world literature. In an age of globalization, translation will be of increasing importance. The practice of translation has long been the province of creative writers. This course complements and draws together creative writers and students of foreign languages, showing that their practices overlap. Students should have knowledge of one language other than English to the 202 (intermediate) level.
Offered as WLIT 388 and WLIT 488.
Prereq: Graduate standing.


WLIT 490. Topics in World Literature (3)
In-depth examination of specific critical and literary theories and of their relevance for literature and culture studies. Authors, works and instructor may vary.
Offered as WLIT 390 and WLIT 490.
Prereq: Graduate standing.


WLIT 495. French Literature in Translation (3)
Topics vary according to student and faculty interest. May include Francophone literature, literature and cinema, women writers, contemporary literature. Counts toward French major only as related course. No knowledge of French required.
Offered as FRCH 395, WLIT 395, FRCH 495, and WLIT 495.
Prereq: Graduate standing.


WLIT 590. Seminar in World Literature (3)
Topics vary depending on student and instructor interests; may include Postcolonial literature; Latin American literature and film; African Anglophone and Francophone literature.
Prereq: Graduate standing.


WLIT 595. Independent Research (1-3)
For graduate students under special circumstances.
Prereq: Graduate standing.


WLIT 601. Independent Study (1-18)
For graduate students under special circumstances.
Prereq: Graduate standing.