rgenerational relations; lifestyles and how they affect participation of the aged in American society; dying and death serve as major themes.
Offered as SOCI 369 and SOCI 469.
Prereq: SOCI 101 and Sophomore standing.


SOCI 370. Sociology of the Family (3)
This course provides the theoretical and methodological foundation for conducting family research. It also reviews the most current research in the sociology of the family arena such as intergenerational issues, ethnicity and gender, and family transitions.
Offered as SOCI 370 and SOCI 470.
Prereq: SOCI 101 and Sophomore standing.


SOCI 372. Work and Family: U.S. and Abroad (3)
Covers the impact on human lives of the interface between work and family; the different ways gender structures the experience of work and family depending upon racial and ethnic background, social class, age, and partner preference; the impact of historical context on work-family experiences; work-family policies in the United States and other countries.
Offered as SOCI 372, WGST 372, and SOCI 472.
Prereq: SOCI 101 and Sophomore standing.


SOCI 374. Using Law to Designate Public-Private Boundaries for Social Policies (3)
This course studies law and the public-private dichotomy. With a basis in important research on the sociology of law, it considers three questions: 1) What is the impact of “law” on the boundary separating the public and private sectors? 2) How does “law” designate which actors and institutions belong to the public and private sectors? 3) Is the public-private dichotomy adequate for sociological analyses of law and its influences? If not, what alternatives to the public-private dichotomy can we offer?
Offered as SOCI 374 and SOCI 474.
Prereq: SOCI 101.


SOCI 375. Independent Study (1–3)
Prereq: SOCI 101 and SOCI 300.


SOCI 377. Population Dynamics and Changing Societies (3)
Population and social structure are inextricably linked, as changes in one elicit changes in the other. Social demography, as a discipline, examines these linkages through the systematic study of the size, composition and distribution of populations and their relationship to the social, political and economic organization of societies. This course will pay particular attention to mortality, morbidity and health, fertility, family and household organization, and migration as the major processes of population change. The population dynamics of the United States will be emphasized, with select comparisons to developing and developed countries.
Offered as SOCI 377 and SOCI 477.


SOCI 381. City as Classroom (3)
In this course, the city is the classroom. We will engage with the urban terrain. We will meet weekly off-campus, interact with community members, and interface--both literally and figuratively--with the city as a way to examine the linkages between historical, conceptual, and contemporary issues, with particular attention paid to race and class dynamics, inequality, and social justice. This course will have four intersecting components, primarily focusing on American cities since the 1930s: the social and physical construction of urban space, the built environment, life and culture in the city, and social movements and grassroots struggles.
Offered as HSTY 381, POSC 381, SOCI 381, HSTY 481, POSC 481, and SOCI 481.


SOCI 392. Senior Capstone Experience (3)
SOCI 392 represents the completion of an independent study paper involving exploration of a sociology topic to be chosen in consultation with the student’s capstone advisor. The student will interact regularly with the faculty advisor who will review their progress on the project. This project allows for original thought and for the tailoring of the research to the student’s interests. The student will integrate theory, methods and social issues as he/she applies critical thinking skills and insights to the analysis of some aspects of a subject chosen from any of the following subfields and concentrations: Gerontology, Social Inequality, Medical Sociology, Crime and Delinquency, The Life Course, Education, Work and Family, Sociology of Law, and Deviance. The Capstone Project has both a written and an oral component. Following the submission of the Capstone paper, the student will give a presentation of the project at the Senior Capstone fair, or another forum chosen by the department.
Prereq: SOCI 101, SOCI 300, SOCI 303, and Stat 201, or PSCL 282.
SAGES Senior Cap


SOCI 397. Honors Studies (3)
Intensive investigation of research or conceptual problem; original work under supervision of faculty member. Limited to senior majors.
Prereq: Senior status.


SOCI 398. Honors Studies (3)
Intensive investigation of research on conceptual problem; original work under supervision of faculty member. Limited to senior majors.


SOCI 400. Development of Sociological Theory (3)
This course examines in detail the works of the major social theorists of the 19th and 20th centuries. It is intended to integrate their ideas with the social and historical milieu from which they were born. Questions of intergroup conflict vs. cooperation, interactions between economic, familial, religious, and political institutions, and the development of the self as a function of larger social processes are addressed. Such celebrated figures as Marx, Weber, and Durkheim, as well as modern thinkers will be presented and discussed.
Prereq: Graduate standing.


SOCI 401. Contemporary Sociological Theory (3)
Current viewpoints in sociological theory are explored using contrasting theoretical perspectives.


SOCI 406. Sociological Research Methods I (3)
The first of a two-semester series in social research methodology. Students will learn how to interpret and conduct social science research. The two-semester course covers problem formulation, the logic of causal inference, measurement models, research designs, sampling, data collection, and data analysis.


SOCI 407. Sociological Research Methods II (3)
The second of a two-semester series in social research methodology. (See SOCI 406.)
Prereq: SOCI 406.


SOCI 410. The Individual in Society (3)
This course focuses on the relationship between individuals and the societies in which they live. Influences of values and culture on individuals’ selves and identities are discussed as well as how individuals attach meaning to personal life experiences and histories in the context of society at large.
Offered as SOCI 310 and SOCI 410.


SOCI 411. Health, Illness, and Social Behavior (3)
This course considers the role of social factors (e.g., poverty, occupational and family structure) on health and illness. Discussion will concentrate on the role of health promotion (e.g., anti-smoking campaigns), social behavior and lifestyle in health and health care use. Considerable attention is given to understanding health careers and professions and their role in the health of societies and individuals.
Offered as SOCI 311 and SOCI 411.


SOCI 413. Sociology of Stress and Coping (3)
This course will focus attention on human stress throughout the lifespan and its role in personal health and well-being. There have been exciting advances in recent years in understanding the nature of stress in everyday life as well as elements of extreme stress. Trauma is experienced by many people due to normative events such as illness and bereavement or natural and man-made disasters such as crime or war. Coping strategies and social supports which ameliorate negative impact of stress will be considered.
Offered as SOCI 313 and SOCI 413.


SOCI 414. Qualitative Methods/Field Research (3)
Students explore the theoretical foundations of qualitative social research. The course is designed to introduce and provide experience with a range of data generation strategies and analytic skills. The ethnographic techniques of semi-structured interviewing and participant-observation receive particular attention.
Offered as SOCI 314 and SOCI 414.


SOCI 419. Sociology of Institutional Care (3)
This course focuses on converging issues of theory, research, and practice in general hospitals, mental hospitals, nursing homes, hospices, and correctional institutions. The ecology of institutions and the adaptation of individuals within institutions will also be considered. There will be field trips to institutional facilities.
Offered as SOCI 319 and SOCI 419.


SOCI 436. Institutional Care: Research and Reform (3)
This course is designed to provide an introduction to the nature of long term care in the U.S. and to contemporary issues of reform and culture change. It also provides an introduction to techniques for studying nursing home culture, and for assessing culture changes. The issues and problems of long term care are well documented and the need for changing practices of long-term care is so widely recognized and deeply felt that several initiatives for “changing the culture” of long term care have gained national notoriety and rapid momentum. While laudatory, such efforts are inevitable criticized on numerous grounds, including cost, philosophy and vision, and lack of research evidence to support claims of success. The course is designed to provide an introduction to these debates in the scientific literature and in popular culture, and will provide an opportunity to develop skills in structured observation and action research.
Offered as SOCI 336 and SOCI 436.


SOCI 443. Medical Sociology (3)
Course covers theories, research methods, and problems in sociology of medicine. Topics include social epidemiology, health and illness behavior, and sick role. Structures and functions of delivery systems and their interrelationships with other social institutions are discussed.


SOCI 445. Sociology of Mental Illness (3)
Focus is on social construction of mental health and illness and sociology of emotions. Social determinants of psychological distress will be discussed along with social stigma associated with mental illness. Institutional and community options for care of the mentally ill will be considered along with the impact of recent social movements of deinstitutionalization and independent living.
Offered as SOCI 345 and SOCI 445.


SOCI 447. Sociology of Education (3)
This course provides an introduction to the field of sociology of education, which might be more properly called sociology of schooling. We will examine the development of schools historically and competing paradigms for understanding the place of school in society. Major theoretical perspectives concerning the nature and consequences of schools for individuals and for societies will be reviewed. Issues of individual opportunity - including how it is organized by race, class, and gender - will be covered, as well as issues institutional dynamics - including tracking, testing and so-called crisis and reform.
Offered as SOCI 347 and SOCI 447.


SOCI 449. Social Inequality (3)
Theory and research on contemporary inequality is considered in terms of income, wealth, education, occupational standing, occupational prestige, status categories, racial, ethnic, religious, age, and gender groupings.
Offered as SOCI 349 and SOCI 449.


SOCI 455. Special Topics (3)
One or more sections each semester focusing on selected areas of study in sociology.
Offered as SOCI 335 and SOCI 455.


SOCI 460. The Sociology of Law (3)
This course will focus on the role of rights in the U.S. legal system and society. In particular, we will consider three questions. The first is how do rights fit in the legal system and society? Second, how have different social groups used and thought about rights? Third, how do legal actors like judges and lawyers think about rights compared to non-lawyers?
Offered as SOCI 360 and SOCI 460.


SOCI 461. The Life Course (3)
Individual experiences and transitions over the life course are considered as the result of societal, cultural, psychological, biological, and historical influences. Developmental issues of childhood, adolescence, young adulthood, middle years and late life are discussed in the context of social expectations, challenges, and opportunities. Emphasis is placed on theoretical readings.
Offered as SOCI 361 and SOCI 461.


SOCI 465. Health Care Delivery (3)
Health care in the U.S. may be approaching a critical cross-road. Limiting care to older persons and the chronically ill has been proposed as a means to combat rising costs and limited access to health care. What are the alternatives to health care rationing? Socialized medicine? National health insurance? This course deals with issues of cost, quality, and access to health care in the United States and other societies. It considers how solutions by other societies can provide directions for the organization of health care in the U.S.
Offered as SOCI 355 and SOCI 455.


SOCI 469. Aging in American Society (3)
Considers the position and participation of aged adults in American society. Sociological perspectives through which to interpret the aging process and old age; social policies; intergenerational relations; lifestyles and how they affect participation of the aged in American society; dying and death serve as major themes.
Offered as SOCI 369 and SOCI 469.


SOCI 470. Sociology of the Family (3)
This course provides the theoretical and methodological foundation for conducting family research. It also reviews the most current research in the sociology of the family arena such as intergenerational issues, ethnicity and gender, and family transitions.
Offered as SOCI 370 and SOCI 470.


SOCI 472. Work and Family: U.S. and Abroad (3)
Covers the impact on human lives of the interface between work and family; the different ways gender structures the experience of work and family depending upon racial and ethnic background, social class, age, and partner preference; the impact of historical context on work-family experiences; work-family policies in the United States and other countries.
Offered as SOCI 372, WGST 372, and SOCI 472.


SOCI 473. Methods of Life-Course Research (3)
This course is about how to conduct research on the dynamics of human growth and development over the life course. It draws upon research from several disciplines related to developmental science, and it focuses on the complexities of studying human lives in time and place. For example, we will consider challenges associated with designing research for various kinds of developmental questions; disentangling age, period, and cohort effects; conducting longitudinal research; handling social contexts; conducting multi-level research; analyzing secondary and archival data; and making comparisons in human development.
Prereq: SOCI 406 or equivalent.


SOCI 474. Using Law to Designate Public-Private Boundaries for Social Policies (3)
This course studies law and the public-private dichotomy. With a basis in important research on the sociology of law, it considers three questions: 1) What is the impact of “law” on the boundary separating the public and private sectors? 2) How does “law” designate which actors and institutions belong to the public and private sectors? 3) Is the public-private dichotomy adequate for sociological analyses of law and its influences? If not, what alternatives to the public-private dichotomy can we offer?
Offered as SOCI 374 and SOCI 474.
Prereq: SOCI 101.


SOCI 477. Population Dynamics and Changing Societies (3)
Population and social structure are inextricably linked, as changes in one elicit changes in the other. Social demography, as a discipline, examines these linkages through the systematic study of the size, composition and distribution of populations and their relationship to the social, political and economic organization of societies. This course will pay particular attention to mortality, morbidity and health, fertility, family and household organization, and migration as the major processes of population change. The population dynamics of the United States will be emphasized, with select comparisons to developing and developed countries.
Offered as SOCI 377 and SOCI 477.


SOCI 481. City as Classroom (3)
In this course, the city is the classroom. We will engage with the urban terrain. We will meet weekly off-campus, interact with community members, and interface--both literally and figuratively--with the city as a way to examine the linkages between historical, conceptual, and contemporary issues, with particular attention paid to race and class dynamics, inequality, and social justice. This course will have four intersecting components, primarily focusing on American cities since the 1930s: the social and physical construction of urban space, the built environment, life and culture in the city, and social movements and grassroots struggles.
Offered as HSTY 381, POSC 381, SOCI 381, HSTY 481, POSC 481, and SOCI 481.


SOCI 496. Public Policy and Aging (3)
Overview of aging and the aged. Concepts in the study of public policy. Policies on aging and conditions that they address. The politics of policies on aging. Emergent trends and issues.
Offered as ANTH 498, BETH 496, EPBI 408, GERO 496, HSTY 480, MPHP 408, NURS 479, NURS 579, POSC 480, and SOCI 496.


SOCI 500. Advanced Social Theory (3)
This course focuses on problems and issues relevant to contemporary social theorizing. As such, it deals with the rational roots of mainstream sociological thought and its relation to practice. Attention will also be paid to critical theory, hermeneutics, and current feminist thinking.
Prereq: SOCI 400 and SOCI 401.


SOCI 509. Problems of Data Analysis (3)
Research in social epidemiology, health service research and other applied fields increasingly demands an understanding of social research methodology. This seminar exposes students to state of the art analyses of social science data including: data preparation, factor analysis, regression and structural equation modeling. Students are provided the opportunity to interpret and critically evaluate the methodology used in journal articles, with an emphasis on data analytical techniques. Students will analyze data sets using SPSS and EQS.
Prereq: STAT 401 or SOCI 406, and SOCI 407.


SOCI 601. Reading and Research (1–9)
Individual study and/or project work.


SOCI 701. Dissertation Ph.D. (1–18)
Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.