s, conceptual blends, image schemas, and other cognitive operations that particular texts and traditions utilize.
Course Offered as RLGN 352/RLGN 452 and COGS 352/452.


RLGN 366. Religion and Film (3)
Study of the cultural use of biblical figures, especially in film: movies as myth; place of myths in American culture; how cinematic images continue the polarization of biblical images and intertwine them with the American myth.
Offered as RLGN 366 and RLGN 466.


RLGN 372. Anthropological Approaches to Religion (3)
The development of, and current approaches to, comparative religion from an anthropological perspective. Topics include witchcraft, ritual, myth, healing, religious language and symbolism, religion and gender, religious experience, the nature of the sacred, religion and social change, altered states of consciousness, and evil. Using material from a wide range of world cultures, critical assessment is made of conventional distinctions such as those between rational/irrational, natural/supernatural, magic/religion, and primitive/civilized. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102.
Offered as ANTH 372, RLGN 372 and ANTH 472 .


RLGN 373. History of the Early Church: First Through Fourth Centuries (3)
Explores the development of the diverse traditions of Christianity in the Roman Empire from the first through the fourth centuries C.E. A variety of New Testament and extra-Biblical sources are examined in translation. Emphasis is placed on the place of Christianity in the larger Roman society, and the variety of early Christian ideals of salvation, the Church, and Church leadership.
Offered as HSTY 303 and RLGN 373.


RLGN 374. Reformation Europe, 1500-1650 (3)
Origins and development of Protestantism, the Catholic Counter-Reformation, and the interaction between secular power and religious identity in Christian Europe.
Offered as HSTY 309 and RLGN 374.


RLGN 388. Topics in Religion (3)
Critical assessment of selected topics of historical or current interest. Project must be accepted by a member of the department faculty prior to registration.
Offered as RLGN 388 and RLGN 488.


RLGN 392. Independent Study (1–3)
Up to three semester hours of independent study may be taken in a single semester. Must have prior approval of faculty member directing the project.


RLGN 395. Honors Research (3)
Intensive study of a topic or problem leading to the writing of an honors thesis. By department approval only. Maximum six credits.


RLGN 399. Major/Minor Seminar (3)
Capstone course primarily for majors and minors in Religion. Allows students to interact with peers and faculty, reflect critically, and integrate their learning experiences. Prepares students to continue their learning in the discipline and in the liberal arts. Subject matter varies according to student and faculty needs and perspectives. May be repeated once for up to six credit-hours. Recommended preparation: RLGN 102 and one other RLGN course.
SAGES Senior Cap


RLGN 433. Philosophy of Religion (3)
Topics include: classical and contemporary arguments for God’s existence; divine foreknowledge and human freedom; the problem of evil and theodicy; nature and significance of religious experience; mysticism; varieties of religious metaphysics; knowledge, belief and faith; nature of religious discourse. Readings from traditional and contemporary sources. Recommended preparation for PHIL 433 and RLGN 433: PHIL 101 or RLGN 102.
Offered as PHIL 333, RLGN 333, PHIL 433, and RLGN 433.


RLGN 441. Religion and Postmodernism (3)
Consideration of the impact of postmodern thought on the study of religion. Examination of how recent critical theory informs our understanding of religious texts and religious themes in contemporary literature, arts and film. Utilizing the theories of Focault, Derrida, Kristeva, and others, the class will explore such postmodern concerns as narrative, textuality, the author, ideology, gender, and rhetoric.
Offered as RLGN 341 and RLGN 441.


RLGN 445. Religion and Horror (3)
This seminar explores relations among religion, horror, and the monstrous in ancient scripture and contemporary horror. Course readings, discussions, and research projects approach the subject from two distinct but related directions: first, a focus on elements of horror and the monstrous in biblical and related ancient mythic and ritual texts; second, an examination of religious dimensions in the modern horror, especially as found in representations of monstrosity in literature and film.
Offered as RLGN 345 and RLGN 445.


RLGN 450. Jewish Ethics (3)
An exploration of Jewish moral and ethical discourse. The first half of the course will be devoted to studying the structure and content of classical Jewish ethics on issues including marriage, abortion, euthanasia and social justice. Students will read and react to primary Jewish religious texts. The second half of the course will focus on various modern forms of Judaism and the diversity of moral rhetoric in the Jewish community today. Readings will include such modern thinkers as Martin Buber and Abraham Joshua Heschel.
Offered as JDST 350, RLGN 350, and RLGN 450.
SAGES Dept Seminar


RLGN 452. Language, Cognition, and Religion (3)
This course utilizes theoretical approaches found in cognitive semantics--a branch of cognitive linguistics--to study the conceptual structures and meanings of religious language. Cognitive semantics, guided by the notion that conceptual structures are embodied, examines the relationship between conceptual systems and the construction of meaning. We consider such ideas as conceptual metaphor theory, conceptual blending, Image schemas, cross-domain mappings, metonymy, mental spaces, and idealized cognitive models. We apply these ideas to selected Christian, Buddhist, and Chinese religious texts in order to understand ways in which religious language categorizes and conceptualizes the world. We examine both the universality of cognitive linguistic processes and the culturally specific metaphors, conceptual blends, image schemas, and other cognitive operations that particular texts and traditions utilize.
Course Offered as RLGN 352/RLGN 452 and COGS 352/452.


RLGN 466. Religion and Film (3)
Study of the cultural use of biblical figures, especially in film: movies as myth; place of myths in American culture; how cinematic images continue the polarization of biblical images and intertwine them with the American myth.
Offered as RLGN 366 and RLGN 466.


RLGN 488. Topics in Religion (3)
Critical assessment of selected topics of historical or current interest. Project must be accepted by a member of the department faculty prior to registration.
Offered as RLGN 388 and RLGN 488.


RLGN 601. Special Research (1–6)
Project must be accepted by a member of the department faculty prior to registration.
Prereq: Graduate standing.


RLGN 651. Thesis M.A. (1–9)
Project must be accepted by a member of the department faculty prior to registration.