sertation research (701) credits.


Early Music Performance Practices Concentration. The Ph.D. in historical musicology with a concentration in early music performance practices requires a minimum of 36 hours of course work, seminars, and tutorials, and an additional 18 hours of dissertation research credit hours. Course distribution is as follows: bibliography and research (3 hours); performance practices (9 hours); notation-theory (9 hours); doctoral seminars (6 hours); lecture-recital (MUAP 751) (3 hours). Remaining hours are freely elected in music history and research with the advisor’s approval. At least three semesters of applied music (0 credits) are required. Ensemble participation is also required for performance practices students but does not earn credit hours toward the degree.


For other musicology students, private lessons at the 400 level, although not required, may be counted up to a maximum of six credits, at the discretion of the advisor.


Examinations include initial placement tests in history and theory; reading tests in two foreign languages pertinent to the student’s field; and comprehensive examinations in history and theory, including written and oral sections, prior to admission to candidacy. Upon completion of the dissertation, an oral defense is held. In addition, performance practices students must audition as part of the admissions process. The candidate must teach a college-level course in music history and literature (or early music performance practices) under the supervision of a faculty member, or have had the equivalent experience before the dissertation is completed.


Doctor of Philosophy in Music Education


The doctorate in music education is offered to persons who have shown a strong and continuing dedication to music teaching and scholarship. Applicants must have completed at least three years of full-time music teaching, usually in the public schools. The degree is designed to prepare professionals to assume positions of leadership in elementary, secondary, and collegiate instruction. Prior to graduation, doctoral students demonstrate competency in teaching, research, and musicianship. Every effort will be made to plan a program based on individual student needs and interests while maintaining standards of musical and scholarly excellence. Electives, therefore, will be chosen in consultation with a faculty advisor in order to ensure a balance between individual interests and traditional graduate expectations. To remain in the program, students must meet GPA and professional standards each year. For more information, contact the director of music education.


A total of 60 credit hours is required for the doctoral degree beyond the master’s level. Courses include:

  1. Music education: research, philosophy, cognition/psychology, curriculum, and assessment (15 hours)
  2. Music: theory, history, applied music (9-12 hours)
  3. Outside cognate (6 hours)
  4. Music education electives (9-12 hours)
  5. Dissertation (18 hours)

A comprehensive examination follows the completion of course work, prior to beginning research for the dissertation. Upon completion of the dissertation, an oral defense is held. The dissertation topic is chosen by the student in consultation with the faculty.


Doctor of Musical Arts in Early Music


This doctorate is granted in recognition of outstanding performing ability in early music combined with superior scholarly ability in the field of early music performance practices. All programs are formulated to suit the needs of the individual student and require the consent of a faculty advisor.


A minimum of 36 hours of course work, seminars, and tutorials is required. Distribution is as follows: bibliography and research (3 hours); performance practices (6-9 hours); notation-theory (9 hours); doctoral seminars (3-6 hours); first two lecture-recitals and documents (MUAP 751, 752) (6 hours). Remaining hours are freely elected in music history and research with advisor’s approval. In addition, the final lecture-recital and document (MUAP 753) must be taken for 6 hours, as well as applied music for zero credit every semester the student is on campus. Ensemble participation is required but does not earn credit hours toward the degree.


Examinations include a performance audition; initial placement tests in history and theory; reading tests in two foreign languages pertinent to the student’s field; and a comprehensive examination with history, theory, performance practices, and oral sections. Exceptional students may be admitted to a combined M.A./D.M.A. degree program in early music.


Facilities


Harkness Chapel


Harkness Chapel, built in 1902, features neo-Gothic architecture, antique oak and Georgia pine woodwork, and Tiffany windows. It is a warm, intimate, and acoustically resonant space for the performance of vocal and instrumental chamber music. The building provides space for concerts, music classes, and department recitals, and is the home of the department’s early music concert series.


Kulas Music Library


Kulas Music Library is a satellite library of Kelvin Smith Library, the university’s main library. It contains more than 45,000 items, including music scores, books on music, sound recordings, video recordings, microforms, and music periodicals. The library also contains a listening room for use of the sound recording and video collections. Music majors at the university also have access to the Robinson Music Library of the Cleveland Institute of Music. The Case Western Reserve Kulas Music Library and the CIM Robinson Music Library coordinate acquisitions and services, and their collections reflect institutional strengths as well as support the CWRU-CIM Joint Music Program.


Center for Music and Technology


The Department of Music’s Center for Music and Technology houses ten Macintosh computers and is classified as a level II Technology-Enhanced Classroom. By supporting the most current music notation software, the center provides a resource for the production of professional typeset-quality scores and papers by faculty and students. The center also works closely with faculty in providing support facilities for the department’s technology-related courses. For example, students enrolled in Computers and Music (MUGN 308) use the center to explore computerized notation, music sequencing, film scoring, and internet multimedia creation, while students enrolled in Technology Assisted Teaching and Learning (MUED 3/420) discuss and experience new ways to incorporate technology into their K-12 music classrooms. While it is designed to meet music-specific needs, the center supports an array of non-musical software, including word processing, graphic and web design, and video editing. It also provides state-of-the-art video and audio recording equipment and a professional video editing workstation.


Kulas Collection of Early Instruments


The department maintains an impressive collection of modern reproductions of early instruments. The instruments are used by the Collegium Musicum, the Case/CIM Baroque Orchestra, and the department’s program in early music performance practices. The collection includes medieval, Renaissance, and baroque strings, as well as brass, woodwinds, and keyboards.


Music Education Resource Center


The department provides a resource center for music education students to prepare educational materials and research projects. The center contains a variety of audiovisual media, including a library of education-oriented music software. Students may borrow items from a large collection of music textbooks, educational recordings, testing materials, vocal and instrumental books, curriculum guides, and classroom instruments.
The Music Education and Technology Software Registry (MET) is a collection of instructional software packages designed for all ages of learners and for a wide range of musical tasks. Both Macintosh and PC workstations are available to all music education students and area music teachers so they can use and evaluate most of the music software that is commercially marketed today. Use of the MET is encouraged, and sometimes required, for many of the projects and assignments in courses throughout the music education curriculum.


Applied Music


Private Instruction


The Department of Music offers private instruction on the usual orchestral instruments, piano, and voice, as well as on Renaissance and Baroque instruments. Students have the opportunity to study with outstanding teachers, most of whom are faculty at the Cleveland Institute of Music. Music majors should consult with their advisors before registering for lessons. Non-major students interested in private instruction should visit the department office (Haydn 201) to begin the lesson registration process and learn further details.


Private lessons carrying credit are available to all university students. Permission for study, level of study, and amount of credit are determined by the faculty of the Department of Music in consultation with the Cleveland Institute of Music. Charges for private lessons are covered by the university tuition rate for undergraduate music and music education majors only; all other students pay an additional fee. The amount of the fee depends on the faculty involved and the length of the lessons. For fee schedule, contact the Cleveland Institute of Music. Students normally earn 1 or 2 semester hours of credit for private instruction based on either half-hour or hour lessons.


All Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degree students in the department must satisfy the applied music requirements specified in their degree programs. Graduate students who anticipate private lesson instruction in their programs should consult an advisor before registration. Students register for individual applied music instruction in courses titled Principal Performance Area and Secondary Performance Area.


Ensembles


A number of music ensembles are open to all students. Entrance into ensembles may be subject to space limitations, and an audition may be required. Students may elect to earn one credit per semester for participation. Auditions for ensembles are generally held during the first week of classes each semester. Dates and times are available from the department.


Course Descriptions


MUAP 11. Recital Class (0)


MUAP 651. M.A. Lecture - Recital and Document (6)

M.A. Lecture - Recital for students in Early Music Performance Practices.


MUAP 751. DMA Recital Document I (3)


MUAP 752. DMA Recital Document II (3)


MUAP 753. DMA Recital Document III (3)


MUAR 151B. Case Audio Internship I (1)

Development of recording engineering skills through professional level work in the Harkness audio service. Recommended preparation: Open only to audio recording majors.


MUAR 152B. Case Audio Internship II (1)
Recommended preparation: MUAR 151B.


MUAR 153B. Case Audio Internship III (1)
Recommended preparation: MUAR 152B.


MUAR 154B. Case Audio Internship IV (1)
Recommended preparation: MUAR 153B.


MUAR 251B. Case Audio Recording Internship I (0)
Professional level work in the Case Western Reserve University Harkness audio service.


MUAR 252B. Case Audio Recording Internship II (0)


MUAR 253B. Case Audio Recording Internship III (0)


MUAR 254B. Case Audio Recording Internship IV (0)


MUCP 399. Undergraduate Independent Studies (1–3)
Each student develops a topic of interest to be explored with a faculty member.


MUCP 751. Composition Document-D.M.A. (3)


MUED 200A. Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Voice (1)

Designed for music education majors to provide the fundamentals of teaching methods for various instruments. Recommended preparation: Music education majors. Non-music majors accepted with consent of department.


MUED 200B. Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Guitar (1)
Designed for music education majors to provide the fundamentals of teaching methods for various instruments. Recommended preparation: Music education majors. Non-music majors accepted with consent of department.


MUED 200C. Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Upper Brass (1)
Designed for music education majors to provide the fundamentals of teaching methods for various instruments. Recommended preparation: Music education majors. Non-music majors accepted with consent of department.


MUED 200D. Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Lower Brass (1)
Designed for music education majors to provide the fundamentals of teaching methods for various instruments. Recommended preparation: Music education majors. Non-music majors accepted with consent of department.


MUED 200E. Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Clarinet and Saxophone (1)
Designed for music education majors to provide the fundamentals of teaching methods for various instruments. Recommended preparation: Music education majors. Non-music majors accepted with consent of department.


MUED 200F. Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Double Reeds and Flute (1)
Designed for music education majors to provide the fundamentals of teaching methods for various instruments. Recommended preparation: Music education majors. Non-music majors accepted with consent of department.


MUED 200G. Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Violin (1)
Designed for music education majors to provide the fundamentals of teaching methods for various instruments. Recommended preparation: Music education majors. Non-music majors accepted with consent of department.


MUED 200H. Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Strings (1)
Designed for music education majors to provide the fundamentals of teaching methods for various instruments. Recommended preparation: Music education majors. Non-music majors accepted with consent of department.


MUED 200P. Basic Skills and Pedagogy: Percussion (1)
Designed for music education majors to provide the fundamentals of teaching methods for various instruments. Recommended preparation: Music education majors. Non-music majors accepted with consent of department.


MUED 240. Foundations of Music Education (3)
An introduction to and overview of the music education profession. Philosophical, historical and psychological perspectives on music education in schools, including contemporary topics and trends. Introduction of Ohio academic content standards and curriculum model for music, along with K-12 National Music Standards. Observation of area music teachers and peer-teaching experience. Recommended preparation: Music education major or permission.


MUED 275. Elements of Conducting (2)
This course is designed to develop the physical tools, and philosophical and aesthetic ideologies necessary for students to conduct in an effective and appropriate manner. Students develop baton technique through systematic physical pattern exercises, and class and field conducting experiences (elementary through adult). Observations and written evaluations of Cleveland Orchestra rehearsals and concerts, along with video analysis/self-evaluation of personal conducting experiences are among the activities required in this course. Topics and content include: philosophical foundations for the conductor, considerations for selecting repertoire and creating a supportive learning environment; rehearsal techniques; planning for the rehearsal and record keeping; rehearsal management; group motivation; score analysis and preparation; participation in professional activities; effective use of technology for the conductor; and national, state, and professional standards. Clinical/Field experiences (all ages) required.


MUED 276. Advanced Conducting (2)
This course continues in-depth development of the physical tools, and philosophical and aesthetic ideologies presented in MUED 275. Students develop baton techniques (with experiences in complex and changing time signatures) through systematic physical/pattern exercises, along with continuous evaluations, from their class and field conducting experiences (elementary through adult), observations and written evaluations of Cleveland Orchestra Rehearsals and Concerts, written critiques from historically significant Master Conductors (from videos in the University’s Music Library), along with video analysis of personal class and field conducting, are among the activities required in this course. Topics and content include: philosophical foundations for the conductor, considerations for selecting repertoire and creating a supportive learning environment; rehearsal techniques; planning for the rehearsal and record keeping; rehearsal management; group motivation; score analysis and preparation; participation in professional activities; effective use of technology for the conductor; and national and state standards. Clinical/Field experiences (all ages) required.


MUED 305. World Music in Education (3)
This course acquaints students with the use of world music, or multicultural music, in the music education classroom. Students are given an overview of the history of world music within American music education, discuss topics related to world music in education, research diverse world music practices, and lead lessons based on this research. Topics and content include: definitions of world/multicultural music; philosophical basis for world music in education; diversity in our Cleveland community; authenticity; ethnomusicology; informal/formal music learning; international perspectives; pedagogical approaches; addressing the State and National Standards through world music in education; and the development of culturally informed music pedagogy based on the study of diverse music. Throughout the course students will become acquainted with the music of diverse cultures and people groups; these will be chosen in part based on student’s own research interests. In addition to the musical cultures chosen by students for study and presentation, the music of The Gambia, West Africa; the Caribbean; and India will be highlighted during in-class activities and lessons. Recommended preparation: MUED 240.
Global & Cultural Diversity


MUED 310. Instrumental and Choral Arranging (3)
Techniques of writing and arranging for instruments of the band and orchestra and voice. Study of scoring problems for school instrumental and vocal groups of all ages and abilities.


MUED 320. Technology Assisted Music Teaching and Learning (3)
Fundamental concepts and skills for using technology in music teaching and learning. This project-oriented class will develop knowledge and competencies related to electronic musical instruments, MIDI sequencing, music notation software, computer-assisted instruction, digital media, the Internet, information processing, computer systems, and lab management as they relate to music education in K-12 schools. Recommended preparation: MUED 240.
Offered as MUED 320 and MUED 420.


MUED 350. General Music Methods A (3)
General Music A introduces student to methods and materials for planning and implementing general music experiences for all ages, with concentration on Pre-K through sixth grade children. Topics of the course include: multiple meanings of music for children; characteristics/needs of young children and creating a supportive learning environment; theories of music learning and teaching; learning styles and collaborative learning; assorted teaching methods, rhythm, pitch, listening, movement, performing, composing; curriculum design; technology for music instruction; multicultural music; music for exceptional children; integrating music with the arts and other curricula; motivation and classroom management; lesson planning and record keeping; developing a personal philosophy of music education; national, state, and professional standards; and assessment. Clinical/Field experiences (Clinical-all ages; Field-focus on Pre-K through elementary) required.


MUED 352. Instrumental Methods and Materials (3)
This course acquaints students with effective ways to develop, organize and maintain a successful instrumental program for any age group, based on a comprehensive instrumental music education model. Students are given a “womb to tomb” view of the instrumentalists’ development, including physiological development and age appropriate instrumental exceptions. Topics and content include: philosophical basis for music education, considerations for selecting repertoire including multicultural music; rehearsal techniques; assessment and record keeping; planning for the rehearsal; recruitment, auditioning, and placement; motivation and classroom management; team teaching and collaborative learning; managing an instrumental program; participation in professional activities; effective use of technology in the instrumental program; philosophy; and national, state, and professional standards. Clinical/Field experiences (all ages) required.


MUED 353. Choral Methods and Materials (3)
This course acquaints students with effective ways to develop a successful choral program for any age group, based on a comprehensive choral music education model. Students are given a “womb to tomb” view of the singing voice, including physiological development, age appropriate vocal expectations, and establishing and maintaining vocal health. Topics include: philosophical basis for vocal music education; the child voice, the adolescent voice, and the adult voice; vocal tone; considerations for selecting repertoire including ensemble assessment, music evaluation, and multicultural music; rehearsal techniques, collaborative learning, and motivation; planning for the rehearsal; developing conducting technique; recruitment, auditioning, placement, score analysis and preparation; classroom management; managing a choral program; participation in professional activities; effective use of technology in a choral program; and national state, and professional standards. Clinical/Field experiences (all ages) required. Recommended preparation: MUED 276.


MUED 355. Instructional Design in Music Education (3)
This Music Education Department Seminar brings together all strands of the Music Education program by focusing on curriculum as the organizational element of instruction. Topics and content include: understanding the issues presented by special learners; techniques for integrating special learners into the music teaching environment; developing learning outcomes; designing instruction; planning classroom experiences; defining assessment and measurement; assessment techniques and instruments for the music classroom; and exploring elements of school music program organization and administration. Professional writing and clinical and field experiences will be a large part of the activities in this course. This course is presented in a seminar format that provides for discussions of classroom topics and commentary on field experiences.
SAGES Dept Seminar


MUED 396A. Student Teaching in Music Education (9)
Teaching music in both elementary and secondary schools, full-time five days a week for 15 weeks. Closely supervised field experiences of all types with a wide variety of students. Emphasis on planning lessons and organizing materials, teaching methodologies, motivation, and student assessment. Topics addressed include communications and the arts, technology in learning, interdisciplinary learning, collaborative learning and teaching, creating a supportive environment, and professional development. Development of skills needed for self-assessment as well as student assessment. Clinical/Field experiences (all ages) required. Recommended preparation: Concurrent enrollment in MUED 396B.
Offered as MUED 396A and MUED 496A.
SAGES Senior Cap


MUED 396B. Student Teaching Seminar in Music Education (3)
This is the SAGES Senior Capstone requirement for students majoring in Music Education. Taken at the same time as the student teaching experience (MUED 396A/496A), this seminar will guide students through preparation for entering the professional world of music education, and mentor them in their preparation of their Senior Capstone Project and Presentation. Recommended preparation: Concurrent enrollment in MUED 496A.
Offered as MUED 396B and MUED 496B.
SAGES Senior Cap


MUED 399. Undergraduate Independent Studies (1–3)
Each student develops a topic of interest to be explored with a faculty member.


MUED 400. Clinical/Field Experience (3)
This provides clinical/field experiences with all ages of students in all teaching areas. Students from a variety of socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds are encountered. Clinical/Field experiences (all ages) required.


MUED 420. Technology Assisted Music Teaching and Learning (3)
Fundamental concepts and skills for using technology in music teaching and learning. This project-oriented class will develop knowledge and competencies related to electronic musical instruments, MIDI sequencing, music notation software, computer-assisted instruction, digital media, the Internet, information processing, computer systems, and lab management as they relate to music education in K-12 schools. Recommended preparation: MUED 240.
Offered as MUED 320 and MUED 420.


MUED 441. Philosophical Foundations of Music Education (3)
In this course, students explore major aesthetic philosophies that have influenced contemporary music education, and discuss current issues central to our field. Among topics included: basic views about art/music; creating art/music; meaning in art/music, experiencing art/music; music and aesthetic education; criticism in music; multicultural music; and critical theories and inquiry regarding music education. Students are asked to assess their own roles in music education, as well as their obligations and potential capacities for leadership in the profession. Students will work toward development of a personal professional philosophy of music education.


MUED 442. Curriculum and Assessment in Music Education (3)
This course is designed to give graduate music education students thorough knowledge of the overarching role of curriculum and assessment as the organizational elements of instruction. In depth coverage of such topics as: the role of assessment and measurement in teaching; epistemology; scope and sequence; backward design; instructional goals; validity; reliability; performance assessments; measuring assessment; curriculum design; and teaching for understanding. These concepts and procedures will be explored in depth to give daily music instruction a global framework in the larger organizational structure of profession, state, national, and accreditation standards for P-12 and college music settings.


MUED 443. Music Cognition and Learning (3)
Survey and critical review of the literature as it relates to music teaching and learning, and music performance. Specific topics may include basic psychoacoustical processes, auditory perception, cognitive organization of musical sound, tonal and musical memory, neuromusical research, affective and physiological responses to music, learning theory, musical aptitude, developmental processes, and motivation.


MUED 444. Research in Music Education (3)
Paradigms and methods in music education research. Specific topics and assignments include research-related resources, tools and materials; research problems; research literature; research procedures, research proposals; qualitative and quantitative research studies; computer-assisted data analysis; and empirical research reports.


MUED 496A. Student Teaching in Music Education (9)
Teaching music in both elementary and secondary schools, full-time five days a week for 15 weeks. Closely supervised field experiences of all types with a wide variety of students. Emphasis on planning lessons and organizing materials, teaching methodologies, motivation, and student assessment. Topics addressed include communications and the arts, technology in learning, interdisciplinary learning, collaborative learning and teaching, creating a supportive environment, and professional development. Development of skills needed for self-assessment as well as student assessment. Clinical/Field experiences (all ages) required. Recommended preparation: Concurrent enrollment in MUED 396B.
Offered as MUED 396A and MUED 496A.
SAGES Senior Cap


MUED 496B. Student Teaching Seminar in Music Education (3)
This is the SAGES Senior Capstone requirement for students majoring in Music Education. Taken at the same time as the student teaching experience (MUED 396A/496A), this seminar will guide students through preparation for entering the professional world of music education, and mentor them in their preparation of their Senior Capstone Project and Presentation. Recommended preparation: Concurrent enrollment in MUED 496A.
Offered as MUED 396B and MUED 496B.
SAGES Senior Cap


MUED 501. Special Reading (M.A. and M.M.) (1–18)


MUED 544. Advanced Research in Music Education (3)

Advanced studies in models and methods of music education research. Research projects using data analysis. In-depth examination of selected quantitative and/or qualitative research designs according to student interests. Discussion of thesis and dissertation proposal format process. Recommended preparation: MUED 444.


MUED 591. Music Education Seminar in Conducting (3)
In this course, students focus on advanced score study, preparation, and analysis. In depth conducting techniques on contemporary music and mixed meter compositions, along with the development of a comprehensive conducting bibliography are the major components in this seminar. Historical research, analytical evaluation, and the practical elements of the physical techniques required for one to conduct a chosen composition are all addressed for each composition studies. Seminar discussions include aesthetic and philosophical ideologies, and the practical issues a conductor faces when put in control of the advanced ensemble.


MUED 601. Special Readings (Ph.D./D.M.A.) (1–18)


MUED 651. Thesis (M.A. and M.M.) (1–6)


MUED 696. College Teaching Practicum (0)


MUED 701. Dissertation Ph.D. (1–18)

Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.


MUEN 324. Case Percussion Ensemble (0–2)
The Case Percussion Ensemble is open to all interested Case-affiliated individuals who seek to continue their musical development by performing percussion ensemble literature. Membership is contingent on an audition that demonstrates moderate percussion ability and the ability to read music. Audition materials can be acquired through the director. Recommended preparation: Audition required.


MUEN 356. University Circle Wind Ensemble (1)
Designed for the most advanced woodwind, brass, and percussion players. Stresses the single-performance concept utilizing only players needed for a given piece. Audition required.


MUEN 373. Jazz Ensemble I (0–1)
Recommended preparation: Audition required.


MUEN 374. Jazz Ensemble II (0–1)


MUEN 382. Case Concert Choir (0–1)

This select choral group performs a wide variety of a cappella and accompanied choral works. Membership is gained only through an audition with the director. Recommended preparation: Audition required.


MUEN 383. Symphonic Winds (0–1)
Performance of advanced symphonic band repertoire. Open to all Case students, faculty and staff. Audition required for part placement only.


MUEN 384. Spartan Marching Band (0–1)


MUEN 385. Case/University Circle Orchestra (0–1)

The orchestra is comprised of Case students, faculty, staff and community players who play strings, woodwinds, brass and percussion. Recommended preparation: Audition required.


MUEN 386. Case Camerata Chamber Orchestra (0–1)
This chamber string ensemble is open to all interested Case affiliated individuals who seek to continue their music development by performing orchestral literature. Each person is required to audition to determine initial placement, section assignment, and seating. All members are required to perform a minimum of 2 concerts per academic year. Recommended preparation: Audition required.


MUEN 387. University Singers (0–1)
Chorus performing a wide variety of traditional and popular choral works. Open to all Case students. No audition required.


MUEN 393. Baroque Chamber Ensembles (0–1)
Designed for students interested in exploring baroque music in a chamber setting on historical instruments.
Prereq: Audition required.


MUEN 394. Baroque Dance Ensemble (0–1)
This course allows musicians and dancers alike to explore historical dance steps and notation. History of dance and its relationships to music will be emphasized as students learn and perform historical dances.
Prereq: MUHI 342 or MUHI 442 or permission of Instructor.


MUEN 395. Collegium Musicum (0–1)
Recommended preparation: Audition required.


MUEN 396. Early Music Singers (0–1)
Recommended preparation: Audition required.


MUEN 397. Baroque Orchestra (0–1)
Recommended preparation: Audition required.


MUEN 398. Cleveland Orchestra Chorus (0–1)
Recommended preparation: Audition required.


MUGN 201. Introduction to Music: Listening Experience I (3)
A flexible approach to the study of the materials and literature of music. Aural and analytical skills primarily for classical music.


MUGN 202. Introduction to Music: Listening Experience II (3)
Application of the skills developed in MUGN 201 to the understanding of historical and stylistic content of Western music. Focus is on particular works in context of the era of composition. Recommended preparation: MUGN 201 or consent of department.


MUGN 215. History and Styles of Jazz (3)
Musical styles and structures of jazz and American popular music since 1900. Recommended preparation: MUGN 201.


MUGN 308. Computers and Music (3)
Emphasis on development of music notation and sequencing skills with some attention to word-processing and graphics. Introduction to data management and page layout software. Designed primarily for music majors but also open to non-majors with sufficient background in music theory. Use of the University’s software library, CWRUnet and the music department’s Center for Music and Technology. No formal training in computers required. Recommended preparation: Music majors only.


MUGN 319. Jazz Skills I (3)
This class is designed to teach students basic skills in jazz improvisation, jazz keyboard, arranging/composition and pedagogy. Basic theory is required. Students will eventually arrange their own composition for big band, which will feature them as the improvising soloist.
Recommended preparation: MUTH 102/MUTH 106, MUHI 108 or permission of instructor.


MUGN 320. Jazz Skills II (3)
This course will build on the foundational skills developed in Jazz Skills I, providing a more intensive study of jazz harmony, improvisation and melodic construction. It is designed to give students an advanced experiential understanding of the theory and performance of jazz. Recommended preparation: MUGN 319.


MUGN 399. Undergraduate Independent Studies (1–3)
Each student develops a topic of interest to be explored with a faculty member.


MUGN 501. Special Reading (M.A. and M.M.) (1–18)


MUGN 651. Thesis: (M.A. and M.M.) (1–6)


MUGN 751. Recital Document I-D.M.A. (1–3)


MUGN 752. Recital Document II - D.M.A. (1–3)


MUHI 301. History of Western Music I (3)

Developments in Western music from early Christian times to c1700. Recommended preparation or concurrent enrollment: MUTH 102, MUTH 104, or MUTH 108.


MUHI 302. History of Western Music II (3)
Developments in Western music from c1700 to c1900. Recommended preparation: MUTH 102, MUTH 104, or MUTH 108.


MUHI 303. History of Western Music III (3)
Music of the twentieth century, covering history, analysis, and aesthetic issues. Recommended preparation: MUHI 301 or MUHI 302, MUTH 104 or MUTH 108.


MUHI 310. Music Cultures of the World: Music of Asia and Africa (3)
A one-semester introduction to musics of Asia and Africa, focusing on the relationship of musical traditions and practices to culture and society. Recommended preparation: MUTH 106.
Global & Cultural Diversity


MUHI 311. Music Cultures of the World II: Music of the Americas (3)
Introduction to selected multicultural musics of North America and Latin America, focusing on the relationship of musical traditions and practices to culture and society. Recommended preparation: MUTH 106.
Global & Cultural Diversity


MUHI 315. History of Jazz and American Popular Music (3)
Musical styles and structures of jazz and American popular music; emphasis on music since 1900. Recommended preparation: MUTH 202 or MUHI 302.


MUHI 341. Introduction to Early Music Performance Practice (3)
Summary and perspective of the problems and issues associated with the field of early music performance practices. Recommended preparation: MUHI 301 and MUHI 302.
Offered as MUHI 341 and MUHI 441.


MUHI 342. Seminar in Early Music Performance Practice (3)
Seminar in a specific instrument and/or vocal area of performance practices, such as baroque vocal, instrumental, or keyboard practices. May be repeated because topics vary. Recommended preparation: MUHI 341.
Offered as MUHI 342 and MUHI 442.


MUHI 350. Topics in Music History (3)
Close study of a theme or aspect of music such as “Music and Gender,” “Symphonies of Mahler,” and “Wagner’s Ring.”
Offered as MUHI 350 and MUHI 450.


MUHI 390. Undergraduate Seminar in Music History (3)
An intensive research seminar in music history for music majors.
SAGES Dept Seminar


MUHI 395. SAGES Capstone for Music Majors (3–6)
Required for music majors, except in the case of double majors or dual-degree candidates who opt to fulfill the capstone in the area of the second major. Course consists of projects varying according to the student’s area of study and interests, but each must include a document of appropriate length and scope. The project must be presented publicly in an appropriate forum.
SAGES Senior Cap


MUHI 399. Undergraduate Independent Studies (1–3)
Each student develops a topic of interest to be explored with a faculty member.


MUHI 401. Methodologies of Music History (3)
Introduction to the scholarly study of music, including principles of music bibliography, techniques of library research, and evaluation of editions. Special emphasis given to the relationship between musical performance and research in the history and criticism of music. Attention will also be given to design of program notes and essays. Required of first-year students in the Master of Music degree program.


MUHI 430. Music History for Educators (3)
Examines the intersections of composers’ musical output as it overlaps with theories of general education, music education, and pedagogy.


MUHI 431. Medieval Music: Early Christian to 1425 (3)
The mass, liturgical drama, and early polyphony through the Ars Nova.


MUHI 432. Music of the Renaissance (3)
Vocal polyphonic music from the Burgundian school through the Elizabethan madrigal.


MUHI 433. Music of the Baroque (3)
Musical developments from Monteverdi to Bach and Handel.


MUHI 434. Viennese Classicism (3)
Development of the symphony, concerto, chamber music, and opera in the works of the Mannheim composers, Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven.


MUHI 435. Nineteenth Century Music (3)
Romanticism and other 19th century trends in music up to impressionism.


MUHI 436. Twentieth Century Music (3)
Critical and analytical study of music since 1900. Examination and discussion of stylistic characteristics and aesthetic aims of contemporary composers.


MUHI 441. Introduction to Early Music Performance Practice (3)
Summary and perspective of the problems and issues associated with the field of early music performance practices. Recommended preparation: MUHI 301 and MUHI 302.
Offered as MUHI 341 and MUHI 441.


MUHI 442. Seminar in Early Music Performance Practice (3)
Seminar in a specific instrument and/or vocal area of performance practices, such as baroque vocal, instrumental, or keyboard practices. May be repeated because topics vary. Recommended preparation: MUHI 341.
Offered as MUHI 342 and MUHI 442.


MUHI 443. Medieval/Renaissance Notation (3)
Theory of chant, modal, mensural, and tablature notations. Practice in making literal transcriptions, editing, and preparing scores for performances.


MUHI 450. Topics in Music History (3)
Close study of a theme or aspect of music such as “Music and Gender,” “Symphonies of Mahler,” and “Wagner’s Ring.”
Offered as MUHI 350 and MUHI 450.


MUHI 501. Special Reading (M.A. and M.M.) (1–18)


MUHI 590. Seminar in Musicology (3)
Problems in musical criticism, aesthetics, and analysis, as well as interdisciplinary methodologies.


MUHI 601. Special Readings Ph.D./D.M.A. (1–18)


MUHI 610. Bibliography and Research Methods in Music (3)

Seminar in research methods and techniques, stressing the analytic and functional approaches to bibliography.


MUHI 611. Doctor of Musical Arts Seminar (3)
Recommended preparation: MUHI 610.


MUHI 651. Thesis (M.A. and M.M.) (1–6)


MUHI 701. Dissertation Ph.D. (1–18)

Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.


MUHI 751. Recital Document I-D.M.A. (1–3)


MUHI 752. Recital Document II - D.M.A. (1–3)


MUHI 753. Recital Document III-D.M.A. (1–6)


MULI 399. Undergraduate Independent Studies (0)

Each student develops a topic of interest to be explored with a faculty member.


MUPD 363. Principles of String Playing and Teaching I (2)
This course is designed to give an overview of historical pedagogy and its relationship to contemporary teaching practice. Students will survey teaching methodologies in relation to the foundational elements of performance technique for their instrument and investigate how to impart this information in an instructional setting. All students enrolled in the course will have the opportunity to teach students in a supervised situation and implement the concepts covered in class.
Offered as MUPD 363 and MUPD 463.


MUPD 364. Principles of String Playing and Teaching II (2)
This course is a continuation of MUPD 363/463 and will foster further integration of the application of pedagogy to the teaching environment by the development of a conceptual rubric for instruction. This will include: expanding teaching strategies for a specific instructional environment or element of technique; principles of delivery; picking repertoire; diagnostic evaluation and assessment; and the creation of a personal style of teaching and reflection.
Offered as MUPD 364 and MUPD 464.


MUPD 399. Undergraduate Independent Studies (1–3)
Each student develops a topic of interest to be explored with a faculty member.


MUPD 463. Principles of String Playing and Teaching I (2)
This course is designed to give an overview of historical pedagogy and its relationship to contemporary teaching practice. Students will survey teaching methodologies in relation to the foundational elements of performance technique for their instrument and investigate how to impart this information in an instructional setting. All students enrolled in the course will have the opportunity to teach students in a supervised situation and implement the concepts covered in class.
Offered as MUPD 363 and MUPD 463.


MUPD 464. Principles of String Playing and Teaching II (2)
This course is a continuation of MUPD 363/463 and will foster further integration of the application of pedagogy to the teaching environment by the development of a conceptual rubric for instruction. This will include: expanding teaching strategies for a specific instructional environment or element of technique; principles of delivery; picking repertoire; diagnostic evaluation and assessment; and the creation of a personal style of teaching and reflection.
Offered as MUPD 364 and MUPD 464.


MUPD 501. Special Reading (M.A. and M.M.) (1–18)


MURP 386. Keyboard Repertory Seminar (0–1)

Intensive study of the repertory for keyboard instruments, including solo literature, chamber music, and other collaborative genres. Master class format with regular performances by enrolled students. Enrollment limited to Case Western Reserve keyboard majors.


MUTH 399. Undergraduate Independent Studies (1–3)
Each student develops a topic of interest to be explored with a faculty member.


MUTH 416. Pre-common Practice Theory and Analysis (3)
An exploration of treatises and analytical methods appropriate to music of the Medieval and Renaissance eras.
MUTH 501. Special Reading (M.A. and M.M.) (1–18)