ecommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100.
Offered as ENGL 365E, WLIT 365E, ENGL 465E, and WLIT 465E.
Global & Cultural Diversity


ENGL 365N. Topics in African-American Literature (3)
Selected topics and writers from nineteenth and twentieth-century African-American literature. May focus on a genre, a single author or a group of authors, a theme or themes. Maximum 6 credits. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100.
Offered as ENGL 365N, ETHS 365N, WLIT 365N, ENGL 465N, and WLIT 465N.
Global & Cultural Diversity


ENGL 365Q. Post-Colonial Literature (3)
Readings in national and regional literatures from former European colonies such as Australia and African countries. Maximum 6 credits. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100.
Offered as ENGL 365Q, ETHS 365Q, WLIT 365Q, ENGL 465Q, and WLIT 465Q.
Global & Cultural Diversity


ENGL 366G. Minority Literatures (3)
A course dealing with literature produced by ethnic and racial minority groups within the U.S. Individual offerings may include works from several groups studied comparatively, or focus on a single group, such as Native Americans, Chicanos/Chicanas, Asian-Americans, Caribbean-Americans. African-American works may also be included. May cover the entire history of the U.S. or shorter periods. Maximum 6 credits. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100.
Offered as ENGL 366G, WLIT 466G, ENGL 466G, and WLIT 466G.
Global & Cultural Diversity


ENGL 367. Introduction to Film (3)
An introduction to the aesthetics of film form. We will analyze the elements that make up a film, screening films that facilitate our discussion of how these elements interact with one another to constitute whole formal systems that generate meanings and other effects. We will bring various theoretical and historical considerations to bear as we explore and appreciate the art of cinema. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100.
Offered as ENGL 367 and ENGL 467.


ENGL 368A. Film History, Theory, and Criticism (3)
This course is an introduction to the three major approaches to cinema that together constitute the field of film studies. The course will be broken into three units: film theory; film criticism; and film history. Screening one film per week, we will consider each film in light of the particular unit’s and week’s focus. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100.
Offered as ENGL 368A, WLIT 368A, ENGL 468A, and WLIT 468A.


ENGL 368B. History of Film (3)
Analysis of selected topics in film history, such as film before 1940, American cinema 1940 to the present. European or Asian cinema since 1940. Maximum 6 credits. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100.
Offered as ENGL 368B and ENGL 468B.


ENGL 368C. Topics in Film (3)
Individual topics in film, such as a particular national cinema, images of women in film, film comedy, New Wave film, literature and film. Maximum 12 credits.
Offered as ENGL 368C, WLIT 368C, ENGL 468C, and WLIT 468C.


ENGL 371. Topics in Women’s Studies (3)
Individual topics and issues in women’s studies relating to writing by and about women, such as feminist theory and criticism; the politics of gender and sexuality; women in popular culture; women in the writing business. Maximum 6 credits.
Offered as ENGL 371 and ENGL 471.
Prereq: 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS or ENGL 150.


ENGL 372. Studies in the Novel (3)
Selected topics in the history and formal development of the novel, such as detective novels; science fiction; epistolary novels; the rise of the novel; the stream of consciousness novel; the Bildungsroman in English. Maximum 6 credits.
Offered as ENGL 372 and ENGL 472.
Prereq: 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS or ENGL 150.


ENGL 373. Studies in Poetry (3)
Selected topics and issues in the study of poetry, such as reading poetry, the elegy, pastoral poetry, love poetry, the long poem, form and meter in poetry. Maximum 6 credits.
Offered as ENGL 373 and ENGL 473.
Prereq: 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS or ENGL 150.


ENGL 374. Internship in Journalism (3-6)
Students work as interns at area newspapers, magazines, trade publications, radio or television and meet as a class to share their experiences as interns and to focus on editorial issues--reporting, writing, fact-checking, editing--that are a part of any journalistic enterprise. Students are responsible for pre-arranging their internship prior to the semester they intend to take the class but can expect guidance from the instructor in this regard. Recommended preparation: ENGL 204 or permission of the department.


ENGL 375. Internship in Technical Communication (3-6)
Students create technical and professional documents in a selected corporate or organizational setting, do assigned reading, and meet as a class to participate in seminar discussions and review of work. Students must pre-arrange internship assignment with instructor prior to semester. Recommended preparation: ENGL 317 or ENGL 398N and permission of department.


ENGL 376. Studies in Genre (3)
Topics in literary genres, such as comedy, biography and autobiography, satire, allegory, the short story, the apologue, narrative poetry. May cross over the prose/poetry boundary. Maximum 6 credits.
Offered as ENGL 376 and ENGL 476.
Prereq: 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS or ENGL 150.


ENGL 379. Topics in Language Studies (3)
Aspects of contemporary language studies. Topics such as history of rhetoric, Saussurean linguistics, generative grammar, psycholinguistics, sociolinguistics, cognitive and construction grammars, metaphor, language acquisition, stylistics. Maximum 9 credits.
Offered as ENGL 379 and ENGL 479.
Prereq: 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS or ENGL 150.


ENGL 380. Departmental Seminar (3)
The English departmental seminar, recommended for the junior year. A topical course, emphasizing disciplinary forms of writing. The class will incorporate an advising function, so that students are prepared for choosing a project for their Capstone Seminar.
Prereq or Coreq: ENGL 300.


SAGES Dept Seminar

ENGL 385. Special Topics in Literature (3)
Close study of a theme or aspect of literature not covered by traditional generic or period rubrics, such as “spatial imagination,” “semiotics of fashion in literature,” “epistolarity.” Maximum 9 credits.
Offered as ENGL 385 and ENGL 485.
Prereq: 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS or ENGL 150.


ENGL 386. Studies in Literature and Culture (3)
Boundary-crossing study of the relations between literary and other aspects of a particular culture or society, including theoretical and critical issues raised by such study. For example, literature and medicine, gay and lesbian literature, Asian/Western literary relations, emotion in literature, philosophy and literature, literature and music. Maximum 9 credits.
Offered as ENGL 386 and ENGL 486.
Prereq: 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS or ENGL 150.


ENGL 387. Literary and Critical Theory (3)
A survey of major schools and texts of literary and critical theory. May be historically or thematically organized. Maximum 6 credits.
Offered as ENGL 387, WLIT 387, ENGL 487, and WLIT 487.
Prereq: 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS or ENGL 150.


ENGL 390. Independent Study and Creative Projects (1-6)
Up to six semester hours of independent study may be taken in a single semester. Must have prior approval of faculty member directing the project. Projects may be critical or creative in nature.


ENGL 392. Classroom Teaching (3)
For undergraduate students who assist in the teaching of ENGL 150, 180, or 181. Interested students should check with the director of composition (for ENGL 150, 180, 181) before the beginning of the semester in which they wish to participate. May be repeated only once; not more than three semester hours in ENGL 392 may be counted toward the major. May also include up to three semester hours of supervised peer tutoring at the University Writing Center.


ENGL 395. Capstone Seminar (3)
Capstone course, to be taken in the senior year. Open to non-English majors. Required for the English Honors Track. Features individual projects in a workshop environment; students have the option of a research-based or a creative writing project.
Prereq: ENGL 300 and ENGL 380.


SAGES Senior Cap
ENGL 398. Professional Communication for Engineers (2)

A writing course for Engineering students only, covering academic and professional genres of written and oral communication. Taken in conjunction with Engineering 398, English 398 constitutes an approved SAGES Departmental Seminar.
Prereq: ENGL 150 or 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, or FSCS. Coreq: ENGR 398.


SAGES Dept Seminar
ENGL 398N. Professional Communication for Engineers (3)

Principles and practices of effective communication in the workplace, with an emphasis on computer-mediated communication. Topics include analyzing audience needs in context, visual communication, computer-mediated documents, ethics, and team writing. Typical assignments include e-mail, memos, letters, reports, documentation, and oral presentations.
Prereq: 100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS or ENGL 150.


ENGL 399. Senior Thesis (3)
Elective research or creative project. Should be used for Honors Projects option. By department approval only. Maximum 6 credits.


ENGL 400. Rhetoric and Teaching of Writing (3)
Classical and modern theories of rhetoric; their application in the classroom. Required of graduate assistants and tutors who have had no prior experience in the teaching of composition.
Prereq: Graduate standing.


ENGL 401. Linguistic Analysis (3)
Analysis of modern English from various theoretical perspectives: structural, generative, discourse analytical, sociolinguistic, psycholinguistic, and cognitive linguistic. Some attention to the major dialects of American English.
Offered as ENGL 301 and ENGL 401.


ENGL 406. Advanced Creative Writing (3)
Workshop for serious undergraduate and graduate writers. Offered alternate years; alternates between poetry and fiction. Admission requires review of writing sample by faculty. Maximum 6 credits.


ENGL 410. History of the English Language (3)
An introductory course covering the major periods of English language development: Old, Middle, and Modern. Students will examine both the linguistic forms and the cultures in which the forms were used. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100.
Offered as ENGL 310 and ENGL 410.


ENGL 420. Renaissance Literature (3)
Aspects of English Renaissance literature and its contexts from 1500-ca. 1620. Genres studied might include poetry, drama, prose fiction, expository and polemic writing, or some works from Continental Europe. Writers such as Skelton, More, Erasmus, Wyatt, Sidney, Spenser, Marlowe, Lanier, Wroth, Shakespeare, Donne. Maximum 6 credits.
Offered as ENGL 320 and ENGL 420.


ENGL 423. Milton (3)
Poetry and selected prose, including the careful study of “Paradise Lost.”
Offered as ENGL 323 and ENGL 423.


ENGL 424. Shakespeare: Histories and Tragedies (3)
Close reading of a selection of Shakespeare’s tragedies and history plays (e.g., “Richard the Third,” “Julius Caesar,” “Hamlet,” “King Lear”). Topics of discussion may include Renaissance drama as a social institution, the nature of tragedy, national history, gender roles, sexual politics, the state and its opponents, theatrical conventions. Assessment may include opportunities for performance.
Offered as ENGL 324, ENGL 424, and THTR 334.


ENGL 425. Shakespeare: Comedies and Romances (3)
Close reading of selected plays of Shakespeare in the genres of comedy and romance (e.g., “The Merchant of Venice,” “Twelfth Night,” “Measure for Measure,” “The Tempest”). Topics of discussion may include issues of sexual desire, gender roles, marriage, the family, genre conventions. Assessment may include opportunities for performance.
Offered as ENGL 325, ENGL 425, and THTR 335.

 

ENGL 428. Studies in the Eighteenth Century (3)
This course examines selected topics in the English literary culture of the eighteenth century, a culture which extended to the Americas and to other English colonies. Literary writings will be examined in relation to other aspects of the century culture, which may include visual arts, marital institutions, the printing industry, property law, medicine, and other topics. Maximum 6 credits.
Offered as ENGL 328 and ENGL 428.


ENGL 429. English Literature, 1780-1837 (3)
Aspects of English literature and its contexts in the early 19th century. Genres might include poetry, prose fiction, political and philosophical writing, literary theory of the period. Writers such as the Wordsworth, Coleridge, Blake, Austen, Byron, the Shelleys. Maximum 6 credits.
Offered as ENGL 329 and ENGL 429.


ENGL 431. Studies in the Nineteenth-Century (3)
Individual topics in English literary culture of the 19th century. Topics might be thematic or formal, such as literature and science, medicine, labor, sexuality, or Empire; literature and other arts; Gothic fiction, decadence. Maximum 6 credits.
Offered as ENGL 331 and ENGL 431.


ENGL 432. Twentieth-Century British Literature (3)
Aspects of British literature (broadly interpreted) and its contexts during the 20th century. Genres studied might include poetry, fiction, and drama. Such writers as Joyce, Woolf, Conrad, Ford, Lawrence, Mansfield, Shaw, Beckett, Stoppard, Yeats, Edward or Dylan Thomas, Stevie Smith, Bowen, Spark. Maximum 6 credits.
Offered as ENGL 332 and ENGL 432.


ENGL 433. Studies in the Twentieth Century (3)
Individual topics in twentieth-century literary culture. Particular issues and topics may cross national boundaries and genre lines as well as exploring political, psychological, and social themes, such as movements, comparative studies across the arts, literature and war, literature and occultism. Maximum 6 credits.
Offered as ENGL 333 and ENGL 433.


ENGL 453. Major Writers (3)
Close and detailed study of the work of one or two writers: development, social and aesthetic contexts, reception, interpretation, significance. Maximum 6 credits.
Offered as ENGL 353 and ENGL 453.


ENGL 456. American Literature Before 1865 (3)
Aspects of American literature and its contexts from the colonial period through the end of the Civil War. Writers such as Bradstreet, Taylor, Franklin, Poe, Stowe, Alcott, Melville, Hawthorne, Emerson, Douglass. Maximum 6 credits.
Offered as ENGL 356 and ENGL 456.


ENGL 457. American Literature 1865-1914 (3)
Aspects of American literature and its contexts from the Civil War to the First World War. Writers such as Whitman and Dickinson, Twain, Howells, James, Chopin, Wharton. Maximum 6 credits.
Offered as ENGL 357 and ENGL 457.


ENGL 458. American Literature 1914-1960 (3)
Aspects of American literature and its contexts from the First World War to the Cold War. Genres studies might include fiction, poetry, drama, polemics. Writers such as T.S. Eliot, Pound, Stevens, Moore, W.C. Williams, Dos Passos, West, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Cather, Faulkner, Barnes, Miller, T. Williams, O’Neill. Maximum 6 credits.
Offered as ENGL 358 and ENGL 458.


ENGL 459. Studies in Contemporary American Literature (3)
Individual topics in literary culture since the 1960s. Topics may include the Beats, literature of the Vietnam war, post-modern fiction, contemporary poetry, the documentary novel. Maximum 6 credits.
Offered as ENGL 359 and ENGL 459.


ENGL 463H. African-American Literature (3)
A historical approach to African-American literature. Such writers as Wheatley, Equiano, Douglas, Jacobs, DuBois, Hurston, Hughes, Wright, Baldwin, Ellison, Morrisonis. Topics covered may include slave narratives, African-American autobiography, the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Aesthetic, literature or protest and to assimilation. Maximum 6 credits. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100.
Offered as ENGL 363H, ETHS 363H, WLIT 363H, ENGL 463H, and WLIT 463H.


ENGL 465E. The Immigrant Experience (3)
Study of fictional and/or autobiographical narrative by authors whose families have experienced immigration to the U.S. Among the ethnic groups represented are Asian-American, Jewish-American, Hispanic-American. May include several ethnic groups or focus on a single one. Attention is paid to historical and social aspects of immigration and ethnicity. Maximum 6 credits. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100.
Offered as ENGL 365E, WLIT 365E, ENGL 465E, and WLIT 465E.


ENGL 465N. Topics in African-American Literature (3)
Selected topics and writers from nineteenth and twentieth-century African-American literature. May focus on a genre, a single author or a group of authors, a theme or themes. Maximum 6 credits. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100.
Offered as ENGL 365N, ETHS 365N, WLIT 365N, ENGL 465N, and WLIT 465N.


ENGL 465Q. Post-Colonial Literature (3)
Readings in national and regional literatures from former European colonies such as Australia and African countries. Maximum 6 credits. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100.
Offered as ENGL 365Q, ETHS 365Q, WLIT 365Q, ENGL 465Q, and WLIT 465Q.


ENGL 466G. Minority Literatures (3)
A course dealing with literature produced by ethnic and racial minority groups within the U.S. Individual offerings may include works from several groups studied comparatively, or focus on a single group, such as Native Americans, Chicanos/Chicanas, Asian-Americans, Caribbean-Americans. African-American works may also be included. May cover the entire history of the U.S. or shorter periods. Maximum 6 credits. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100.
Offered as ENGL 366G, WLIT 466G, ENGL 466G, and WLIT 466G.


ENGL 467. Introduction to Film (3)
An introduction to the aesthetics of film form. We will analyze the elements that make up a film, screening films that facilitate our discussion of how these elements interact with one another to constitute whole formal systems that generate meanings and other effects. We will bring various theoretical and historical considerations to bear as we explore and appreciate the art of cinema. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100.
Offered as ENGL 367 and ENGL 467.


ENGL 468A. Film History, Theory, and Criticism (3)
This course is an introduction to the three major approaches to cinema that together constitute the field of film studies. The course will be broken into three units: film theory; film criticism; and film history. Screening one film per week, we will consider each film in light of the particular unit’s and week’s focus. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100.
Offered as ENGL 368A, WLIT 368A, ENGL 468A, and WLIT 468A.


ENGL 468B. History of Film (3)
Analysis of selected topics in film history, such as film before 1940, American cinema 1940 to the present. European or Asian cinema since 1940. Maximum 6 credits. Recommended preparation: ENGL 150 or USFS 100.
Offered as ENGL 368B and ENGL 468B.


ENGL 468C. Topics in Film (3)
Individual topics in film, such as a particular national cinema, images of women in film, film comedy, New Wave film, literature and film. Maximum 12 credits.
Offered as ENGL 368C, WLIT 368C, ENGL 468C, and WLIT 468C.


ENGL 471. Topics in Women’s Studies (3)
Individual topics and issues in women’s studies relating to writing by and about women, such as feminist theory and criticism; the politics of gender and sexuality; women in popular culture; women in the writing business. Maximum 6 credits.
Offered as ENGL 371 and ENGL 471.


ENGL 472. Studies in the Novel (3)
Selected topics in the history and formal development of the novel, such as detective novels; science fiction; epistolary novels; the rise of the novel; the stream of consciousness novel; the Bildungsroman in English. Maximum 6 credits.
Offered as ENGL 372 and ENGL 472.


ENGL 473. Studies in Poetry (3)
Selected topics and issues in the study of poetry, such as reading poetry, the elegy, pastoral poetry, love poetry, the long poem, form and meter in poetry. Maximum 6 credits.
Offered as ENGL 373 and ENGL 473.


ENGL 476. Studies in Genre (3)
Topics in literary genres, such as comedy, biography and autobiography, satire, allegory, the short story, the apologue, narrative poetry. May cross over the prose/poetry boundary. Maximum 6 credits.
Offered as ENGL 376 and ENGL 476.


ENGL 479. Topics in Language Studies (3)
Aspects of contemporary language studies. Topics such as history of rhetoric, Saussurean linguistics, generative grammar, psycholinguistics, sociolinguistics, cognitive and construction grammars, metaphor, language acquisition, stylistics. Maximum 9 credits.
Offered as ENGL 379 and ENGL 479.


ENGL 480. ESL Composition Theory (3)
Study of theories related to teaching ESL composition, including second language acquisition; specialized grammar related to common ESL problems; cultural and affective issues; different Englishes; composition theory and research as it relates to ESL.


ENGL 485. Special Topics in Literature (3)
Close study of a theme or aspect of literature not covered by traditional generic or period rubrics, such as “spatial imagination,” “semiotics of fashion in literature,” “epistolarity.” Maximum 9 credits.
Offered as ENGL 385 and ENGL 485.


ENGL 486. Studies in Literature and Culture (3)
Boundary-crossing study of the relations between literary and other aspects of a particular culture or society, including theoretical and critical issues raised by such study. For example, literature and medicine, gay and lesbian literature, Asian/Western literary relations, emotion in literature, philosophy and literature, literature and music. Maximum 9 credits.
Offered as ENGL 386 and ENGL 486.


ENGL 487. Literary and Critical Theory (3)
A survey of major schools and texts of literary and critical theory. May be historically or thematically organized. Maximum 6 credits.
Offered as ENGL 387, WLIT 387, ENGL 487, and WLIT 487.

 

ENGL 501. Theories of Rhetoric (3)


ENGL 502. Critical Theory (3)

Theories and methods of contemporary literary study. Required of all graduate degree-seeking students.


ENGL 506. Professional Writing: Theory and Practice (3)
Prepares graduate students to teach disciplinary forms of writing, including technical and professional writing, in academic and non-academic settings.
Prereq: ENGL 400.


ENGL 508. Seminar: English Literature 1550-1660 (3)


ENGL 510. Research Methods (3)

This course focuses on methods and resources for research in English, including substantial treatments of narrative, poetics, and close-reading skills. It introduces graduate students to questions of textuality, genre, medium, authorship, reception, historiography, and bibliography. It features an introduction to libraries, special collections, InterLibrary Loan, and print and computer databases (including internet resources and the Oxford English Dictionary). The Research Methods course invites students to develop professional attitudes toward the study of English language and literature and offers a common base and vocabulary to students whose professional interests will inevitably diverge in the course of their study.


ENGL 517. Seminar: American Literature (3)


ENGL 518. Seminar: English Literature 1660-1800 (3)


ENGL 519. Seminar: English Literature 1800-1900 (3)


ENGL 520. Seminar: 20th Century Literature (3)


ENGL 521. Seminar: The Novel (3)


ENGL 522. Seminar: Topics in Poetry (3)


ENGL 524. Seminar: Criticism and Other Special Topics (3)


ENGL 525. Intellectual Property and the Construction of Authorship (3)

“Authorship” and “invention” are among the West’s most powerful ideas--the categories by which creative production has been defined and valued for the last two centuries. We will investigate the emergence and consolidation of these ideas in the context of some of the institutions, technologies, and practices that have fostered and been fostered by them, such as printing and publishing, copyright and patent law, education curricula and disciplinary pedagogies. Then we will turn our attention to the varieties of authorship and invention in operation today--from the solitary ethos characteristic of the arts and humanities to the collaborative, even corporate, forms in ascendance in science and industry. How are ideas of authorship and invention employed in the various discursive spheres to assign credit and responsibility? May tensions be found with creative practice? What are the stakes? Who wins, who loses? And what will be the consequences of digitization and globalization? Our study will culminate in attendance at an interdisciplinary conference on “Con/texts of Invention” which will take place at Case Western Reserve on April 21-23. The goal of our study will be to identify worthy research topics within students’ own areas of interest.
Offered as ENGL 525 and HSTY 525.
Prereq: Graduate standing.


ENGL 550. External Seminar (3)
Course work offered in cooperation with participating English departments in the region; content and approach vary. Requires prior approval of the graduate director.


ENGL 590. Special Reading or Research (3)
Independent study as arranged with individual instructors.
Prereq: Graduate status or consent of department.


ENGL 601. Directed Reading (1-6)
Preparation for the Ph.D. general examination.
Prereq: Graduate status.


ENGL 651. Thesis M.A. (1-18)


ENGL 701. Dissertation Ph.D. (1-18)

Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.