for the study of phonology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics. We ask how approaches that relate language to general cognitive processes (perception, memory, categorization, etc.) can lead to a deeper understanding both of language and of the human mind.


COGS 407. Theory of Cognitive Linguistics II (3)
COGS 407 is the second course in a two-course sequence designed to provide an introduction to theory of cognitive linguistics at the MA level. It covers contemporary theory in cognitive linguistics in greater detail and supports student work in COGS 408 and 409, the Workshop courses.
Prereq: COGS 406 or consent of instructor.


COGS 408. Workshop on Cognitive Linguistics I (3)
This is the first in a two-course sequence (408 & 409) designed to provide experience in research methods in cognitive linguistics at the MA level. A workshop in which students read examples of cognitive linguistics research, develop their own topics (theoretical or empirical), and work on them to produce a final paper.


COGS 409. Workshop in Cognitive Linguistics II (3)
The second course in a two-course sequence (408 & 409) designed to provide experience in research methods in cognitive linguistics at the MA level. A workshop in which students read examples of cognitive linguistics research, develop their own topics (theoretical or empirical), and work on them to produce a final paper.
Prereq: COGS 408 or consent of instructor.


COGS 413. Special Topics in Cognitive Linguistics (3)
This course covers special topics in the field of cognitive linguistics. Topics will vary from semester to semester.
Offered as COGS 313 and COGS 413.


COGS 415. Mental Space Theory (3)
This course covers theory of mental spaces and methodology of mental space analysis, with special emphasis on the use of mental space theory to analyze human performance in various areas of cognition, including reasoning, judgment, decision, counterfactual thought, inference, planning, communication and language, gesture, social cognition, cognitive design and engineering, representation, learning, humor, symbol systems, and invention. It includes a consideration of experimental methods that have arisen under the influence of mental space theory. A student may earn credit for either COGS 315 or COGS 415, but not both.
Offered as COGS 315 and COGS 415.


COGS 425. Cognitive Approaches to Literature (3)
This course approaches literature as a window into language, in which cognition is characterized by the same imaging and imaginary properties as artistic literature. It is an attempt to identify and analyze procedures as aesthetically interesting and generally relevant forms of human thinking, feeling, imagining, fantasizing, and conceptualizing. The course introduces current theories of literature in relation to language and mind, and it presents and discusses practical applications in critical reading and text analysis, using examples from modern literature in the main genres. A student may earn credit for either COGS 325 or COGS 425 but not both. Recommended preparation: COGS 101, COGS 202.
Offered as COGS 325 and COGS 425.


COGS 426. Cognitive Approaches to Music (3)
This course will study the ways in which the presence of music relates to cognition and the semiotics of inter-subjective communication at large--the emergence of language, gesture, and symbolization of time. Topics of interests include: the ways that specific works of musical art invite semantic interpretation; how intelligible musical structure relates to meaning; how musical activities correspond to brain activity; and how music relates to and/or induces emotion. Recommended preparation: COGS 101, COGS 202.
Offered as COGS 326 and COGS 426.


COGS 427. Gesture in Cognition and Communication (3)
Most people never notice that when they are talking, they’re also gesturing. Why do we produce these gestures? What can studying them tell us about the human mind? This course surveys scientific research on gesture, exploring topics such as the role of gesture in communication, cross-cultural differences in gesture, and the relationship between gesture and signed languages. The course will focus on gestures produced with speech, but will cover symbolic and ritualized gesture in the visual arts and in dance.
Offered as COGS 327 and COGS 427 and MLIT 327.


COGS 452. Language, Cognition, and Religion (3)
This course utilizes theoretical approaches found in cognitive semantics--a branch of cognitive linguistics--to study the conceptual structures and meanings of religious language. Cognitive semantics, guided by the notion that conceptual structures are embodied, examines the relationship between conceptual systems and the construction of meaning. We consider such ideas as conceptual metaphor theory, conceptual blending, Image schemas, cross-domain mappings, metonymy, mental spaces, and idealized cognitive models. We apply these ideas to selected Christian, Buddhist, and Chinese religious texts in order to understand ways in which religious language categorizes and conceptualizes the world. We examine both the universality of cognitive linguistic processes and the culturally specific metaphors, conceptual blends, image schemas, and other cognitive operations that particular texts and traditions utilize.
Course Offered as RLGN 352/RLGN 452 and COGS 352/452.


COGS 499. Independent Studies (1–3)
This course is a face-to-face seminar between students and instructor, aiming at letting and helping the students independently develop original research on well-defined topics in the field of cognitive linguistics. Themes can vary within the wide area of cognition and culture.