taken in conjunction with any other 100 or 200 level Art History class to complete a sequence in the Arts portion of the Humanities section of the General Education Requirements in the College of Arts and Sciences or can be used as part of a three course Humanities sequence in the Engineering Core curriculum.)


ARTH 104. Introduction to Asian Art (3)
This course surveys the vast cultural landscapes of Asia, from India to Central Asia, and Southeast Asia, on to China, Korea and then Japan.
Global & Cultural Diversity


ARTH 203. The Arts of Asia (3)
A survey of Japanese and Chinese art from the Bronze Age to the 18th century, with particular emphasis on objects in the Cleveland Museum of Art. The relationship of art works to Buddhism and Hinduism is explored along with cultural rituals, ceremonies, and traditions.
Global & Cultural Diversity


ARTH 211. Building on Antiquity (3)
This course will provide orientation in the architectural orders and in most periods of European and Euro-American architectural history as well as, to an extent, criticism. Students will learn how to research buildings from different historical epochs, how to work with relevant databases and a range on on-line resources, and with the print resources available. Students will gain some familiarity with the conventions of architectural representation as these became established over centuries. There will be an important writing component, and a considerable amount of group work involving oral presentation and classroom discussion. The issue of the meaning(s) of architecture will be central; we will consider the blatant political uses of architecture and of imagery associated with architecture, more elusive and/or ambiguous cases, and the phenomenon of meanings changing from one era to another or according to audience. We will consider the relationship of the relatively formal “language” of classical architecture (the orders, especially as endowed with gender associations in the Viturvian tradition) and the more subtle, ad hoc ways that buildings project meaning or mood.
Offered as ARTH 211 and CLSC 211.


ARTH 220. Jewish Traditional Art and Architecture (3)
Tradition and transformation in Jewish artistic expression over time and across space. Course will begin with the biblical period and continue down to the present day in Israel and America. Examination of how concepts such as “Jewish” and “art” undergo change within the Jewish community over this period.
Offered as ARTH 220 and JDST 220.
Global & Cultural Diversity


ARTH 226. Introduction to Greek and Roman Art (3)
Classical art from the 8th century B.C. to the fourth century A.D.; the major developments in the architecture, sculpture, and painting of ancient Greece, Etruria, and Rome.
Offered as ARTH 226 and CLSC 226.


ARTH 227. Ancient Cities and Sanctuaries
A selection of cities and sanctuaries from the ancient Near East, Egypt, the Aegean, Greece, Etruria, and Rome; their political and religious institutions and the relationship to contemporary art forms.
Offered as ARTH 227 and CLSC 227.


ARTH 228. Ancient Greek Athletics (3)
Exploration of the role of athletics in the ancient, primarily Greek world, and their reflection in the art of the period.
Offered as ARTH 228 and CLSC 228.


ARTH 240. Architecture: Ancient to 1850 (3)
Western traditions of architecture and urban design from antiquity to the early nineteenth century, with emphasis on pre-industrial cities and landscapes. Interactions between western theory and practice and certain non-western cultures, especially the Arab/Turkish world and China.
Global & Cultural Diversity


ARTH 250. Art in the Age of Discovery (3)
A survey of developments in Renaissance art and architecture in northern Europe and Italy during a new age of science, discovery and exploration, 1400-1600.


ARTH 260. Art in the Age of Grandeur (3)
A survey of European art in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, an era of rising nationalism, political aggrandizement, religious expansion and extravagant art patronage.


ARTH 270. American Art and Culture Before 1900 (3)
Survey of the development of American art from colonial times to the present which explores how art has expressed both American values and American anxieties. Painting is emphasized, but the course also considers architecture, the decorative arts, film, literature, and music.
Offered as AMST 270 and ARTH 270.


ARTH 271. American Art and Culture: The Twentieth Century (3)
Survey of the development of American art from 1900 to the present (and the future) which will explore how art has expressed both American values and American anxieties. Painting will be emphasized, but the course will also consider architecture, the decorative arts, film, literature, and music.
Offered as AMST 271 and ARTH 271.


ARTH 280. Modern Art and Modern Science (3)
An examination of the development of painting, sculpture, and architecture from the 19th to the mid 20th century. Special attention is given to the emergence of “modernism” and the influence of science on such movements as Impressionism and Cubism.


ARTH 284. History of Photography (3)
A survey of the history of photography from its inception in 1839 to the present. Emphasis is on the complex relationship between technological innovations and picture-making; the artistic, documentary, and personal uses of photography; and the relationship of photography to other art forms.


ARTH 290. Introduction to the Art of Sub-Saharan Africa (3)
Exploration of the diverse forms and multiple contexts of the visual arts of sub-Saharan Africa. Attention focused on the sculpture of different peoples of West and Central Africa. Ancient arts in terracotta and bronze of Nigeria, Mali, and Chad and rock art of Saharan, Southern, and Eastern Africa will also be explored. Topics such as the styles, aesthetics, meanings, and functions of African art and the training, techniques, and status of the African artist will be discussed.
Global & Cultural Diversity


ARTH 293. A World Art History (3)
Traditionally European (and American) art historians focused on the art tradition of their own culture. But recently there has been interest in a world art history. Specialists look at the history of other visual cultures. And so then the great intellectual challenge is to write a narrative including art from everywhere. This project is very important politically. Our world has so many dangerous conflicts, and so sympathetic study of art from other cultures is an important way to promote international understanding. In the first part of the class we look at the history of European art history. We discuss Vasari’s great pioneering history, and the development of his concerns by Hegel; and, in the mid-twentieth century by Ernst Gombrich and Clement Greenberg. This monocultural tradition focuses on the history of European art. In the second part we consider the art of three great cultures outside Europe, China, India, and Islam. We read a little about their art history, focusing on the ways in which it is very different from the history of European art. The aim is not to do a systematic analysis, which would be a very large task, but to introduce some suggestive themes. We will discuss the role of the medium in Chinese scroll painting and Islamic concepts of decoration. We will look at the representations of carpets within European paintings. They are an important example of what happens when diverse cultures connect.
Global & Cultural Diversity


ARTH 302. Buddhist Art in Asia (3)
The development of Buddhist art from its origins in India along the silk route to China and along the maritime routes to Japan and southeast Asia.
Offered as ARTH 302 and ARTH 402.
Global & Cultural Diversity


ARTH 303. History of Far Eastern Art (3)
A survey of traditional arts of Asia east of the Indus river, designed to emphasize the creative contributions of the artist with particular attention to the international relations of: the Bronze Age, Buddhist art, Hindu art, and the later arts of China, Korea, and Japan. National and regional contributions to the developed styles of South Asia and the Far East will be stressed.
Offered as ARTH 303 and ARTH 403.


ARTH 304. Art of West Africa (3)
This course will survey artistic traditions of the past, and traditions that continue to flourish to this day in culture regions in West Africa called the Western Sudan and the Guinea Coast. An area of immense geographical and human diversity, the Western Sudan is the homeland of some of Africa’s most renowned medieval empires. An ancient culture known as Jenne (8th – 17th century) has produced a wide variety of refined ceramic artifacts. The Guinea Coast is densely populated by hundreds of different ethnic groups and harbors a diversity of artistic traditions. An active trade with Europeans was established in the region as early as the 15th century. Gender-restricted and ritually powerful organizations still serve as the major patrons of the arts in the region. Contrary to the elongated so-called “pole style” typical of the Western Sudan, the arts of the Guinea Coast are characterized by organic and elegant forms and smooth surfaces in a variety of media.
Offered as ARTH 304 and ARTH 404.


ARTH 305. The Art of India (3)
A survey of Indian art from the Indus valley civilization to the Islamic conquest of India. Stylistic developments of the three-dimensional arts examined through cave sites and other extant materials.
Offered as ARTH 305 and ARTH 405.


ARTH 306. History of Indian Sculpture (3)
The stylistic development of both Buddhist and Hindu schools of Indian sculpture from the prehistoric period to the 12th century. Sculptural images are studied in terms of Indian mythology and literature.
Offered as ARTH 306 and ARTH 406.


ARTH 311. Rome: City and Image (3)
This course studies the architectural and urban history of Rome from the republican era of the ancient city up to the eighteenth century using the city itself as the major “text.” The emphasis will be placed on the extraordinary transformations wrought in the city, or at least in key districts, by powerful rulers and/or elites, especially in the ancient empire and in the Renaissance and baroque eras. In a larger perspective, the great construction projects exerted a far-reaching effect within and beyond Europe, but we will study them in relation to their topographical situation, their functions, and their place in a long history of variations on prestigious themes since many of the artworks and the urban settings featured in the course carry the mark of the Long history of the city itself. Recommended preparation: At least one 200-level course in ANTH, ARTH, CLSC, ENGL, HSTY, or RLGN.
Offered as ARTH311/411 and CLSC 311.


ARTH 328. Greek Sculpture (3)
Greek sculpture from the Archaic period through the Hellenistic; style, the development of specific types, and the uses of architectural sculpture.
Offered as ARTH 328, CLSC 328, and ARTH 428.


ARTH 332. Art and Archaeology of Ancient Italy (3)
The arts of the Italian peninsula from the 8th century B.C. to the 4th century A.D., with emphasis on recent archaeological discoveries. Lectures deal with architecture, sculpture, painting, and the decorative arts; supplemented by gallery tours at the Cleveland Museum of Art.
Offered as ARTH 332, CLSC 332, and ARTH 432.


ARTH 333. Greek and Roman Painting (3)
Greek vase painting, Etruscan tomb painting and Roman wall painting. The development of monumental painting in antiquity.
Offered as ARTH 333, CLSC 333, and ARTH 433.


ARTH 334. Art and Archaeology of Greece (3)
A survey of the art and architecture of Greece from the beginning of the Bronze Age (3000 B.C.) to the Roman conquest (100 B.C.) with emphasis on recent archaeological discoveries. Lectures deal with architecture, sculpture, painting, and the decorative arts, supplemented by gallery tours at the Cleveland Museum of Art.
Offered as ARTH 334, CLSC 334, and ARTH 434.


ARTH 335. Issues in Ancient Art (3)
Various topics in Ancient art. Lectures, discussions and reports.
Offered as ARTH 335 and ARTH 435.


ARTH 340. Issues in the Art of China (3)
This is a topics course. Each offering will focus on a specific topic within the area of Chinese art. Sample topics may include: Women painters in Beijing, Modern Artists in China-1980-Present, Shang Dynasty Tombs, Yuan Dynasty Buddhist Art. Lectures, discussions, and reports.
Offered as ARTH 340 and ARTH 440.
Global & Cultural Diversity


ARTH 341. Issues in the Art of Japan (3)
This is a topics course. Each offering will focus on a specific topic within the area of Japanese art. Sample topics may include: Muromachi Hanging Scrolls, Ryoan-ji Temple Garden Architecture, Rimpa School Panel Screens, Buddhist Painting in the Edo Period. Lectures, discussions, and reports.

Offered as ARTH 341 and ARTH 441.


ARTH 342. Issues in the Art of India (3)
This is a topics course. Each offering will focus on a specific topic within the area of Indian art. Sample topics may include: Northern Temple Architecture, Mughal Painting, Gupta Period Sculpture, Great Stupa sculptural articulation. Lectures, discussions, and reports.
Offered as ARTH 342 and ARTH 442.


ARTH 343. Issues in the Art of Southeast Asia (3)
This is a topics course. Each offering will focus on a specific topic within the area of Southeast Asian art. Sample topics may include: Buddhist Art, Introduction to Southeast Asian Art, Temple Architecture in Thailand, Cambodian Stone Carvings. Lectures, discussions, and reports.
Offered as ARTH 343 and ARTH 443.


ARTH 344. Issues in the Art of Africa (3)
This is a topics course. Each offering will focus on a specific topic within the area of African art. Sample topics may include: Ritual Masks, Sub-Saharan Religious Architecture, Carvings of Twins in Fertility Rites, Benin Bronze Warrior Reliefs. Lectures, discussions, and reports.
Offered as ARTH 344 and ARTH 444.


ARTH 345. Issues in Pre-Columbian Art (3)
This is a topics course. Each offering will focus on a specific topic within the area of Pre-Columbian art. Sample topics may include: Ancient Meso-America, Mayan Temple/Palace Complexes, Royal Peruvian Settlements, Inca Decorative Arts. Lectures, discussions, and reports.
Offered as ARTH 345 and ARTH 445.


ARTH 346. Issues in the Art of Native Peoples (3)
This is a topics course. Each offering will focus on a specific topic within the area of art of native peoples. Sample topics may include: North American Indian Art, Mound Building Cultures in the Central United States, Introduction to Maiori Polychrome Painting, Decorative American Indian Bead Work. Lectures, discussions, and reports.
Offered as ARTH 346 and ARTH 446.


ARTH 347. Issues in Islamic Art (3)
This is a topics course. Each offering will focus on a specific topic within the area of Islamic art. Sample topics may include: Mosque Architecture in Spain, Islamic Decorative Arts, Mughal Figurative Art, Introduction to the Art of Islam. Lectures, discussions, and reports.
Offered as ARTH 347 and ARTH 447.


ARTH 350. Issues in Medieval Art (3)
Various topics in Medieval Art. Lectures, discussions, and reports.
Offered as ARTH 350 and ARTH 450.


ARTH 351. Late Gothic Art in Italy (3)
Sculpture of the Pisani; early trends in Pisa, Siena, and Florence; Cimabue and Giotto; Duccio, Simone Martini, and the Lorenzetti; painting in Florence and Siena after the Black Death.
Offered as ARTH 351 and ARTH 451.


ARTH 352. Italian Art of the 15th Century (3)
The early 15th century in Florence, civic humanism, the sculpture of Ghiberti and Donatello, the painting of Masaccio; the International Style in painting, the art of Uccello, Piero della Francesca, Mantegna, and Botticelli; Carpaccio and the Bellini in Venice.
Offered as ARTH 352 and ARTH 452.


ARTH 353. Sixteenth Century Italian Art (3)
The development of the High Renaissance and Mannerist styles in Italy and late 16th century trends: painting and sculpture.
Offered as ARTH 353 and ARTH 453.


ARTH 356. Italian Renaissance and Baroque Sculpture (3)
Italian sculpture from the early 12th century to the later 18th century. The Pisani, Ghiberti, Donatello, Michelangelo, the Mannerists and Bernini.
Offered as ARTH 356 and ARTH 456.


ARTH 360. Renaissance Art in Northern Europe (3)
Painting, sculpture and the graphic arts in the Netherlands, Germany, and France, 1400-1580, highlighting artists such as Jan van Eyck, Albrecht DÜrer and Pieter Bruegel. The rise of secular subjects and bourgeois patronage is explored.
Offered as ARTH 360 and ARTH 460.


ARTH 361. Dutch and Flemish 17th Century Painting (3)
The golden age of Dutch and Flemish art with study of major masters (Rubens, Hals, Rembrandt, and Vermeer) and developments in subject matter: landscape, still-life, and genre themes.
Offered as ARTH 361 and ARTH 461.


ARTH 362. Issues in Renaissance Art (3)
Various topics in Renaissance art. Lectures, discussions and reports.
Offered as ARTH 362 and ARTH 462.


ARTH 365. Issues in Baroque Art (3)
Various topics in baroque art. Lectures, discussions and reports.
Offered as ARTH 365 and ARTH 465.


ARTH 367. 17th and 18th Century French Art (3)
A Survey of the arts of painting, sculpture and architecture in France from 1600-1780. Attention will be given to stylistic developments and to social and political contexts, patronage and art theory.
Offered as ARTH 367 and ARTH 467.


ARTH 374. Impressionism to Symbolism (3)
Major developments in European painting and sculpture during the latter half of the nineteenth century. Post-impressionism, synthetism, symbolism, and the arts and crafts movement considered in their socio-cultural contexts. Works of Degas, Manet, Monet, Klimt, Bocklin, Gauguin, etc.
Offered as ARTH 374 and ARTH 474.


ARTH 379. Issues in 19th Century Art (3)
Various topics in 19th century art, with class lectures, discussions and reports. Consult department for current topic.
Offered as ARTH 379 and ARTH 479.


ARTH 380. Abstract Expressionism and Its Aftermath (3)
An examination of the development and influences of Abstract Expressionism, including the impact on the Beat Generation and Pop Art.
Offered as ARTH 380 and ARTH 480.


ARTH 381. Neoclassicism to Realism (3)
The main developments of European art, chiefly painting and sculpture from post-impressionism to the present; the nature of abstract art and the interrelationships between the visual arts and new developments in literature, philosophy, and science.
Offered as ARTH 381 and ARTH 481.


ARTH 382. Visions of Utopia: 20th Century European Art (3)
Major movements in early 20th century European painting and sculpture with utopian goals. Focus on the interrelationships between the visual arts and new developments in literature, philosophy, and sciences.
Offered as ARTH 382 and ARTH 482.


ARTH 383. Gender Issues in Feminist Art: The 20th/21st Century (3)
An in-depth thematic approach to issues affecting works of art by and about women. Focus on the late 20th century. Emphasis on a specifically modern use of feminine myths, subjects and modes of production, and feminist criticism.
Offered as ARTH 383, WGST 383 and ARTH 483.


ARTH 384. American Art and Architecture in the Age of Washington and Jefferson (3)
In the 18th century, Americans created not only a political revolution but an artistic and creative one as well. In the 17th century, most Americans were subsistence farmers and most of their products, manufactures, and buildings were relatively crude. In the 18th century, Americans not only established a new and lasting form of government, but for the first time produced paintings, buildings, furniture and silver that rivaled the finest productions of Europe. Notably, many of the leaders of the American Revolution, such as Paul Revere, George Washington, and Thomas Jefferson, also made significant contributions to the arts.
Offered as ARTH 384 and ARTH 484.


ARTH 385. American Avant-Garde: 1900 - 1925 (3)
An examination of the development of avant-garde styles in New York during the early twentieth century. In-depth discussion of the Photo-secession, Stieglitz’s “291” gallery, the Armory Show, Marcel Duchamp’s move to America, and the formation and demise of the New York Dada movement.
Offered as ARTH 385 and ARTH 485.


ARTH 392. Issues in 20th/21st Century Art (3)
Various topics in 20th/21st century art, with class lectures, discussions, and reports.
Offered as ARTH 392 and ARTH 492.


ARTH 393. Contemporary Art: Critical Directions (3)
An examination of the directions taken by avant-garde American art and criticism in the aftermath of Abstract Expressionism. Includes the rise and fall of modernism in the 1960s and ‘70s, as well as an investigation of Post-modern trends and theories.
Offered as ARTH 393 and ARTH 493.


ARTH 394. Departmental Seminar (3)
The Department of History of Art and Art departmental seminar. A topical course, emphasizing disciplinary writing and modes of investigation and analysis. It is recommended for Art History majors before the majors seminar/capstone course, typically taken in the junior or senior years. The course advances the goals of SAGES within the disciplinary context of art history by focusing on close readings of art history texts (with an emphasis upon methodological approaches), examination of original works of art when possible, analytical writing, and intensive seminar-style discussion.
Prereq: ARTH 101 or ARTH 102 and at least one 200-level ARTH course.


SAGES Dept Seminar
ARTH 395. Internship (3)

This course is designated for students seeking professional experience in art history. It focuses on the museum experience (registration, exhibition, interpretation, and administration) although students may also elect to conduct internships in museum-related environments such as art conservation. Students are encouraged to have gained significant experience in art history course work before embarking on an internship. Students must identify an internship and supervisor as well as a campus internship supervisor the semester before enrolling in the internship. Recommended preparation: ARTH 101, ARTH 102, or ARTH 104, and consent.


ARTH 396. Majors Seminar (3)
Capstone course required of all undergraduate Art History majors, typically taken in senior year. Requires professional-level research with peer and faculty oversight culminating in formal written and oral presentations. Limited to Art History majors.
SAGES Senior Cap


ARTH 397. History of Prints and Printmaking (3)
Development of techniques and style and the social function of prints. The great masters: DÜrer, Rembrandt, Goya, and others. Based on the extensive collections of the Cleveland Museum of Art.
Offered as ARTH 397 and ARTH 497.


ARTH 398. Independent Study in Art History (1–3)
Individual research and reports on special topics.


ARTH 399. Honors Thesis (3)
Intensive study of a topic or problem leading to the preparation of an honors thesis.


ARTH 402. Buddhist Art in Asia (3)
The development of Buddhist art from its origins in India along the silk route to China and along the maritime routes to Japan and southeast Asia.
Offered as ARTH 302 and ARTH 402.


ARTH 403. History of Far Eastern Art (3)
A survey of traditional arts of Asia east of the Indus river, designed to emphasize the creative contributions of the artist with particular attention to the international relations of: the Bronze Age, Buddhist art, Hindu art and the later arts of China, Korea, and Japan. National and regional contributions to the developed styles of South Asia and the Far East will be stressed.
Offered as ARTH 303 and ARTH 403.


ARTH 404. Art of West Africa (3)
This course will survey artistic traditions of the past, and traditions that continue to flourish to this day in culture regions in West Africa called the Western Sudan and the Guinea Coast. An area of immense geographical and human diversity, the Western Sudan is the homeland of some of Africa’s most renowned medieval empires. An ancient culture known as Jenne (8th - 17th century) has produced a wide variety of refined ceramic artifacts. The Guinea Coast is densely populated by hundreds of different ethnic groups and harbors a diversity of artistic traditions. An active trade with Europeans was established in the region as early as in the 15th century. Gender-restricted and ritually powerful organizations still serve as the major patrons of the arts in the region. Contrary to the elongated so-called “pole style” typical of the Western Sudan, the arts of the Guinea Coast are characterized by organic and elegant forms and smooth surfaces in a variety of media.
Offered as ARTH 304 and ARTH 404.


ARTH 405. The Art of India (3)
A survey of Indian art from the Indus valley civilization to the Islamic conquest of India. Stylistic developments of the three-dimensional arts examined through cave sites and other extant materials.
Offered as ARTH 305 and ARTH 405.


ARTH 406. History of Indian Sculpture (3)
The stylistic development of both Buddhist and Hindu schools of Indian sculpture from the prehistoric period to the 12th century. Sculptural images are studied in terms of Indian mythology and literature.
Offered as ARTH 306 and ARTH 406.


ARTH 411. Rome: City and Image (3)
This course studies the architectural and urban history of Rome from the republican era of the ancient city up to the eighteenth century using the city itself as the major “text.” The emphasis will be placed on the extraordinary transformations wrought in the city, or at least in key districts, by powerful rulers and/or elites, especially in the ancient empire and in the Renaissance and baroque eras. In a larger perspective, the great construction projects exerted a far-reaching effect within and beyond Europe, but we will study them in relation to their topographical situation, their functions, and their place in a long history of variations on prestigious themes since many of the artworks and the urban settings featured in the course carry the mark of the Long history of the city itself. Recommended preparation: At least one 200-level course in ANTH, ARTH, CLSC, ENGL, HSTY, or RLGN.
Offered as ARTH311/411 and CLSC 311.


ARTH 428. Greek Sculpture (3)
Greek sculpture from the Archaic period through the Hellenistic; style, the development of specific types, and the uses of architectural sculpture.
Offered as ARTH 328, CLSC 328, and ARTH 428.


ARTH 432. Art and Archaeology of Ancient Italy (3)
The arts of the Italian peninsula from the 8th century B.C. to the 4th century A.D., with emphasis on recent archaeological discoveries. Lectures deal with architecture, sculpture, painting, and the decorative arts; supplemented by gallery tours at the Cleveland Museum of Art.
Offered as ARTH 332, CLSC 332, and ARTH 432.


ARTH 433. Greek and Roman Painting (3)
Greek vase painting, Etruscan tomb painting and Roman wall painting. The development of monumental painting in antiquity.
Offered as ARTH 333, CLSC 333, and ARTH 433.


ARTH 434. Art and Archaeology of Greece (3)
A survey of the art and architecture of Greece from the beginning of the Bronze Age (3000 B.C.) to the Roman conquest (100 B.C.) with emphasis on recent archaeological discoveries. Lectures deal with architecture, sculpture, painting, and the decorative arts, supplemented by gallery tours at the Cleveland Museum of Art.
Offered as ARTH 334, CLSC 334, and ARTH 434.


ARTH 435. Issues in Ancient Art (3)
Various topics in Ancient art. Lectures, discussions and reports.
Offered as ARTH 335 and ARTH 435.


ARTH 440. Issues in the Art of China (3)
This is a topics course. Each offering will focus on a specific topic within the area of Chinese art. Sample topics may include: Women painters in Beijing, Modern Artists in China-1980-Present, Shang Dynasty Tombs, Yuan Dynasty Buddhist Art. Lectures, discussions, and reports.
Offered as ARTH 340 and ARTH 440.


ARTH 441. Issues in the Art of Japan (3)
This is a topics course. Each offering will focus on a specific topic within the area of Japanese art. Sample topics may include: Muromachi Hanging Scrolls, Ryoan-ji Temple Garden Architecture, Rimpa School Panel Screens, Buddhist Painting in the Edo Period. Lectures, discussions, and reports.
Offered as ARTH 341 and ARTH 441.


ARTH 442. Issues in the Art of India (3)
This is a topics course. Each offering will focus on a specific topic within the area of Indian art. Sample topics may include: Northern Temple Architecture, Mughal Painting, Gupta Period Sculpture, Great Stupa sculptural articulation. Lectures, discussions, and reports.
Offered as ARTH 342 and ARTH 442.


ARTH 443. Issues in the Art of Southeast Asia (3)
This is a topics course. Each offering will focus on a specific topic within the area of Southeast Asian art. Sample topics may include: Buddhist Art, Introduction to Southeast Asian Art, Temple Architecture in Thailand, Cambodian Stone Carvings. Lectures, discussions, and reports.
Offered as ARTH 343 and ARTH 443.


ARTH 444. Issues in the Art of Africa (3)
This is a topics course. Each offering will focus on a specific topic within the area of African art. Sample topics may include: Ritual Masks, Sub-Saharan Religious Architecture, Carvings of Twins in Fertility Rites, Benin Bronze Warrior Reliefs. Lectures, discussions, and reports.
Offered as ARTH 344 and ARTH 444.


ARTH 445. Issues in Pre-Columbian Art (3)
This is a topics course. Each offering will focus on a specific topic within the area of Pre-Columbian art. Sample topics may include: Ancient Meso-America, Mayan Temple/Palace Complexes, Royal Peruvian Settlements, Inca Decorative Arts. Lectures, discussions, and reports.
Offered as ARTH 345 and ARTH 445.


ARTH 446. Issues in the Art of Native Peoples (3)
This is a topics course. Each offering will focus on a specific topic within the area of art of native peoples. Sample topics may include: North American Indian Art, Mound Building Cultures in the Central United States, Introduction to Maiori Polychrome Painting, Decorative American Indian Bead Work. Lectures, discussions, and reports.
Offered as ARTH 346 and ARTH 446.


ARTH 447. Issues in Islamic Art (3)
This is a topics course. Each offering will focus on a specific topic within the area of Islamic art. Sample topics may include: Mosque Architecture in Spain, Islamic Decorative Arts, Mughal Figurative Art, Introduction to the Art of Islam. Lectures, discussions, and reports.
Offered as ARTH 347 and ARTH 447.


ARTH 450. Issues in Medieval Art (3)
Various topics in Medieval Art. Lectures, discussions, and reports.
Offered as ARTH 350 and ARTH 450.


ARTH 451. Late Gothic Art in Italy (3)
Sculpture of the Pisani; early trends in Pisa, Siena, and Florence; Cimabue and Giotto; Duccio, Simone Martini, and the Lorenzetti; painting in Florence and Siena after the Black Death.
Offered as ARTH 351 and ARTH 451.


ARTH 452. Italian Art of the 15th Century (3)
The early 15th century in Florence, civic humanism, the sculpture of Ghiberti and Donatello, the painting of Masaccio; the International Style in painting, the art of Uccello, Piero della Francesca, Mantegna, and Botticelli; Carpaccio and the Bellini in Venice.
Offered as ARTH 352 and ARTH 452.


ARTH 453. Sixteenth Century Italian Art (3)
The development of the High Renaissance and Mannerist styles in Italy and late 16th century trends: painting and sculpture.
Offered as ARTH 353 and ARTH 453.


ARTH 456. Italian Renaissance and Baroque Sculpture (3)
Italian sculpture from the early 12th century to the later 18th century. The Pisani, Ghiberti, Donatello, Michelangelo, the Mannerists and Bernini.
Offered as ARTH 356 and ARTH 456.


ARTH 460. Renaissance Art in Northern Europe (3)
Painting, sculpture and the graphic arts in the Netherlands, Germany, and France, 1400-1580, highlighting artists such as Jan van Eyck, Albrecht Durer and Pieter Bruegel. The rise of secular subjects and bourgeois patronage is explored.
Offered as ARTH 360 and ARTH 460.


ARTH 461. Dutch and Flemish 17th Century Painting (3)
The golden age of Dutch and Flemish art with study of major masters (Rubens, Hals, Rembrandt, and Vermeer) and developments in subject matter: landscape, still-life, and genre themes.
Offered as ARTH 361 and ARTH 461.


ARTH 462. Issues in Renaissance Art (3)
Various topics in Renaissance art. Lectures, discussions and reports.
Offered as ARTH 362 and ARTH 462.


ARTH 465. Issues in Baroque Art (3)
Various topics in baroque art. Lectures, discussions and reports.
Offered as ARTH 365 and ARTH 465.


ARTH 467. 17th and 18th Century French Art (3)
A Survey of the arts of painting, sculpture and architecture in France from 1600-1780. Attention will be given to stylistic developments and to social and political contexts, patronage and art theory.
Offered as ARTH 367 and ARTH 467.


ARTH 474. Impressionism to Symbolism (3)
Major developments in European painting and sculpture during the latter half of the nineteenth century. Post impressionism, synthetism, symbolism, and the arts and crafts movement considered in their socio-cultural contexts. Works of Degas, Manet, Monet, Klimt, Bocklin, Gauguin, etc.
Offered as ARTH 374 and ARTH 474.


ARTH 479. Issues in 19th Century Art (3)
Various topics in 19th century art, with class lectures, discussions and reports. Consult department for current topic.
Offered as ARTH 379 and ARTH 479.


ARTH 480. Abstract Expressionism and Its Aftermath (3)
An examination of the development and influences of Abstract Expressionism, including the impact on the Beat Generation and Pop Art.
Offered as ARTH 380 and ARTH 480.


ARTH 481. Neoclassicism to Realism (3)
The main developments of European art chiefly painting and sculpture from post-impressionism to the present; the nature of abstract art and the interrelationships between the visual arts and new developments in literature, philosophy, and science.
Offered as ARTH 381 and ARTH 481.


ARTH 482. Visions of Utopia: 20th Century European Art (3)
Major movements in early 20th century European painting and sculpture with utopian goals. Focus on the interrelationships between the visual arts and new developments in literature, philosophy, and sciences.
Offered as ARTH 382 and ARTH 482.


ARTH 483. Gender Issues in Feminist Art: The 20th/21st Century (3)
An in-depth thematic approach to issues affecting works of art by and about women. Focus on the late 20th century. Emphasis on a specifically modern use of feminine myths, subjects and modes of production, and feminist criticism.
Offered as ARTH 383, WGST 383 and ARTH 483.


ARTH 484. American Art and Architecture in the Age of Washington and Jefferson (3)
In the 18th century, Americans created not only a political revolution but an artistic and creative one as well. In the 17th century, most Americans were subsistence farmers and most of their products, manufactures, and buildings were relatively crude. In the 18th century, Americans not only established a new and lasting form of government, but for the first time produced paintings, buildings, furniture and silver that rivaled the finest productions of Europe. Notably, many of the leaders of the American Revolution, such as Paul Revere, George Washington, and Thomas Jefferson, also made significant contributions to the arts.
Offered as ARTH 384 and ARTH 484.


ARTH 485. American Avant-Garde: 1900 - 1925 (3)
An examination of the development of avant-garde styles in New York during the early twentieth century. In-depth discussion of the Photo-secession, Stieglitz’s “291” gallery, the Armory Show, Marcel Duchamp’s move to America, and the formation and demise of the New York Dada movement.
Offered as ARTH 385 and ARTH 485.


ARTH 489. M.A. Qualifying Paper (3)
Individual research and intensive study of a specific topic in art history which culminates in a written M.A. Qualifying Paper. Recommended preparation: 27 credit hours of Art History.


ARTH 490. Visual Arts and Museums (3)
Students who successfully complete this course may be considered for admission into ARTH 491A, a supervised internship in an art museum or gallery situation.


ARTH 491A. Visual Arts and Museums: Internship (1)
Recommended preparation: ARTH 490.


ARTH 491B. Visual Arts and Museums: Internship (3)
Second semester of Internship; includes final project devised in consultation with the director of museum studies. Recommended preparation: ARTH 490 and ARTH 491A.


ARTH 492. Issues in 20th/21st Century Art (3)
Various topics in 20th/21st century art, with class lectures, discussions, and reports.
Offered as ARTH 392 and ARTH 492.


ARTH 493. Contemporary Art: Critical Directions (3)
An examination of the directions taken by avant-garde American art and criticism in the aftermath of Abstract Expressionism. Includes the rise and fall of modernism in the 1960s and ‘70s, as well as an investigation of Post-modern trends and theories.
Offered as ARTH 393 and ARTH 493.


ARTH 494A. Directed Readings in Non-Western Art (1–3)
Directed reading.


ARTH 494B. Ancient Art (1–3)


ARTH 494C. Medieval Art (1–3)


ARTH 494D. Renaissance and Baroque Art (1–3)


ARTH 494E. American Art (1–3)


ARTH 494F. Modern Art (1–3)


ARTH 495. Methodologies of Art History (3)

The study of art history as a discipline in its practical and theoretical aspects. Consideration given to research methods, style and historical context, and a critical examination of selected major art historical texts with a view to understanding traditional as well as recent approaches. Special attention is given to art historical writing, employing selected original works in the Cleveland Museum of Art. Required of first-year graduate students in the Ph.D. and Master’s programs.


ARTH 497. History of Prints and Printmaking (3)
Development of techniques and style and the social function of prints. The great masters: DÜrer, Rembrandt, Goya, and others. Based on the extensive collections of the Cleveland Museum of Art.
Offered as ARTH 397 and ARTH 497.


ARTH 512. Seminar in Ancient Art (3)


ARTH 518B. Seminar in Asian Art (3)


ARTH 540. Seminar in Non-Western Art (3)

Topics may include: African Art and The West, Africa: Symbolism and Ritual, The Classic Period in Mesoamerica, Andean Textiles.


ARTH 545B. Seminar in Medieval Art (3)


ARTH 550. Seminar: Issues in Western European Art (3)


ARTH 551. Seminar in Renaissance Art (3)


ARTH 552. Seminar in Baroque Art (3)


ARTH 565. Seminar in American Art (3)


ARTH 570. Seminar: 19th Century Art (3)


ARTH 575. Critical Theory Seminar (3)

In-depth study of controversial revisionist writings which demonstrate the strong impact of structuralist, poststructuralist, semiotic, Marxist, psychoanalytic, film, and gender theories on recent art historical discourse. Discussion of a wide range of current theoretical positions applied to visual and critical analysis of 19th and 20th century art works. Recommended preparation: ARTH 495.


ARTH 576. Seminar in Modern Art (3)


ARTH 584. Seminar: History of Photography (3)
This seminar style course will investigate various topics in the history of photography, making use of objects in area collections whenever possible. In addition to original works of art, the course will stress recent directions in the secondary literature. Students will gain skills in examination of objects, research, critical analysis, and written and verbal communication.


ARTH 601. Research in Art History (1–18)
(Credit as arranged.)


ARTH 610. Cleveland Museum of Art Intern (1)
Recommended preparation: ARTH 490.


ARTH 651. Thesis M.A. (1–18)


ARTH 701. Dissertation Ph.D. (1–18)
(Credit as arranged.)
Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.


ARTS 101. Design and Color I (3)
Organizational and structural projects as a basis for the development of style. Studies in line, texture, shape, space, value, color, and two dimensional composition through studio problems, art studio media and techniques.


ARTS 106. Creative Drawing I (3)
Development of graphic fluency in black and white through direct observation of nature and the model. Drawing as a means of enlarging visual sensitivity using a wide range of media and subject matter. Work from nude model.


ARTS 201. Design and Color II (3)
Continuation of ARTS 101. Composition: three-dimensional projects. Advanced work in the properties and uses of color and materials.
Prereq: ARTS 101.


ARTS 206. Creative Drawing II (3)
Continuation of ARTS 106. Advanced work in graphic representation. Development of visual acuity and a personal drawing style while working in color. Work from nude model.
Prereq: ARTS 106.


ARTS 210. Enameling and Jewelry I (3)
Techniques in the application of vitreous enamel on copper and of constructed metal jewelry. Technical skill and suitability of design as applied to the medium.


ARTS 212. Weaving, Fibers, and Textiles I (3)
Learn basic concepts and methods for designing textile surfaces: fabric painting and dyeing. Construct textiles using off-loom weaving and interlacing techniques. Emphasis on development of technical skills, application of design concepts and personal expression.


ARTS 214. Ceramics I (3)
The techniques of hand building in pinch, coil and slab methods. Development of sensitivity to design and form. Basic work in stoneware, earthenware, and glazing.


ARTS 216. Painting I (3)
The creative, conceptual, visual, and technical aspects of painting. Style ranging from naturalism to abstraction. Work in acrylic and mixed media.


ARTS 220. Photography Studio I (3)
Camera, film, and darkroom techniques. Development of basic black and white perceptual and photographic skills. Darkroom and photographic field and lab work. 35mm camera required.


ARTS 295. Introduction to Art Education (3)
General history and theories of art education. Development of personal philosophy as basis for teaching art. Topics in professional standards, creativity, aesthetic theory, and art criticism. (Clinical/field experience required.)


ARTS 300. Current Issues in Art Education (3)
Contemporary issues in Art Education; understanding art goals and standards of National Art Education Association and the Ohio State Department of Education for teachers, students and administrators. Special topics: art and technology, multiculturalism, special populations and classroom management.
Offered as ARTS 300 and ARTS 400.
Prereq: ARTS 295.


ARTS 302. Architecture and City Design I (3)
The social spatial, and aesthetic elements in architecture; the components of the building: the window, door, roof, enclosing walls, and character of interior and exterior space. Projects related to small, intimate scale and residential structures. Lectures, field trips, studio experiences. Recommended ARTS 101 or ARTS 106 courses prior to enrollment.
Offered as ARTH 302 or ARTS 402.


ARTS 303. Architecture and City Design II (3)
The social, spatial, and aesthetic elements of the urban setting of architecture, the organizational components of the city, the path, the node, the edge, and the grid. Projects related to large-scale and public buildings and their relationship to the encompassing visual world. Lectures, field trips, studio experiences. Recommended ARTS 101 or ARTS 106 courses prior to enrollment.
Offered as ARTS 303 or ARTS 403.


ARTS 304. Architecture and City Design III (3)
A study of historic precedents and the social implications of modern and contemporary architecture including analysis and form interpretation as it relates to building and materials technologies. Practical application and synthesis of architectural knowledge through site visits and research of local and regional architecture. Discussions of historic and contemporary architects, engineers and significant architecture and engineering firms.
Prereq: ARTS 302 and ARTS 303.


ARTS 310. Enameling and Jewelry II (3)
Continuation of ARTS 210. Advanced enameling and jewelry techniques applied to copper or silver, cloisonné, champlevé, basse taille, plique-jour. Creative use of design principles and jewelry techniques.
Prereq: ARTS 210.


ARTS 312. Weaving, Fibers, and Textiles II (3)
Continuation of ARTS 212. Exploration of a selected area of textiles in surface design or constructed textiles. Development of a personal aesthetic through design and execution of a series of projects.
Prereq: ARTS 212.


ARTS 314. Ceramics II (3)
Continuation of ARTS 214. Problematic approach to technical aspects of ceramics; experience in wheel throwing and option of hand-building. Experimentation with glaze and clay body formulation available.
Prereq: ARTS 214.


ARTS 316. Painting II (3)
The creative, conceptual, visual and technical aspects of painting. Styles ranging from expressionism, cubism, surrealism and abstraction. Work in acrylic and mixed media leading to the development of personal painting style.
Prereq: ARTS 216.


ARTS 320. Photography Studio II (3)
Continuation of ARTS 220. Advanced theory and black and white techniques. Development of personal aesthetic encouraged. Field work. 35mm camera required.
Prereq: ARTS 220.


ARTS 322. Photography: Color Studio (3)
Personal expression through use of color photography. Introduction to color printing and processing techniques. History of the medium. Field and lab work. 35mm camera required.
Prereq: ARTS 220.


ARTS 325. Creative Photography (3)
Creative photography through photographing and responding to photographs. The question of self-expression and photographic medium explored in the pursuit of understanding images.
Prereq: ARTS 220 and ARTS 320 or ARTS 322.


ARTS 350. Multimedia I (3)
Fundamental concepts and skills for using technology to design, create, express, and present. This project-oriented class will develop knowledge and competencies related to digital imaging, animation, video, multimedia, production and presentation.
Offered as ARTS 350 and ARTS 450.
Prereq: One from ARTS 101, ARTS 106, ARTS 216, or ARTS 220 or permission of the director of art education.


ARTS 365A. Painting (3)
Advanced painting projects determined in consultation with instructor.
Prereq: ARTS 216 and ARTS 316.


ARTS 365B. Design and Color (3)
Advanced design projects determined in consultation with instructor.
Prereq: ARTS 101 and ARTS 201.


ARTS 365C. Enameling and Jewelry (3)
Advanced enameling and jewelry projects determined in consultation with instructor.
Prereq: ARTS 210 and ARTS 310.


ARTS 365D. B&W Photography Studio (3)
Advanced black and white projects determined in consultation with instructor.
Prereq: ARTS 220 and ARTS 320.


ARTS 365E. Color Studio (3)
Advanced digital color studio projects determined in consultation with instructor.
Prereq: ARTS 220 and ARTS 322.


ARTS 365F. Creative Drawing (3)
Advanced drawing in black and white and color media.
Prereq: ARTS 106 and ARTS 206.


ARTS 365G. Ceramics (3)
Advanced ceramics projects determined in consultation with instructor.
Prereq: ARTS 214 and ARTS 314.


ARTS 365H. Weaving, Fibers, and Textiles (3)
Advance textile projects determined in consultation with instructor.
Prereq: ARTS 212 and ARTS 312.


ARTS 366A. Student Teaching in Art: Pre-K - 6th Grade (4)
Teaching art for early childhood, elementary, and middle school students in a school setting. Includes art curriculum development, implementation, and assessment. Professional standards and practices.
Offered as ARTS 366A and ARTS 466A.
Prereq: ARTS 295, ARTS 300, ARTS 385, ARTS 386, ARTS 387, and ARTS 393. Coreq: ARTS 366B and ARTS 465.


ARTS 366B. Student Teaching in Art: 7th - 12th Grade (4)
Teaching adolescents and young adults art in a school setting. Includes art curriculum development, implementation, assessment and classroom management. Professional standards and practices.
Offered as ARTS 366B and ARTS 466B.
Prereq: ARTS 295, ARTS 300, ARTS 385, ARTS 386, ARTS 387 and ARTS 393. Coreq: ARTS 366A and ARTS 465.


ARTS 385. Clinical/Field Based Experience I (1)
Art education students observe and assist art teachers in classes in a variety of public and private educational environments such as local schools, Cleveland Museum of Art, and Cleveland Children’s Museum. Students study, identify, and analyze differences in art curriculum taught at the various art programs that they observe. Written reports using departmental observation guidelines are required.
Prereq: ARTS 295.


ARTS 386. Clinical/Field Based Experience II (1)
Art education students become sensitized to serving needs of “special” populations. Observation of educational strategies for teaching learning disabled and/or physically disabled students. Written reports using departmental observation guidelines required.
Prereq: ARTS 295.


ARTS 387. Clinical/Field Based Experience III (1)
Art education students observe and assist in art programs for artistically gifted students working in specialized art areas (drawing, painting, sculpture, printmaking, art history). Written reports using departmental observation guidelines are required.
Prereq: ARTS 295.


ARTS 393. Art Content, Pedagogy, Methodology, and Assessment (3)
Growth and development of image making from Pre-K through young adult. Principles and practices of art instruction in grades Pre-K through 12th grade. Issues in art education. Curriculum construction, implementation and assessment of art lessons that address content areas of art production, art history, art appreciation, and art criticism. Clinical field experiences required.
Offered as ARTS 393 and ARTS 493.
Prereq: ARTS 295.


ARTS 395. Introduction to Multimedia Technology (3)
Fundamental concepts and skills for using technology in art, electronic portfolio development, and teaching and learning. This project-oriented class will develop knowledge and competencies related to digital imaging and video, multimedia production and presentation, the Internet, information processing, computer systems and management as they relate to art education.
Offered as ARTS 395 and ARTS 495.
Prereq: ARTS 101 and ARTS 201 or ARTS 220 and ARTS 320.


ARTS 399. Independent Study in Art Studio (1–3)
Independent Study in Art Studio; by permit only.


ARTS 400. Current Issues in Art Education (3)
Contemporary issues in Art Education; understanding art goals and standards of National Art Education Association and the Ohio State Department of Education for teachers, students and administrators. Special topics: art and technology, multiculturalism, special populations and classroom management.
Offered as ARTS 300 and ARTS 400.


ARTS 402. Architecture and City Design I (3)
The social spatial, and aesthetic elements in architecture; the components of the building: the window, door, roof, enclosing walls, and character of interior and exterior space. Projects related to small, intimate scale and residential structures. Lectures, field trips, studio experiences. Recommended ARTS 101 or ARTS 106 courses prior to enrollment.
Offered as ARTH 302 or ARTS 402.


ARTS 403. Architecture and City Design II (3)
The social, spatial, and aesthetic elements of the urban setting of architecture, the organizational components of the city, the path, the node, the edge, and the grid. Projects related to large-scale and public buildings and their relationship to the encompassing visual world. Lectures, field trips, studio experiences. Recommended ARTS 101 or ARTS 106 courses prior to enrollment.
Offered as ARTS 303 or ARTS 403.


ARTS 450. Multimedia I (3)
Fundamental concepts and skills for using technology to design, create, express, and present. This project-oriented class will develop knowledge and competencies related to digital imaging, animation, video, multimedia, production and presentation.
Offered as ARTS 350 and ARTS 450.


ARTS 465. Seminar for Art Teachers (4)
For art education majors and teacher licensure candidates. Principles and practice in school art instruction grades Pre-K through 12th grade. Organization and management of the art program that incorporates writing sequential art curriculum that integrates art production, art history, appreciation, and criticism. Planning, development, and evaluation of teaching materials, lessons, and units. The seminar includes discussion of professional issues, ethics, art advocacy, and classroom management.
Prereq: ARTS 295 or ARTS 602, and ARTS 393 or ARTS 493. Coreq: ARTS 366A and ARTS 366B or ARTS 466A and ARTS 466B.


ARTS 466A. Student Teaching in Art: Pre-K - 6th Grade (4)
Teaching art for early childhood, elementary, and middle school students in a school setting. Includes art curriculum development, implementation, and assessment. Professional standards and practices.
Offered as ARTS 366A and ARTS 466A.
Prereq: ARTS 385, ARTS 386, ARTS 387, ARTS 400, ARTS 493, and ARTS 602. Coreq: ARTS 465 and ARTS 466B.


ARTS 466B. Student Teaching in Art: 7th - 12th Grade (4)
Teaching adolescents and young adults art in a school setting. Includes art curriculum development, implementation, assessment and classroom management. Professional standards and practices.
Offered as ARTS 366B and ARTS 466B.
Prereq: ARTS 385, ARTS 386, ARTS 387, ARTS 400, ARTS 493, and ARTS 602. Coreq: ARTS 465 and ARTS 466A.


ARTS 493. Art Content, Pedagogy, Methodology, and Assessment (3)
Growth and development of image making from Pre-K through young adult. Principles and practices of art instruction in grades Pre-K through 12th grade. Issues in art education. Curriculum construction, implementation and assessment of art lessons that address content areas of art production, art history, art appreciation, and art criticism. Clinical field experiences required.
Offered as ARTS 393 and ARTS 493.
Prereq: ARTS 602.


ARTS 494. Teaching Art (3)
Research contrasting theories of art education in relationship to a variety of educational settings in elementary and secondary schools. Developing innovative, interdisciplinary, comprehensive curriculum models for a specific organization. For licensed art teachers only or consent of instructor.


ARTS 495. Introduction to Multimedia Technology (3)
Fundamental concepts and skills for using technology in art, electronic portfolio development, and teaching and learning. This project-oriented class will develop knowledge and competencies related to digital imaging and video, multimedia production and presentation, the Internet, information processing, computer systems and management as they relate to art education.
Offered as ARTS 395 and ARTS 495.


ARTS 497. Summer Workshop in Art Education (3)
A current art education issue is covered in depth.


ARTS 602. Study in Art Education (3)
General history and theories of art education. Development of personal philosophy as basis for teaching art. Topics in professional standards, creativity, aesthetic theory, and art criticism. Students produce an art education research paper. Clinical/Field experiences are required.


ARTS 605. Final Creative Thesis (1–3)
Students receive individual guidance for an approved self-designed creative project from program faculty members. A public exhibition or presentation is required. By permit only.