iors, analyses of talk-in-interactions across a wide range of social settings and cultural contexts, gestures, comportment practices and the use of space, linguistic variation and change, verbal art, language and emotion, the limits of language, institutional language, and issues of language and identity. Students with interest in language and culture as well as those who are new to linguistic anthropology are welcome. No prior training in linguistics is presupposed.


ANTH 225. Evolution (3)
Multidisciplinary study of the course and processes of organic evolution provides a broad understanding of the evolution of structural and functional diversity, the relationships among organisms and their environments, and the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of organisms. Topics include the genetic basis of micro- and macro-evolutionary change, the concept of adaptation, natural selection, population dynamics, theories of species formation, principles of phylogenetic inference, biogeography, evolutionary rates, evolutionary convergence, homology, Darwinian medicine, and conceptual and philosophic issues in evolutionary theory.
Offered as ANTH 225, BIOL 225, GEOL 225, HSTY 225, and PHIL 225.


ANTH 233. Introduction to Jewish Folklore (3)
Exploration of a variety of genres, research methods and interpretations of Jewish folklore, from antiquity to the present. Emphasis on how Jewish folk traditions and culture give us access to the spirit and mentality of the many different generations of the Jewish ethnic group, illuminating its past and informing the direction of its future development.
Offered as ANTH 233 and JDST 233.
Global & Cultural Diversity


ANTH 295. Comparative Primate Behavior (3)
The behavior of non-human primates (prosimians, monkeys, and apes) and the relevance of these studies for understanding the evolution of human behavior. Biological and ecological influences on behavior. The social aspects of primate life, both human and nonhuman. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or ANTH 103 or consent of department.


ANTH 301. Biological Aging in Humans (3)
Biological aging phenomena, evidence that various sociocultural and environmental influences may slow or accelerate the aging process, and theories explaining the evolution of the aging process. Recommended preparation: ANTH 103 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 301 and ANTH 401.


ANTH 302. Darwinian Medicine (3)
Darwinian medicine deals with evolutionary aspects of modern human disease. It applies the concepts and methods of evolutionary biology to the question of why we are vulnerable to disease. Darwinian (or evolutionary) medicine proposes several general hypotheses about disease causation including disease as evolutionary legacy and design compromise, the result of a novel environment, a consequence of genetic adaptation, the result of infectious organisms’ evolutionary adaptations, and disease symptoms as manifestation of defense mechanisms. It proposes that evolutionary ideas can explain, help to prevent and perhaps help to treat some diseases. This course presents the basic logic of Darwinian medicine and evaluates hypotheses about specific diseases that illustrate each of the hypotheses about disease causation. Recommended preparation: ANTH 103 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 302 and ANTH 402.


ANTH 304. Introduction to the Anthropology of Aging (3)
Reviews historical and methodological approaches to the study of aging. Examines theoretical assumptions about aging by comparing studies from Western and non-Western societies that illustrate the differential importance of culture in the experience of aging. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 304 and ANTH 404.


ANTH 305. Child Policy (3)
This course introduces students to issues in child policy. Local, state and federal child policy will be considered, and topics will include, for example, policies related to child poverty, schooling, child welfare, and children’s physical and mental health. Students will learn how policy is developed, how research informs policy and vice versa. Recommended preparation: One social sciences course or consent.
Offered as ANTH 305 and CHST 301.


ANTH 306. The Anthropology of Childhood and the Family
Child-rearing patterns and the family as an institution, using evidence from Western and non-Western cultures. Human universals and cultural variation, the experience of childhood and recent changes in the American family. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 306 and ANTH 406.


ANTH 307. Experiential Learning in Child Policy (3–6)
Focus on state and federal legislation impacting children, youth, and families. Course includes an experiential learning component at the state or federal level and a travel experience to either Columbus, OH or Washington, D.C. to learn firsthand how policy is formed. Students may take this course twice for credit.
Offered as ANTH 307 and CHST 302.


ANTH 308. Child Policy Externship (3)
This course provides students with externships in child policy. These externships give students an opportunity to work directly with professionals who design and implement policies that impact the lives of children and their families. Agencies involved are active in areas such as childcare, education, juvenile justice, and physical and mental health. Students apply for the externship. Selected students are placed in a local child policy agency. An individualized learning plan is developed in consultation with the Childhood Studies Program faculty, the supervisor in the agency, and the student. This course is a 3 credit-hour course and may be taken twice for a total of 6 credit hours.
Offered as ANTH 308 and CHST 398.


ANTH 309. Family Violence and Child Abuse (3)
The prevalence and causes of intrafamilial violence. Spouse abuse, child abuse, adolescent abuse, sexual abuse, parent abuse, and sibling violence. Major theoretical positions on the occurrence of these behaviors in light of information from both Western and non-Western cultures. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 309 and ANTH 409.


ANTH 310. Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology (3)
This is an introduction to the core concepts, theories and methodologies that form the study of language from an anthropological point of view. The course provides exposure to current issues in linguistic anthropological research and reviews some of the foundational topics of research past, highlighting the contributions of linguistics to anthropology and social science. Topics to be explored include: 1) an overview of the study of language (language structure and patterns, the effects of linguistic categories on thought and behavior, meaning and linguistic relativity, cross-language comparison, and non-verbal communication); 2) doing linguistic anthropology “on the ground” (an intro to the laboratory and field techniques of linguistic anthropology); 3) the study of language as function and social action (language and social structure speech acts and events, verbal art, language and emotion); and 4) the study of language/discourse and power (language in politics, medicine, and law).
Offered as ANTH 310 and ANTH 410.


ANTH 312. “Where Does it Hurt”: Doctor-Patient Talk (3)
Taking medical interactions as our focus, this course explores the problems of doctor-patient (mis)communication from the view of language and culture. By examining a wide range of texts on patients’ illness experiences and healthcare encounters, we will identify underlying variations in communication styles and bodily comportment, which can and do affect the successful outcome of both intra- and cross-cultural medical interactions. Specific topics to be covered are: the relationship of clinical questioning and answering to the power to speak and to issues of legitimacy, authority, and the negotiation of treatment; the distinctions between ‘interview’ and ‘conversation’ and how these particular ways of speaking encourage or discourage different doctor-patient interactions; how cultural understandings of what it means to be a patient reflect socio-cultural assumptions about the nature of wellness, illness, and care; and how differences in sex, ethnicity, and the presence (or absence) of interpreters in cross-cultural care complicate doctor-patient talk.
Offered as ANTH 312 or ANTH 412.


ANTH 313. The Anthropology of Adolescence (3)
This course investigates the anthropology of adolescence. What are the conditions under which adolescence has appeared around the world as a life stage? What are the roles of adolescence cross-culturally? What are the varieties of adolescent experience? Through classic and contemporary texts, the course will address these questions as well as special topics particularly important to adolescence such as globalization, mental health, and sexuality.
Offered as ANTH 313 and ANTH 413.


ANTH 314. Cultures of the United States
This course considers the rich ethnic diversity of the U.S. from the perspective of social/cultural anthropology. Conquest, immigration, problems of conflicts and accommodation, and the character of the diverse regional and ethnic cultures are considered as are forms of racism, discrimination, and their consequences. Groups of interest include various Latina/o and Native peoples, African-American groups, and specific ethnic groups of Pacific, Mediterranean, European, Asian, and Caribbean origin.
Offered as ANTH 314, ETHS 314, and ANTH 414.
Global & Cultural Diversity


ANTH 317. Asian Medical Systems
Examines the philosophical assumptions and therapies of the traditional and contemporary medical systems of India, Tibet, China, and Japan. Particular attention will be given to the folk, popular, and institutional sectors of medical practice as well as to the contemporary relationship between traditional medicine and Western medicine in each of these societies. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 317 and ANTH 417.


ANTH 318. Death and Dying (3)
Examines cultural context of death and dying. Topics include social and psychological consequences of changing patterns of mortality, attitudes towards the taking of life, preparation for death, mortuary rituals, grief and mourning, and nature of relationship between living and dead. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 318 or ANTH 418.


ANTH 319. Introduction to Statistical Analysis in the Social Sciences (3)
Statistical description (central tendency, variation, correlation, etc.) and statistical evaluation (two sample comparisons, regression, analysis of variance, non-parametric statistics). Developing an understanding of statistical inference, particularly on proper usage of statistical methods. Examples from the social sciences. Cannot be used to meet the A&S Humanities and Social Sciences requirement. Not available for credit to students who have completed STAT 201 or PSCL 282.


ANTH 320. Doing Ethnography in Cleveland (3)
Anthropologists use ethnography to understand the complexity and diversity of cultures by studying people in their daily lives. Through hands-on participation in ethnographic fieldwork, students will prepare an ethnography on an aspect of life in the city of Cleveland. Class activities will focus on issues of conducting, analyzing, and interpreting ethnographic research.
Prereq: ANTH 102.


ANTH 321. Methods in Archaeology (3)
This course reviews the basic methods and techniques used in modern anthropological archaeology. Topics to be discussed include the nature of the archaeological record, research design, techniques of field archaeology, methods of laboratory analysis, museum archaeology, ethnoarchaeology, and cultural interpretation.
Prereq: ANTH 107.


ANTH 322. Living Africa (3)
This course is an introduction to the peoples and cultures of Africa. Rather than a traditional, survey approach, this course takes a thematic approach to issues regarding core aspects of African societies such as history, political organization, family and kinship, art and literature, religion, gender, international relations, and economy. Taking a multidisciplinary perspective, the course will draw on diverse sources, from classical ethnographic writings to popular cultural criticism, literature, films, poetry, and news media.
Offered as ANTH 322 and ANTH 422.
Global & Cultural Diversity


ANTH 323. AIDS: Epidemiology, Biology, and Culture (3)
This course will examine the biological and cultural impact of AIDS in different societies around the world. Topics include: the origin and evolution of the virus, the evolutionary implications of the epidemic, routes of transmission, a historical comparison of AIDS to other epidemics in human history, current worldwide prevalences of AIDS, and cultural responses to the epidemic. Special emphasis will be placed on the long-term biological and social consequences of the epidemic. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or ANTH 103 or ANTH 105 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 323 and ANTH 423.


ANTH 324. Field Methods in Archaeology (3–6)
This field course is designed to give the student a comprehensive introduction to archaeological field work. All participants will be introduced to the methods of archaeological survey, techniques of hand excavation, artifact identification, and the preparation of field notes and documentation. In large measure this is a “learning through doing” course which is supplemented by formal and informal lectures and discussions about archaeological methods and regional prehistory. The Fields School is held as two, three-week sessions of instruction in the field. All participants are required to attend an orientation meeting that is held at the Museum on the first day of each session. The remainder of each session will take place from Monday through Friday at an archaeological site in northeast Ohio. Students are responsible for their own transportation to and from the field site and must bring a sack lunch. All participants will receive a field manual which will provide detailed information on the course and techniques of field work.


ANTH 326. Power, Illness, and Inequality: The Political Economy of Health (3)
This course explores the relationship between social inequality and the distribution of health and illness across class, race, gender, sexual orientation, and national boundaries. Class readings drawn from critical anthropological approaches to the study of health emphasize the fundamental importance of power relations and economic constraints in explaining patterns of disease. The course critically examines the nature of Western biomedicine and inequality in the delivery of health services. Special consideration is given to political economic analysis of health issues in the developing world such as AIDS, hunger, reproductive health, and primary health care provision. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or ANTH 215 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 326 and ANTH 426.


ANTH 327. Ancient Cultures of the Ohio Region (3)
This course surveys the archaeology of Native American cultures in the Great Lakes region from ca. 10,000 B.C. to A.D. 1700. The geographic scope of this course is the upper Midwest, southern Ontario, and the St. Lawrence Valley with a focus on the Ohio region. Recommended preparation: ANTH 107 or consent of the department.
Offered as ANTH 327 and ANTH 427.


ANTH 330. Special Topics in Prehistory (3)
Special topics or geographical areas of archaeological significance (e.g., the origins of food production, the archaeology of the Mediterranean, the archaeology of North America). Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or ANTH 107 or consent of department.


ANTH 331. Ancient Civilizations of the Near East (3)
The social, economic, and ecological factors involved in the formation of the earliest Asian civilizations. The developmental role of cities, warfare, trade, and irrigation considered with respect to “state” formation in Mesopotamia, Iran, and the Indus Valley. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or ANTH 107 or consent of department.


ANTH 333. Roots of Ancient India: Archaeology of South Asia (3)
Examination of the archaeological record of cultural development from earliest times through the Iron Age in India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and Bangladesh. Particular attention devoted to how these ancient cultural developments laid the foundations for the early historic civilizations of this region. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or ANTH 107 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 333 and ANTH 433.


ANTH 334. Urban Anthropology (3)
This urban anthropology course will focus on contemporary understandings of the institutions of urban, national and transnational life. We will explore the complex ways that urban worlds and social problems are shaped by globalizing capitalism, national, and transnational processes. As well, we will examine how and why various identities, nations, and transnational institutions are expressed in and by people living in current global urban hierarchies. In particular, we will look at how the urban, national, and transnational dynamically produce and are produced by the everyday cultural practices of people living and struggling in North American urban spaces. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 334 and ANTH 434.


ANTH 337. Comparative Medical Systems (3)
This course considers the world’s major medical systems. Foci include professional and folk medical systems of Asia and South Asia, North and South America, Europe and the Mediterranean, including the Christian and Islamic medical traditions. Attention is paid to medical origins and the relationship of popular to professional medicines. The examination of each medical tradition includes consideration of its psychological medicine and system of medical ethics. Recommended preparation: ANTH 215.
Offered as ANTH 337 and ANTH 437.


ANTH 340. Culture and Emotion (3)
The cross-cultural consideration of the relationship of culture and emotion. The cultural construction of the experience and expression of emotion. Key substantive issues include: ethnopsychological variations in indigenous conceptualizations and displays of emotion; the socialization of affect; the self and emotion; contextual variations in emotional expression with respect to gender, power relations, patterns of subsistence, and the individual; and the relationship between emotion and illness processes. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 340 and ANTH 440.


ANTH 341. Cultural Area Studies in Anthropology (3)
Recommended preparation: ANTH 102.
Offered as ANTH 341 and ANTH 441.


ANTH 343. Psychoanalytic Anthropology (3)
Psychoanalytic theory and its application to cross-cultural materials. The cultural context of analytic theory’s development and its applications in social/cultural and medical anthropology; application of cultural criticism to psychoanalytic conceptions and its constructions of the following: social evolution; religious ideology, praxis, patterns and dynamics; altered states of consciousness; individual personality and psychopathology; individual and cultural defense mechanisms; socialization; cognition; emotion; symbolism; and gender. Also considers bases for a culturally relative analytic theory. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 343 and ANTH 443.


ANTH 345. Ethnicity, Gender, and Mental Health (3)
An overview of mental health status and ethnicity. Analysis of ethnicity in relation to culture, social class, gender, sociopolitical conflict and the world refugee crisis. Consideration of populations at special risk for the development of specific mental disorders (e.g., schizophrenia, affective disorders, adjustment and stress disorders). Contemporary ethnographic survey of ethnic groups at risk both at home and abroad. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 345 and ANTH 445.


ANTH 348. Sexuality and Gender (3)
This course examines the relationships among gender, sexuality, race, nation, and the body. In particular, it focuses on contemporary ideas and theories in the study of the complex historical and cultural relationships between sexuality and gender. In addition, we examine sexuality and social movements, identity politics, and the so-called “culture wars.” In short, this class will not be a voyeuristic narration of exotic sexual or gender practices; and where we use the “other” it will be solely for the purpose of exploring our own practices and ideologies. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 348 and ANTH 448.


ANTH 351. Topics in International Health (3)
Special topics of interest in International Health. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or ANTH 215 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 351 and ANTH 451.


ANTH 352. Japanese Culture and Society (3)
Focuses on contemporary Japanese cultural and social institutions. Topics include child-rearing, personality, values, education, gender roles, the dual economy, and popular culture. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 352 and ANTH 452.
Global & Cultural Diversity


ANTH 353. Chinese Culture and Society (3)
Focuses on Chinese cultural and social institutions during the Maoist and post-Maoist eras. Topics include ideology, economics, politics, religion, family life, and popular culture. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 353 and ANTH 453.
Global & Cultural Diversity


ANTH 356. Mediterranean Culture and Society (3)
Ethnography of the Mediterranean culture area. Topics include geography, topography, climate, rural and urban life styles, economy, social identity (encompassing gender, ethnic, national, provincial, tribal and religious identity), religion, ritual relations, concepts of self, health and healing, politics, worldview and values, family and kinship, aging, death and dying. Past and present methods and problems of anthropological research in the region and the theoretical frameworks that have guided researchers. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 356 and ANTH 456.
Global & Cultural Diversity


ANTH 357. Native American Cultures (3)
Intensive examination of the cultures of selected Native American peoples, including historical, political, religious, social organizational, linguistic, and medical/psychiatric aspects of American Indian life. Not available for credit to students who have completed USSO 219. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102. Offered as ANTH 357 and ANTH 457.
SAGES Dept Seminar
Global & Cultural Diversity


ANTH 358. Women’s Mental Health (3)
This anthropological course is an examination of the cultural psychology of women in the following domains: (1) women’s social status cross-culturally; (2) specific psychiatric syndromes, such as psychoses, mood and personality disorders as they affect women; and (3) power and resilience. Issues of the cultural validity of psychological theories for women across diverse settings is the subject of critique throughout the seminar. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or ANTH 215.
Offered as: ANTH 358, ANTH 458.


ANTH 359. Introduction to International Health (3)
Critical health problems and needs in developing countries. Prevalence of infectious disease, malnutrition, chronic disease, injury control. Examines strategies for improvement of health in less developed countries. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102.
Offered as ANTH 359 and ANTH 459.


ANTH 361. Urban Health (3)
This course provides an anthropological perspective on the most important health problems facing urban population around the world. Special attention will be given to an examination of disparities in health among urban residents based on poverty, race/ethnicity, gender, and nationality.
Offered as ANTH 361 and ANTH 461.


ANTH 362. Contemporary Theory in Anthropology (3)
A critical examination of anthropological thought in England, France and the United States during the second half of the twentieth century. Emphasis will be on the way authors formulate questions that motivate anthropological discourse, on the way central concepts are formulated and applied and on the controversies and debates that result. Readings are drawn from influential texts by prominent contemporary anthropologists. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 362 and ANTH 462.


ANTH 363. Anthropology and Bioethics (3)
The course will review theoretical work on anthropology and values, the discipline of bioethics, its philosophical roots, the body of anthropological work in bioethics, and critically examine a number of current bioethical issues in the United States and internationally. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 363 and ANTH 463.


ANTH 365. Gender and Sex Differences: Cross-cultural Perspective (3)
Gender roles and sex differences throughout the life cycle considered from a cross-cultural perspective. Major approaches to explaining sex roles discussed in light of information from both Western and non-Western cultures.
Offered as ANTH 365 and ANTH 465 and WGST 365.
Prereq: ANTH 102 or consent of department.


ANTH 367. Topics in Evolutionary Biology (3)
The focus for this course on a special topic of interest in evolutionary biology will vary from one offering to the next. Examples of possible topics include theories of speciation, the evolution of language, the evolution of sex, evolution and biodiversity, molecular evolution. ANAT/ANTH/GEOL/PHIL 467/BIOL 468 will require a longer, more sophisticated term paper, and additional class presentation.
Offered as ANTH 367, BIOL 368, GEOL 367, PHIL 367, ANAT 467, ANTH 467, BIOL 468, GEOL 467, and PHIL 467.
Prereq: ANTH 225 or equivalent.


ANTH 368. Evolutionary Biology Capstone (3)
This course focuses on a special topic of interest in evolutionary biology that will vary from one offering to the next. Examples of possible topics include theories of speciation, the evolution of language, the evolution of sex, evolution and biodiversity, molecular evolution. Students will participate in discussions and lead class seminars on evolutionary topics and in collaboration with an advisor or advisors, select a topic for a research paper or project. Each student will write a major research report or complete a major project and will make a public presentation of her/his findings.
Offered as ANTH 368, BIOL 369, PHIL 368.
Prereq: ANTH 225, BIOL 225, GEOL 225, HSTY 225, PHIL 225 or its equivalent or permission of instructor.
SAGES Senior Cap


ANTH 369. The Anthropology of Nutrition (3)
Examines human nutrition and physical performance within the framework of human adaptability theory. The emphasis is on the measurement of energetic intake and expenditure in human populations; the assessment, health consequences, and bio-cultural correlates of malnutrition and obesity; and the uses of energetic data in assessing human population adaptation. Recommended preparation: ANTH 103 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 369 and ANTH 469.


ANTH 369D. The Anthropology of Nutrition (3)
Human nutrition is examined from an anthropological perspective. We will briefly cover methods for assessing and evaluating dietary intake and dietary patterns. The remainder of the course will focus on various social, ecological, and genetic factors which influence human nutritional patterns and the causes and consequences of protein-energy malnutrition. The course will be taught in a seminar format and is designed to enhance your skills in critically reading the anthropological literature and in improving your written and oral communication skills. A student may not receive credit for both ANTH 369 and ANTH 369D. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102, ANTH 103.


SAGES Dept Seminar
ANTH 371. Culture, Behavior, and Person: Psychological Anthropology (3)

Cross-cultural perspectives on personality, human development, individual variability, cognition, deviant behavior, and the role of the individual in his/her society. Classic and contemporary anthropological writings on Western and non-Western societies. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 371 and ANTH 471.


ANTH 372. Anthropological Approaches to Religion (3)
The development of, and current approaches to, comparative religion from an anthropological perspective. Topics include witchcraft, ritual, myth, healing, religious language and symbolism, religion and gender, religious experience, the nature of the sacred, religion and social change, altered states of consciousness, and evil. Using material from a wide range of world cultures, critical assessment is made of conventional distinctions such as those between rational/irrational, natural/supernatural, magic/religion, and primitive/civilized. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102.
Offered as ANTH 372, RLGN 372 and ANTH 472.


ANTH 375. Human Evolution: The Fossil Evidence (3)
This course will survey the biological and behavioral changes that occurred in the hominid lineage during the past five million years. In addition to a thorough review of the fossil evidence for human evolution, students will develop the theoretical framework in evolutionary biology. Recommended preparation: ANTH 377, BIOL 225.
Offered as ANAT 375, ANTH 375, ANAT 475 and ANTH 475.
Prereq: ANTH 103.


ANTH 376. Topics in the Anthropology of Health and Medicine (3)
Special topics of interest, such as the biology of human adaptability; the ecology of the human life cycle health delivery systems; transcultural psychiatry; nutrition, health, and disease; paleoepidemiology; and population anthropology. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or ANTH 103.
Offered as ANTH 376 and ANTH 476.
SAGES Dept Seminar


ANTH 377. Human Osteology (4)
This course for upper division undergraduates and graduate students will review the following topics: human skeletal development and identification; and forensic identification (skeletal aging, sex identification and population affiliation).
Offered as ANAT 377, ANTH 377, ANAT 477 and ANTH 477.


ANTH 378. Reproductive Health: An Evolutionary Perspective (3)
This course provides students with an evolutionary perspective on the factors influencing human reproductive health, including reproductive biology, ecology, and various aspects of natural human fertility. Our focus will be on variation in human reproduction in mostly non-western populations. Recommended preparation: ANTH 103.
Offered as ANTH 378 and ANTH 478.
SAGES Dept Seminar


ANTH 379. Topics in Cultural and Social Anthropology (3)
Special topics of interest across the range of social and cultural anthropology. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102.
Offered as ANTH 379 and ANTH 479.


ANTH 380. Independent Study in Laboratory Archaeology I (1–3)
This course provides an introduction to the basic methods and techniques of artifact curation and laboratory analysis in archaeology. Under the supervision of the instructor, each student will develop and carry out a focused project of material analysis and interpretation using the archaeology collections of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History. Each student is required to spend a minimum of two hours per week in the Archaeology laboratory for each credit hour taken. By the end of the course, the student will prepare a short report describing the results of their particular project. Recommended preparation: ANTH 107 and permission of department, and prior permission of Department of Archaeology at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History.


ANTH 381. Independent Study in Laboratory Archaeology II (1–3)
This course provides an introduction to the basic methods and techniques of artifact curation and laboratory analysis in archaeology. Under the supervision of the instructor, each student will develop and carry out a focused project of material analysis and interpretation using the archaeology collections of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History. Each student is required to spend a minimum of two hours per week in the Archaeology laboratory for each credit hour taken. By the end of the course, the student will prepare a short report describing the results of their particular project. Recommended preparation: ANTH 107 and permission of department, and prior permission of Department of Archaeology at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History.


ANTH 388. Globalization, Development and Underdevelopment: Anthropological Persp (3)
This course examines both theoretical and practical perspectives on globalization and economic development in the “Third World.” From “Dependency,” “Modernization,” and “World System” theory to post-structuralist critiques of development discourse, the class seeks to provide a framework for understanding current debates on development and globalization. The “neoliberal monologue” that dominates the contemporary development enterprise is critically examined in the context of growing global inequality. Special consideration is given to the roles of international agencies such as the World Bank, International Monetary Fund, United Nations, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in the “development industry.” The course also focuses on the contribution of anthropologists to development theory and practice with emphasis on the impact of development on the health of the poor and survival of indigenous cultures. Opportunities for professional anthropologists in the development field are reviewed.
Offered as ANTH 388 and ANTH 488.
Global & Cultural Diversity


ANTH 389. Crossroads: Transformation of Rural Blues into Urban Rock (3)
A multimedia approach to the development and transformation of an American musical form, the blues. Foci include the social and cultural history of rural and urban blues, rhythm and blues, rock ‘n’ roll, and the later forms of rock, the social context and life histories of modern music’s creators and innovators, the development of vocal and instrumental styles, blues and rock, visual and performance iconography, milestones in the development of musical genres and the major roles of racism and discrimination in the development of these forms of popular music. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102.
Offered as ANTH 389 and ANTH 489.


ANTH 391. Honors Tutorial (3)
Prereq: Acceptance into Honors Program.


ANTH 392. Honors Tutorial (3)
Prereq: Acceptance into Honors Program.


ANTH 393. Human Ecology: The Biology of Human Adaptability (3)
The place of human populations in the ecosystem. The importance of biological and behavioral responses of populations ranging from hunters and gatherers to contemporary and industrial societies. The effect of various natural and manmade stresses on man’s adaptation to the environment. Recommended preparation: ANTH 103 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 393 and ANTH 493.


ANTH 394. Seminar in Evolutionary Biology (3)
This seminar investigates 20th-century evolutionary theory, especially the Modern Evolutionary synthesis and subsequent expansions of and challenges to that synthesis. The course encompasses the multidisciplinary nature of the science of evolution, demonstrating how disciplinary background influences practitioners’ conceptualizations of pattern and process. This course emphasizes practical writing and research skills, including formulation of testable theses, grant proposal techniques, and the implementation of original research using the facilities on campus and at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History.
Offered as ANTH 394, BIOL 394, GEOL 394, HSTY 394, PHIL 394, ANTH 494, BIOL 494, GEOL 494, HSTY 494, and PHIL 494.


ANTH 396. Undergraduate Research in Evolutionary Biology (3)
Students propose and conduct guided research on an aspect of evolutionary biology. The research will be sponsored and supervised by a member of the CASE faculty or other qualified professional. A written report must be submitted to the Evolutionary Biology Steering Committee before credit is granted.
Offered as ANTH 396, BIOL 396, GEOL 396, and PHIL 396.
Prereq: ANTH 225 or equivalent.


ANTH 397. Epidemiology and the Evolution of Human Diseases (3)
Basic concepts of infectious and degenerative diseases. Description and analysis of the changing distribution and determinants of disease in prehistoric, historic, and contemporary human populations. Recommended preparation: ANTH 103 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 397 and ANTH 497.


ANTH 398. Anthropology SAGES Capstone (3)
Supervised original research on a topic in anthropology, culminating in a written report and a public presentation. The research project may be in the form of an independent research project, a literature review, or some other original project with anthropological significance. The project must be approved and supervised by faculty. Group research projects are acceptable, but a plan which clearly identifies the distinct and substantial role of each participant must be approved by the supervising faculty.
Prereq: Major in Anthropology.
SAGES Senior Cap


ANTH 398C. Child Policy Externship and Capstone (3)
This course provides students with externships in child policy. These externships give students an opportunity to work directly with professionals who design and implement policies that impact the lives of children and their families. Agencies involved are active in areas such as childcare, education, juvenile justice, and physical and mental health. Students apply for the externship. Selected students are placed in a local child policy agency. An individualized learning plan is developed in consultation with the Childhood Studies Program faculty, the supervisor in the agency, and the student.
Offered as ANTH 398C, CHST 398C, PSCL 398C.


SAGES Senior Cap
ANTH 399. Independent Study (1–6)

Students may propose topics for independent reading and research.


ANTH 401. Biological Aging in Humans (3)
Biological aging phenomena, evidence that various sociocultural and environmental influences may slow or accelerate the aging process, and theories explaining the evolution of the aging process. Recommended preparation: ANTH 103 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 301 and ANTH 401.


ANTH 402. Darwinian Medicine (3)
Darwinian medicine deals with evolutionary aspects of modern human disease. It applies the concepts and methods of evolutionary biology to the question of why we are vulnerable to disease. Darwinian (or evolutionary) medicine proposes several general hypotheses about disease causation including disease as evolutionary legacy and design compromise, the result of a novel environment, a consequence of genetic adaptation, the result of infectious organisms’ evolutionary adaptations, and disease symptoms as manifestation of defense mechanisms. It proposes that evolutionary ideas can explain, help to prevent and perhaps help to treat some diseases. This course presents the basic logic of Darwinian medicine and evaluates hypotheses about specific diseases that illustrate each of the hypotheses about disease causation. Recommended preparation: ANTH 103 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 302 and ANTH 402.


ANTH 404. Introduction to the Anthropology of Aging (3)
Reviews historical and methodological approaches to the study of aging. Examines theoretical assumptions about aging by comparing studies from Western and non-Western societies that illustrate the differential importance of culture in the experience of aging. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 304 and ANTH 404.


ANTH 406. The Anthropology of Childhood and the Family (3)
Child-rearing patterns and the family as an institution, using evidence from Western and non-Western cultures. Human universals and cultural variation, the experience of childhood and recent changes in the American family. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 306 and ANTH 406.


ANTH 409. Family Violence and Child Abuse (3)
The prevalence and causes of intrafamilial violence. Spouse abuse, child abuse, adolescent abuse, sexual abuse, parent abuse, and sibling violence. Major theoretical positions on the occurrence of these behaviors in light of information from both Western and non-Western cultures. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 309 and ANTH 409.


ANTH 410. Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology (3)
This is an introduction to the core concepts, theories and methodologies that form the study of language from an anthropological point of view. The course provides exposure to current issues in linguistic anthropological research and reviews some of the foundational topics of research past, highlighting the contributions of linguistics to anthropology and social science. Topics to be explored include: 1) an overview of the study of language (language structure and patterns, the effects of linguistic categories on thought and behavior, meaning and linguistic relativity, cross-language comparison, and non-verbal communication); 2) doing linguistic anthropology “on the ground” (an intro to the laboratory and field techniques of linguistic anthropology); 3) the study of language as function and social action (language and social structure speech acts and events, verbal art, language and emotion); and 4) the study of language/discourse and power (language in politics, medicine, and law).
Offered as ANTH 310 and ANTH 410.


ANTH 412. “Where Does it Hurt”: Doctor-Patient Talk (3)
Taking medical interactions as our focus, this course explores the problems of doctor-patient (mis)communication from the view of language and culture. By examining a wide range of texts on patients’ illness experiences and healthcare encounters, we will identify underlying variations in communication styles and bodily comportment, which can and do affect the successful outcome of both intra- and cross-cultural medical interactions. Specific topics to be covered are: the relationship of clinical questioning and answering to the power to speak and to issues of legitimacy, authority, and the negotiation of treatment; the distinctions between ‘interview’ and ‘conversation’ and how these particular ways of speaking encourage or discourage different doctor-patient interactions; how cultural understandings of what it means to be a patient reflect socio-cultural assumptions about the nature of wellness, illness, and care; and how differences in sex, ethnicity, and the presence (or absence) of interpreters in cross-cultural care complicate doctor-patient talk.
Offered as ANTH 312 or ANTH 412.


ANTH 413. The Anthropology of Adolescence (3)
This course investigates the anthropology of adolescence. What are the conditions under which adolescence has appeared around the world as a life stage? What are the roles of adolescence cross-culturally? What are the varieties of adolescent experience? Through classic and contemporary texts, the course will address these questions as well as special topics particularly important to adolescence such as globalization, mental health, and sexuality.
Offered as ANTH 313 and ANTH 413.


ANTH 414. Cultures of the United States (3)
This course considers the rich ethnic diversity of the U.S. from the perspective of social/cultural anthropology. Conquest, immigration, problems of conflicts and accommodation, and the character of the diverse regional and ethnic cultures are considered as are forms of racism, discrimination, and their consequences. Groups of interest include various Latina/o and Native peoples, African-American groups, and specific ethnic groups of Pacific, Mediterranean, European, Asian, and Caribbean origin.
Offered as ANTH 314, ETHS 314, and ANTH 414.


ANTH 417. Asian Medical Systems (3)
Examines the philosophical assumptions and therapies of the traditional and contemporary medical systems of India, Tibet, China, and Japan. Particular attention will be given to the folk, popular, and institutional sectors of medical practice as well as to the contemporary relationship between traditional medicine and Western medicine in each of these societies. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 317 and ANTH 417.


ANTH 418. Death and Dying (3)
Examines cultural context of death and dying. Topics include social and psychological consequences of changing patterns of mortality, attitudes towards the taking of life, preparation for death, mortuary rituals, grief and mourning, and nature of relationship between living and dead. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 318 or ANTH 418.


ANTH 422. Living Africa (3)
This course is an introduction to the peoples and cultures of Africa. Rather than a traditional, survey approach, this course takes a thematic approach to issues regarding core aspects of African societies such as history, political organization, family and kinship, art and literature, religion, gender, international relations, and economy. Taking a multidisciplinary perspective, the course will draw on diverse sources, from classical ethnographic writings to popular cultural criticism, literature, films, poetry, and news media.
Offered as ANTH 322 and ANTH 422.


ANTH 423. AIDS: Epidemiology, Biology, and Culture
This course will examine the biological and cultural impact of AIDS in different societies around the world. Topics include: the origin and evolution of the virus, the evolutionary implications of the epidemic, routes of transmission, a historical comparison of AIDS to other epidemics in human history, current worldwide prevalences of AIDS, and cultural responses to the epidemic. Special emphasis will be placed on the long-term biological and social consequences of the epidemic. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or ANTH 103 or ANTH 105 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 323 and ANTH 423.


ANTH 426. Power, Illness, and Inequality: The Political Economy of Health (3)
This course explores the relationship between social inequality and the distribution of health and illness across class, race, gender, sexual orientation, and national boundaries. Class readings drawn from critical anthropological approaches to the study of health emphasize the fundamental importance of power relations and economic constraints in explaining patterns of disease. The course critically examines the nature of Western biomedicine and inequality in the delivery of health services. Special consideration is given to political economic analysis of health issues in the developing world such as AIDS, hunger, reproductive health, and primary health care provision. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or ANTH 215 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 326 and ANTH 426.


ANTH 427. Ancient Cultures of the Ohio Region (3)
This course surveys the archaeology of Native American cultures in the Great Lakes region from ca. 10,000 B.C. to A.D. 1700. The geographic scope of this course is the upper Midwest, southern Ontario, and the St. Lawrence Valley with a focus on the Ohio region. Recommended preparation: ANTH 107 or consent of the department.
Offered as ANTH 327 and ANTH 427.


ANTH 433. Roots of Ancient India: Archaeology of South Asia (3)
Examination of the archaeological record of cultural development from earliest times through the Iron Age in India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and Bangladesh. Particular attention devoted to how these ancient cultural developments laid the foundations for the early historic civilizations of this region. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or ANTH 107 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 333 and ANTH 433.


ANTH 434. Urban Anthropology (3)
This urban anthropology course will focus on contemporary understandings of the institutions of urban, national and transnational life. We will explore the complex ways that urban worlds and social problems are shaped by globalizing capitalism, national, and transnational processes. As well, we will examine how and why various identities, nations, and transnational institutions are expressed in and by people living in current global urban hierarchies. In particular, we will look at how the urban, national, and transnational dynamically produce and are produced by the everyday cultural practices of people living and struggling in North American urban spaces. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 334 and ANTH 434.


ANTH 437. Comparative Medical Systems (3)
This course considers the world’s major medical systems. Foci include professional and folk medical systems of Asia and South Asia, North and South America, Europe and the Mediterranean, including the Christian and Islamic medical traditions. Attention is paid to medical origins and the relationship of popular to professional medicines. The examination of each medical tradition includes consideration of its psychological medicine and system of medical ethics. Recommended preparation: ANTH 215.
Offered as ANTH 337 and ANTH 437.


ANTH 440. Culture and Emotion (3)
The cross-cultural consideration of the relationship of culture and emotion. The cultural construction of the experience and expression of emotion. Key substantive issues include: ethnopsychological variations in indigenous conceptualizations and displays of emotion; the socialization of affect; the self and emotion; contextual variations in emotional expression with respect to gender, power relations, patterns of subsistence, and the individual; and the relationship between emotion and illness processes. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 340 and ANTH 440.


ANTH 441. Cultural Area Studies in Anthropology (3)
Recommended preparation: ANTH 102.
Offered as ANTH 341 and ANTH 441.


ANTH 443. Psychoanalytic Anthropology (3)
Psychoanalytic theory and its application to cross-cultural materials. The cultural context of analytic theory’s development and its applications in social/cultural and medical anthropology; application of cultural criticism to psychoanalytic conceptions and its constructions of the following: social evolution; religious ideology, praxis, patterns and dynamics; altered states of consciousness; individual personality and psychopathology; individual and cultural defense mechanisms; socialization; cognition; emotion; symbolism; and gender. Also considers bases for a culturally relative analytic theory. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 343 and ANTH 443.


ANTH 445. Ethnicity, Gender, and Mental Health (3)
An overview of mental health status and ethnicity. Analysis of ethnicity in relation to culture, social class, gender, sociopolitical conflict and the world refugee crisis. Consideration of populations at special risk for the development of specific mental disorders (e.g., schizophrenia, affective disorders, adjustment and stress disorders). Contemporary ethnographic survey of ethnic groups at risk both at home and abroad. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 345 and ANTH 445.


ANTH 448. Sexuality and Gender (3)
This course examines the relationships among gender, sexuality, race, nation, and the body. In particular, it focuses on contemporary ideas and theories in the study of the complex historical and cultural relationships between sexuality and gender. In addition, we examine sexuality and social movements, identity politics, and the so-called “culture wars.” In short, this class will not be a voyeuristic narration of exotic sexual or gender practices; and where we use the “other” it will be solely for the purpose of exploring our own practices and ideologies. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 348 and ANTH 448.


ANTH 451. Topics in International Health (3)
Special topics of interest in International Health. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or ANTH 215 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 351 and ANTH 451.


ANTH 452. Japanese Culture and Society (3)
Focuses on contemporary Japanese cultural and social institutions. Topics include child-rearing, personality, values, education, gender roles, the dual economy, and popular culture. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 352 and ANTH 452.


ANTH 453. Chinese Culture and Society (3)
Focuses on Chinese cultural and social institutions during the Maoist and post-Maoist eras. Topics include ideology, economics, politics, religion, family life, and popular culture. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 353 and ANTH 453.


ANTH 456. Mediterranean Culture and Society (3)
Ethnography of the Mediterranean culture area. Topics include geography, topography, climate, rural and urban life styles, economy, social identity (encompassing gender, ethnic, national, provincial, tribal and religious identity), religion, ritual relations, concepts of self, health and healing, politics, worldview and values, family and kinship, aging, death and dying. Past and present methods and problems of anthropological research in the region and the theoretical frameworks that have guided researchers. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 356 and ANTH 456.


ANTH 457. Native American Cultures (3)
Intensive examination of the cultures of selected Native American peoples, including historical, political, religious, social organizational, linguistic, and medical/psychiatric aspects of American Indian life. Not available for credit to students who have completed USSO 219. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102. Offered as ANTH 357 and ANTH 457.


ANTH 458. Women’s Mental Health (3)
This anthropological course is an examination of the cultural psychology of women in the following domains: (1) women’s social status cross-culturally; (2) specific psychiatric syndromes, such as psychoses, mood and personality disorders as they affect women; and (3) power and resilience. Issues of the cultural validity of psychological theories for women across diverse settings is the subject of critique throughout the seminar. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or ANTH 215.
Offered as: ANTH 358, ANTH 458.


ANTH 459. Introduction to International Health (3)
Critical health problems and needs in developing countries. Prevalence of infectious disease, malnutrition, chronic disease, injury control. Examines strategies for improvement of health in less developed countries. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102.
Offered as ANTH 359 and ANTH 459.


ANTH 461. Urban Health (3)
This course provides an anthropological perspective on the most important health problems facing urban population around the world. Special attention will be given to an examination of disparities in health among urban residents based on poverty, race/ethnicity, gender, and nationality.
Offered as ANTH 361 and ANTH 461.


ANTH 462. Contemporary Theory in Anthropology (3)
A critical examination of anthropological thought in England, France and the United States during the second half of the twentieth century. Emphasis will be on the way authors formulate questions that motivate anthropological discourse, on the way central concepts are formulated and applied and on the controversies and debates that result. Readings are drawn from influential texts by prominent contemporary anthropologists. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 362 and ANTH 462.


ANTH 463. Anthropology and Bioethics (3)
The course will review theoretical work on anthropology and values, the discipline of bioethics, its philosophical roots, the body of anthropological work in bioethics, and critically examine a number of current bioethical issues in the United States and internationally. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 363 and ANTH 463.


ANTH 465. Gender and Sex Differences: Cross-cultural Perspective (3)
Gender roles and sex differences throughout the life cycle considered from a cross-cultural perspective. Major approaches to explaining sex roles discussed in light of information from both Western and non-Western cultures.
Offered as ANTH 365 and ANTH 465 and WGST 365.


ANTH 467. Topics in Evolutionary Biology (3)
The focus for this course on a special topic of interest in evolutionary biology will vary from one offering to the next. Examples of possible topics include theories of speciation, the evolution of language, the evolution of sex, evolution and biodiversity, molecular evolution. ANAT/ANTH/GEOL/PHIL 467/BIOL 468 will require a longer, more sophisticated term paper, and additional class presentation.
Offered as ANTH 367, BIOL 368, GEOL 367, PHIL 367, ANAT 467, ANTH 467, BIOL 468, GEOL 467, and PHIL 467.


ANTH 469. The Anthropology of Nutrition (3)
Examines human nutrition and physical performance within the framework of human adaptability theory. The emphasis is on the measurement of energetic intake and expenditure in human populations; the assessment, health consequences, and bio-cultural correlates of malnutrition and obesity; and the uses of energetic data in assessing human population adaptation. Recommended preparation: ANTH 103 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 369 and ANTH 469.


ANTH 470. Tutorial in Physical Anthropology (3)
Guided readings in physical anthropology. Recommended preparation: Graduate standing and consent of department.


ANTH 471. Culture, Behavior, and Person: Psychological Anthropology (3)
Cross-cultural perspectives on personality, human development, individual variability, cognition, deviant behavior, and the role of the individual in his/her society. Classic and contemporary anthropological writings on Western and non-Western societies. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 371 and ANTH 471.


ANTH 472. Anthropological Approaches to Religion (3)
The development of, and current approaches to, comparative religion from an anthropological perspective. Topics include witchcraft, ritual, myth, healing, religious language and symbolism, religion and gender, religious experience, the nature of the sacred, religion and social change, altered states of consciousness, and evil. Using material from a wide range of world cultures, critical assessment is made of conventional distinctions such as those between rational/irrational, natural/supernatural, magic/religion, and primitive/civilized. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102.
Offered as ANTH 372, RLGN 372 and ANTH 472.


ANTH 475. Human Evolution: The Fossil Evidence (3)
This course will survey the biological and behavioral changes that occurred in the hominid lineage during the past five million years. In addition to a thorough review of the fossil evidence for human evolution, students will develop the theoretical framework in evolutionary biology. Recommended preparation: ANTH 377, BIOL 225.
Offered as ANAT 375, ANTH 375, ANAT 475 and ANTH 475.
Prereq: ANTH 103.


ANTH 476. Topics in the Anthropology of Health and Medicine (3)
Special topics of interest, such as the biology of human adaptability; the ecology of the human life cycle health delivery systems; transcultural psychiatry; nutrition, health, and disease; paleoepidemiology; and population anthropology. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102 or ANTH 103.
Offered as ANTH 376 and ANTH 476.


ANTH 477. Human Osteology (3)
This course for upper division undergraduates and graduate students will review the following topics: human skeletal development and identification; and forensic identification (skeletal aging, sex identification and population affiliation).
Offered as ANAT 377, ANTH 377, ANAT 477 and ANTH 477.


ANTH 478. Reproductive Health: An Evolutionary Perspective (3)
This course provides students with an evolutionary perspective on the factors influencing human reproductive health, including reproductive biology, ecology, and various aspects of natural human fertility. Our focus will be on variation in human reproduction in mostly non-western populations. Recommended preparation: ANTH 103.
Offered as ANTH 378 and ANTH 478.
Prereq: ANTH 103.


ANTH 479. Topics in Cultural and Social Anthropology (3)
Special topics of interest across the range of social and cultural anthropology. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102.
Offered as ANTH 379 and ANTH 479.


ANTH 480. The Anthropology of Health and Illness I (3)
Part one of the graduate core course in medical anthropology includes sections giving an overview of topics such as the history and conceptual development of medical anthropology, anthropological epidemiology, psychiatric anthropology, social networks/support systems, and health care systems. Recommended preparation: Graduate standing.


ANTH 481. The Anthropology of Health and Illness II (3)
Part two of the graduate core course in medical anthropology includes sections giving an overview of topics such as human adaptability theory, nutritional anthropology, demography, the anthropology of biomedicine, cross-cultural aging, clinical anthropology, and international health. Recommended preparation: ANTH 480.


ANTH 488. Globalization, Development and Underdevelopment: Anthropological Persp (3)
This course examines both theoretical and practical perspectives on globalization and economic development in the “Third World.” From “Dependency,” “Modernization,” and “World System” theory to post-structuralist critiques of development discourse, the class seeks to provide a framework for understanding current debates on development and globalization. The “neoliberal monologue” that dominates the contemporary development enterprise is critically examined in the context of growing global inequality. Special consideration is given to the roles of international agencies such as the World Bank, International Monetary Fund, United Nations, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in the “development industry.” The course also focuses on the contribution of anthropologists to development theory and practice with emphasis on the impact of development on the health of the poor and survival of indigenous cultures. Opportunities for professional anthropologists in the development field are reviewed.
Offered as ANTH 388 and ANTH 488.


ANTH 489. Crossroads: Transformation of Rural Blues into Urban Rock (3)
A multimedia approach to the development and transformation of an American musical form, the blues. Foci include the social and cultural history of rural and urban blues, rhythm and blues, rock ‘n’ roll, and the later forms of rock, the social context and life histories of modern music’s creators and innovators, the development of vocal and instrumental styles, blues and rock, visual and performance iconography, milestones in the development of musical genres and the major roles of racism and discrimination in the development of these forms of popular music. Recommended preparation: ANTH 102.
Offered as ANTH 389 and ANTH 489.


ANTH 493. Human Ecology: The Biology of Human Adaptability (3)
The place of human populations in the ecosystem. The importance of biological and behavioral responses of populations ranging from hunters and gatherers to contemporary and industrial societies. The effect of various natural and manmade stresses on man’s adaptation to the environment. Recommended preparation: ANTH 103 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 393 and ANTH 493.


ANTH 494. Seminar in Evolutionary Biology (3)
This seminar investigates 20th-century evolutionary theory, especially the Modern Evolutionary synthesis and subsequent expansions of and challenges to that synthesis. The course encompasses the multidisciplinary nature of the science of evolution, demonstrating how disciplinary background influences practitioners’ conceptualizations of pattern and process. This course emphasizes practical writing and research skills, including formulation of testable theses, grant proposal techniques, and the implementation of original research using the facilities on campus and at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History.
Offered as ANTH 394, BIOL 394, GEOL 394, HSTY 394, PHIL 394, ANTH 494, BIOL 494, GEOL 494, HSTY 494, and PHIL 494.


ANTH 497. Epidemiology and the Evolution of Human Diseases (3)
Basic concepts of infectious and degenerative diseases. Description and analysis of the changing distribution and determinants of disease in prehistoric, historic, and contemporary human populations. Recommended preparation: ANTH 103 or consent of department.
Offered as ANTH 397 and ANTH 497.


ANTH 498. Public Policy and Aging (3)
Overview of aging and the aged. Concepts in the study of public policy. Policies on aging and conditions that they address. The politics of policies on aging. Emergent trends and issues.
Offered as ANTH 498, BETH 496, EPBI 408, GERO 496, HSTY 480, MPHP 408, NURS 479, NURS 579, POSC 480, and SOCI 496.


ANTH 502. Research Practicum in Med Anthropology and Cross-cultural Gerontology (3)
Provides M.A. students with firsthand experience in applying anthropology to health and aging problems.
Prereq: Graduate standing.


ANTH 503. Seminar in Social Cultural Anthropology (3)


ANTH 504. Anthropological Research Design (3)

Practical and theoretical issues in the selection of questions for health and aging research in societal settings. Illustration of frameworks and designs for research. Discussion of the problems of collection, analysis, and interpretation of data along with the nonscientific influences on the research process and the use of results.
Prereq: Graduate standing.


ANTH 506. Seminar in Comparative Health Systems (3)
Prereq: ANTH 480.


ANTH 507. Seminar in Controversial Issues in Anthropology (3)
The goals of this course are to provide students with opportunities to: (1) Familiarize themselves with the (alleged) facts of various controversial issues that have characterized the field of anthropology over the past 50 years; (2) enhance their skills in analyzing and assessing the nature and quality of the arguments and empirical data employed by parties to the controversies; (3) develop an appreciation of the role of historical and political contexts in shaping the emergence and evolution of the controversies; and (4) consider the ethics involved in the practice and public representation of anthropology.
Prereq: ANTH 480 and ANTH 481.


ANTH 508. Seminar in Policy and Program Planning and Evaluation
Prereq: ANTH 504.


ANTH 509. Seminar in the Ethnopsychology of Emotion (3)
In this seminar we will be concerned with the relationship of culture and emotion. The study of emotion, traditionally the domain of philosophy, psychology, and physiology, has increasingly attracted the attention of psychological and medical anthropologists. Contemporary anthropological approaches to the problem have documented the substantial role that culture plays in mediating both the experience and the expression of emotion. These issues will be examined through review of cross-cultural, ethnographic materials.
Prereq: ANTH 480.


ANTH 510. Seminar in International Health (3)
This seminar will survey the major areas of research in the field of international health, including anthropology and public health research in international health. Emphasis will be on critical evaluation of current international health theory and methods and review of relevant literature, in regard to the health of the world’s population.
Prereq: ANTH 480 and ANTH 481.


ANTH 511. Topics Seminar in Anthropology and Global Health (3)
Various topics will be offered for graduate students in medical anthropology, such as “Global Mental Health,” “Global Child Health,” and “Global Disease Patterns.”
Prereq: ANTH 480 or ANTH 481.


ANTH 513. Seminar in Ethnopsychiatry (3)
Theory and practice of psychotherapeutic forms. Diagnostic and therapeutic forms from Europe, the United States, Japan, India, and other major cultural traditions and those of local areas such as West Africa, Native America, and Latin America. The cultural theories of mental disorders, related conceptions of self and person, and the relationships of local psychological theory to clinical praxis and outcome.


ANTH 519. Seminar in Human Ecology and Adaptability (3)


ANTH 530. Seminar in Medical Anthropology: Topics (3)

Various topics will be offered for graduate students in medical anthropology, such as “Anthropological Perspectives on Women’s Health and Reproduction” and “Biocultural Anthropology.”
Prereq: ANTH 480.


ANTH 542. Human Body: Discourse and Experience (3)
Interdisciplinary approach to embodiment as a starting point for rethinking the concepts of culture and existence. Methodological distinction between phenomenological and semiotic approaches. Topics include cultural uses of the body, the body as representation and expression, the body as an object of domination, the body of health and illness, sexuality and gendered body, religion and the sacred body, and technology and the body.
Prereq: Graduate standing.


ANTH 591. Seminar in Physical Anthropology (3)


ANTH 599. Tutorial: Advanced Studies in Anthropology (1–18)

(Credit as arranged.) Advanced studies in anthropology.


ANTH 601. Independent Research (1–18)
(Credit as arranged.)


ANTH 651. Thesis M.A. (1–18)


ANTH 700. Dissertation Fieldwork (0)

Students conducting dissertation fieldwork off-campus may choose to register for this course with the permission of their dissertation advisor. Students may register for a maximum of one academic year. Under extraordinary circumstances (e.g., civil war) students may petition for additional time. Prereq: Ph.D. candidate with an approved dissertation prospectus.


ANTH 701. Dissertation Ph.D. (1–18)
(Credit as arranged.)
Prereq: Predoctoral research consent or advanced to Ph.D. candidacy milestone.