positions in governmental and private agencies, as well as teach at the college and university levels. All Master of Arts students in cross-cultural gerontology must complete 27 credit hours including the following core courses: ANTH 401, 404, 462, and 504. In addition to the four core courses, students must take an approved statistics course. Twelve credit hours are taken as electives in anthropology or in other departments with advisor’s approval.

Ph.D. Requirements
All Ph.D. students in cross-cultural gerontology are required to develop a specific plan of study in consultation with their advisor. It requires a minimum of 36 credit hours:

1. Students must take 18 credit hours in electives as approved by their advisory committee. (For those students who have not completed the M.A. statistics requirement, an approved 3-credit course in statistics is required.)

2. Students must take 18 credit hours in dissertation (ANTH 701).

After completing course requirements, a student must take the written Doctor of Philosophy candidacy examination. Within one semester of successfully completing the written Doctor of Philosophy candidacy examination, the student is required to defend a dissertation prospectus with the cooperation of his or her advisor and committee. Before a candidate is permitted to defend the dissertation, he or she must demonstrate a reading knowledge in a foreign language in which there is a scholarly literature relevant to his or her program of studies. A foreign-born student may substitute his or her native language (if it is not English) if it meets the above conditions.

M.A./PH.D./M.P.H. PROGRAM WITH THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

The joint M.A./Ph.D./M.P.H. program provides students with the opportunity to receive an anthropology graduate degree and a public health degree simultaneously. A combined public health/anthropology degree will be especially valuable to students interested in working in urban health or international health, or within health policy programs. The joint M.A./M.P.H. requires 54 credit hours (21 in Anthropology and 33 in Public Health). The joint Ph.D./M.P.H. requires an additional 18 credit hours in Anthropology beyond the M.A. level and 18 hours of ANTH 701 (Dissertation Research), for a total of 90 credit hours. Each joint degree student will develop a program of study with their advisors in both Anthropology and Pubic Health.

JOINT M.S. NURSING/M.A. ANTHROPOLOGY PROGRAM

The joint M.S.N./M.A. program affords students a unique opportunity to combine the cross-cultural expertise of medical anthropology with clinical expertise in nursing. This combination of skills and knowledge will be of particular value in preparing students for careers in international health and in our multi-cultural society. Students must complete a minimum of 19 credits in nursing core courses, 12 to 22 credits in clinical major courses, and a minimum of 18 credits in anthropology courses. The actual number of credits depends upon the nursing major selected. The total M.S.N./M.A. degree requirement is a minimum of 55 hours.

JOINT DOCTOR OF MEDICINE/DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY PROGRAM

The objectives of the joint M.D./Ph.D. programs are to train unusually qualified students

1. to conduct research on a broad range of bio-cultural problems, with emphasis on the relationship between medicine, ecology, subsistence variables, population dynamics, and disease epidemiology; and

2. to identify and analyze sociocultural impediments to the successful introduction of effective functioning, and evaluation of programs of health care in diverse contexts.

Applicants should make separate application for admission to the School of Medicine and the Department of Anthropology (through the School of Graduate Studies). Applications to the Department of Anthropology must include MCAT scores, in addition to other information indicated on the graduate school forms.

Application to the School of Medicine is initiated through the American Medical College Application Service in Washington, D.C., but applicants may write to the Admission Office of the School of Medicine for further information about the application procedure. The names of students whose applications have been reviewed favorably by the Department of Anthropology will be forwarded to the Admissions Committee of the School of Medicine with a recommendation that, if accepted by the School of Medicine, these applicants be admitted to the joint-degree program. The Department of Anthropology’s recommendation does not imply automatic admission to that school. The credentials presented by applicants to the program will be considered competitively among all other applicants to the School of Medicine.

OTHER SPECIALIZATIONS

Students interested in graduate degrees in social-cultural or physical anthropology should contact the department about requirements.

ANTHROPOLOGY (ANTH)

Undergraduate Courses

ANTH 102. Being Human: An Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology (3)
The nature of culture and humans as culture-bearing animals. The range of cultural phenomena including language, social organization, religion, and culture change, and the relevance of anthropology for contemporary social, economic, and ecological problems.

ANTH 103. Introduction to Human Evolution (3)
Physical, cultural, and technological evolution of humans. The systematic interrelationships between humans, culture, and environment.

ANTH 105. Worldwide Variation in Human Biology (3)
The genetic, ontogenetic, and physiological bases for biological variation within human populations. These variations in the context of adaptation to the natural environment, human-made environment, and continuing environmental change.

ANTH 107. Archaeology: An Introduction (3)
Basic archaeological concepts are discussed followed by a review of human cultural and biological evolution from the earliest times through development of state organized societies. Geographical scope is worldwide with special attention given to ecological and cultural relationships affecting human societies through time.

ANTH 202. Archaeology of Eastern North America (3)
This course is an introduction to the archaeology and prehistory of the eastern woodlands of North America. Course material will focus on the archaeological record of native societies living east of the Mississippi River from the first arrivals at the end of the Pleistocene up to the coming of Europeans. Specific topics for discussion include late Pleistocene settlement, hunter-gatherer environmental adaptations, the origin of food production, and the development of ranked societies.

ANTH 212. Popular Culture in the United States (3)
This course considers the history, character and constituents of popular culture in the U.S. and the various methods by which it is defined and studied. Key elements of popular culture in the United States are considered in their social (ethnic, gender, age) and historical contexts. The course provides an introduction to other more specialized courses in the anthropology of Gender, Popular Music and Science and Medicine. We will consider both themes and images (icons) of Usonian popular culture, their origins and transformations.

ANTH 215. Health, Culture, and Disease: An Introduction to Medical Anthropology (3)
This course is an introduction to the field of Medical Anthropology. Medical Anthropology is concerned with the cross-cultural study of culture, health, and illness. During the course of the semester, our survey will include (1) theoretical orientations and key concepts; (2) the cross-cultural diversity of health beliefs and practices (abroad and at home); and (3) contemporary issues and special populations (e.g., AIDS, homelessness, refugees, women’s health, and children at risk).

ANTH 225. Evolution (3)
(See PHIL 225.) Cross-listed as PHIL 225.

ANTH 295. Comparative Primate Behavior (3)
The behavior of non-human primates (prosimians, monkeys, and apes) and the relevance of these studies for understanding the evolution of human behavior. Biological and ecological influences on behavior. The social aspects of primate life, both human and nonhuman. Prereq: ANTH 102 or ANTH 103 or consent of department.

ANTH 301. Biological Aging in Humans (3)
Biological aging phenomena, evidence that various sociocultural and environmental influences may slow or accelerate the aging process, and theories explaining the evolution of the aging process. Prereq: ANTH 103 or consent of department.

ANTH 302. Darwinian Medicine (3)
Darwinian medicine deals with evolutionary aspects of modern human disease. It applies the concepts and methods of evolutionary biology to the question of why we are vulnerable to disease. Darwinian (or evolutionary) medicine proposes several general hypotheses about disease causation including disease as evolutionary legacy and design compromise, the result of a novel environment, a consequence of genetic adaptation, the result of infectious organisms’ evolutionary adaptations, and disease symptoms as manifestation of defense mechanisms. It proposes that evolutionary ideas can explain, help to prevent and perhaps help to treat some diseases. This course presents the basic logic of Darwinian medicine and evaluates hypotheses about specific diseases that illustrate each of the hypotheses about disease causation. Prereq: ANTH 103 or ANTH 105 or consent of department.

ANTH 304. Introduction to the Anthropology of Aging (3)
Reviews historical and methodological approaches to the study of aging. Examines theoretical assumptions about aging by comparing studies from Western and non-Western societies that illustrate the differential importance of culture in the experience of aging. Prereq: ANTH 102 or consent of department.

ANTH 306. Anthropology of Childhood and the Family (3)
Child-rearing patterns and the family as an institution, using evidence from Western and non-Western cultures. Human universals and cultural variation, the experience of childhood and recent changes in the American family. Prereq: ANTH 102 or consent of department.

ANTH 309. Family Violence and Child Abuse (3)
The prevalence and causes of intrafamilial violence. Spouse abuse, child abuse, adolescent abuse, sexual abuse, parent abuse, and sibling violence. Major theoretical positions on the occurrence of these behaviors in light of information from both Western and non-Western cultures. Prereq: ANTH 102 or consent of department.

ANTH 313A. Medical Anthropology - Scholars Seminar (3)
This course will combine seminar and hands-on experience in medical settings. Seminar topics will include culture and ethnicity; health care utilization; medical anthropology; and cross-cultural parenting and child development. Concurrent research will be carried out with families being cared for at University Hospital’s pediatric clinics. Prereq: ANTH 102, ANTH 215, and application to the department of Anthropology.

ANTH 314. Cultures of the United States (3)
This course considers the rich ethnic diversity of the U.S. from the perspective of social/cultural anthropology. Conquest, immigrations, problems of conflicts and accommodation, and the character of the diverse regional and ethnic cultures are considered as are forms of racism, discrimination, and their consequences. Groups of interest include various Latino and Native peoples, African-American groups, and specific ethnic groups of Pacific, Mediterranean, European, Asian, and Caribbean origin.

ANTH 317. Asian Medical Systems (3)
Examines the philosophical assumptions and therapies of the traditional and contemporary medical systems of India, Tibet, China, and Japan. Particular attention will be given to the folk, popular, and institutional sectors of medical practice as well as to the contemporary relationship between traditional medicine and Western medicine in each of these societies. Prereq: ANTH 102 or consent of department.

ANTH 318. Death and Dying (3)
Examines cultural context of death and dying. Topics include social and psychological consequences of changing patterns of mortality, attitudes towards the taking of life, preparation for death, mortuary rituals, grief and mourning, and nature of relationship between living and dead. Prereq: ANTH 102 or consent of department.

ANTH 319. Introduction to Statistical Analysis in the Social Sciences (3)
Statistical description (central tendency, variation, correlation, etc.) and statistical evaluation (two sample comparisons, regression, analysis of variance, non-parametric statistics). Developing an understanding of statistical inference, particularly on proper usage of statistical methods. Examples from the social sciences. Cannot be used to meet the A&S Humanities and Social Sciences requirement. Not available for credit to students who have completed STAT 201 or PSCL 282.

ANTH 321. Methods in Archaeology (3)
This course reviews the basic methods and techniques used in modern anthropological archaeology. Topics to be discussed include the nature of the archaeological record, research design, techniques of field archaeology, methods of laboratory analysis, museum archaeology, ethnoarchaeology, and cultural interpretation. Prereq: ANTH 107 or consent of department.

ANTH 322. Living Africa (3)
This course is an introduction to the peoples and cultures of Africa. Rather than a traditional, survey approach, this course takes a thematic approach to issues regarding core aspects of African societies such as history, political organization, family and kinship, art and literature, religion, gender, international relations, and economy. Taking a multidisciplinary perspective, the course will draw on diverse sources, from classical ethnographic writings to popular cultural criticism, literature, films, poetry, and news media.

ANTH 323. AIDS: Epidemiology, Biology, and Cultures (3)
This course will examine the biological and cultural impact of AIDS in different societies around the world. Topics include: the origin and evolution of the virus, the evolutionary implications of the epidemic, routes of transmission, a historical comparison of AIDS to other epidemics in human history, current worldwide prevalences of AIDS, and cultural responses to the epidemic. Special emphasis will be placed on the long-term biological and social consequences of the epidemic. Prereq: ANTH 102 or ANTH 103 or ANTH 105 or consent of department.

ANTH 324. Field Methods in Archaeology (6)
This field course is designed to give the student a comprehensive introduction to archaeological field work. All participants will be introduced to the methods of archaeological survey, techniques of hand excavation, artifact identification, and the preparation of field notes and documentation. In large measure this is a "learning through doing" course which is supplemented by formal and informal lectures and discussions about archaeological methods and regional prehistory. The Field School is held as two, three-week sessions of instruction in the field. All participants are required to attend an orientation meeting that is held at the Museum on the first day of each session. The remainder of each session will take place from Monday through Friday at an archaeological site in northeast Ohio. Students are responsible for their own transportation to and from the field site and must bring a sack lunch. All participants will receive a field manual which will provide detailed information on the course and techniques of field work. Prereq: Permission of department.

ANTH 326. Power, Illness, and Inequality: The Political Economy of Health (3)
This course explores the relationship between social inequality and the distribution of health and illness across class, race, gender, sexual orientation, and national boundaries. Class readings drawn from critical anthropological approaches to the study of health emphasize the fundamental importance of power relations and economic constraints in explaining patterns of disease. The course critically examines the nature of Western biomedicine and inequality in the delivery of health services. Special consideration is given to political economic analysis of health issues in the developing world such as AIDS, hunger, reproductive health, and primary health care provision. Prereq: ANTH 102 or ANTH 215 or consent of department.

ANTH 327. Great Lakes Archaeology (3)
This course surveys the archaeology of Native American cultures in the Great Lakes region from ca. 10,000 B.C. to A.D. 1700. The geographic scope of this course is the upper Midwest, southern Ontario, and the St. Lawrence Valley with a focus on the Ohio region. Prereq: ANTH 107 or consent of the department.

ANTH 330. Special Topics in Prehistory (3)
Special topics or geographical areas of archaeological significance (e.g., the origins of food production, the archaeology of the Mediterranean, the archaeology of North America). Prereq: ANTH 102 or ANTH 107 or consent of department.

ANTH 331. Ancient Civilizations of the Near East (3)
The social, economic, and ecological factors involved in the formation of the earliest Asian civilizations. The developmental role of cities, warfare, trade, and irrigation considered with respect to "state" formation in Mesopotamia, Iran, and the Indus Valley. Prereq: ANTH 102 or ANTH 107 or consent of department.

ANTH 333. Roots of Ancient India: Archaeology of South Asia (3)
Examination of the archaeological record of cultural development from earliest times through the Iron Age in India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and Bangladesh. Particular attention devoted to how these ancient cultural developments laid the foundations for the early historic civilizations of this region. Prereq: ANTH 102 or ANTH 107 or consent of department.

ANTH 334. Urban Anthropology (3)
This urban anthropology course will focus on contemporary understandings of the institutions of urban, national and transnational life. We will explore the complex ways that urban worlds and social problems are shaped by globalizing capitalism, national, and transnational processes. As well, we will examine how and why various identities, nations, and transnational institutions are expressed in and by people living in current global urban hierarchies. In particular, we will look at how the urban, national, and transnational dynamically produce and are produced by the everyday cultural practices of people living and struggling in North American urban spaces. Prereq: ANTH 102 or consent of department.

ANTH 337. Comparative Medical Systems (3)
This course considers the world’s major medical systems. Foci include professional and folk medical systems of Asia and South Asia, North and South America, Europe and the Mediterranean, including the Christian and Islamic medical traditions. Attention is paid to medical origins and the relationship of popular to professional medicines. The examination of each medical tradition includes consideration of its psychological medicine and system of medical ethics. Prereq: ANTH 215.

ANTH 340. Culture and Emotion (3)
The cross-cultural consideration of the relationship of culture and emotion. The cultural construction of the experience and expression of emotion. Key substantive issues include: ethnopsychological variations in indigenous conceptualizations and displays of emotion; the socialization of affect; the self and emotion; contextual variations in emotional expression with respect to gender, power relations, patterns of subsistence, and the individual; and the relationship between emotion and illness processes. Prereq: ANTH 102 or consent of department.

ANTH 341. Cultural Area Studies in Anthropology (3)
Prereq: ANTH 102.

ANTH 343. Psychoanalytic Anthropology (3)
Psychoanalytic theory and its application to cross-cultural materials. The cultural context of analytic theory’s development and its applications in social/cultural and medical anthropology; application of cultural criticism to psychoanalytic conceptions and its constructions of the following: social evolution; religious ideology, praxis, patterns and dynamics; altered states of consciousness; individual personality and psychopathology; individual and cultural defense mechanisms; socialization; cognition; emotion; symbolism; and gender. Also considers bases for a culturally relative analytic theory. Prereq: ANTH 102 or consent of department.

ANTH 345. Ethnicity, Gender, and Mental Health (3)
An overview of mental health status and ethnicity. Analysis of ethnicity in relation to culture, social class, gender, sociopolitical conflict and the world refugee crisis. Consideration of populations at special risk for development of specific mental disorders (e.g., schizophrenia, affective disorders, adjustment and stress disorders). Contemporary ethnographic survey of ethnic groups at risk both at home and abroad. Prereq: ANTH 102 or consent of department.

ANTH 348. Sexuality and Gender (3)
This course examines the relationships among gender, sexuality, race, nation, and the body. In particular, it focuses on contemporary ideas and theories in the study of the complex historical and cultural relationships between sexuality and gender. In addition, we examine sexuality and social movements, identity politics, and the so-called "culture wars." In short, this class will not be a voyeuristic narration of exotic sexual or gender practices; and where we use the "other" it will be solely for the purpose of exploring our own practices and ideologies. Prereq: ANTH 102 or consent of department.

ANTH 351. Topics in International Health (3)
Special topics of interest in International Health. Prereq: ANTH 102 or ANTH 215 or consent of department.

ANTH 352. Japanese Culture and Society (3)
Focuses on contemporary Japanese cultural and social institutions. Topics include child-rearing, personality, values, education, gender roles, the dual economy, and popular culture. Prereq: ANTH 102 or consent of department.

ANTH 353. Chinese Culture and Society (3)
Focuses on Chinese cultural and social institutions during the Maoist and post-Maoist eras. Topics include ideology, economics, politics, religion, family life, and popular culture. Prereq: ANTH 102 or consent of department.

ANTH 356. Mediterranean Culture and Society (3)
Ethnography of the Mediterranean culture area. Topics include geography, topography, climate, rural and urban life styles, economy, social identity (encompassing gender, ethnic, national, provincial, tribal and religious identity), religion, ritual relations, concepts of self, health and healing, politics, worldview and values, family and kinship, aging, death and dying. Past and present methods and problems of anthropological research in the region and the theoretical frameworks that have guided researchers. Prereq: ANTH 102 or consent of department.

ANTH 357. Native American Cultures (3)
Intensive examination of the cultures of selected Native American peoples, including historical, political, religious, social organizational, linguistic, and medical/psychiatric aspects of American Indian life. Prereq: ANTH 102.

ANTH 358. Women’s Mental Health (3)
This anthropological course is an examination of the cultural psychology of women in the following domains: (1) women’s social status cross-culturally; (2) specific psychiatric syndromes, such as psychoses, mood and personality disorders as they affect women; and (3) power and resilience. Issues of the cultural validity of psychological theories for women across diverse settings is the subject of critique throughout the seminar. Prereq: ANTH 102 or ANTH 215.

ANTH 359. Introduction to International Health (3)
Critical health problems and needs in developing countries. Prevalence of infectious disease, malnutrition, chronic disease, injury control. Examines strategies for improvement of health in less developed countries. Prereq: ANTH 102.

ANTH 361. Urban Health (3)
This course provides an anthropological perspective on the most important health problems facing urban population around the world. Special attention will be given to an examination of disparities in health among urban residents based on poverty, race/ethnicity, gender, and nationality.

ANTH 362. Contemporary Theory in Anthropology (3)
A critical examination of anthropological thought in England, France and the United States during the second half of the twentieth century. Emphasis will be on the way authors formulate questions that motivate anthropological discourse, on the way central concepts are formulated and applied and on the controversies and debates that result. Readings are drawn from influential texts by prominent contemporary anthropologists. Prereq: ANTH 102 or consent of department.

ANTH 363. Anthropology and Bioethics (3)
The course will review theoretical work on anthropology and values, the discipline of bioethics, its philosophical roots, the body of anthropological work in bioethics, and critically examine a number of current bioethical issues in the United States and internationally. Prereq: ANTH 102 or consent of department.

ANTH 365. Gender and Sex Differences: Cross-cultural Perspective (3)
Gender roles and sex differences throughout the life cycle considered from a cross-cultural perspective. Major approaches to explaining sex roles discussed in light of information from both Western and non-Western cultures. Prereq: ANTH 102 or consent of department.

ANTH 369. The Anthropology of Nutrition (3)
Examines human nutrition and physical performance within the framework of human adaptability theory. The emphasis is on the measurement of energetic intake and expenditure in human populations; the assessment, health consequences, and bio-cultural correlates of malnutrition and obesity; and the uses of energetic data in assessing human population adaptation. Prereq: ANTH 103 or consent of department.

ANTH 371. Culture, Behavior, and Person: Psychological Anthropology (3)
Cross-cultural perspectives on personality, human development, individual variability, cognition, deviant behavior, and the role of the individual in his/her society. Classic and contemporary anthropological writings on Western and non-Western societies. Prereq: ANTH 102 or consent of department.

ANTH 372. Anthropological Approaches to Religion (3)
The development of, and current approaches to, comparative religion from an anthropological perspective. Topics include witchcraft, ritual, myth, healing, religious language and symbolism, religion and gender, religious experience, the nature of the sacred, religion and social change, altered states of consciousness, and evil. Using material from a wide range of world cultures, critical assessment is made of conventional distinctions such as those between rational/irrational, natural/supernatural, magic/religion, and primitive/civilized. Prereq: ANTH 102 or consent of department. Cross-listed as RLGN 372.

ANTH 375. Human Evolution: The Fossil Evidence (3)
This course will survey the biological and behavioral changes that occurred in the hominid lineage during the past five million years. In addition to a thorough review of the fossil evidence for human evolution, students will develop the theoretical framework in evolutionary biology. Prereq: ANTH 103 and BIOL 110. Cross-listed as ANAT 375.

ANTH 376. Topics in the Anthropology of Health and Medicine (3)
Special topics of interest, such as the biology of human adaptability; the ecology of the human life cycle health delivery systems; transcultural psychiatry; nutrition, health, and disease; paleoepidemiology; and population anthropology. Prereq: ANTH 102 or ANTH 103.

ANTH 377. Human Osteology (4)
This course for upper division undergraduates and graduate students will review the following topics: human skeletal development and identification; and forensic identification (skeletal aging, sex identification and population affiliation). Cross-listed as ANAT 377.

ANTH 380. Independent Study in Laboratory Archaeology I (1-3)
This course provides an introduction to the basic methods and techniques of artifact curation and laboratory analysis in archaeology. Under the supervision of the instructor, each student will develop and carry out a focused project of material analysis and interpretation using the archaeology collections of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History. Each student is required to spend a minimum of two hours per week in the Archaeology laboratory for each credit hour taken. By the end of the course, the student will prepare a short report describing the results of their particular project. Prereq: ANTH 107 and permission of department, and prior permission of Department of Archaeology at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History.

ANTH 381. Independent Study in Laboratory Archaeology II (1-3)
This course provides an introduction to the basic methods and techniques of artifact curation and laboratory analysis in archaeology. Under the supervision of the instructor, each student will develop and carry out a focused project of material analysis and interpretation using the archaeology collections of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History. Each student is required to spend a minimum of two hours per week in the Archaeology laboratory for each credit hour taken. By the end of the course, the student will prepare a short report describing the results of their particular project. Prereq: ANTH 107 and permission of department, and prior permission of Department of Archaeology at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History.

ANTH 383. Evolutionary Anatomy (4)
This course will introduce graduate and advanced undergraduate students to primate comparative anatomy and will examine methods of reconstructing physiology and behavior from fossil remains. Prereq: ANTH 103 and BIOL 110. Cross-listed as ANAT 383.

ANTH 385. Applied Anthropology (3)
Analysis of the use of anthropological theory and data for social development planning and programs. A cross-cultural analysis of the implications of planned change and their ramifications. Prereq: ANTH 102 or ANTH 103 and ANTH 105.

ANTH 388. Globalization, Development, & Underdevelopment: Anthropological Persp. (3)
This course examines both theoretical and practical perspectives on globalization and economic development in the "Third World." From "Dependency," "Modernization," and "World System" theory to post-structuralist critiques of development discourse, the class seeks to provide a framework for understanding current debates on development and globalization. The "neoliberal monologue" that dominates the contemporary development enterprise is critically examined in the context of growing global inequality. Special consideration is given to the roles of international agencies such as the World Bank, International Monetary Fund, United Nations, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in the "development industry." The course also focuses on the contributions of anthropologists to development theory and practice with emphasis on the impact of development on the health of the poor and survival of indigenous cultures. Opportunities for professional anthropologists in the development field are reviewed.

ANTH 389. Crossroads: Transformation of Rural Blues into Urban Rock (3)
A multimedia approach to the development and transformation of an American musical form, the blues. Foci include the social and cultural history of rural and urban blues, rhythm and blues, rock ‘n’ roll, and the later forms of rock, the social context and life histories of modern music’s creators and innovators, the development of vocal and instrumental styles, blues and rock, visual and performance iconography, milestones in the development of musical genres and the major roles of racism and discrimination in the development of these forms of popular music. Prereq: ANTH 102.

ANTH 391. Honors Tutorial (3)
Prereq: Acceptance into Honors Program.

ANTH 392. Honors Tutorial (3)
Prereq: Acceptance into Honors Program.

ANTH 393. Human Ecology: Biology of Human Adaptability (3)
The place of human populations in the ecosystem. The importance of biological and behavioral responses of populations ranging from hunters and gatherers to contemporary and industrial societies. The effect of various natural and manmade stresses on man’s adaptation to the environment. Prereq: ANTH 103 or consent of department.

ANTH 394. Seminar in Evolutionary Biology (3)
(See PHIL 394.) Cross-listed as PHIL 394.

ANTH 397. Epidemiology and Evolution of Human Disease (3)
Basic concepts of infectious and degenerative diseases. Description and analysis of the changing distribution and determinants of disease in prehistoric, historic, and contemporary human populations. Prereq: ANTH 103 or consent of department.

ANTH 399. Independent Study (1-6)
Students may propose topics for independent reading and research. Prereq: Consent of department.

Graduate Courses

ANTH 401. Biological Aging in Humans (3)
(See ANTH 301.) Prereq: ANTH 103 or consent of department.

ANTH 402. Darwinian Medicine (3)
(See ANTH 302.) Prereq: ANTH 103 or ANTH 105 or consent of department.

ANTH 404. Introduction to the Anthropology of Aging (3)
(See ANTH 304.) Prereq: ANTH 102 or consent of department.

ANTH 406. Anthropology of Childhood and the Family (3)
(See ANTH 306.) Prereq: ANTH 102 or consent of department.

ANTH 409. Family Violence and Child Abuse (3)
(See ANTH 309.) Prereq: ANTH 102 or consent of department.

ANTH 414. Cultures of the United States (3)
(See ANTH 314.)

ANTH 417. Asian Medical Systems (3)
(See ANTH 317.) Prereq: ANTH 102 or consent of department.

ANTH 418. Death and Dying (3)
(See ANTH 318.) Prereq: ANTH 102 or consent of department.

ANTH 422. Living Africa (3)
(See ANTH 322.)

ANTH 423. AIDS: Epidemiology, Biology, and Culture (3)
(See ANTH 323.) Prereq: ANTH 102 or ANTH 103 or ANTH 105 or consent of department.

ANTH 424. Field Methods in Archaeology (6)
This field course is designed to give the student a comprehensive introduction to archaeological field work. All participants will be introduced to the methods of archaeological survey, techniques of hand excavation, artifact identification, and the preparation of field notes and documentation. In large measure this is a "learning through doing" course which is supplemented by formal and informal lectures and discussions about archaeological methods and regional prehistory. The Field School is held as two, three-week sessions of instruction in the field. All participants are required to attend an orientation meeting that is held at the Museum on the first day of each session. The remainder of each session will take place from Monday through Friday at an archaeological site in northeast Ohio. Students are responsible for their own transportation to and from the field site and must bring a sack lunch. All participants will receive a field manual which will provide detailed information on the course and techniques of field work. Prereq: Permission of department.

ANTH 426. Power, Illness, and Inequality: The Political Economy of Health (3)
(See ANTH 326.)

ANTH 427. Great Lakes Archaeology (3)
(See ANTH 327.) Prereq: ANTH 107 or consent of department.

ANTH 428. Ethics in Science (3)
This course is a survey of key ethical and value issues in science. Topics to be covered may include: research with human subjects; research with animals; scientific misconduct, including fraud; the role of science in society; opposition to science based on alternative value systems; the historical context of contemporary science; relationships between science and industry, including potential conflicts of interest; the social responsibilities of scientists; science and government; the use of science in public policy, including controversies over smoking and lung cancer, asbestos, and global warming; and the scientist as a "hired gun." Extensive student participation is expected.

ANTH 430. Origins of Civilization (3)
(See ANTH 330.) Prereq: ANTH 102 or consent of department.

ANTH 431. Ancient Civilizations of the Near East (3)
(See ANTH 331.) Prereq: ANTH 102 or ANTH 107 or consent of department.

ANTH 433. Roots of Ancient India: Archaeology of South Asia (3)
(See ANTH 333.) Prereq: ANTH 102 or ANTH 107 or consent of department.

ANTH 434. Urban Anthropology (3)
(See ANTH 334.) Prereq: ANTH 102 or consent of department.

ANTH 437. Comparative Medical Systems (3)
(See ANTH 337.) Prereq: ANTH 215.

ANTH 440. Culture and Emotion (3)
(See ANTH 340.) Prereq: ANTH 102 or consent of department.

ANTH 441. Cultural Area Studies in Anthropology (3)
(See ANTH 341.) Prereq: ANTH 102.

ANTH 443. Psychoanalytic Anthropology (3)
(See ANTH 343.) Prereq: ANTH 102 or consent of department.

ANTH 445. Ethnicity, Gender, and Mental Health (3)
(See ANTH 345.) Prereq: ANTH 102 or consent of department.

ANTH 448. Sexuality and Gender (3)
(See ANTH 348.) Prereq: ANTH 102 or consent of department.

ANTH 451. Topics in International Health (3)
(See ANTH 351.) Prereq: ANTH 102 or ANTH 215.

ANTH 452. Japanese Culture and Society (3)
(See ANTH 352.) Prereq: ANTH 102 or consent of department.

ANTH 453. Chinese Culture and Society (3)
(See ANTH 353.) Prereq: ANTH 102 or consent of department.

ANTH 456. Mediterranean Culture and Society (3)
(See ANTH 356.) Prereq: ANTH 102 or consent of department.

ANTH 457. Native American Cultures (3)
(See ANTH 357.) Prereq: ANTH 102.

ANTH 458. Women’s Mental Health (3)
(See ANTH 358.) Prereq: ANTH 102 or ANTH 215.

ANTH 459. Introduction to International Health (3)
(See ANTH 359.) Prereq: ANTH 102.

ANTH 461. Urban Health (3)
(See ANTH 361.)

ANTH 462. Contemporary Theory in Anthropology (3)
(See ANTH 362.) Prereq: ANTH 102 or consent of department.

ANTH 463. Anthropology and Bioethics (3)
(See ANTH 363.) Prereq: ANTH 102 or consent of department. Cross-listed as BETH 463.

ANTH 465. Gender and Sex Differences: Cross-cultural Perspective (3)
(
See ANTH 365.) Prereq: ANTH 102 or consent of department.

ANTH 469. The Anthropology of Nutrition (3)
(
See ANTH 369.) Prereq: ANTH 103 or consent of department.

ANTH 470. Tutorial in Physical Anthropology (3)
Guided readings in physical anthropology. Prereq: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

ANTH 471. Culture, Behavior, and Person: Psychological Anthropology (3)
(See ANTH 371.) Prereq: ANTH 102 or consent of department.

ANTH 472. Anthropological Approaches to Religion (3)
(See ANTH 372.) Prereq: ANTH 102 or consent of department.

ANTH 475. Human Evolution: The Fossil Evidence (3)
(See ANTH 375.) Prereq: ANTH 103 and BIOL 110. Cross-listed as ANAT 475.

ANTH 476. Topics in the Anthropology of Health and Medicine (3)
(See ANTH 376.)

ANTH 477. Human Osteology (4)
(See ANTH 377.) Cross-listed as ANAT 477.

ANTH 479. Social-Cultural Anthropology (3)
Prereq: Graduate standing or consent of department.

ANTH 480. The Anthropology of Health and Illness I (3)
Part one of the graduate core course in medical anthropology. Includes sections giving an overview of topics such as the history and conceptual development of medical anthropology, anthropological epidemiology, psychiatric anthropology, social networks/support systems, and health care systems. Prereq: Graduate standing.

ANTH 481. The Anthropology of Health and Illness II (3)
Part two of the graduate core course in medical anthropology. Includes sections giving an overview of topics such as human adaptability theory, nutritional anthropology, demography, the anthropology of biomedicine, cross-cultural aging, clinical anthropology and international health. Prereq: ANTH 480.

ANTH 483. Evolutionary Anatomy (4)
(See ANTH 383.) Prereq: ANTH 103 and BIOL 110. Cross-listed as ANAT 483.

ANTH 485. Applied Anthropology (3)
(See ANTH 385.) Prereq: Graduate standing.

ANTH 488. Globalization, Development, & Underdevelopment: Anthropological Persp. (3)
(See ANTH 388.)

ANTH 489. Crossroads: Transformation of Rural Blues into Urban Rock (3)
(See ANTH 389.) Prereq: ANTH 102.

ANTH 493. Human Ecology: Biology of Human Adaptability (3)
(See ANTH 393.) Prereq: ANTH 103 or consent of department.

ANTH 494. Seminar in Evolutionary Biology (3)
(See PHIL 494.) Cross-listed as PHIL 494.

ANTH 497. Epidemiology and Evolution of Human Diseases (3)
(See ANTH 397.)

ANTH 498. Public Policy and Aging (3)
(See EPBI 408.) Cross-listed as EPBI 408.

ANTH 502. Research Practicum in Med Anthropology and Cross-cultural Gerontology (3)
Provides M.A. students with firsthand experience in applying anthropology to health and aging problems. Prereq: Graduate standing.

ANTH 503. Seminar in Social Cultural Anthropology (3)

ANTH 504. Advanced Methods in Medical and Gerontological Anthropology (3)
Practical and theoretical issues in the selection of questions for health and aging research in societal settings. Illustration of frameworks and designs for research. Discussion of the problems of collection, analysis, and interpretation of data along with the nonscientific influences on the research process and the use of results. Prereq: Graduate standing.

ANTH 505. Women’s Mental Health (3)
This anthropological course is a feminist examination of the cultural psychology of women in the following domains: 1. contextualized modes of attention, perception, and orientations for being-in-the-world; 2. power, resistance and resilience; and 3. specific psychiatric syndromes of schizophrenia and depression as they affect women. Issues of the cultural validity of theories premised upon an Euro-American ethnopsychology will be the subject of critique throughout the seminar. Prereq: Graduate standing and consent of department.

ANTH 506. Seminar in Comparative Health Systems (3)
Prereq: ANTH 480 or consent of department.

ANTH 508. Seminar in Policy and Program Planning and Evaluation (3)
Prereq: ANTH 504.

ANTH 509. Seminar in Ethnopsychology of Emotion (3)
In this seminar we will be concerned with the relationship of culture and emotion. The study of emotion, traditionally the domain of philosophy, psychology, and physiology, has increasingly attracted the attention of psychological and medical anthropologists. Contemporary anthropological approaches to the problem have documented the substantial role that culture plays in mediating both the experience and the expression of emotion. These issues will be examined through review of cross-cultural, ethnographic materials. Prereq: ANTH 480.

ANTH 510. Seminar in International Health (3)
This seminar will survey the major areas of research in the field of international health, including anthropology and public health research in international health. Emphasis will be on critical evaluation of current international health theory and methods and review of relevant literature, in regard to the health of the world’s population. Prereq: ANTH 480 and ANTH 481.

ANTH 513. Seminar in Ethnopsychiatry (3)
Theory and practice of psychotherapeutic forms. Diagnostic and therapeutic forms from Europe, the United States, Japan, India, and other major cultural traditions and those of local areas such as West Africa, Native America, and Latin America. The cultural theories of mental disorders, related conceptions of self and person, and the relationships of local psychological theory to clinical praxis and outcome.

ANTH 519. Seminar in Human Ecology and Adaptability (3)

ANTH 530. Seminar in Medical Anthropology: Topics (3)
Various topics will be offered for graduate students in medical anthropology, such as "Anthropological Perspectives on Women’s Health and Reproduction" and "Biocultural Anthropology." Prereq: ANTH 480.

ANTH 542. Human Body: Discourse and Experience (3)
Interdisciplinary approach to embodiment as a starting point for rethinking the concepts of culture and existence. Methodological distinction between phenomenological and semiotic approaches. Topics include cultural uses of the body, the body as representation and expression, the body as an object of domination, the body of health and illness, sexuality and gendered body, religion and the sacred body, and technology and the body. Prereq: Graduate standing or consent of department.

ANTH 591. Seminar in Physical Anthropology (3)

ANTH 599. Tutorial: Advanced Studies in Anthropology (1-18)
(Credit as arranged.) Advanced studies in anthropology.

ANTH 601. Independent Research (1-18)
(Credit as arranged.)

ANTH 651. Thesis M.A. (1-18)

ANTH 700. Dissertation Fieldwork (0)
Students conducting dissertation fieldwork off-campus may choose to register for this course with the permission of their dissertation advisor. Students may register for a maximum of two academic years. Prereq: Must be Ph.D. candidate and have permission of department.

ANTH 701. Dissertation Ph.D. (1-18)
(Credit as arranged.)

ANTH 702. Appointed Dissertation Fellow (9)

Department of Art History and Art

Art History
Mather House
Phone 216-368-4118; Fax 216-368-4681
Ellen G. Landau, Chair

Art Education/Art Studio
Art Studio Facility, 2215 Adelbert Road
Phone 216-368-2714; Fax 216-368-2715
Tim Shuckerow, Director of Art Education and Art Studio

ART HISTORY AND ART

The Department of Art History and Art offers opportunities to study art history, both Western and Non-Western, to participate in a broad range of studio offerings, to pursue state teacher licensure in art education, and to engage in pre-professional museum training. The Bachelor of Arts degree is granted in art history and in pre-architecture (second major only), and the Bachelor of Science degree in art education. In addition, the department offers graduate programs leading to the degrees of Master of Arts in art history, in art history and museum studies, and in art education; and the Doctor of Philosophy in art history, and in art history and museum studies. All art programs are considerably enhanced by close cooperation with and access to the facilities of cultural institutions located in University Circle, in particular the Cleveland Museum of Art and the Cleveland Institute of Art.

The undergraduate and graduate programs in art history are offered as part of the Joint Program in Art History of Case Western Reserve University and the Cleveland Museum of Art. All classes are taught at the museum, and courses are occasionally offered by the museum curators who hold adjunct appointments in the department. Students taking advanced-level courses use the museum’s extensive research library, and all students have an opportunity to study original works of art in the museum’s superb collections. Students majoring in art history have a wide variety of career opportunities. Graduates with a strong background in art are employed as teachers; as museum professionals (both curatorial and administrative); as art librarians and archivists; as journalists or as sales representatives in commercial art galleries, auction houses, and bookstores; as art conservators and restorers; as art specialists in the diplomatic service and at all levels of government; and in industry, film, and television. Some of these specialties require additional study and professional preparation beyond the bachelor’s degree.

ART EDUCATION

The Art Education program’s mission is "to prepare committed, knowledgeable, and creative professional art educators who will develop into leaders, teachers, and talented artists in the field of art education".

The undergraduate and graduate degree programs in art education are given jointly with the Cleveland Institute of Art. Art education majors have the advantage of pursuing their academic studies in a university environment and their studio studies at a professional art school which educates artists and designers. Students participate in educational field experiences conducted in many of greater Cleveland’s urban, suburban and rural school systems, its hospitals, museums and cultural institutions. Graduates of the University’s art education programs have pursued careers as teachers, supervisors and consultants in public and private schools, colleges, art schools and museums; as administrators of galleries and art organizations; as art therapists in hospitals and community centers; as designers of educational programs for industry; and as practicing artists.

A second major and a minor sequence in pre-architecture are offered for those students expecting to continue architectural studies at the graduate level (or who simply wish to pursue an area of interest).

The university offers a variety of introductory and intermediate art studio courses taught by experienced artists/teachers in a newly renovated art building to students interested in developing and nurturing their artistic and creative talents.

Qualified undergraduates majoring in art history or art education may also participate in the Integrated Graduate Studies Program (see separate listing in this bulletin).

FACULTY

Art History and Art

Ellen G. Landau, Ph.D. (University of Delaware)
Professor and Chair
20th century American and European art; Critical Theory and Gender Studies

Henry Adams, Ph.D. (Yale University)
Professor & Curator of American Painting, Cleveland Museum of Art
American art

David Carrier, Ph.D. (Columbia University)
Champney Family Professor
Methodology of Art History, Contemporary Art and Art Criticism

Jenifer Neils, Ph.D. (Princeton University)
Ruth Coulter Heede Professor
Ancient art and classical archaeology

Edward J. Olszewski, Ph.D. (University of Minnesota)
Professor
Italian Renaissance and Baroque art

Constantine Petridis, Ph.D. (Ghent University)
Assistant Professor & Assistant Curator, Cleveland Museum of Art
African Art

Catherine B. Scallen, Ph.D. (Princeton University)
Associate Professor and Undergraduate Advisor
Northern Renaissance and Baroque art and historiography

ADJUNCT FACULTY

Curators of the Cleveland Museum of Art

Michael Bennett, Ph.D. (Harvard University)
Ancient Art

Susan Bergh, Ph.D. (Columbia University)
Art of the Ancient Americas

Michael Cunningham, Ph.D. (University of Chicago)
Japanese and Korean art

Stephen Fliegel, M.A. (University of Sheffield)
Medieval art

William Robinson, Ph.D. (Case Western Reserve University)
Modern art

J. Stanton Thomas, Ph.D. (Case Western Reserve University)
Medieval and Northern Renaissance art

Marjorie Williams, M.A. (University of Michigan)
Asian art

Art Education

Tim Shuckerow, M.A. (Case Western Reserve University)
Director of Art Education and Art Studio
Supervisor of Art Education

Amelia Joynes M.Ed. (Cleveland State University)
Supervisor of Art Education Secondary Student Teaching

Sandra Noble, M.A. (Cleveland State University)
Supervisor of Art Education Elementary Student Teaching and Clinical/Field-Based Experience

Undergraduate Programs

MAJORS

Art History
The curriculum in art history is designed to give students a broad grounding in painting, sculpture, architecture and the decorative arts, with a strong emphasis on understanding the cultural context in which they were produced. Students also develop a technical and critical vocabulary as well as sound writing skills to analyze works of art.

The major in art history, which leads to the Bachelor of Arts degree, requires 36 hours of course work in art history, including:

ARTH 101, Art History I (3)

ARTH 102, Art History II (3)

ARTH 396, Majors Seminar (3)

At least 6 credit hours must be taken at the 200 level. At least 15 credit hours must be taken at the 300 level. One approved art studio course is also required. Foreign language study (French, German, or Italian) is highly recommended.

Pre-Architecture
The pre-architecture major leads to the Bachelor of Arts degree. However, it may be chosen only as a second major. The double major is required so that the perspectives provided by this interdisciplinary program may be complemented by a concentrated disciplinary experience. The pre-architecture program introduces the student to the forms, history, and functions of architecture as well as the studio skills relevant to its practice. The program is designed to provide a background for undergraduate students who plan to continue architectural studies at the graduate level, as well as for those interested in the study of architecture as part of a liberal or technical education.

To declare a pre-architecture major, students should have declared a first major and have sophomore or junior standing. Up to 6 credits in general education requirements and elective courses taken by students for their first major may be applied to their pre-architecture major.

The major consists of a minimum of 30 credit hours, 15 of which are in required courses and the remainder of which are approved elective courses. Detailed information about approved electives is available in the departmental office.

The required courses are:

ARTS 302, 303, Architecture and City Design I, II (3, 3)

ARTH 101, Art History I (3)

ARTH 102, Art History II (3)

ARTS 106, Creative Drawing I (3)

Fifteen hours of electives must be selected from the following groups:

A. 6 hours from selected art history courses.

B. 6 hours from:

ARTS 101, 201, Design and Color I, II (3,3)

ARTS 206, Creative Drawing II (3)

ARTS 220, Photography Studio I (3)

THTR 223, 224, Stagecraft I, II (3,3)

C. For students whose interests lie in aesthetics and the history of architecture, 3 hours in sociology, American studies, anthropology, history of science and technology, civil engineering, or geology. Students are encouraged to include as many of the courses listed below as possible in their schedules:

MATH 125, 126, Mathematics I, II (4,4)

PHYS 115, 116, Introduction to Physics (4,4) and Laboratory (4,4)

PHYS 121, General Physics-Mechanics (4)

PHYS 122, General Physics II-Electricity and Magnetism (4) and Laboratory

Art Education
The program in art education, which leads to the Bachelor of Science degree, requires a total of 123 credits and is designed to educate professional teachers of art for the public and private schools who are also competent, creative artists. The program meets all requirements of the Ohio Board of Education to qualify its University-recommended students for PreK-12 Art Specialist Licensure to teach art in the public schools of Ohio and over 40 reciprocating states.

This program is conducted jointly by Case Western Reserve University and the Cleveland Institute of Art. Admission requires application to Case Western Reserve and submission of an art portfolio to the Cleveland Institute of Art. Credentials must be acceptable to both institutions. Academic work is taken at Case Western Reserve University and studio courses at the Cleveland Institute of Art, as follows:

Academic Courses at Case Western Reserve University

*ENGL 150

3

PHED (two semesters-Lifetime Sports Activities)

0

*GER: Mathematics

3

*GER: Natural Sciences

3

*GER: Natural Science or Science and Society

3

*Art History 101, 102

6

*GER: History, Philosophy, Religion

6

*PSCL 101, EDUC 304

6

ARTS 295, 300, 385, 386, 387, 393, 366A, 366B, 465

24

*EDUC 301

3

ARTH electives (one must be at 300 level)

6

ENGL elective (300 level)

3

*GER: Global and Cultural Diversity

3

One open elective (300 level)

3

* indicates courses fulfilling Arts and Sciences General Education

 

Requirements

Art Studio at Cleveland Institute of Art

Total of 51 hours of studio possible, taken at the Cleveland Institute of Art

Computer Basics 101, 201

3

Design 107, 108, 209

9

Drawing 117, 118, 217

9

Painting 121, 122, 210

9

Sculpture 227

3

5 studio electives at 3 hours each

15

CIA open elective

3

RETENTION AND ADVANCED STANDING

(Undergraduate Level)
Students in art education who expect to meet Ohio’s licensure requirements must apply for advanced standing by the end of their first semester junior year. To apply, students must submit to the art education faculty information about grade point average, written personal goals, three faculty recommendations, self-analysis of program progress up to the point of evaluation, and have an interview with the program director. Art education faculty may (1) accept a student for advanced standing; (2) accept a student with reservation, with a remedial plan; or (3) reject a student and recommend a career change.

To enter student teaching, a 2.5 cumulative University grade point average is required, a 3.0 cumulative G.P.A. average in professional education courses, and a total of 300 contact hours of clinical field-based experience acquired in a variety of settings as required by the State of Ohio. Fingerprinting for a criminal background check by the Ohio Bureau of Criminal Identification is required. For students who have not lived in Ohio consecutively for the past five years, a background check through the Federal Bureau of Investigation is also required.

To be recommended by the university’s director of teacher licensure for State Teacher Licensure, a 3.0 cumulative G.P.A. must be maintained in all professional education courses. An overall G.P.A. of 2.5 must be maintained. The Ohio Department of Education requires passing scores on the Praxis II Principles of Learning and Teaching and Art Content Knowledge exams in addition to the requirements stated above.

Completion of the Bachelor of Science degree exists separately from the assurance that State of Ohio Visual Art Teacher Licensure will be awarded.

Additional information on this program is available in the office of the director of art education.

MINORS

Four minors are available in art: one in art history, and three through the art studio program:

Art History
Requires 18 hours of art history including:

ARTH 101, Art History I (3)

ARTH 102, Art History II (3)

At least three credit hours must be taken at the 200 level.

Art Studio
Requires 18 hours in art studio including:

ARTS 101, Design and Color (3)

ARTS 106, Creative Drawing (3)

Four additional studio courses, two of which must be in the same area (i.e., drawing, painting, design, photography, or ceramics).

Photography
Requires 18 hours including:

ARTS 220, Photography Studio I (3)

ARTS 320, Photography Studio II (3)

ARTS 322, Photography: Color Studio (3)

ARTS 325, Creative Photography (3) or ARTS 365D, Black and White Photography Studio

ARTS 365E, Color Studio (3) or ARTS 365K, Creative Photography

An elective, either ARTS 399, Independent Study in Art Studio (3) or ARTH102, Art History II (3)

Pre-Architecture
Requires 18 hours including:

ARTS 302, 303, Architecture and City Design I, II (3, 3)

ARTH 101, Art History I (3)

ARTH 102, Art History II (3)

ARTS 106, Creative Drawing (3)

One approved elective.

SEQUENCES

Sequences for students in the Engineering Core are available in art history and in art studio, in photography, and in pre-architecture. Sequences must include three art history courses, two of which should be at the 100 or 200 level, and selected in consultation with the departmental advisor. Art history sequences may include one three-hour course in art studio. A pre-architecture sequence is offered by art studio, drawn from ARTS 106, 302, 303; ARTH 101, 102.

DEPARTMENTAL HONORS

Majors who wish to earn the Bachelor of Arts degree with Honors in Art History must make written application to the department chair no later than the fall semester of their senior year. Departmental honors are awarded upon fulfillment of the following requirements: a grade point average of at least 3.5 in the major and an honors thesis (ARTH 399) that receives a grade of A.

INTEGRATED GRADUATE STUDIES

Qualified undergraduates majoring in art history or art education also may participate in the Integrated Graduate Studies Program. Interested students should note the general requirements and the admission procedure sin this bulletin and may consult the department for further information.

Graduate Programs

MASTER OF ARTS IN ART HISTORY

The master’s program in art history is designed to provide the student with a broad knowledge of the major art historical periods, the scholarly and bibliographical resources, and the methodologies of art history. It also offers an opportunity to investigate art historical problems in some depth. In addition to the regular graduate school application form, applicants to the graduate program in art history are required to submit GRE scores and copies of two term papers which they consider to represent their best work. Applicants for the M.A. should have a BA major or minor concentration in art history or a related humanities field and a minimum G.P.A. of 3.0.

The master’s degree in art history is conducted exclusively under Plan B as described under the School of Graduate Studies in this bulletin. All other requirements of the M.A. program must be fulfilled:

ARTH 495, Methodologies of Art History (3)

Eight graduate courses, including one each from four of the following five areas, three of which must be seminars at the 500-level (24):

1. Non-Western

2. Ancient

3. Medieval

4. Renaissance/Baroque

5. Modern and American

A reading knowledge of one foreign language (French, German, or Italian).

Successful performance on the M.A. comprehensive examination.

3 credit hours of Qualifying Paper (ARTH 489)

Total: 30 hours.

MASTER OF ARTS IN ART HISTORY AND MUSEUM STUDIES

The master’s program in art history and museum studies includes the same broad requirements and objectives of the master’s program in art history, with additional study of art museum procedures and two supervised museum internships.

The requirements include:

ARTH 495, Methodology of Art History (3)

ARTH 490, Visual Arts and Museums (3)

ARTH 491A&B, Visual Arts and Museums: Internship (1/3)

Seven graduate courses, including one each from four of the following five areas, three of which must be graduate seminars at the 500 level (21):

1. Non-Western

2. Ancient

3. Medieval

4. Renaissance/Baroque

5. Modern and American

Total 31 hours

MASTER OF ARTS IN ART EDUCATION

The Master of Arts in Art Education is offered in two plans: Plan I for those who are already teacher licensed and who desire advanced studio- and art-related studies; Plan II for those holding the Bachelor of Fine Arts or equivalent degree who desire teaching licensure as visual art specialists. Both programs are offered jointly by Case Western Reserve University and the Cleveland Institute of Art.

The admission procedure includes a formal application, three letters of recommendation, and a college transcript, which are to be submitted to the Art Education office. The Cleveland Institute of Art admission procedure requires a portfolio of art work. Approval by both the University and the Cleveland Institute of Art is required for admission. Information and application forms are available through the office of Graduate Admission at Case Western Reserve University and through the department.

Students in this program may follow either of two plans.

Plan I: 36 semester hours of course credit:
18 hours in studio to be taken at the Cleveland Institute of Art at the 300 level or above; and 18 hours in academic courses to be taken at Case Western Reserve University at the 400 level or above, to be selected in consultation with the Director of Art Education; or

30 semester hours of course credit: 18 hours in studio to be taken at the Cleveland Institute of Art at the 300 level or above and 12 hours in academic courses to be taken at Case Western Reserve University at the 400 level or above, to be selected in consultation with the Director of Art Education; AND a thesis based on individual research not less than 6 semester hours of registration.

Plan II: 36 semester hours of course credit:
(Teacher Licensure Track for holders of the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree or equivalent studio background)

EDUC 401, Introduction to Education (3)

EDUC 404, Educational Psychology (3)

ARTS 385, Clinical Field-Based Experience I (1)

ARTS 386, Clinical Field-Based Experience II (1)

ARTS 387, Clinical Field-Based Experience III (1)

ARTS 400, Current Issues in Art Education (3)

ARTS 493, Art Content, Pedagogy, Methodology, and Assessment (3)

ARTS 466 A&B, Student Teaching in Art for Pre-K — 6th Grade and 7th — 12th Grade (4 each)

ARTS 465, Seminar for Art Teachers (4)

ARTS 602, Study in Art Education (3)

Studio electives at the Cleveland Institute of Art at the 300-level or above (6)

RETENTION AND ADVANCED STANDING

(Graduate Level)
Students in art education who expect to meet state teacher licensure requirements must apply for advanced standing prior to the semester in which they register for student teaching. To apply, students must submit to the art education faculty information about grade point average, personal goals, and self-analysis of performance in the program up to the point of evaluation. Art education faculty may (1) accept a student for advanced standing; (2) accept a student with reservation, with a remedial plan; or (3) reject a student and recommend a career change.

A 3.0 cumulative grade point average is required to enter student teaching as well as a total of 300 contact hours of clinical field-based experience as required by the State of Ohio.

A 3.0 grade point average must be maintained in all professional education courses and an overall G.P.A. of 3.0 is required to be recommended by the university’s Director of Teacher Licensure for State Teacher Licensure.

Completion of the Master of Arts degree exists separately from the assurance that State of Ohio Visual Art Teacher Certification will be awarded. The State of Ohio requires a passing score on the National Teacher Examination, fingerprinting with a criminal background check by the Ohio Bureau of Criminal Identification, in addition to the requirements stated above. All M.A. degree candidates are required to present a documented thesis exhibition in the program’s gallery of their art work prior to graduation.

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN ART HISTORY

The doctorate in Art History is designed to allow advanced graduate students the opportunity to specialize in designated areas. Admission to the program requires an M.A. in art history or its equivalent, including a reading knowledge of one approved foreign language (French, German, or Italian). A qualifying examination or the equivalent is also required for admission at the doctoral level.

Applicants are required to submit GRE scores and two papers written during their matriculation for a master’s degree or a thesis if completed by the time of application.

University requirements for the Ph.D. include a minimum of 36 hours of course credits, but the department may require additional course work as preparation for the general examination or for the dissertation. The minimum credits are to be distributed as follows: ARTH 495, Methodologies of Art History (3); two graduate seminars at the 500 level or above (6); three additional courses at the 400 level or above (9); and a minimum of 18 hours of ARTH 701, Ph.D. Dissertation.

Doctoral students must demonstrate an ability to read two approved languages (other than English) useful in art historical research. German is normally required as one of the two languages for students concentrating in Western art. Both languages must be approved by the department at the time of admission or during the first semester of doctoral study.

Ph.D. students are required to pass a written and oral general examination before being advanced to candidacy. Within two weeks after the written examination, the faculty examining committee will administer the oral examination. A final evaluation will be based on the student’s performance in both the written and oral sections of the general examination.

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN ART HISTORY AND MUSEUM STUDIES

The Ph.D. program in art history and museum studies is offered to a limited number of candidates. The program combines the academic requirements of a Ph.D. with practical museum training and is designed to provide experience in connoisseurship, conservation, and art education, as well as a planned program of academic course work and independent research. Admission to the program is made on the basis of academic record, experience, recommendations, and personal interviews. A master’s degree in art history or its equivalent is required for admission as well as GRE scores and a reading knowledge of one foreign language. A Ph.D. qualifying examination or the equivalent is also required for admission.

Students in the Museum Studies Program are required to take a minimum of 38 hours of graduate study as follows: ARTH 610, Cleveland Museum of Art Internship (2); two graduate seminars at the 500 level or above (6); four elective courses at the 400 level or above (12); and a minimum of 18 hours of ARTH 701, Ph.D. Dissertation.

During the two-semester internship, the student will be assigned to one or more departments in the Cleveland Museum of Art for supervised study and practice that will be evaluated by a member of the Joint Faculty in Art History. The dissertation subject may be related to some aspect of art museum research; it may take the form of a special collection or exhibition catalogue, but it must satisfy the scholarly standards of the department and the University. Any student who has not taken ARTH 495, Methodologies of Art History or the equivalent, will be required to do so as part of the 12 hours of elective courses. Students also must satisfy all other requirements for the Ph.D. degree in art history.

ART HISTORY (ARTH)

Undergraduate Courses

ARTH 101. Art History I: Pyramids to Pagodas (3)
The first half of a two-semester survey of world art highlighting the major monuments of the ancient Mediterranean, medieval Europe, MesoAmerica, Africa, and Asia. Special emphasis on visual analysis, and socio-cultural contexts, and objects in the Cleveland Museum of Art.

ARTH 102. Art History II: Michelangelo to Mapplethorpe (3)
The second half of a two-semester survey of world art highlighting the major monuments of Renaissance and Baroque Europe, America, and Asia. Special emphasis on visual analysis historical and sociocultural contexts and objects in the Cleveland Museum of Art. (ARTH 101 and 102 may be combined, or either can be taken in conjunction with any other 100 or 200 level Art History class to complete a sequence in the Arts portion of the Humanities section of the General Education Requirements in the College of Arts and Sciences or can be used as part of a three course Humanities sequence in the Engineering Core curriculum.)

ARTH 103. Works of Art, Images, and Artifacts (3)
This course is designed to introduce students to the history of art and to the cultural resources of University Circle. It is comprised of slide lectures, videos, presentations by invited curators, and visits to the museums surrounding the University. By examining a variety of objects from many times and places and raising issues that cut across categories, it encourages discussion and helps to develop a critical understanding of visual and material culture.

ARTH 203. The Arts of Asia (3)
A survey of Japanese and Chinese art from the Bronze Age to the 18th century, with particular emphasis on objects in the Cleveland Museum of Art. The relationship of art works to Buddhism and Hinduism is explored along with cultural rituals, ceremonies, and traditions.

ARTH 226. Introduction to Greek and Roman Art (3)
Classical art from the 8th century B.C. to the fourth century A.D.; the major developments in the architecture, sculpture, and painting of ancient Greece, Etruria, and Rome. Cross-listed as CLSC 226.

ARTH 227. Ancient Cities and Sanctuaries (3)
A selection of cities and sanctuaries from the ancient Near East, Egypt, the Aegean, Greece, Etruria, and Rome; their political and religious institutions and the relationship to contemporary art forms. Cross-listed as CLSC 227.

ARTH 240. Introduction to Medieval Art (3)
Architecture, sculpture, painting, manuscript illumination, mosaics, and metal work from Early Christian period through later Middle Ages.

ARTH 250. Art in the Age of Discovery (3)
A survey of developments in Renaissance art and architecture in northern Europe and Italy during a new age of science, discovery and exploration, 1400-1600.

ARTH 260. Art in the Age of Grandeur (3)
A survey of European art in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, an era of rising nationalism, political aggrandizement, religious expansion and extravagant art patronage.

ARTH 270. American Art and Culture Before 1900 (3)
Survey of the development of American art from colonial times to the present which explores how art has expressed both American values and American anxieties. Painting is emphasized, but the course also considers architecture, the decorative arts, film, literature, and music. Cross-listed as AMST 270.

ARTH 271. American Art and Culture: The Twentieth Century (3)
Survey of the development of American art from 1900 to the present (and the future) which will explore how art has expressed both American values and American anxieties. Painting will be emphasized, but the course will also consider architecture, the decorative arts, film, literature, and music. Cross-listed as AMST 271.

ARTH 280. Modern Art and Modern Science (3)
An examination of the development of painting, sculpture, and architecture from the 19th to the mid 20th century. Special attention is given to the emergence of "modernism" and the influence of science on such movements as Impressionism and Cubism.

ARTH 284. History of Photography (3)
A survey of the history of photography from its inception in 1839 to the present. Emphasis is on the complex relationship between technological innovations and picture-making; the artistic, documentary, and personal uses of photography; and the relationship of photography to other art forms.

ARTH 290. Introduction to the Art of Sub-Saharan Africa (3)
Exploration of the diverse forms and multiple contexts of the visual arts of sub-Saharan Africa. Attention focused on the sculpture of different peoples of West and Central Africa. Ancient arts in terracotta and bronze of Nigeria, Mali, and Chad and rock art of Saharan, Southern, and Eastern Africa will also be explored. Topics such as the styles, aesthetics, meanings, and functions of African art and the training, techniques, and status of the African artist will be discussed.

ARTH 300. Childhood through Art (3)
This course will explore the imagery of children in art from its beginnings in ancient Egyptian sculpture up to the present with photographs by Mapplethorpe and Sally Mann. In order to develop a critical awareness of how children are portrayed and how the viewer is manipulated, students will study specific works of art in the Cleveland Museum of Art as well as examples from contemporary visual culture. Cross-listed as CHST 300.

ARTH 302. Buddhist Art in Asia (3)
The development of Buddhist art from its origins in India along the silk route to China and along the maritime routes to Japan and southeast Asia.

ARTH 303. History of Far Eastern Art (3)
A survey of traditional arts of Asia east of the Indus river, designed to emphasize the creative contributions of the artist with particular attention to the international relations of: the Bronze Age, Buddhist art, Hindu art and the later arts of China, Korea, and Japan. National and regional contributions to the developed styles of South Asia and the Far East will be stressed.

ARTH 305. The Art of India (3)
A survey of Indian art from the Indus valley civilization to the Islamic conquest of India. Stylistic developments of the three-dimensional arts examined through cave sites and other extant materials.

ARTH 306. History of Indian Sculpture (3)
The stylistic development of both Buddhist and Hindu schools of Indian sculpture from the prehistoric period to the 12th century. Sculptural images are studied in terms of Indian mythology and literature.

ARTH 328. Greek Sculpture (3)
Greek sculpture from the Archaic period through the Hellenistic; style, the development of specific types, and the uses of architectural sculpture. Cross-listed as CLSC 328.

ARTH 332. Art and Archaeology of Ancient Italy (3)
The arts of the Italian peninsula from the 8th century B.C. to the 4th century A.D., with emphasis on recent archaeological discoveries. Lectures deal with architecture, sculpture, painting, and the decorative arts; supplemented by gallery tours at the Cleveland Museum of Art. Cross-listed as CLSC 332.

ARTH 333. Greek and Roman Painting (3)
Greek vase painting, Etruscan tomb painting and Roman wall painting. The development of monumental painting in antiquity. Cross-listed as CLSC 333.

ARTH 334. Art and Classical Archaeology of Greece (3)
A survey of the art and architecture of Greece from the beginning of the Bronze Age (3000 B.C.) to the Roman conquest (100 B.C.) with emphasis on recent archaeological discoveries. Lectures deal with architecture, sculpture, painting and the decorative arts, supplemented by gallery tours at the Cleveland Museum of Art. Cross-listed as CLSC 334.

ARTH 340. Issues In Non-Western Art (3)
Various topics in non-western art. Lectures, discussions, and reports.

ARTH 350. Topics in Medieval Art (3)
Various topics in Medieval Art. Lectures, discussions, and reports.

ARTH 351. Late Gothic Art in Italy (3)
Sculpture of the Pisani; early trends in Pisa, Siena, and Florence; Cimabue and Giotto; Duccio, Simone Martini, and the Lorenzetti; painting in Florence and Siena after the Black Death.

ARTH 352. Italian Art of the 15th Century (3)
The early 15th century in Florence, civic humanism, the sculpture of Ghiberti and Donatello, the painting of Masaccio; the International Style in painting, the art of Uccello, Piero della Francesca, Mantegna, and Botticelli; Carpaccio and the Bellini in Venice.

ARTH 353. Sixteenth Century Italian Art (3)
The development of the High Renaissance and Mannerist styles in Italy and late 16th century trends: painting and sculpture.

ARTH 356. Italian Renaissance and Baroque Sculpture (3)
Italian sculpture from the early 12th century to the later 18th century. The Pisani, Ghiberti, Donatello, Michelangelo, the Mannerists and Bernini.

ARTH 361. Dutch and Flemish 17th Century Painting (3)
The golden age of Dutch and Flemish art with study of major masters (Rubens, Hals, Rembrandt, and Vermeer) and developments in subject matter: landscape, still-life, and genre themes.

ARTH 362. Issues in Renaissance Art (3)
Various topics in Renaissance art. Lectures, discussions and reports.

ARTH 365. Issues in Baroque Art (3)
Various topics in baroque art. Lectures, discussions and reports.

ARTH 367. 17th and 18th Century French Art (3)
A survey of the arts of painting, sculpture and architecture in France from 1600 to 1780. Attention will be given to stylistic developments and to social and political contexts, patronage and art theory.

ARTH 374. Impressionism to Symbolism (3)
Major developments in European painting and sculpture during the latter half of the nineteenth century. Post-impressionism synthetism, symbolism, and the arts and crafts movement considered in their socio-cultural contexts. Works of Degas, Manet, Monet, Klimt, Bocklin, Gauguin, etc.

ARTH 379. Issues in 19th Century Art (3)
Various topics in 19th century art, with class lectures, discussions and reports. Consult department for current topic.

ARTH 380. Abstract Expressionism and Its Aftermath (3)
An examination of the development and influences of Abstract Expressionism, including the impact on the Beat Generation and Pop Art.

ARTH 381. Neoclassicism to Realism (3)
The main developments of European art chiefly painting and sculpture from post-impressionism to the present; the nature of abstract art and the interrelationships between the visual arts and new developments in literature, philosophy, and science.

ARTH 382. Visions of Utopia: 20th Century European Art (3)
Major movements in early 20th century European painting and sculpture with utopian goals. Focus on the interrelationships between the visual arts and new developments in literature, philosophy, and sciences.

ARTH 383. Gender Issues in Feminist Art (3)
An in-depth thematic approach to issues affecting works of art by and about women. Focus on the late 20th century. Emphasis on a specifically modern use of feminine myths, subjects and modes of production, and feminist criticism.

ARTH 385. American Avant-Garde: 1900 - 1925 (3)
An examination of the development of avant-garde styles in New York during the early twentieth century. In-depth discussion of the Photo-secession, Stieglitz’s "291" gallery, the Armory Show, Marcel Duchamp’s move to America, and the formation and demise of the New York Dada movement.

ARTH 392. Issues in 20th Century Art (3)
Various topics in 20th century art, with class lectures, discussions and reports.

ARTH 393. Contemporary Art: Critical Directions (3)
An examination of the directions taken by avant-garde American art and criticism in the aftermath of Abstract Expressionism. Includes the rise and fall of modernism in the 1960s and ’70s, as well as an investigation of Post-modern trends and theories.

ARTH 396. Majors Seminar (3)
A group discussion course designed to focus on methodology and the relationship between art and contemporary society. Required of majors. Offered in alternate years.

ARTH 397. History of Prints and Printmaking (3)
Development of techniques and style and the social function of prints. The great masters: Durer, Rembrandt, Goya, and others. Based on the extensive collections of the Cleveland Museum of Art.

ARTH 398. Independent Study in Art History (1-3)
Individual research and reports on special topics.

ARTH 399. Honors Thesis (3)
Intensive study of a topic or problem leading to the preparation of an honors thesis.

Graduate Courses

ARTH 400. Childhood through Art (3)
(See ARTH 300.)

ARTH 402. Buddhist Art in Asia (3)
(See ARTH 302.)

ARTH 403. History of Far Eastern Art (3)
(See ARTH 303.)

ARTH 405. The Art of India (3)
(See ARTH 305.)

ARTH 406. History of Indian Sculpture (3)
(See ARTH 306.)

ARTH 428. Greek Sculpture (3)
(See ARTH 328.)

ARTH 432. Art and Archaeology of Ancient Italy (3)
(See ARTH 332.)

ARTH 433. Greek and Roman Painting (3)
(See ARTH 333.)

ARTH 434. Art and Classical Archaeology of Greece (3)
(See ARTH 334.)

ARTH 440. Issues in Non-Western Art (3)
(See ARTH 340.)

ARTH 450. Topics in Medieval Art (3)
(See ARTH 350.)

ARTH 451. Late Gothic Art in Italy (3)
(See ARTH 351.)

ARTH 452. Italian Art of the 15th Century (3)
(See ARTH 352.)

ARTH 453. Sixteenth Century Italian Art (3)
(See ARTH 353.)

ARTH 456. Italian Renaissance and Baroque Sculpture (3)
(See ARTH 356.)

ARTH 461. Dutch and Flemish 17th Century Painting (3)
(See ARTH 361.)

ARTH 462. Issues in Renaissance Art (3)
(See ARTH 362.)

ARTH 465. Issues in Baroque Art (3)
(See ARTH 365.)

ARTH 467. 17th and 18th Century French Art (3)
(See ARTH 367.)

ARTH 474. Impressionism to Symbolism (3)
(See ARTH 374.)

ARTH 479. Issues in 19th Century Art (3)
(See ARTH 379.)

ARTH 480. Abstract Expressionism and Its Aftermath (3)
(See ARTH 380.)

ARTH 481. Neoclassicism to Realism (3)
(See ARTH 381.)

ARTH 482. Visions of Utopia: 20th Century European Art (3)
(See ARTH 382.)

ARTH 483. Gender Issues in Feminist Art (3)
(See ARTH 383.)

ARTH 485. American Avant-Garde: 1900 - 1925 (3)
(See ARTH 385.)

ARTH 489. M.A. Qualifying Paper (3)
Individual research and intensive study of a specific topic in art history which culminates in a written M.A. Qualifying Paper. Prereq: 27 credit hours of Art History.

ARTH 490. Visual Arts and Museums (3)
Students who successfully complete this course may be considered for admission into ARTH 491A, a supervised internship in an art museum or gallery situation.

ARTH 491A. Visual Arts and Museums: Internship (1)
Prereq: ARTH 490.

ARTH 491B. Visual Arts and Museums: Internship (3)
Second semester of Internship; includes final project devised in consultation with Director of Museum Studies. Prereq: ARTH 490 and ARTH 491A.

ARTH 492. Issues in 20th Century Art (3)
(See ARTH 392.)

ARTH 493. Contemporary Art: Critical Directions (3)
(See ARTH 393.)

ARTH 494B. Ancient Art (1-3)
Directed reading. Consent of professor and department chair required before registering.

ARTH 494C. Medieval Art (1-3)
Directed reading. Consent of professor and department chair required before registering.

ARTH 494D. Renaissance and Baroque Art (1-3)
Directed reading. Consent of professor and department chair required before registering.

ARTH 494E. American Art (1-3)
Directed reading. Consent of professor and department chair required before registering.

ARTH 494F. Modern Art (1-3)
Directed reading. Consent of professor and department chair required before registering.

ARTH 495. Methodologies of Art History (3)
The study of art history as a discipline in its practical and theoretical aspects. Consideration given to research methods, style and historical context, and a critical examination of selected major art historical texts with a view to understanding traditional as well as recent approaches. Special attention is given to art historical writing, employing selected original works in the Cleveland Museum of Art. Required of first-year graduate students in the Ph.D. and Master’s programs.

ARTH 497. History of Prints and Printmaking (3)
(See ARTH 397.)

ARTH 512. Seminar in Ancient Art (3)

ARTH 518B. Seminar in Asian Art (3)

ARTH 540. Seminar in Non-Western Art (3)
Topics may include: African Art and The West, Africa: Symbolism and Ritual, The Classic Period in Mesoamerica, Andean Textiles.

ARTH 545B. Seminar in Medieval Art (3)

ARTH 550. Seminar: Issues in Western European Art (3)

ARTH 551. Seminar in Renaissance Art (3)

ARTH 552. Seminar in Baroque Art (3)

ARTH 565. Seminar in American Art (3)

ARTH 570. Seminar: 19th Century Art (3)

ARTH 575. Critical Theory Seminar (3)
In-depth study of controversial revisionist writings which demonstrate the strong impact of structuralist, poststructuralist, semiotic, Marxist, psychoanalytic, film, and gender theories on recent art historical discourse. Discussion of a wide range of current theoretical positions applied to visual and critical analysis of 19th and 20th century art works. Prereq: ARTH 495.

ARTH 576. Seminar in Modern Art (3)

ARTH 601. Research in Art History (1-18)
(Credit as arranged.)

ARTH 610. Cleveland Museum of Art Intern (1)
Prereq: ARTH 490.

ARTH 651. Thesis M.A. (1-18)

ARTH 701. Dissertation Ph.D. (1-18)
(Credit as arranged.)

ARTH 702. Appointed Dissertation Fellow (9)

ART EDUCATION/ART STUDIO (ARTS)

Undergraduate Courses

ARTS 101. Design and Color I (3)
Organizational and structural problems as a basis for the development of style. Studies in line, texture, shape, space, value, color, and two dimensional composition through studio problems.

ARTS 106. Creative Drawing I (3)
Development of graphic fluency in black and white through direct observation of nature and the model. Drawing as a means of enlarging visual sensitivity using a wide range of media and subject matter. Work from model.

ARTS 201. Design and Color II (3)
Continuation of ARTS 101. Composition: three-dimensional problems. Advanced work in the properties and uses of color and materials. Prereq: ARTS 101.

ARTS 206. Creative Drawing II (3)
Continuation of ARTS 106. Advanced work in graphic representation. Development of visual acuity and a personal drawing style while working in color. Work from the model. Prereq: ARTS 106.

ARTS 210. Enameling and Jewelry I (3)
Techniques in the application of vitreous enamel on copper and of constructed metal jewelry. Technical skill and suitability of design as applied to the medium.

ARTS 212. Weaving, Fibers, and Textiles I (3)
Basic techniques of weaving, macrame, and textile printing. Use of natural and synthetic fibers. Introduction to batik, quilting, and block printing on fabric.

ARTS 214. Ceramics I (3)
The techniques of hand building. Development of sensitivity to design and form. Basic work in stoneware, earthenware, and glazing.

ARTS 216. Painting I (3)
The creative, conceptual, visual, and technical aspects of painting. Style ranging from naturalism to abstraction. Work in acrylic and mixed media.

ARTS 220. Photography Studio I (3)
Camera, film, and darkroom techniques. Development of basic perceptual and photographic skills. Darkroom and photographic field and lab work. 35mm camera required.

ARTS 295. Introduction to Art Education (3)
General history and theories of art education. Development of personal philosophy as basis for teaching art. Topics in professional standards, creativity, aesthetic theory, and art criticism.

ARTS 300. Current Issues in Art Education (3)
Contemporary issues in Art Education; understanding art goals and standards of National Art Education Association and the Ohio State Department of Education for teachers, students and administrators. Special topics: art and technology, multiculturalism, and special populations. Prereq: ARTS 295.

ARTS 302. Architecture and City Design I (3)
The social spatial, and aesthetic elements in architecture; the components of the building: the window, door, roof, enclosing walls, and character of interior and exterior space. Problems related to small, intimate scale and residential structures. Lectures, field trips, studio experiences. Recommended ARTS 101 or ARTS 106 courses prior to enrollment.

ARTS 303. Architecture and City Design II (3)
The social, spatial, and aesthetic elements of the urban setting of architecture, the organizational components of the city, the path, the node, the edge, and the grid. Problems related to large-scale and public buildings and their relationship to the encompassing visual world. Lectures, field trips, studio experiences. Recommended ARTS 101 or ARTS 106 courses prior to enrollment.

ARTS 310. Enameling and Jewelry II (3)
Continuation of ARTS 210. Advanced enameling and jewelry techniques applied to copper or silver, cloisonne, champleve, basse taille, plique-jour. Creative use of design principles and jewelry techniques. Prereq: ARTS 210.

ARTS 312. Weaving, Fibers, and Textile II (3)
Continuation of ARTS 212. Development of a selected area of weaving or textiles: loom weaving tapestry, three dimensional work, batik, or fabric printing. Exploration of an area through design and execution of a series of projects. Prereq: ARTS 212.

ARTS 314. Ceramics II (3)
Continuation of ARTS 214. Problematic approach to technical aspects of ceramics; extensive experience in wheel throwing, experimentation with glaze and clay body formulation. Prereq: ARTS 214.

ARTS 316. Painting II (3)
Continuation of ARTS 216. Expansion of basic concepts treated in ARTS 216. Work in acrylic and mixed media. Development of personal style. Prereq: ARTS 216.

ARTS 320. Photography Studio II (3)
Continuation of ARTS 220. Advanced theory and black and white techniques, historic processes and theory. Development of personal aesthetic encouraged. Field work. 35mm camera required. Prereq: ARTS 220.

ARTS 322. Photography: Color Studio (3)
Personal expression through use of color photography. Introduction to color printing and processing techniques. History of the medium. Field and lab work. 35mm camera required. Prereq: ARTS 220.

ARTS 325. Creative Photography (3)
Creative photography through photographing and responding to photographs. The question of self-expression and photographic medium explored in the pursuit of understanding images. Prereq: ARTS 220 and ARTS 320 or ARTS 322.

ARTS 365A. Painting (3)
Advanced painting problems determined in consultation with instructor. Prereq: ARTS 216 and ARTS 316.

ARTS 365B. Design and Color (3)
Advanced design problem determined in consultation with instructor. Prereq: ARTS 101 and ARTS 201.

ARTS 365C. Enameling and Jewelry (3)
Advanced enameling and jewelry problems determined in consultation with instructor. Prereq: ARTS 210 and ARTS 310.

ARTS 365D. B&W Photography Studio (3)
Advanced black and white problems determined in consultation with instructor. Prereq: ARTS 220 and ARTS 320.

ARTS 365E. Color Studio (3)
Advanced color studio problems determined in consultation with instructor. Prereq: ARTS 220 and ARTS 320.

ARTS 365F. Creative Drawing (3)
Advanced multimedia drawing. Prereq: ARTS 106 and ARTS 206.

ARTS 365G. Ceramics (3)
Advanced ceramics problems determined in consultation with instructor. Prereq: ARTS 214 and ARTS 314.

ARTS 365H. Weaving, Fibers, and Textiles (3)
Advance textile problems determined in consultation with instructor. Prereq: ARTS 212 and ARTS 312.

ARTS 365K. Creative Photography (3)
Incorporates computer technologies and multimedia processes with photography. Prereq: ARTS 220 and ARTS 320 and ARTS 322.

ARTS 366A. Student Teaching in Art: Pre-K - 6th Grade (4)
Teaching art for early childhood, elementary, and middle school students in a school setting. Includes art curriculum development, implementation, and assessment. Professional standards and practices. Prereq: ARTS 295, ARTS 300, ARTS 385, ARTS 386, ARTS 387, and ARTS 393. Coreq: ARTS 366B and ARTS 465.

ARTS 366B. Student Teaching in Art: 7th - 12th Grade (4)
Teaching adolescents and young adults art in a school setting. Includes art curriculum development, implementation, and assessment. Professional standards and practices. Prereq: ARTS 295, ARTS 300, ARTS 385, ARTS 386, ARTS 387, and ARTS 393. Coreq: ARTS 366A and ARTS 465.

ARTS 385. Clinical/Field Based Experience I (1)
Art education students observe and assist art teachers in classes in a variety of public and private educational environments such as local schools, Cleveland Museum of Art, and Cleveland Children’s Museum. Students study, identify, and analyze differences in art curriculum taught at the various art programs that they observe. Written reports using departmental observation guidelines are required. Prereq: ARTS 295 or consent of Art Education director.

ARTS 386. Clinical/Field Based Experience II (1)
Art education students become sensitized to serving needs of "special" populations. Observation of educational strategies for teaching learning disabled and/or physically disabled students. Written reports using departmental observation guidelines required. Prereq: ARTS 295 or consent of Art Education director.

ARTS 387. Clinical/Field Based Experience III (1)
Art education students observe and assist in art programs for artistically gifted students working in specialized art areas (drawing, painting, sculpture, printmaking, art history). Written reports using departmental observation guidelines are required. Prereq: ARTS 295.

ARTS 393. Art Content, Pedagogy, Methodology, and Assessment (3)
Growth and development of image making from Pre-K through young adult. Principles and practices of art instruction in grades Pre-K through 12th grade. Issues in art education. Curriculum construction, implementation and assessment of art lessons that address content areas of art production, art history, art appreciation, and art criticism. Clinical field experiences required. Prereq: ARTS 295.

ARTS 399. Independent Study in Art Studio (1-3)
Prereq: Permit required from Director of Art Studio.

Graduate Courses

ARTS 400. Current Issues in Art Education (3)
(See ARTS 300.) Research paper required for graduate students.

ARTS 402. Architecture and City Design I (3)
(See ARTS 302.)

ARTS 403. Architecture and City Design II (3)
(See ARTS 303.)

ARTS 465. Seminar for Art Teachers (4)
For art education majors. Principles and practice in art instruction in grades Pre-K through 12th grade. Organization and management of the art program that incorporates production, art history, appreciation, and criticism into an integrated sequential curriculum. Planning, development, and evaluation of teaching materials, lessons, and units. Prereq: ARTS 295 or ARTS 602, and ARTS 393 or ARTS 493. Coreq: ARTS 366A and ARTS 366B or ARTS 466A and ARTS 466B.

ARTS 466A. Student Teaching in Art: Pre-K - 6th Grade (4)
(See ARTS 366A.) Prereq: ARTS 385, ARTS 386, ARTS 387, ARTS 400, ARTS 493, and ARTS 602. Coreq: ARTS 465 and ARTS 466B.

ARTS 466B. Student Teaching in Art: 7th - 12th Grade (4)
(
See ARTS 366B.) Prereq: ARTS 385, ARTS 386, ARTS 387, ARTS 400, ARTS 493, and ARTS 602. Coreq: ARTS 465 and ARTS 466A.

ARTS 493. Art Content, Pedagogy, Methodology, and Assessment (3)
(See ARTS 393.) Prereq: ARTS 602.

ARTS 494. Teaching Art (3)
Research contrasting theories of art education in relationship to a variety of educational settings in elementary and secondary schools. Developing innovative, interdisciplinary, comprehensive curriculum models for a specific organization. For licensed art teachers only. Prereq: Permit required from Director of Art Education.

ARTS 497. Summer Workshop in Art Education (3)
A current art education issue is covered in depth.

ARTS 602. Independent Study in Art Education (3)
General history and theories of art education. Development of personal philosophy as basis for teaching art. Topics in professional standards, creativity, aesthetic theory, and art criticism. Students must also produce an art education research paper. Clinical/Field experiences are required.

ARTS 605. Final Creative Thesis (1-3)
Students receive individual guidance for an approved self-designed project from program faculty members. A public exhibition or presentation is required. Prereq: Permit required from Director of Art Education.

Artificial Intelligence

508 Olin
Phone 216-368-2839
George W. Ernst, Director
E-mail: ernst@eecs.cwru.edu

PROGRAM FACULTY

George W. Ernst, Ph.D. (Carnegie Institute of Technology)
Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Randall D. Beer, Ph. D. (Case Western Reserve University)
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Michael S. Branicky, Ph.D. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Hillel J. Chiel, Ph.D. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
Professor of Biology

Grover C. Gilmore, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins University)
Professor of Psychology

Robert L. Greene, Ph.D. (Yale University)
Professor of Psychology

Gilles Klopman, Ph.D. (University of Brussels, Belgium)
Professor of Chemistry

Behnam Malakooti, Ph.D. (Purdue University)
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Francis L. Merat, Ph.D. (Case Western Reserve University)
Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Wyatt S. Newman, Ph.D. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Undergraduate Program

The program in artificial intelligence offers an undergraduate minor. The core of the minor introduces students to the techniques of artificial intelligence programming and the basic theoretical concepts of artificial intelligence, knowledge representation, and automated reasoning. Within the minor, a student may choose a track pertaining to science and engineering or a track pertaining to artificial intelligence and cognition. Students who take the science and engineering track will have the opportunity to build significant intelligent systems. They will acquire a solid understanding of methods for knowledge representation and automated reasoning. The science and engineering track provides an opportunity for a student to acquire knowledge that is useful in areas such as management and engineering.

The artificial intelligence and cognition track will give students the opportunity to explore the relationships between computational processes and the study of mind and language. Studies of the relationships between these areas have led to developments in robotics, mathematical neuroscience, visual processing systems, parallel processing systems, mathematical and experimental psychology, and linguistics.

A minor consists of five courses. Every student who takes the minor in artificial intelligence must take the two courses, ENGR 131 (Elementary Computer Programming) and EECS 391 (Introduction to Artificial Intelligence). Students who take the artificial intelligence minor must also take one of two minor tracks:

The Technology Track requires 3 of the following courses:

BIOL 373 Introduction to Neurobiology

BIOL 374 Neurobiology of Behavior

BIOL 477 Dynamics of Adaptive Behavior (cross listed as EECS 477)

BIOL 478 Computational Neuroscience (cross listed as EECS 478)

BIOL 479 Seminar in Computational Neuroscience (cross listed as EECS 479)

EECS 350 Industrial and Production Systems Engineering

EECS 352 Engineering Economics and Decision Analysis

EECS 360 Manufacturing, Operations and Automated Systems

EECS 375 Autonomous Robotics (cross listed as BIOL 375)

EECS 411 Logic Programming

EECS 475 Autonomous Robotics (cross listed as BIOL 475)

EECS 484 Computational Intelligence I: Basic Principles

EECS 487 Computational Intelligence II: Applications

EECS 489 Robotics I

EECS 491 Intelligent Systems I

EECS 531 Computer Vision for Industrial Applications

EECS 589 Robotics II

EECS 591 Intelligent Systems II

PHIL 201 Introduction to Logic

PHIL 306 Mathematical Logic

The Cognitive Science Track requires 3 of the following courses:

BIOL 373 Introduction to Neurobiology

BIOL 374 Neurobiology of Behavior

BIOL 477 Dynamics of Adaptive Behavior (cross listed as EECS 477)

BIOL 478 Computational Neuroscience (cross listed as EECS 478)

BIOL 479 Seminar in Computational Neuroscience (cross listed as EECS 479)

ENGL 301 Linguistic Analysis of Modern English

PHIL 201 Introduction to Logic

PHIL 306 Mathematical Logic

PSCL 101 General Psychology I

PSCL 352 Physiological Psychology

PSCL 353 Psychology of Learning

PSCL 355 Sensation and Perception

PSCL 357 Cognitive Psychology

PSCL 370 Human Intelligence

PSCL 402 Cognition and Information Processing

400- and 500-level courses require the approval of the minor advisor.

Asian Studies

106 Mather House
Phone 216-368-2623
Elisabeth Köll, Director (exk21@po.cwru.edu)

ADVISORY COMMITTEE

Elisabeth Köll, Ph.D. (Oxford University)
Assistant Professor, History
Director, Asian Studies Program
Modern China, Chinese business

William E. Deal, Ph.D. (Harvard University)
Severance Associate Professor of the History of Religion and Chair
Buddhism, Japanese and Chinese religions, ethics, methodology of religion, religion and culture

Linda C. Ehrlich, Ph.D. (University of Hawaii/East-West Center)
Associate Professor, Japanese and Comparative Literature
Cinema and art, emphasis on Asian (Japanese) cinema; traditional Asian theater; Japanese poetry; literature and film; cinema of Spain

Margaret M. Fitzgerald, M.A. (Ohio State University)
Lecturer, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures
Japanese language and culture

Melvyn C. Goldstein, Ph.D. (University of Washington)
John Reynolds Harkness Professor of Anthropology and Chair
Director, Center for Research on Tibet
Social anthropology; cross-cultural aging; cultural ecology; development; Tibet, China, Mongolia, Himalayas

Takao Hagiwara, Ph.D. (University of British Columbia)
Associate Professor, Japanese and Comparative Literature
Japanese literature, especially modern prose and poetry; classical and modern Japanese literature; pre-modern Japanese sensibilities and (post)modernism

Charlotte Ikels, Ph.D. (University of Hawaii)
Professor, Anthropology
Urban life, aging, intergenerational relations, health care, comparative biomedical ethics; China, Hong Kong, U.S.

Undergraduate Programs

Asian Studies has become an increasingly important area of study in North American colleges and universities. This is due in part to a growing acknowledgment that Asian cultures are of significance both regionally and globally. The Asian Studies Program offers students the opportunity to explore these cultures from a multidisciplinary perspective so that they are able to understand the social, cultural, political, and other forces that shape and have shaped these nations.

The Asian Studies Program brings together faculty with research and teaching interests in the histories and cultures of Asia, and provides students with a curriculum that offers several different approaches to the study of Asia. The Asian Studies Program is interdisciplinary, drawing faculty and courses from such departments as Anthropology, Art History and Art, Economics, Modern Languages and Literatures, History, Philosophy, Political Science, and Religion. A current list of approved courses is available from a Program advisor. Several Asian Studies courses contribute to the completion of the Arts and Sciences General Education Requirements.

The undergraduate program in Asian Studies offers a major, minor, and sequence. Students are encouraged to take courses in different disciplines in order to obtain broad exposure to the languages, literature, art, culture, religious traditions, and political, economic, and social institutions of Asian countries. Asian Studies also offers an honors program to qualified majors.

In addition to course offerings, the Asian Studies Program sponsors extracurricular activities that enhance the formal study of Asia and give students additional opportunities for exploring and understanding the importance of Asia in the global community. Extracurricular activities include sponsorship of lectures, films, and the administration of a Website devoted to Asia. The Program also encourages students to study abroad in an Asian country and to utilize local Asian resources at the Cleveland Museum of Art and other area institutions.

MAJOR (FOR B.A.)

The major in Asian Studies consists of two tracks. Students choose one of the two tracks. Track 1 requires a minimum of 37 credit hours and includes an Asian language requirement. Track 2, which does not require study of an Asian language, can only be taken as a second major. Both tracks require ASIA 133 and ASIA 134, and additional hours chosen from a list of approved courses available from a Program advisor. Students prepare a program of study, indicating specific course selections to meet the requirements for the chosen track. A Program advisor must approve a student’s program of study.

Track 1 (first major) - 37 semester hours total

• ASIA 133 and ASIA 134 (cross-listed as: HSTY 133 and HSTY 134)

• at least 16 hours in an Asian language

• 3 hours in Anthropology (Asia-related)

• 3 hours in Political Science or Economics (Asia-related)

• 3 hours in Religion (Asia-related)

• 6 additional hours (Asia-related) selected in consultation with a Program advisor

Track 2 (can only be taken as a second major) - 36 semester hours total

• ASIA 133 and ASIA 134 (cross-listed as: HSTY 133 and HSTY 134)

• 6 hours in Anthropology (Asia-related - suggested: ANTH 352 and ANTH 353)

• 6 hours in Religion (Asia-related - suggested: RLGN 204 and RLGN 217)

• 3 hours in Comparative Literature (Asia-related)

• 3 hours in Political Science or Economics (Asia-related)

• 12 additional hours (Asia-related) selected in consultation with a Program advisor

MINOR

The minor in Asian Studies consists of 18 semester hours of courses, including ASIA 133 or ASIA 134. The remaining 15 credit hours are selected in consultation with a Program advisor. Only one year (8 credits) of language study (Japanese or Chinese) counts toward the minor.

18 semester hours total

• ASIA 133 or ASIA 134 (cross-listed as: HSTY 133 or HSTY 134)

• 15 additional hours (Asia-related) selected in consultation with a Program advisor

• only one year (8 hours) of Asian language study counts toward the minor

SEQUENCE (ENGINEERING CORE)

The requirements for an Asian Studies sequence are satisfied with the completion of ASIA 133 or ASIA 134 and six additional semester hours of Asia-related courses chosen in consultation with a Program advisor.

9 semester hours total

• ASIA 133 or ASIA 134 (cross-listed as: HSTY 133 or HSTY 134)

• 6 additional hours (Asia-related) selected in consultation with a Program advisor

ASIAN STUDIES HONORS

Asian Studies Honors is a semester-long program for Asian Studies majors, normally taken during the senior year, involving the research and writing of an Honors Thesis. Honors Program requirements include the completion of ASIA 133 and ASIA 134, at least two semesters of study of an Asian language and two further content courses in Asian Studies, and maintenance of GPAs of at least 3.0 overall and 3.2 in Asian Studies courses. A participating student enrolls in Asia 398: Honors Thesis, and writes a thesis under the direction of a faculty member designated as the thesis director, in association with a second reader, who must be a member of the Asian Studies Program. A third reader, who need not be a member of the Asian Studies Program, is optional. Each student must maintain regular contact with the supervising faculty member in the various stages of the research and writing of the thesis. Detailed guidelines and deadlines for the course are available from the director of the Asian Studies Program.

ASIAN STUDIES (ASIA)

Undergraduate Courses

ASIA 110. Introduction to East Asian Culture and Society (3)
This course is an introduction to Chinese and Japanese culture and society from both contemporary and historical perspectives. Students will examine political, social, religious, artistic, literary, and other phenomena which have shaped these two East Asian nations. This course is both an introduction to China and Japan for non-majors, and a foundation for Asian Studies majors and minors pursuing further course work on East Asia.

ASIA 133. Introduction to Chinese History and Civilization (3)
(See HSTY 133.) Cross-listed as HSTY 133.

ASIA 134. Introduction to Japanese History and Civilization (3)
(See HSTY 134.) Cross-listed as HSTY 134.

ASIA 230. Asian Cinema and Drama (3)
(See CMPL 230.) Cross-listed as CMPL 230.

ASIA 284. Daily Life in Imperial China (3)
(See HSTY 284.) Cross-listed as HSTY 284.

ASIA 398. Honors Thesis (1-4)
Intensive study of a topic or problem under the direction of a faculty member, resulting in the preparation of an honors thesis. Prereq: Permission of program director.

ASIA 399. Independent Study (1-3)
Tutorial in Asian studies.

Department of Astronomy

422 A.W. Smith Building
Phone 216-368-3728; Fax 216-368-5406
R. Earle Luck, Chair
wsobs@grendel.astr.cwru.edu

FACILITIES

The Department of Astronomy operates the Kitt Peak Station near Tucson, Arizona, home of the Burrell Schmidt telescope. This telescope is used for deep surveys and imaging with large format CCDs. The 0.9m reflector located at the Nassau Station near Chardon, Ohio is remote control capable and equipped for both direct imaging and spectroscopy. A 9.5-inch refractor permanently mounted on the roof of the campus offices of the Department of Astronomy is available for use by students. The department also maintains a research and instruction computer laboratory.

FACULTY

R. Earle Luck, Ph.D. (University of Texas, Austin)
Worcester R. and Cornelia B. Warner Professor and Chair
Director of the Warner and Swasey Observatory

J. Christopher Mihos, Ph.D. (University of Michigan)
Associate Professor

Heather L. Morrison, Ph. D. (Australian National University)
Associate Professor

SECONDARY FACULTY

Lawrence M. Krauss, Ph.D. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
Ambrose Swasey Professor and Chair, Department of Physics

John E. Ruhl, Ph.D. (Princeton University)
Professor of Physics

Glenn Starkman, Ph.D. (Stanford University)
Associate Professor, Department of Physics

Undergraduate Programs

Two degrees in astronomy are offered, the Bachelor of Science degree and the Bachelor of Arts degree. The primary difference between the two degrees is that the B.A. degree allows somewhat more flexibility in choice of courses. Both the B.A. and B.S. degrees provide excellent preparation for graduate studies. There are also two minor programs in astronomy.

A broad and substantial background in physics and mathematics with introductory exposure to astronomy is emphasized in the astronomy curriculum. A faculty actively engaged in research provides first-rate instruction and opportunity for undergraduate involvement in research.

A bachelorís degree in astronomy is designed to prepare for graduate study in astronomy, but the holder of this undergraduate degree who seeks employment can fill the same jobs as physics and computer science majors.

Graduate Programs

The department offers graduate programs leading to the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in astronomy. Current research provides opportunities in optical observational astronomy and theoretical studies of galaxy interaction and formation. Prospective graduate students must submit scores on the Graduate Record Examination including the advanced physics test. Further information on the departmentís graduate programs, and details concerning financial aid, are available through the departmental office.

ASTRONOMY (ASTR)

Undergraduate Courses

ASTR 201. The Sun and its Planets (3)
An overview of the solar system; the planets and other objects that orbit about the sun and the sun itself as the dominant mass and the most important source of energy in the solar system. Concepts and the development of our knowledge will be emphasized. Not available for credit to astronomy majors.

ASTR 202. Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe (3)
Stellar structure, energy sources, and evolution, including red giants, white dwarfs, supernovae, pulsars, and black holes. Stellar populations in the Milky Way and external galaxies. The universe and its evolution. Not available to astronomy majors.

ASTR 203. Archaeoastronomy: Calendars, Barrows, and Megaliths (3)
To acquaint the student with the regular cycles of the Sun, Moon, planets, and stars. To show how ancient civilizations (and some not so ancient) have used those cycles to formulate calendars which are evidenced primarily by artifacts and ruins scattered over the entire Earth.

ASTR 204. Einstein’s Universe (3)
This course is intended to introduce the non-scientist to the concepts of modern cosmology–the structure and evolution of the universe. No mathematical background beyond simple algebra is needed.

ASTR 205. The Scale of the Universe (3)
The solar system, stars, and galaxies. Our place in the Universe. Cosmology and the evolution of the Universe. The use of physical laws to study the Universe. The scientific method–predictions and tests of scientific theory.

ASTR 221. Stars and Planets (3)
Stellar structure and energy production. Formation and evolution of stars. Supernovae, neutron stars, and black holes. Star clusters. Planetary systems and the detection of extrasolar planets. The application of physical laws to the study of the universe. Prereq: MATH 122 or MATH 126.

ASTR 222. Galaxies and Cosmology (3)
The Milky Way Galaxy. Structure, dynamics, and evolution of galaxies. Galaxy clusters and large scale structure of the Universe. Physical cosmology and the Big Bang. Evolution of the Universe. Prereq: ASTR 221 or consent of department.

ASTR 306. Astronomical Techniques (3)
Emphasis will be on acquisition of direct imaging and/or spectroscopic data at the 0.9 meter telescope and its subsequent reduction. Principles of optics applied to astronomical telescopes and instrumentation. Modern detector technology. Computational techniques will also be explored through projects emphasizing modeling of data, dynamical simulations of star clusters emphasizing modeling of data, dynamical simulations of star clusters and galaxies, or astronomical database mining. Prereq: ASTR 221 and ASTR 222.

ASTR 309. Senior Seminar I (1)
Selected topics in astronomy not covered ordinarily in courses. Presentation of talks by the students.

ASTR 310. Senior Seminar II (1)
Selected topics in astronomy not covered ordinarily in courses. Presentation of talks by students.

ASTR 311. Stellar Physics (3)
Radiative transfer, atomic and molecular opacities, and the observable properties of stars. Stellar interiors, nuclear processes, and energy generation. The evolution of stars of varying mass and production of the elements within supernovae explosions. Prereq: ASTR 222.

ASTR 323. The Local Universe (3)
The Milky Way Galaxy. Galaxy populations. Quantitative structure and dynamics of galaxies. The interstellar media of galaxies. Dark matter and stellar populations. The Local Group and Virgo cluster. Prereq: ASTR 222.

ASTR 328. Cosmology and the Structure of the Universe (3)
Distances to galaxies. The content of the distant universe. Large scale structure and galaxy clusters. Physical cosmology. Structure and galaxy formation and evolution. Testing cosmological models. Cross-listed as PHYS 328.

ASTR 369. Undergraduate Research (1-3)
Supervised research on topics of interest. Can be used as a thesis course if desired. Students may register more than once for a maximum of 9 credits overall (1-3 credits each semester). Prereq: Consent of department.

ASTR 396. Special Topics in Astronomy (1-3)
Open to astronomy majors only.

Graduate Courses

ASTR 409. Nucleosynthesis and Chemical Evolution (3)
Formation of the elements by stellar nucleosynthesis, especially within supernovae. The subsequent dispersal of this material into the interstellar medium and its incorporation into stars. The observable elemental content of stars and the relation of that content to the history and dynamics of the Galaxy. Prereq: Consent of department.

ASTR 411. Stellar Physics (3)
(See ASTR 311.)

ASTR 423. The Local Universe (3)
(See ASTR 323.)

ASTR 427. Dynamical Astronomy (3)
Gravitational dynamics of stars, star clusters, and galaxies. Dynamical evolution of gravitational systems. Dynamical equilibria, stability, and perturbation theory. Analytic and computational techniques. Prereq: Consent of department.

ASTR 428. Cosmology and the Structure of the Universe (3)
(See ASTR 328.) Cross-listed as PHYS 428.

ASTR 497. Special Topics in Astronomy (1-3)
Prereq: Consent of department.

ASTR 601. Research (1-18)
Original research under the guidance of the staff.

ASTR 651. Thesis M.S. (1-18)
(Credit as arranged.)

ASTR 701. Dissertation Ph.D. (1-18)
(Credit as arranged.)

ASTR 702. Appointed Dissertation Fellow (9)

ASTR 820. Hands-On Astronomy For Secondary School Teachers (2)
This course is designed to train secondary school teachers in the use of Hands-On Astronomy curriculum materials and resources. Programs included are the Hands-On Universe Project of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the Hands-On Astrophysics Project of the American Association of Variable Star Observers. Resources to be demonstrated and training provided for include the network of Hands-On Universe telescopes and specifically, the University’s 0.9 meter Robotic Telescope.

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE
MAJOR IN ASTRONOMY

Freshman Year

Credit Hours

Fall

MATH 121 Calculus for Science & Engineering I

(4)

or MATH 123 Calculus I

(4)

PHYS 121 General Physics I: Mechanics

(4)

ENGL 150 Expository Writing

(3)

PHED 101 Physical Education Activities

(0)

Social Science I

(3)

Arts & Humanities I

(3)

Spring

MATH 122 Calculus for Science & Engineering II

(4)

or MATH 124 Calculus II

(4)

PHYS 122 General Physics II: Electricity and Magnetism

(4)

PHED 102 Physical Education Activities

(0)

Social Science II

(3)

Arts & Humanities II

(3)

Sophomore Year

Fall

ASTR 221 Stars and Planets

(3)

MATH 223 Calculus for Science & Engineering III

(3) or

MATH 227 Calculus III

(3)

PHYS 221 General Physics III: Modern Physics

(3)

ENGR 131 Elementary Computer Programming

(3)

Arts & Humanities III

(3)

Spring

ASTR 222 Galaxies and Cosmology

(3)

MATH 224 Elementary Differential Equations

(3)

or MATH 228 Differential Equations

(3)

PHYS 250 Mathematical Physics & Computing

(3)

PHYS 310 Classical Mechanics

(3)

Arts & Humanities IV

(3)

Junior Year

Credit Hours

Fall

 

ASTR 311 Stellar Physics

(3) a

PHYS 313 Thermodynamics & Statistical Mechanics

(3)

STAT 312 Statistics for Science and Engineering

(3)

Technical Elective

(3)

Spring

ASTR 328 Cosmology and the Structure of the Universe

(3) a

PHYS 324 Electricity & Magnetism I

(3)

PHYS 326 Contemporary Physical Optics

(3)

Technical Elective

(3)

Senior Year

Fall

ASTR 306 Astronomical Techniques

(3) a

ASTR 309 Seminar I

(1)

PHYS 331 Quantum Mechanics I

(3)

Social Science III

(3)

Spring

ASTR 310 Senior Seminar II

(1)

Science & Society

(3)

Cultural Diversity

(3)

Minors in Astronomy

 

For non-physical science majors: ASTR 221, 222; PHYS 115, 116, and 1 of the following: (ASTR 306, 311, 323, 328).

For physical science majors: ASTR 221, 222, and 3 of the following: (ASTR 306, 311, 323, 328).

Approved Technical Electives - B. A. In Astronomy

(This is not an exhaustive list)

CHEM 107 Properties and Structure of Matter I

CHEM 108 Properties and Structure of Matter II

PHYS 204 Advanced Instrumentation Lab

PHYS 316 Introduction to Nuclear and Particle Physics

PHYS 325 E&M II

PHYS 332 QM II

Total Hours In Core and Departmental Requirements: 104

Open Electives to be added as appropriate to bring the total number of hours to the minimum of 120 needed for graduation with a B.A.

Nine hours of Mathematics and Natural Science (Physics) double counted toward General Education Requirement.

Astronomy Hours: 17

Physics Hours: 29

Math/Stat Hours: 17

Technical Electives Hours: 9

Technical Electives are additional courses in astronomy, chemistry, mathematics, statistics, physics, or geology which satisfy interests of the student but also fall within the science/mathematics objectives of the major. For a list of approved technical electives see advisor.

a. 1300 level Astronomy Courses: 3 of the following 4 are required: (ASTR 306, 311, 323, 328)

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ASTRONOMY DEGREE

Freshman Year

(Class-Lab-Credit Hours)

Fall

MATH 121 Calculus for Science & Engineering I

(4-0-4) or

MATH 123 Calculus I

(4-0-4)

PHYS 121 General Physics I - Mechanics

(4-0-4) a

ENGL 150 Expository Writing

(3-0-3)

PHED 101 Physical Education Activities

(0-3-0)

Arts & Humanities I

(3-0-3)

Social Science I

(3-0-3)

Total:

17-3-17

Spring

MATH 122 Calculus for Science & Engineering II

(4-0-4) or

MATH 124 Calculus II

(4-0-4)

PHYS 122 General Physics II: Electricity & Magnetism

(4-0-4) a

PHED 102 Physical Education Activities

(0-3-0)

Arts & Humanities II

(3-0-3)

Social Science II

(3-0-3)

Total:

14-3-14

Sophomore Year

Fall

ASTR 221 Stars and Planets

(3-0-3)

MATH 223 Calculus for Science & Engineering III

(3-0-3) or

MATH 227 Calculus III

(3-0-3)

PHYS 203 Laboratory Physics

(2-4-4)

PHYS 221 General Physics III: Modern Physics

(3-0-3) a

ENGR 131 Elementary Computer Programming

(3-0-3)

Total:

14-4-16

Spring

ASTR 222 Galaxies and Cosmology

(3-0-3)

MATH 224 Elementary Differential Equations

(3-0-3) or

MATH 228 Differential Equations

(3-0-3)

PHYS 204 Advanced Instrumentation Lab

(1-4-4)

PHYS 250 Mathematical Physics & Computing

(3-0-3)

PHYS 310 Classical Mechanics

(3-0-3)

Total:

13-4-16

Junior Year

(Class-Lab-Credit Hours)

Fall

ASTR 311 Stellar Physics

(3-0-3) b

PHYS 313 Thermodynamics & Statistical Mechanics

(3-0-3)

STAT 312 Statistics for Science and Engineering

(3-0-3)

Technical Elective

(3-0-3)

Arts & Humanities III

(3-0-3)

Total

15-0-15

Spring

ASTR 328 Cosmology and the Structure of the Universe

(3-0-3) b

PHYS 324 Electricity & Magnetism I

(3-0-3)

PHYS 326 Physical Optics

(3-0-3)

Technical Elective

(3-0-3)

Science & Society

(3-0-3)

Total:

15-0-15

Senior Year

Fall

ASTR 306 Astronomical Techniques

(3-0-3) b

ASTR 309 Senior Seminar I

(1-0-1)

PHYS 325 Electricity & Magnetism II

(3-0-3)

PHYS 331 Quantum Mechanics I

(3-0-3)

Social Science III

(3-0-3)

Cultural Diversity

(3-0-3)

Total:

16-0-16

Spring

ASTR 310 Senior Seminar II

(1-0-1)

ASTR 323 The Local Universe

(3-0-3) b

PHYS 332 Quantum Mechanics II

(3-0-3)

Technical Elective

(3-0-3)

Arts & Humanities IV

(3-0-3)

Technical Elective

(3-0-3)

Total:

16-0-16

Total Hours Required for Graduation: 125

Nine hours of Mathematics and Natural Science (Physics) double counted toward General Education Requirement.

Astronomy Hours: 20

Physics Hours: 43

Math/Stat Hours 17

Technical Electives Hours 12

Technical Electives are additional courses in astronomy, chemistry, mathematics, statistics, physics, or geology which satisfy interests of the student but also fall within the science/mathematics objectives of the major. For a list of approved technical electives see advisor.

Approved Technical Electives - B. S. In Astronomy

(This is not an exhaustive list)

GEOL 345 Planetary Materials

MATH 201 Introduction to Linear Algebra

MATH 345 Introduction to Applied Mathematics

PHYS 316 Introduction to Nuclear and Particle Physics

PHYS 349 Methods of Mathematical Physics I

PHYS 350 Methods of Mathematical Physics II

Minors in Astronomy

For non-physical science majors: ASTR 221, 222; PHYS 115, 116; and 1 of the following: ASTR 306, 311, 323, or 328.

For physical science majors: ASTR 221, 222, and 3 of the following ASTR 306, 311, 323, or 328.

a. Selected students may be invited to take PHYS 123, 124, 223 in place of 121, 122, 221.

b. Courses taught every other year only.