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WESTERN RESERVE STUDIES SYMPOSIUM

 

3rd Annual

Western Reserve Studies Symposium

TRANSPLANTING AND INNOVATING:

NEW PATTERNS ON THE RESERVE, 1830-1880

Lake Erie College

Painesville, Ohio

November 6-7, 1988

Nineteenth Century Cleveland: From New England Village To Polyglot Metropolis
Henry B. Leonard, Kent State University

Oral History And Multi-Cultural Education: Finding Our Place In Cleveland's Global Village
Edward M. Miggins, Cuyahoga Community College

A Second New England In The West: Real Or Imaginary?
Harry F. Lupold, Lakeland Community College

Lake Ports West Of The Cuyahoga, 1820-1880: The Development Of A Sub-Region Within The Reserve
Robert Wheeler, Cleveland State University

Challenges Of Commerce: Changing Town Patterns In The Western Reserve, 1840-1875
William E. Busta, Case Western Reserve University

North Broadway: From A New England Farming Community To A Bohemian-Urban Neighborhood
Dale Thomas. Bay Village Schools

The Yankee School Teacher: Transmission Of The Culture
Rita S. Saslaw, The University of Akron

Women Enter Medicine In The Western Reserve: The Graduation Of The First Six Women Doctors From Western Reserve College, 1852-1856
Linda L. Goldstein, Case Western Reserve University

Western Reserve Women And The U.S. Sanitary Commission, 1861-1865
Virginia Gunn, The University of Akron

Constance Fenimore Woolson And The Next Country
Carolyn VenBergen, University of Rochester

A New Variety, Try One: The Art Of De Scott Evans
Nannette V. Maciejunes, Columbus Museum of Art

Quilts In The Western Reserve
Ricky Clark, Oberlin College

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Transplanting and Innovating: New Patterns On The Reserve, 1830-1880, the third in the series of Western Reserve Studies Symposia was held on November 6-7, 1987 at Lake Erie College.
This Symposium was designed to advance chronologically the study of the Western Reserve and focus on a region in transition. The frontier had moved westward leaving behind settled communities marked by historic New England ties and transplanted New England roots. Over the years 1830-1880, new migrants created patterns and new forces that shaped and redefined the identity of the Western Reserve.

The Lake Erie College Press Western Reseme Studies: A Journal of Regional History and Culture publishes the proceedings of the Symposium Transplanting and Imovating: New Patterns On The Reserve, 1830-1880 with the generous support of the Harriet B. Storrs Fund and individual contributions of Ffi~ of the Western Reserve. Gladys Haddad of Lake Erie College and David Anderson of Hiram College are co-editors.

 

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LAKE ERIE COLLEGE PRESS
Editorial Board

Gladys Haddad, Director
Egidio Lunardi, Business Manager

Paul Belanger
James Liotta
Maria Martinez
Jake Rufli
Richard Sokolowski

WESTERN RESERVE STUDIES: A JOURNAL OF REGIONAL HISTORY AND CULTURE is an annual publication of the LAKE ERIE COLLEGE PRESS.

 

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Contributers and Editors
DAVID ANDERSON is Professor of English at Hiram College and an editor of the Hiram Poetry Review and Festschrift where his articles also appear. He is a contributor to Western Reserve Studies: A Journal of Regional History and Cu!ture and co-editor of the 1987 and 1988 issues.

WILLIAM E. BUSTA is a Ph.D. candidate in American Studies at Case Western Reserve University. He has directed Clevelands New Organization for the Visual Arts and assisted at the Dittrick Museum of Historical Medicine and the Western Reserve Historical Society.

RICKY CLARK is a Research Associate at Oberlin College. An embroiderer and quiltmaker, she is a founder of the Ohio Quilt Research Project. She was the curator and author of the catalogue for the exhibition QuiIts and Carousels: Folk Art in the Firelands at the Firelands Association for the Visual Arts Gallery. She was the curator for the Lake Erie College, B. K. Smith Gallery exhibition "Western Reserve Quilts, 1830-1880.

LINDA L. GOLDSTEIN is Director of Corporate and Foundation Relations for the School of Medicine at Case Western Reserve University where she is a Ph.D. candidate in American Studies. She was a contributor to Ordinary Women/Extraordinary Lives: An Anthology.

VIRGINIA GUNN is Associate Professor of clothing and textde arts in the School of Home Economics and Family Ecology at the University of Akron where she is a Ph.D. candidate in History. She is curator of the Universitys historic costume, textile, and Hower House collections. She is a textile consultant for the Summit County Historical Society and director of the American Quilt Study group.

GLADYS HADDAD is Professor of American Studies at Lake Erie College and Director of The Lake Erie College Press which publishes Western Reserve Studies: A Journul of Regional History and Culture. She is the project director for the Western Reserve Studies Symposia, She is a humanities scholar for the National Endowment for the Humanities program Common Ground: The Migration of Yankee Culture from Seacoast to Western Reserve, 1790-1860. She has published in The Gamut, The Western Reserve Magazine and The Encyclopedia of Cleveland History. She is co-editor and author of Ohios Western Reserve: A Regional Reader.

HENRY B. LEONARD is Associate Professor of History at Kent State University. He has published on Clevelands immigrants for the Catholic Historical Review, Labor History, and The Encyclopedia of Cleveland History.

HARRY F. LUPOLD is Professor of History at Lakeland Community College. He has published in The Negro History Bulletin, Inland Seas, Ohioana Quarterly, The Western Reserve Magazine, and The Encyclopedia of Cleveland History. He is the author of The Latch String Is Out: A Pioneer History of Lake County, Ohio, and The Forgotten People: The Woodland Erie. He is co-editor and author of Ohios Western Reserve: A Regional Reader.

NANNETTE V. MACIEJUNES is Assistant Curator and Director of the Lute Project at the Columbus Museum of Art. She was curator and author of the catalogue for A New Variety, Try One: The Art of De Scott Evans, and curator for Plus Prints: Painters and Sculptors as Printmakers and The Early Works of Charles E. Burchfield at the Columbus Museum of Art.

EDWARD M. MIGGINS is Associate Professor of History at Cuyahoga Comunity College and was research director for the Cleveland Public Library's Heritage Program. His publications include A Guide to Studying Neighborhoods and Resources on Cleveland, The Ethnic Mosaic: The Settlement of Cleveland by the New Immigrants and Migrants, Cleveland: A City of Uplifting Influences: From Sweet Charity to Modern Social Welfare and Philanthropy and, The Search for the One Best System: Cleveland Public Schools and Education Reform, 1830-1920 in Cleveland: A Tradition of Reform. He is co-editor of The Birth of Modern Cleveland, 1865-1929 and a contributor to The Encyclopedia of Cleveland History.

RITA S. SASLAW is Professor of Education and Chair of the Foundations Department at the University of Akron. She has published in Educational Studies, History of Education Quarterly and Educational Horizons. She is a contributor to the National Endowment for the Humanities program Common Ground: The Migration of Yankee Culture from Seacoast to Western Reserve, 1790- 1860.

DALE THOMAS is a teacher of American History at Bay Village High School. His research interests are in Cleveland neighborhoods and ethnicity.

CAROLYN VANBERGEN is a Ph.D. candidate in English at the University of Rochester. Her dissertation is titled Constance Fenimore Woolson: Local Color and Womens Writing. She has taught at the Eastman School of Music and the University of Rochester.

ROBERT WHEELER is Associate Professor of History at Cleveland State university. He is the author of a series of articles on Western Reserve agriculture, industry, towns and culture from 1800 to 1860 published in The Western Reserve Magazine. He wrote Pleasantly Situated On the West Side: An Economic and Social History of the Ohio city Area 1800-1878. He is a contributor to The Encyclopedia of Cleveland History.

For more information call Professor Gladys Haddad, Symposium Director, at
Case Western Reserve University (216) 368-4117,
or email Professor Haddad