um)

 Program Description

For complete guidelines see http://www.neh.gov/grants/grantsbydivision.html

Faculty Humanities Workshops

September 15, 2006

Projects Begin: April 07

$30,000 for program serving a single institution

$75,000 for program serving multi-institutions or region

Grants support local and regional professional development programs for K-12 teachers and faculty at post-secondary institutions. Workshops should: (1) extend and deepen knowledge of the humanities by fostering collaborative study of significant topics, texts, and issues; (2) provide faculty with the opportunity to engage in rigorous intellectual inquiry; (3) involve scholars from outside the institution(s) who are experts on the topic of the workshop; (4) use creative formats and programs to engage faculty members; and (5) advance the study and teaching of the humanities at the participating institution(s). Proposals to provide workshops for teachers with limited access to professional development in the humanities are encouraged. Funds may be used to pay for visiting scholars, books and other materials, logistical support, and appropriate release time for project staff.

Grants for Teaching and Learning Resources and Curriculum Development

October 2, 2006

Projects Begin: Apr 07

$100,000 for Curriculum Dev.

$200,00 for Materials Dev.

Grants support projects to improve specific areas of humanities education and are intended to serve as national models. NEH is especially interested in projects that offer solutions to problems frequently encountered by teachers. Projects may: (1) help schools, colleges, and universities develop (or revise) and implement significant humanities programs, curricula, courses, and materials for teaching and learning; (2) develop and apply technologies to integrate outstanding humanities scholarship into teaching and learning at all levels of K-12 and higher education; or (3) provide materials and tools to ensure that future teachers acquire advanced knowledge and understanding of the humanities. Two types of grants are available: (1) Curriculum development project grants are typically given to collaborations of faculty within individual institutions or from cooperating schools, colleges, and universities, and/or with libraries, museums, and regional/national consortia.  Goal is to prepare, implement, and evaluate new or revised curricula that can serve as national models. Projects must produce specific teaching and learning resources and include plans for maintaining or expanding the results of the grant after the funding ends. (2) Materials development projects involve groups of teachers and scholars working collaboratively to create resources such as sourcebooks, document collections, or teaching guides on specific humanities topics and texts, which will have a significant impact on humanities instruction nationwide. Eligible materials may be in print or electronic formats. Applicants may design, produce, and test interactive educational software and other electronic technologies capable of running on multiple platforms and must include provisions for long-term access and maintenance. Traditional textbooks are not eligible.

Summer

Seminars and Institutes

March 1, 2007

Projects Begin: Sum 08

$45,000-$120,000 for Seminars

$80,000-$200,000 for Institutes

These grants support national faculty development programs in the humanities for school teachers, and for college and university faculty. Seminars and institutes may be as short as two weeks or as long as six weeks. Goals are to: (1) extend and deepen knowledge and understanding of the humanities by focusing on significant topics, texts, and issues; (2) enhance the intellectual vitality and professional development of participants; (3) build a community of inquiry and provide models of excellent scholarship and teaching; and (4) promote effective links between teaching and research in the humanities.  Seminars for university faculty (15 participants) enable participants with related interests to conduct scholarly research or focused study under the direction of an expert. Institutes for university faculty (25-30 participants) focus on a topic of major importance in undergraduate curricula.

III. Preservation and Access Grants Relevant to Faculty (not Libraries)

Fellowship/Grant

Application Deadline

Award Amount

 Program Description

For complete guidelines see http://www.neh.gov/grants/grantsbydivision.html

Grants to Preserve and Create Access to Humanities Collections

July 17, 2006

Projects Begin: May 07

$50,000-$350,000

These grants support projects to preserve and create intellectual access to collections, which, because of their intellectual content and value as cultural artifacts, are considered highly important for research, education, and public programming in the humanities. Collections may include, but are not limited to, books, journals, newspapers, manuscript and archival materials, maps, still and moving images, sound recordings, and objects of art and material culture. Eligible activities include: (1) processing archival and manuscript collections; (2) cataloging printed works, photographs, recorded sound, and moving image collections;  (3) documentation of art and material culture collections; (4) preservation reformatting (including brittle books and serials microfilming projects), conservation treatment, and deacidification of collections; (5) digitization of collections to enhance their accessibility; (6) development of archival oral histories; and (7) cataloging and microfilming of United States newspapers.

Reference

Materials

Grants

July 17, 2006

Projects Begin: May 07

$150,000-

$325,000  For two years

Grants support projects to create reference works and research tools, such as databases and electronic archives; print and online encyclopedias; historical, etymological, and bilingual dictionaries that document a language, as well as reference grammars and other linguistic tools; tools for GIS analysis; and descriptive catalogs. Scholarly editions are not eligible in this program, but are funded in the program below.

Scholarly

Editions Grants

November 1, 2006

Projects Begin: Jul 07

$50,000-$100,000

Scholarly Editions Grants support the preparation by a team of at least two editors and staff of texts and documents that are currently inaccessible or available in inadequate editions. Projects involving significant literary, philosophical, and historical materials are typical in this grant program, but other types of work, such as musical notation, are also eligible. NEH invites proposals to digitize and publish in electronic form existing completed print or microfilm editions, or completed series within larger projects. Not eligible for funding are textbooks intended primarily for classroom use

Documenting Endangered Languages

September 15, 2006

Projects Begin: May 07

18-22 awards from $2M total

Joint Program of NEH/NSF/Smithsonian Institution that supports projects to develop and advance knowledge concerning endangered human languages.  Made urgent by the imminent death of an estimated half of the 6000-7000 currently used human languages, this effort aims also to exploit advances in information technology.  Funding will support fieldwork and other activities relevant to recording, documenting, and archiving endangered languages, including the preparation of lexicons, grammars, text samples, and databases. Funding will be available in the form of one- to three-year project grants as well as fellowships for up to twelve months.  At least half the available funding will be awarded to projects involving fieldwork.


IV. Challenge Grants

Fellowship/Grant

Application Deadline

Award Amount

 Program Description

For complete guidelines see http://www.neh.gov/grants/grantsbydivision.html

Challenge Grants

May 1, 2006

November 1, 2006

$30,000-$1,000,000

on a 1:3 match

(must raise 3 times the challenge grant amount)

NEH challenge grants help institutions and organizations secure long-term improvements in and support for their humanities programs and resources. Challenge grant funds should not merely replace funds already being expended on the humanities, but instead should reflect careful strategic planning to strengthen and enhance the institution's activities in and commitment to the humanities.

Institutions may use the income from invested funds to meet ongoing humanities-related costs. Examples include:

  • faculty and staff positions,
  • fellowships,
  • lecture or exhibition series,
  • visiting scholars or consultants,
  • publishing subventions,
  • maintenance of facilities,
  • faculty and staff development,
  • acquisitions, and
  • preservation/conservation programs.

Challenge grant funds can be used for fundraising costs totaling no more than 10% of grant funds; and as bridging support, where the challenge grant provides for endowment income to meet the same expenses in the future. Bridging funds up to the equivalent amount of projected endowment income may be used to cover expenses during the grant period, while the endowment is being established.

Challenge grant funds cannot be used for:

  • direct expenditures for operations or programs,
  • recovery of indirect costs,
  • awards or stipends for students below the graduate level, or
  • support for short-term projects eligible for grants from other NEH programs.

We the People

Challenge Grants

February 1, 2007

$300,000 to

$1,000,000 on 1:3 match

As part of its We the People initiative, NEH invites proposals for challenge grants designed to help institutions and organizations secure long-term improvements in and support for humanities activities focused on exploring significant themes and events in American history. NEH is particularly interested in projects that advance knowledge of the founding principles of the United States in their full historical and institutional context. We the People challenge grant funds should not merely replace funds already being expended on the humanities, but instead should reflect careful strategic planning to improve and strengthen the institution's activities in and commitment to the teaching, studying, and understanding of our nation's history, institutions, and culture. Grants may be used to support construction and renovation, purchase of equipment, acquisitions, and conservation of collections; and to establish or enhance endowments that generate income for such program activities as faculty and staff positions, fellowships, lecture or exhibition series, visiting scholars, publishing subventions, consultants, maintenance of facilities, faculty development, acquisitions, and preservation.

V. Public Programs

Fellowship/Grant

Application Deadline

Award Amount

 Program Description

For complete guidelines see http://www.neh.gov/grants/grantsbydivision.html

Consultation Grants for Museums, Libraries, and Special Projects

September 12, 2006

Projects Begin: April 2007

$10,000 for six-twelve months

Grants support the development of new public humanities project or chart a new interpretive direction of an existing program. They support the costs of conferring with a team of advisors to help identify key humanities themes and questions during the early stages of a project's development. Public humanities programs promote lifelong learning for broad public audiences in fields such as history, literature, comparative religion, and philosophy, and other fields of the humanities.   Grants can be used for meeting with advisors, program partners, and representatives of target audiences or other groups involved in the project, including reasonable costs associated with these consultation activities (e.g., honoraria, long-distance telephone charges, special research, etc); traveling to relevant collections or sites to learn from other similar projects and consult with advisors; identifying advisors and other collaborating organizations for subsequent stages of the project; developing a preliminary plan for the format and design of a project; or conducting preliminary audience evaluation.

Implementation for Special Projects

February 5, 2007

Projects Begin: Oct 2007

Up to $300,000 for 24-36 months

Grants support a variety of public humanities program formats, including public discussion forums, hands-on learning experiences, discussion series based on reading or film-viewing, multi-faceted conferences, or symposia. Small exhibitions or interpretive publications might serve as common texts for such programs. Special Projects may take place at diverse venues. The audiences might be the general public or non-academic group.  Support is available for final consultation with scholars or other advisers; exhibition fabrication; website development; companion publication costs; publicity and promotional expenses; presentation and distribution of public programs and related materials; and audience evaluation

Planning Grants for Museums, Libraries, and Special Projects

September 12, 2006

Projects Begin: May 2007

Up to $40,000 for about 12 months

Planning Grants are used to refine the content and interpretive approach of projects prior to implementation. Public humanities programs promote lifelong learning in history, literature, comparative religion, philosophy, and other fields of the humanities for broad public audiences. Planning grants support all activities connected with project planning, including: meetings with advisers, program partners, and representatives of target audiences or other groups involved in the project; preliminary audience evaluation; travel to collections, sites, or to other resources; drafting of text for labels, exhibitions, brochures, publications, or other interpretive materials; design of the preliminary exhibitions and/or website; and general preparation of the associated programs and materials for dissemination.