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ETHNIC STUDIES PROGRAM

  ETHS

 

Ethnic Studies Minor

FALL 2009

ETHS Courses

Description

Section

Days & Times

Room (Capacity)

Instructor

ETHS  251 - 
Perspectives in Ethnicity, Race, Religion and Gender

100-LEC(3264)

TuTh 1:15PM - 2:30PM

Clark Hall 302 (40)

Alice Bach

ETHS  262 - 
African-American History Since 1945

100-LEC(10337)

TuTh 1:15PM - 2:30PM

Clark Hall 103 (10)

Rhonda Williams

ETHS  335 - 
Women in Developing Countries

100-LEC(10413)

TuTh 1:15PM - 2:30PM

Clark Hall 308 (30)

Cheryl Toman

ETHS  339 - 
Black Women and Religion

100-SEM(16739)

TuTh 2:45PM - 4:00PM

Sears 350 (32)

Joy Bostic

Concentrations:

 

Concentration in African-American Studies:

ETHS 262: African American History Since 1945   (3)

  • TTh 1:15 - 2:30 PM, Clark Hall 103
  • Instructor: Rhonda Williams
  • Associate Professor of History
  • Office: Mather House
  • Phone: 368-2515

Completes the three-term sequence of the African American history survey (although the first two courses are not prerequisites for this course). Explores some of the key events and developments shaping African-American social, political, and cultural history since 1945.
Offered as HSTY 262 and ETHS 262.

ETHS 339-100: Black Women and Religion   (3)

  • TTh 2:45 - 4:00 PM, Sears 350
  • Instructor: Joy Bostic
  • Associate Professor of Religion
  • Office: Mather House
  • Phone:

This course is an exploration of the multidimensional religious experiences of black women in the United States. These experiences will be examined within particular historical periods and across diverse social and cultural contexts. Course topics and themes include black women and slave religion, spirituality and folk beliefs, religion and feminist/womanist discourse, perspectives on institutional roles, religion and activism, and spirituality and the arts.
Offered as ETHS 339, RLGN 338 and WGST 339.

Other courses :

ETHS 251: Perspectives in Ethnicity, Race, Religion and Gender   (3)

  • TTh 1:15 - 2:30 PM, Clark Hall 302
  • Instructor: Alice Bach
  • Office:
  • Phone:

This course is designed to introduce students to the study of ethnicity. Basic concepts such as race, gender, class, and identity construction will be examined. Students are encouraged to use the tools and perspectives of several disciplines to address the experiences of ethnic groups in the United States.
Offered as ETHS 251 and RLGN 251.

ETHS 335: Women in Developing Countries   (3)

  • TTh 1:15 - 2:30 PM, Clark Hall 308
  • Instructor: Cheryl Toman
  • Assistant Professor of Modern Languages and Literature
  • Office: Guilford House
  • Phone: 368-2233

This course will feature case studies, theory, and literature of current issues concerning women in developing countries primarily of the French-speaking world. Discussion and research topics include matriarchal traditions and FGM in Africa, the Tunisian feminist movement, women, Islam, and tradition in the Middle East, women-centered power structures in India (Kerala, Pondichery), and poverty and women in Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia. Guest speakers and special projects are important elements of the course. Seminar-style format, taught in English, with significant disciplinary writing in English for WGST, ETHS, and some WLIT students, and writing in French for FRCH and WLIT students. Writing assignments include two shorter essays and a substantial research paper.
Offered as ETHS 335, FRCH 335, WLIT 335, WGST 335, FRCH 435 and WLIT 435.

 

 

SPRING 2009

ETHS Courses

Description
Days & Times
Room
Instructor
ETHS 218 - Jews in Early Modern Europe TuTh 2:45PM - 4:00PM Mather House 107 Gillian Weiss
ETHS 234 - France and Islam M 4:00PM - 6:30PM Clark Hall 110 Gillian Weiss
ETHS 235 - Theater and Identity TuTh 10:00AM - 11:15AM Clark Hall 110 Gilbert Doho
ETHS 251A - Oral Performances and Ethnic Identities TuTh 2:45PM - 4:00PM Clark Hall 110 Gilbert Doho
ETHS 252B - Introduction to Latina/o Studies MW 12:30PM - 1:45PM Clark Hall 104 Jacqueline Nanfito
ETHS 295 - The Francophone World TuTh 1:15PM - 2:30PM Clark Hall 103 Cheryl Toman
ETHS 301 - Women, Creativity and the Arts TuTh 2:45PM - 4:00PM Guilford House 317 Cheryl Toman
ETHS 316/416 - African Political Thought TuTh 1:15PM - 2:30PM Mandel Center 107 Laura Hengehold
ETHS 318 - History of Black Women in the U.S. M 2:00PM - 4:30PM Sears 541 Laila Haidarali
ETHS 336 - The Struggle for Justice in Latin America TuTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM Clark Hall 104 Marixa Lasso
ETHS 366 - Government and Politics of Africa TuTh 1:15PM - 2:30PM White Building 324 Elliot Posner
ETHS 399 - Independent Study TBA To Be Announced Alice Bach

Concentrations:

Concentration in African Studies:

ETHS 316 or 416: African Political Thought  (3)

  • TR 1:15 - 2:30PM, Mandel Center 107
  • Instructor: Laura Hengehold , Ph.D.
  • Associate Professor of Philosophy
  • Office:
  • Phone:
  • laura.hengehold@case.edu

Introduction to select themes in the work of contemporary African philosophers, with special emphasis on political thought. In this course, students will learn something about factors affecting the creation and flow of knowledge and ideas about Africa and discuss the relative importance of the "nation-state" as an idea in Europe, pre-colonial Africa, and postcolonial Africa.

Offered as PHIL 316/416 and ETHS 316/416.

ETHS 366: Government and Politics of Africa (3)

  • TR 1:15 - 2:30 PM, White Building 324
  • Instructor: Elliot Posner , Ph.D.
  • Office:
  • Phone:

Comparative analysis of the political forces and organizations currently functioning in Africa, as well as a survey of the formal government institutions. Special emphasis on single-party rule, military rule, and the political ramifications of African socialism, tribalism and the problems of national integration.
Offered as ETHS 366, POSC 366, and POSC 466.


Concentration in Latin American and Caribbean Studies:

ETHS 252B: Introduction to Latina/o Studies (3)

  • MW 12:30 - 1:45 PM, Clark Hall 104
  • Instructor: Jaqueline Nanfito , Ph.D.
  • Office:
  • jaqueline.nanfito@case.edu

Interdisciplinary introduction to the basis for a Latina/o ethnicity through an exploration of commonalities and differences in the peoples of Latin American and Caribbean origin within the continental United States. Topics include methodological and theoretical formulations central to the field (e.g., racial, gender, and sexual formations, modes and relations of production and class, nation and transnation), history and contemporary issues of identity, family, community, immigration, and the potential for a pan-ethnic identity. Discussions will focus on major demographic, social, economic and political trends: historical roots of Latinas/os in the U.S.; the evolution of Latina/o ethnicity and identity; immigration and the formation of Latina/o communities; schooling and language usage; tendencies and determinants of socioeconomic and labor force status; discrimination, segregation and bias in contemporary America; racial and gender relations; and political behavior among Latinas/os.

ETHS 336/ HSTY336: The Struggle for Justice in Latin America (3)

  • TR 4:30 - 5:45 PM, Clark Hall 104
  • Instructor: Marixa Lasso , Ph.D.
  • Office:
  • marixa.lasso@case.edu

This course looks at how indigenous peoples, women, students, workers, peasants, and Afro-Latin Americans struggled for justice in Latin America. It will study how notions of justice have changed from colonial times to the present. It will also examine how different sectors of Latin American society understood the meaning of justice and how that understanding evolved through time. This class seeks to familiarize students with the history of the idea of justice in Latin America. At the end of this course students will understand the complex intellectual and political differences behind Latin America's apparent chaotic and tumultuous political history. Second, it seeks to develop students' critical thinking by examining how an abstract term, such as justice, changes across time and space. 
Offered as ETHS 336 and HSTY 336.

Concentration in African-American Studies:

ETHS 318: History of Black Women in the U.S.   (3)

  • M 2:00 - 4:30 PM, Sears 541
  • Instructor: Laila Haidarali, Ph.D.
  • Associate Professor of Philosophy
  • Office:
  • Phone:

Chronologically arranged around specific issues in black women's history organizations, participation in community and political movements, labor experiences, and expressive culture. The course will use a variety of materials, including autobiography, literature, music, and film.
Offered as ETHS 318, HSTY 318, and WGST 318.

 

 

Fall 2008 Courses

Full List

 

ETHS 251: Perspectives in Ethnicity, Race, Religion, and Gender (3)

  • T-R 10:00-11:15 AM, Clark Hall 302
  • Instructor: Alice Bach , Ph.D.
  • Professor of Catholic Studies, Department of Religion
  • Office: Mather House
  • Phone 216-368-1637
  • alice.bach@case.edu

This course is designed to introduce students to the study of ethnicity.  Basic concepts such as race, gender, class, and identity construction will be examined.  Students are encouraged to use the tools and perspectives of several disciplines to address the experiences of ethnic groups in the United States.
Offered as ETHS 251 and RLGN 251.

 

ETHS 359: Palestine & Israel: Whose Promised Land? Issues of Religion, Politics & Media Coverage (3)

  • TR 1:15-2:30 PM, Clark Hall 308
  • Instructor: Alice Bach , Ph.D.
  • Professor of Catholic Studies, Department of Religion
  • Office: Mather House
  • Phone 216-368-1637
  • alice.bach@case.edu

The major focus of this seminar will range from the ongoing questions of peace and justice in Israel and occupied Palestine to the land and border questions; Green line, crossing points, the wall; to interpretations from biblical to contemporary texts, reflecting a multiplicity of agendas.  Our primary focus will be the analysis of recent research and scholarship on issues of mass violence, contested space and land, gender, race and ethnicity, religious sectarianism, colonialism/imperialism.  Through our readings we will identify the bias and concerns of various interpretive communities involved in the ongoing struggles in this very small area.  With two peoples claiming the same land for different reasons, can this conflict ever be resolved?  Recommended preparation: One course about the Middle East.
Offered as ETHS 359 and RLGN 320.

ETHS 399: Independent Study (0-3)

  • TBA
  • Instructor: TBA
  • Office:
  • Phone

This course focuses on topics in ethnicity. In consultation with the program director and instructors, students pick topics in their concentrations and make a list of books and/films for personal and intensive reading. Some of these projects might be Arts and Identity in post-independent Africa [African Concentration], films, literatures and human rights in Latin America [Latin America and Caribbean Concentration], civil rights through music and songs [African-American Concentration] etc. Travel may be a component of this course depending on the nature of the students' interests. Weekly reports are required for the instructors to measure the students progress.

 

ETHS 222: African-American Religions (3)

  • TR 1:15 - 2:30 PM, Yost 101
  • Instructor: Joy Bostic , Ph.D.
  • Department of Religion
  • Office:
  • Phone:
  • joy.bostic@case.edu

This course is an exploration of the rich diversity of African American religions from the colonial period to the present.  Attention will be given to key figures, institutional expressions, and significant movements in African American religious history.  Major themes include African traditions in American religions, slavery and religion, sacred music, social protest, Black Nationalism in religion, Islam, African American women and religion, and black and womanist theologies.  Course requirements will include field trips to local religious sites.  Offered as ETHS 222 and RLGN 222.

 

ETHS 394: The Subaltern and the Poetics of War in Africa (3)

  • TR 2:45-4:00 PM, Clark Hall 210
  • Instructor: Gilbert Doho , Ph.D.
  • Associate Professor of French and Francophone Studies
  • Office:
  • Phone:
  • tse@case.edu

This course is a seminar on major war writers and filmakers in Africa such as Chinua Achebe, Ngugiwa Thiongo, Emmanuel Dongola, Iweala Uzodinma, Ismael Beah, Semebene Ousmane, Ingrid Sinclair etc. Students will be asked to use postcolonial theory to critically read and view films and texts on war in Africa. They will engage in discussion with guest scholars in the field of African studies. In addition to a final research paper, students are also required to write short papers on selected books and films read and/or viewed during the semester.

Syllabus coming soon

Link to Blackboard

Research Working Group, "The Subaltern and the Poetics of War in Africa"

Lecture Series Calendar

Baker-Nord Center for the Humanities event calendar

 

ETHS 352: African Feminisms(3)

  • MW 12:30-1:45 PM, Guilford House 301
  • Instructor: Cheryl Toman , Ph.D.
  • Associate Professor of French and Francophone Studies
  • Office:
  • Phone:
  • cheryl.toman@case.edu

This course traces the history of African feminism from its origins in various cultural traditions through to a more theoretical analysis of gender, marriage, and motherhood seen from an Afrocentric perspective.  Approaches studied are those that pertain to anthropology, history, literature and culture.  African feminism's of scholars such as Filomina Steady, Cheikh Anta Diop, Buchi Emecheta, Ifi Amadiume, Obioma Nnaemeka, Oyeronko Oyewumi, and Calixthe Beyala will be studied and there will be some comparative analysis of Western feminisms to show how African feminisms are clearly distinct.

ETHS 253B: Introduction to Latin American History (3)

  • TR 10:00 -11:15 AM, Mandel Center 106
  • Instructor: Marixa Lasso , Ph.D.
  • Office:
  • marixa.lasso@case.edu

This course provides an introduction to the historical and cultural development of Latin America, in an attempt to identify the forces, both internal and external, which shape the social, economic and political realities in present day Latin America.  Beginning with its pre-Columbian civilizations, the course moves through the conquest and colonial period of the Americas, the wars of independence and the emergence of nation-states in the nineteenth century, and the issues confronting the region throughout the turbulent twentieth century, such as migration and urbanization, popular protest and revolution, environmental degradation, great power intervention, the drug trade and corruption, and the integration of the region into the global economy.
Offered as ETHS 253B and HSTY 136
.

 

Past Courses Offered

 

Spring 2006 Courses

Ethnic Studies Minor

Core courses:

ETHS 251A: Oral Performance and Ethnic Identity (3)

  • T-R 10:00-11:15 AM, MTHH 107
  • Instructor: Gilbert Doho, Ph.D.
  • (Sorbonne University Nouvelle, Paris III)
  • Associate Professor of French and Francophone Studies
  • Office: 204 Guilford House
  • Phone 368-4885
  • gilbert.doho@case.edu

This course is an in-depth study of African griots, Native American, African-American, East European, and Latina/o-American storytellers, the oral epic, and performance traditions that have helped to shape and anchor the identities of different ethnic groups. The course will explore the multi-generic composition of the oral epic, which combines forms as diverse as narrative, song, praise poetry, theater, music and historical oratory. ETHS 251A will provide a comprehensive overview of oral performances while focusing on a particular area or areas of Africa, Asia, the United States, or Latin America. In the African continent, for example, the focus will be on the Madinka Sundjata corpus, dealing with the empire of Mali; the life of Shaka, the Zulu in South Africa; while in the United States, the narrative life of Frederick Douglas, blues and negro-spiritual will be considered as the sites of ethnic discourse. Using a comparative approach, the course will examine aesthetic issues of oral performance, the written word, interactions between music and voice, and interaction between poetic and prose narrative forms. The performance texts will be augmented by field recordings and in-class demonstrations by griots and other storytellers from Africa and the United States.

ETHS 253B: Introduction to Latin American Studies (3)
  • TR 1:15 - 2:30 PM, Clark 205
  • Instructor: Jacqueline Nanfito, Ph.D.
  • (University of California, Los Angeles)
  • Associate Professor of Spanish
  • Office: Guilford 308
  • Phone: 368 5264
  • jackqueline.nanfito@case.edu

This course provides an introduction to the historical and cultural development of Latin America, in an attempt to identify the forces, both internal and external, which shape the social, economic and political realities in present day Latin America. Beginning with its pre-Columbian civilizations, the course moves through the conquest and colonial period of the Americas, the wars of independence and the emergence of nation-states in the nineteenth century, and the issues confronting the region throughout the turbulent twentieth century, such as migration and urbanization, popular protest and revolution, environmental degradation, great power intervention, the drug trade and corruption, and the integration of the region into the global economy.

Concentration in Global Ethnic Studies:

ETHS 295: The Francophone World (3)

Instructor: Cheryl Toman, Ph. D. (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) Assistant Professor of French

XList: FRCH 295

  • TR 1:15 - 2:30 PM, Clark 205
  • Instructor: Cheryl Toman , Ph.D.
  • (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)
  • Assistant Professor of French
  • cheryl.toman@case.edu

The course offers an introduction to the Francophone World from a historical, cultural, and literary perspective. The Francophone World includes countries and regions around the globe with a substantial French-speaking population (and where French is sometimes, but not always, an official language): North America (Louisiana, Quebec, and Acadia); North Africa (Tunisia, Morocco, Algeria, and Egypt); the Middle-East (Lebanon, Syria); the Caribbean (Martinique, Guadeloupe, Haiti); South-East Asia (Vietnam); and Europe (France, Belgium, Switzerland, and Luxembourg). FRCH 295 provides a comprehensive overview of the Francophone World, while focusing on a particular area or areas in any given semester. In this particular semester we will focus on the Caribbean, the Maghreb, and select countries of Sub-Saharan Africa (Senegal, Cameroon). Our inquiry will include the study of their colonization histories, of the Independences period (broadly speaking, the 1960s), and of the post colonial era through film, literature, and readings of significant political/theoretical texts.

ETHS 335: Women in Developing Countries (3)

Xlist: FRCH 335

  • TR 1:15 - 2:30 PM, Clark 205
  • Instructor: Cheryl Toman , Ph.D.
  • (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)
  • Assistant Professor of French
  • cheryl.toman@case.edu

This course will feature case studies, theory, and literature of current issues concerning women in developing countries primarily of the French-speaking world. Discussion and research topics include matriarchal traditions and FGM in Africa, the Tunisian feminist movement, women, islam, and tradition in the Middle East, women-centered power structures in India (Kerala, Pondichery), and poverty and women in Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia. Guest speakers and special projects are important elements of the course. Taught in English. Cross-listed as ETHS 335, WLIT 335, and WMST 335.

Concentration in African-American Studies:

ETHS 363H: African-American Literature (3)

XList: ENGL 363H

  • MWF 11:30-12:20 PM, Seras 354
  • Instructor: Thomas Sayers Ellis , Ph.D.
  • (Brown University)
  • Associate Professor of Engligh
  • Office: Guilford 322
  • Phone: 368-2372
  • tse@case.edu

A historical approach to African-American literature. Such writers as Wheatley, Equiano, Douglas, Jacobs, DuBois, Hurston, Hughes, Wright, Baldwin, Ellison, Morrisonis. Topics covered may include slave narratives, African-American autobiography, the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Aesthetic, literature or protest and to assimilation. Maximum 6 credits. Prereq: ENGL 150 or USFS 100.

Concentration in Latin American and Caribbean Studies:

ETHS:  Poetics of Gender in Latin America (3)

  • Instructor: Jacqueline Nanfito, Ph.D.
  • (University of California, Los Angeles)
  • Associate Professor of Spanish
  • Office: Guilford 308
  • Phone: 368 5264
  • jackqueline.nanfito@case.edu

As a service-learning, interdisciplinary course, this course is designed to provide Case students with rich international service learning experiences in the Dominican Republic, thereby enabling them to develop skills in global citizenship while addressing community-identified needs. Through cultural immersion and experiential learning in and around Santo Domingo, students will apply their theoretical understanding of Ethnic Studies and Women's Studies to practical and concrete situations affecting the daily lives of Dominicans in urban and rural communities. Approved SAGES capstone.

 

 

Fall 2005 Courses

Ethnic Studies Minor

Core courses:

ETHS 252 A: Introduction to African-American Studies (3)

(X-Listed: HYST 252 A)

  • MWF 10:30-11:20 AM
  • Instructor: Rhonda Williams, Ph.D.
  • (University of Pennsylvania)
  • Associate Professor of History
  • Office: 106 Mather House/Phone: 368-2515
  • Fall 2005 Office Hours:

This course is designed to introduce students to the study of Black History, cultures, economics, and politics. Students will learn about the development of the field by exploring theoretical questions, methodological approaches, and major themes that have shaped the study of black people, primarily in the U.S. context. This is a seminar-style, discussion-based course that emphasizes critical analysis and expository writing.

ETHS 252 B: Introduction to Latino/a-American studies (3)
  • MWF 11:30-12:20 PM
  • Instructor: Jacqueline Nanfito, Ph.D.
  • (University of California, Los Angeles)
  • Associate Professor of Spanish
  • Office; Guilford 308/Phone: 368 5264
  • Fall 2005 Office Hours:

Interdisciplinary intro to the basis for a Latino/a ethnicity through an exploration of commonalities and differences in the peoples of Latin American and Caribbean origin within the continental U.S. Topics include methodological and theoretical formulations central to the field history and contemporary issues of identity, family, community, immigration, and the potential for a pan-ethnic identity.

ETHS 253 A:
(X-listed as HSTY 135)
  • MWF 11:30-12:20 PM
  • Instructor: Jonathan Sadowsky, Ph.D.
  • Johns Hopkins University
  • Dr. Theodore J. Castele Associate Professor of Medical History
  • Office: Mather House 204/ Phone 368-2622
  • Fall 2005 Office Hours: Th 1:30-3:45 by appointment.

A general introduction to major themes in modern African history, with an emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Topics include oral tradition and narrative, economic structure and dynamics, religious movements, colonialism, nationalism, and the dilemmas of independent African states.

Concentration Courses:

(African Studies, African-American Studies, Latino/a American Studies, Latin American and Caribbean Studies, and Global Ethnic Studies)
ETHS 259: Tricksters, Conjurers, & Gods: Religion & Culture in W. Africa & African Diaspora (3)

(X-Listed RLGN 259)

  • TR 10-11:15 AM
  • Instructors: Alice Bach, Ph.D.
  • (Union Theological Seminary, New York)
  • Archbishop Paul J. Hallinan Associate Professor of Catholic Studies
  • Office: 105 Mather House/Phone 368-1637
  • Fall 2005 Office Hours: 11:30-1pm by appointment
  • Gilbert Doho, Ph.D.
  • (Sorbonne University Nouvelle, Paris III)
  • Associate Professor of French and Francophone Studies
  • Office: 204 Guilford House/Phone 368-4885
  • Fall 2005 Office Hours: Tues/Th: 11: 30-2:00

Explore the ties of religion and culture in West Africa and the African Diaspora through traditional myths, rituals, literature, and art. Students will explore recent literature generated from the African and Caribbean culture, from authors such as Derek Walcott, Edwidge Danicat, and Jamaica Kincaid. This course will help familiarize students with the phenomenon of religion and its implications for society and culture.

ETHS 279: Introduction to Latin American History (3)
  • (x-listed as HSTY 279)
  • TR 10:00-11:15 AM
  • Instructor: Marixa Lasso, Ph.D.
  • Assistant Professor of Latin American History

An introduction to the history of the region of peoples of Latin America, crucial events that have shaped Latin American societies, and different perspectives from which historians have interpreted those events.

ETHS 318: History of Black Women in U.S (3)
  • (x-listed as HSTY 318)
  • MW 12:30-1:45 PM
  • Instructor: Rhonda Williams, Ph.D. (University of Pennsylvania)
  • Associate Professor of History
  • Office: 106 Mather House/Phone: 368-2515
  • Fall 2005 Office Hours:

Chronologically arranged around specific issues in black women's history organizations, participation in community and political movements, labor experiences, and expressive culture. The course will use a variety of materials, including autobiography, literature, music, and film.

ETHS 362: Politics of Central Asia (3)
  • (x-listed as POSC 362)
  • T 4:30-7:00 PM
  • Instructor: Kelly M. McMann, Ph.D. (University of Michigan)
  • Assistant Professor of Political Science
  • Office: 218 Mather House/Phone 368-5565
  • Fall 2005 Office Hours: Tues: 3:30-4-:15 by appointment

Once an unfamiliar region to many people of the world, Central Asia took center stage in the fall of 2001 as a result of the U.S. campaign against terrorism. This course will introduce students to the politics of Central Asia, focusing on the region today composed of Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgiszstan, and Kazakkhstan. We will review the nationalism, foreign relations, religion, ethnicity, and economics of the region.

Spring 2005 Courses

CORE COURSES

ETHS 253 B: Introduction to Latin American Studies (3)

This course provides an introduction to the historical and cultural development of Latin America, in an attempt to identify the forces, both internal and external, which shape the social, economic, political realities in present-day Latin America.

MW 12:30-1:45

Instructor: Jacqueline Nanfito, Ph.D. (University of California, Los Angeles) Associate Professor of Spanish

 

ETHS 314: Cultures of the United States (3)

( Cross-listed as ANTH 314)

This course considers the rich ethnic diversity of the U.S. from the  perspective of social/cultural anthropology. Conquest, immigra-tion, problems of conflicts and accommodation, and the character of the diverse regional and ethnic cultures are considered, as are forms of racism, discrimination, and their consequences. Groups of interest include Latino and Native peoples, African-American groups, and specific ethnic groups of Pacific, Mediterranean, European, Asian, and Caribbean origins.

TR 10-11:15 a.m.

Instructor: Atwood D. Gaines, M.A., Ph.D., M.P.H (University of California, Berkeley) Professor of Anthropology, Bioethics, Nursing and Psychiatry

 

CONCENTRATION COURSES

 

ETHS 201: Topics in Women Studies (3)

(Cross-listed as WMST 201/ENGL 270/HSTY 270/PHIL270/RLGN270)

This course introduces women and men students to the methods and concepts of gender studies, women's studies, and feminist theory. An interdisciplinary course, it covers approaches used in literary criticism, history, philosophy, political science, sociology, anthropology, psychology, film studies, cultural studies, and art history. It is the required introductory course for students taking the women's studies major.Prereq: ENGL 150 or USFS 100.

Instructor: Heather Meakin, Ph.D. (University of Oxford) Assistant Professor of English

 

ETHS 368C: African Film(3)

(Cross-listed as ENGL 368C/468C/ WLIT368C/468C)

African Cinema is a field where economic cultural, political, and other major issues of the continent are staged, examined or contested. This course considers cinema as an instrument of social transformation and discusses burning issues such as colonialism, neocolonialism, nation v. tribe, gender biases, and development from Francophone Sub-Sahara Africa.

MW  4:30-5:45

Instructor: Gilbert Doho, Ph.D. (Sorbonne University Nouvelle, Paris III) Associate Professor of French

Gilbert Doho

ETHS 295: The Francophone World (3)

(Cross-listed as FRCH 295)

Francophone identities are certainly constructed with a strong impact on ethnic identities. This course will enable our students to grasp the importance of local cultures, politics, and economics in regard to the construction of modern nations in francophone Africa.

MW 12:30-1:45 p.m.

Instructor: Gilbert Doho, Ph.D. (Sorbonne University Nouvelle, Paris III)

Associate Professor of French

 

ETHS 335: Women in Developing Countries (3)

(Cross-listed as WMST 335, ETHS 335, and WLIT 335.)

This course will feature case studies, theory, and literature of current issues concerning women in developing countries primarily of the French-speaking world.  Topics include matriarchal traditions and FGM in Africa, the Tunisian feminist movement, women, Islam, and tradition in the Middle East, women-centered power structures in India (Kerala,Pondichéry), and poverty and women in Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia.  Guest speakers and group projects are a highlight of the course. Taught in English. 

TR 2:45-4:00 p.m.

Instructor: Cheryl Toman, Ph. D. (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) Assistant Professor of French

 

ETHS 364: Dictators & Dem/Mod Latin America(3)

Examination of political leadership in modern Latin America, exploring the nature, causes, and consequences of dictatorship and democracy in the region, moving from the collapse of oligarchic rule and the emergence of populism in the 1930s and 1940s, to the end of democracy and establishment of military regimes in the 1960s and 1970s, and ultimately to the contemporary processes of democratization and economic liberalization. (Cross-listed as POSC 364)

TR 10-11:15 a.m.

Instructor: Laura Tartakoff, J.D. (Case Western Reserve University) Adjunct Associate Professor of Political Science

 

Laura Ymayo Tartakoff- Adjunct Associate Professor of Political Science

 

 

 

Fall 2004 Courses

ETHS 251: INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF RACE AND ETHNICITY (3)
This course is designed to introduce students to the study of ethnicity and cultural concepts of biological differences ("race"). Basic concepts such as race, gender, class, and identity will be examined as will the social and cultural means of their construction.  Students are encouraged to use the tools, and perspectives of several disciplines to address the experiences of ethnic groups in the U.S.

Instructor: Atwood D. Gaines, Ph.D, M.P.H . (University of California, Berkeley), M.P.H (University of California, Berkeley, School of Public Health)
Professor of Anthropology , Psychiatry, Nursing and Biochemical Ethics; religion, medical/psychiatric anthropology, aging; cultural studies of sciences; bioethics; social identity; United States, the Mediterranean

TTH: 10:00-11:15am

ETHS 252 A : INTRODUCTION TO AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES (3)    
This course is designed to introduce students to the study of African American history, cultures, economics, and politics. Students will learn about the development of the discipline by exploring theoretical questions, methodological approaches, and major themes that have shaped the study of black people in the US context.

Instructor: Rhonda Williams , Ph.D . ( University of Pennsylvania ) Assistant Professor of History (African American History and Culture)

TTH: 1:15-2:30 pm

ETHS 252 B: INTRODUCTION TO LATINO/A STUDIES (3)
Interdisciplinary introduction to the basis for a Latino/a ethnicity through an exploration of commonalities and differences in the peoples of Latin American and Caribbean origin in the continental United States . Topics include immigration and acculturation experiences and their commonalities and differences, comparison of Latina/o experiences to those of other racial, ethnic and immigrant groups, and the potential for a pan-ethnic identity. 

Instructor: Jacqueline Nanfito, Ph.D . ( University of California , Los Angeles ) Associate Professor of Spanish (Latin American Studies)

MW: 12:30pm-1:45pm

II. CONCENTRATIONS

SOCI 302: RACE AND ETHNIC MINORITIES IN AMERICAN SOCIETY (3)
Has the United States become a melting pot of ethnic groups or does it remain a salad bowl? American society is uniquely diverse in its ethnic and racial composition. This diversity has influenced much of American history and had substantial impact on the structure of social organization of present day society. This course familiarizes students with basic concepts of race and ethnicity, relevant theories and their applications to critical issues.

Instructor: Gul Seckin, MSG ( University of Southern California ) Teaching Assistant, PH.D candidate Department of Sociology

MWF: 3:00-3:50pm

CRN 16710

ENGL 365Q/WLIT 365Q: POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURE: THE INDIAN NOVEL IN ENGLISH
The twentieth century witnessed the rapid development of the Indian novel in English, and what is often called "Indo-Anglian" writing now constitutes an important and widely read body of work. In this class we will read a series of well-known novels by Indian authors who are central to an Indo-Anglian literary tradition. As we explore the development of this tradition, we will also pay attention to the important social and cultural developments in Imperial and Post-Independence India, as well as to the diversity of contemporary Indian writing. Written requirements will include a report on an aspect of twentieth-century cultural history in India , a review of a contemporary Indian novel, a short analytic paper, and a longer research project emerging from students' particular interests. Novels will likely be selected from those by Rabindranath Tagore, Raja Rao, R. K. Narayan, Kamala Markandaya, Anita Desai, and Salman Rushdie.

Instructor: Kurt Koenigsberger, Ph.D . ( Vanderbilt University ) Assistant Professor of English (Postcolonial Studies)

MWF 4-4:50pm

ECON 375: ECON OF DEVELOPING COUNTRIES
This course examines the problems of less developed countries, including theories of economic growth, politics for capital accumulation, criteria for resource allocation, foreign trade problems, inflation, population trends, and development planning.

Instructor: Martine Lussier, Ph. D ( University of Toronto )

Lecturer , Department of Economics.

MWF 3:00-3:50pm

SPAN 336: CHICANA/O LITERATURE
An introduction to Chicana/o literature written after 1943. Literary history, clarification of linguistic terminology, and an examination of the cultural components of each work. Readings , discussions, and lectures in Spanish.

Instructor: Jorge Marturano, MA ( Duke University) Lecturer , Department of Modern Languages and Literatures.

MW 12:30-1:45pm

11764 SPAN 342 LATIN AMERICAN FEMINIST VOICES
This course examines the awakening of feminine and feminist consciousness in the literary production of Latin American women writers, particularly from the 1920s to the present. Close attention paid to the dominant themes of love and dependency; imagination as evasion; alienation and rebellion; sexuality and power; the search for identity and the self-preservation of subjectivity. Readings include prose, poetry, and dramatic texts of female Latin American writers contributing to the emerging of feminist ideologies and the mapping of feminist identities.

Instructor: Jacqueline Nanfito, Ph.D. ( University of California , Los Angeles ) Associate Professor of Spanish (Latin American Studies)

MWF 9:30-10:20am

79117 SPAN 370 SPC TPC: LATIN AMER CINEMA
This course is designed to introduce students to the basic elements of film analysis as well as to the major trends in Latin American cinema from the 1960s to the present. We will analyze independent and mainstream films from Mexico, Cuba, Argentina, and Brazil, paying particular attention to the historical contexts in which these films were produced and to the political, cultural, and aesthetic debates that surrounded their production.

Instructor: Gabriela Copertari, Ph.D . ( Georgetown University) Assistant Professor of Spanish (Latin American Literature and Film)

T R 0115-0230pm
M 0630-0930pm

CONTACT PERSON:

Gilbert Doho, Program Director
Department of Modern Languages and Literatures
Guilford House 204
Tel: 216 368 4885
Email: gilbert.doho@case.edu