cpl student projects


Students projects presentations


Laura Germann (2009) “Acoustic cues for identification of prosodic contours expressing syntactic, semantic, and emotional information content”, Capstone project, presented as poster at SOURCE Undergraduate Symposium, CWRU, April 16, 2009.

Clopton, S., Bonaventura, P., Freebairn, L., Hansen, A., Iyengar, B., Lewis, B, and Taylor, G. (2008) "Articulation Errors In Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS)", presented at the 'American Speech and Hearing Association' Convention, Chicago, November 20-22 2008.

Li, Rui (2005) "Phonetic Substitution as a Foreign Accent Phenomenon in Native Mandarin Speakers’ Pronunciation of English", Project for COSI 211, Phonology and phonetics, Presented at Research ShowCASE 2005.


Student Capstone Projects


Laura Dickerson (2009) “Differences in production and processing of prosody in AS vs. HFA children”, Capstone project presentation.

 


Student Grants


LAUREN MILLER AND BRADY BOCCUCCI GOT THE CWRU ‘EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING’ SCHOLARSHIP (2008) FOR PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE AT THE CRC SPEECH PATHOLOGY CLINIC IN ROME, Italy

Lauren’s comments:

The Experiential Learners Fellowship provided me with a once in a lifetime opportunity that enlightened me to the diverse application of speech therapy around the world. The trip allowed me to apply the knowledge that I acquired from my classes at Case Western Reserve University to real clinical situations. The work I performed in Italy provided me with the chance to take part in field research and experience hands-on data collection and storage. In Italy I observed many different approaches to speech therapy. Traveling to Italy and studying speech therapy in a foreign country allowed me to experience a variety of research and clinical procedures in speech language pathology. As a whole, the clinicians at the center in Italy used Non-Speech Oral Motor Mechanisms more frequently than I have seen in my observations of therapy sessions in the United States. For example, one clinician I observed placed a chocolate chip on the end of a tongue depressor and held the tongue depressor immediately past the tip of the child’s tongue. The therapist instructed the child to protrude their tongue straight out towards the chocolate chip in order to strengthen and coordinate their tongue musculature. The child was asked to perform a variety of tongue movements using the chocolate chip on the tongue depressor as a target for their tongue movement. In the end, the child was given the treat as a reward for their good behavior. The clinicians in Italy used different techniques in their therapy sessions, and also structured their therapy differently than the therapy sessions I have observed at the Cleveland Hearing and Speech Center.”

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