Department of Art History and Art

Department of Art History and Art 2009 Spring Courses


Spring 2009 - Art History Courses


The following courses in Art History will be offered by the faculty of the Case Western Reserve University/Cleveland Museum of Art Joint Program in Art History & Museum Studies. Courses at the 100, 200 and 300 levels are open to undergraduate students. For specific questions concerning a particular course please contact the individual instructor. For Course Registration Numbers and classroom assignments go to the Searchable Schedule of Classes on the Registrar’s webpage: http://www.case.edu/provost/registrar/soc.html

ARTH 102 M W F 10:30-11:20 - ADAMS
ACTS OF GENIUS: THE ARTS OF HUMANKIND – THE RENAISSANCE TO THE PRESENT
Works of art such as The Mona Lisa, Michelangelo’s David, A Noble Scholar Under a Willow, The Joy of Life, and a dismembered shark—artists such as Rembrandt, Van Gogh, Ma Lin, Mary Cassatt and Andy Warhol. The class will survey world art, from the Renaissance to the present, in a broad cultural and historical context, including the art of India and Asia. Requirements: short weekly questionnaires, a midterm and a final exam. Required Text: Marilyn Stokstad, Art History.

ARTH 250 MWF 11:30-12:20 - OLSZEWSKI
ART IN THE AGE OF DISCOVERY

A consideration of European art during a period of exploration and discovery. The impact on the arts of advances in science, political and religious thought, and exploration will be examined through the works of major masters including Donatello, Botticelli, Dürer, Michelangelo, Bruegel, Holbein and Titian. Texts: Roberta Olson, Italian Renaissance Sculpture; Frederick Hartt, History of Italian Renaissance Art; and Michael Baxandall, Painting and Experience in Fifteenth Century Italy. Requirements: three examinations given at five week intervals (including the final examination), a term paper on a research topic.

ARTH 271 (AMST 271) MW 12:30-1:45 - ADAMS
AMERICAN ART & CULTURE: THE 20TH/21ST CENTURY

A survey of the development of American art from 1900 to the present (and the future) which will explore how art has expressed both American values and American anxieties. Painting will be emphasized but the course will also consider architecture, the decorative arts, film, literature and music. Requirements: There will be weekly writing assignments, a midterm and final exam. Recommended reading: Wayne Craven, American Art and Culture, McGraw-Hill, 2003, and Henry Adams, What’s American About American Art?, Cleveland Museum of Art, 2009.

ARTH 303/403 T TH 10:00-11:15 - CUNNINGHAM
HISTORY OF FAR EASTERN ART: URBAN FANTASIES OF MODERN JAPAN - THE “FLOATING WORLD” OF JAPANESE WOODBLOCK PRINTS

Edo (modern Tokyo) was a bustling metropolis of some one million inhabitants in the 18th century. It was also the locus of dynamic social and political shifts in a culture traditionally known for its conservatism. Yet beginning in the 17th century wealthy commoners sought out respite from the government's eyes in the entertainment districts northeast of the city, as well in the city's stylish theatre life. These two subjects comprise two of the most popular subjects of "ukiyo-e," the Japanese word now familiar to westerners for describing the fascinating realms of life and intriguing compositional designs that characterize Japanese woodblock prints, books, and paintings. Their mesmerizing visuality propelled the appreciation of Japanese art among 19th and twentieth century western artists and collectors alike, as no other medium in Asian art has done. This class will introduce the subjects, social settings and visual evolution of "Floating World" imagery. It will also incorporate readings in contemporary literature as well as make references to the European and American artists influenced by their contact with ukiyo-e. Requirements: Half of the classes will take place actually viewing prints at the Cleveland Museum of Art. Weekly reading assignments will be given. Reserves will be established at both Kelvin Smith Library and the Cleveland Museum of Art Ingalls Library, which is the more significant resource for this subject. 4 short(3-5 pages) papers, midterm and final exam.

ARTH 333/433 F 2:00-5:00 - DUMSER
AUGUSTAN ROME

The reign of Augustus, Rome’s first emperor, was a time of profound change for the city of Rome. In the famous words of Suetonius, Augustus “found Rome built of brick and left it in marble”. This course will explore the unusually rich material and textual evidence for Augustan Rome to understand how the visual arts were utilized to support Augustus’ revolutionary political ideology. While our primary focus will be on city planning and urban measures, we will also reconstruct the architectural, sculptural and painted programs of key Augustan sites in Rome. The class will be conducted as a seminar with weekly readings from the course reserve and an emphasis on engaged class discussion. Requirements: analytical response papers, site presentation, and research paper with oral report. Graduate students will write a longer research paper, and lead a class discussion of a reading. Textbook: D. Favro, The Urban Image of Augustan Rome (Cambridge UP, 1996); additional readings on reserve.

ARTH 344/444 W 4:00-7:00 - PEFFER
ISSUES IN THE ART OF AFRICA: AFRICA AND PHOTOGRAPHY

This course surveys photographic practice in Africa. Since the earliest years of photography it has been used by colonials, missionaries, anthropologists, and tourists to gender, racialize, and otherwise take the measure of the African continent. It has also been used to sacralize and to commemorate in modern neo-traditional contexts, as well as being used by contemporary African artists to imagine alternatives to the historical archive of images. We examine these aspects of the social history of photographic practice, and also consider recent critiques of the materiality of the photograph in Africa. Requirements: Three 3-5 page response papers, a 3-page project proposal with annotated bibliography, and a final paper (11-15 pages).

ARTH 383/483 M 2:00-5:00 - LANDAU
GENDER ISSUES IN FEMINIST ART

In this course, organized as a pro-seminar, we will concentrate on discovering how gender issues can become stylistically and iconographically encoded in art. Particular emphasis will be placed on examining paintings, sculptures, photographs and performances by contemporary women and other marginalized groups using a theoretical context. A selection of provocative readings will provide methodologies useful for assessing the radical re-evaluation of traditionally accepted aesthetic, social and political meanings in art that has taken place since the advent of the Feminist Movement. Norma Broude and Mary D. Garrard, eds., The Power of Feminist Art (Abrams, 1995), Anne M. Wagner, Three Artists, Three Women: Modernism and the Art of Hesse, Krasner and O'Keeffe(Univ. of California, 1997) and other texts will be used. Course requirements: written responses to reading assignments, term paper, final exam or oral report.

ARTH 394 W 2:00-5:00 - LANDAU
DEPARTMENT SEMINAR (SAGES)

This course fulfills the SAGES requirement of a departmental seminar. We will investigate the myth of the modern artist, focusing on Pablo Picasso and his lifelong, controversial depictions of the female nude. We will look at popular conceptions of the artist in such media as film and biographies and then contrast these popular conceptions with examinations of Picasso in art historical and other scholarly social-cultural contexts. The course will comprise close reading of texts, detailed examination of specific works of art, analytical writing, and seminar-style discussion. Particular attention will be paid to methodological issues in art history: how to investigate, analyze and present research findings in written form. Research is inherently a collaborative process, and one exercise will involve a group reading of Picasso's canonical 1907 canvas, Les Demoiselles d'Avignon. Course readings will include materials on reserve, John Richardson's three-part Life of Picasso, Christopher Green's Picasso's Les Demoiselles d'Avignon (Cambridge, 2001) and other recent texts focusing on Picasso and the nude. Course assignments include short essays and presentations.

ARTH 395 AS ARRANGED - HELMREICH
INTERNSHIP

This course is designated for students seeking professional experience in art history. It focuses on the museum experience (registration, exhibition, interpretation, and administration) although students may also elect to conduct internships in museum-related environments such as art conservation. Students are encouraged to have gained significant experience in art history coursework before embarking on an internship. Students must identify an internship and supervisor as well as a campus internship supervisor the semester before enrolling in the internship.

ARTH 398 AS ARRANGED - STAFF
INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ART HISTORY

Individual research and reports on special topics. Consent of Professor.

ARTH 399 AS ARRANGED - STAFF
HONORS THESIS

Consent of Department Chair. List name of supervising Professor.

ARTH 489 AS ARRANGED - STAFF
MA QUALIFYING PAPER

Graduating Art History (ARH) Masters students only.

ARTH 491 A & B AS ARRANGED - HELMREICH
VISUAL ARTS AND MUSEUMS: INTERNSHIP

Consent of supervising Professor. Prerequisite: ARTH 490

ARTH 518B W 12:30-3:30 - CUNNINGHAM
SEMINAR IN ASIAN ART: WORD, OBJECT, AND IMAGE IN JAPANESE RELIGIOUS ART
This class will explore the rich cultural history of visual "religious" expression in Japan from the 5th-15th centuries. It will embrace texts, ritual practice, and sacred space as important pathways for understanding visual "stuff." Particular focus will be provided by the active use of the CMA collections of Chinese, Korean, and Japanese art. Active participation in class discussions as well as presentations are expected. Access to both KSL and CMA libraries is essential. Weekly reading assignments, as well as increasingly intense familiarity with key monuments of Japanese religious art, form key components of our study together.

ARTH 552 TH 1:15-4:15 - SCALLEN
SEMINAR IN BAROQUE ART: CONNOISSEURSHIP OF OLD MASTER PAINTINGS

In this seminar we will consider the history, historiography, and practice of connoisseurship of Old Master paintings (European 15-18th centuries) from 1500 to the present. Connoisseurship of Old Master paintings was a foundational methodology for the discipline of art history in the nineteenth century, and flourished until the mid-twentieth century. For several decades it was rejected as a valid methodology by many art historians as too subjective, too tied to the art market, and too committed to the valorization of “great masters.” Nonetheless it continued to be practiced in museums and auction houses as a valid methodological approach. Recently it has also made a scholarly comeback as art historians begin to reconsider the practices and history of this methodology. Whenever possible, we will turn to the collections and staff of the CMA to augment the viewpoints and case studies examined in the class. Requirements: Class meetings will include discussion of readings done in common; all are expected to participate in these discussions regularly as a seminar requirement. Each participant will be responsible for reviewing an important contribution to the historiography of painting connoisseurship, leading a discussion on this publication, and writing an extended critique of this publication. Each participant will conduct an interpretive or historiographic research project; this project will to be presented formally to the class as a presentation and submitted as a paper; an annotated bibliography should be handed out to the class at the time of the oral presentation. Course readings: Readings will be drawn from books, journals, and exhibition catalogues available at Ingalls Library. Whenever possible they will be scanned and posted to Blackboard

ARTH 584 T 1:15-4:15 - HELMREICH/HINSON
SEMINAR IN HISTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHY

This seminar examines the history of early twentieth-century European modern photography, with a particular focus upon Surrealist photography. The course seeks to address such questions as why photography was central to Surrealism and how the Surrealists deployed the medium on its own and in conjunction with their publications and exhibitions; course topics also include the technological changes in the medium and the relationship between photography and other art media. Surrealist photography has also been the source of key conceptual considerations of the medium, both historically and more recently. Thus, the course will include both secondary and primary source authors considered crucial for the history of photography such as Walter Benjamin and Rosalind Krauss. The course takes as its core study materials the David Raymond collection of over 170 of Surrealist photographs recently acquired by the Cleveland Museum of Art. Co-taught by Professor Anne Helmreich and Curator Tom Hinson, the course will attend to skills and practices related to museum work such as object-based research, exhibition development, and label writing. In addition to these skills, students will have the opportunity to learn connoisseurship skills relevant to photography such as characteristics of photographic processes and photographers.

ARTH 601 AS ARRANGED
RESEARCH IN ART HISTORY STAFF

ARTH 610 AS ARRANGED - ADAMS
CLEVELAND MUSEUM OF ART INTERNSHIP

Open to doctoral candidates in the Museum Studies Program only.

ARTH 701 AS ARRANGED
DISSERTATION PH.D.