Department of Art History and Art

Department of Art History and Art 2007 Spring Courses


Spring 2007 - Art History Courses


ARTH 102 M W F 10:30-11:20

ART HISTORY II: MICHELANGELO TO MAPPLETHORPE BERARDI

In this course we will examine major works of world art from around 1400 to our own contemporary era. The introduction to this survey of art will come in the form of lectures, discussions, and visits to local cultural institutions and historic sites to view art and architecture firsthand. Course requirements include 3 non comprehensive exams and 3 short papers which will explore works of art using different modes of investigation. The text will be Marilyn Stokstad, Art History, Volume Two, Revised Second Edition, Pearson Education Inc, Upper Saddle River, NJ, 2005.

ARTH 240 T TH 1:15-2:30

ARCHITECTURE BEFORE THE AUTOMOBILE: BURROUGHS

TRADITION AND INNOVATION IN BUILDING DESIGN

IN EUROPE AND BEYOND, FROM ANTIQUITY TO THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION

Focus largely on western traditions of architecture and urban design from antiquity to the early nineteenth century. Course includes attention to interactions between western theory and practice and certain non-western cultures, especially the Arab/Turkish world and

China. Text: Ian Sutton, Western Architecture: From Ancient Greece to the Present. New York: Thames and Hudson, 1999

Two grading options, with or without a paper:

Option A: 3 short papers, plus 2 tests and final

Option B: 2 tests and final exam

ARTH 250 MWF 11:30-12:20

ART IN THE AGE OF DISCOVERY OLSZEWSKI

A consideration of European art during a period of exploration and discovery. The impact on the arts of advances in science, political and religious thought, and exploration will be examined through the works of major masters including Donatello, Botticelli, Dürer, Michelangelo, Bruegel, Holbein and Titian. Texts: Roberta Olson, Italian Renaissance Sculpture; Frederick Hartt, History of Italian Renaissance Art; and Michael Baxandall, Painting and Experience in Fifteenth Century Italy. Requirements: three examinations given at five week intervals (including the final examination), a term paper on a research topic.

ARTH 271 MW 12:30-1:45

AMERICAN ART & ARCHITECTURE: ADAMS

THE 20/21ST CENTURY


A survey of the development of American art from 1900 to the present (and the future) which will explore how art has expressed both American values and American anxieties. Painting will be emphasized but the course will also consider architecture, the decorative arts, film, literature and music. Requirements: There will be weekly writing assignments, a midterm and final exam. Textbook: Wayne Craven, American Art and Culture, McGraw-Hill, 2003.

ARTH 302/402 T TH 10:00-11:15

BUDDHIST ART IN ASIA CUNNINGHAM

Buddhist thought and ritual have had a profound impact upon East Asian cultures for over two millennia. This course offers a broad examination of the vitality of this religious culture in the daily life of China, Korea, and Japan through the ages. It focuses on particularly venerated monuments, beginning with those in India, and ending with Japanese spiritual centers in Nara and Kyoto. Architecture, sculpture, and the decorative arts, and garden design represent important visual, as well as philosophical components of this course.
Requirements: Students must be able to use the Cleveland Museum of Art library resources. As there is no course textbook, weekly reading assignments will be given. Reserve shelves will be available at KSL and CMA libraries for this purpose. A midterm, final exam and paper are required.

ARTH 334/434 T TH 10:00-11:15

ART & ARCHEOLOGY OF GREECE NEILS

This course explores the development of Greek art and architecture over three millennia from abstract Cycladic marble figurines to replicas of fresco painting buried in the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius. It will address the latest archaeological discoveries and examine major sites such as Athens, Olympia and Delphi. The text is John Griffiths Pedley's Greek Art and Archaeology. 3rd ed. (2002). There will be a midterm, final, and paper, presented both orally and in written form.

ARTH 340/440 T TH 2:45-4:00

THE ARTS OF NIGERIA PETRIDIS

The contemporary state of Nigeria boasts one of the richest artistic legacies of sub-Saharan Africa. Nigerian arts are characterized by an impressive variety of styles and a long history. This course will examine the arts of a number of different cultures from both a formal and a contextual perspective. Among the highlights to be discussed are the arts of the Benin Kingdom, the Yoruba, the Niger Delta, the Cross River, and the Igbo. The course will consist of lectures by the instructor, critical readings, and discussions. Articles and chapters from journals and books will be assigned on a weekly basis. In addition to a mid-term and a final exam, students will be required to research and write a paper focusing on one object from the CMA's African art collection.

ARTH 374/474 W 5:00-7:30

IMPRESSIONISM TO SYMBOLISM HELMREICH and

LEMONEDES

This course complements the spring special exhibition at the museum, Monet in Normandy. The course will balance an in-depth examination of Monet’s career, beginning with his early plein-air landscapes and concluding with his monumental series paintings, with study of his broader artistic and social contexts, such as the rise of landscape painting and the practice of oil sketching in the nineteenth century and the desire to escape to the countryside attendant upon the growth of Paris and industrialization. Monet’s work will be investigated in relationship to that of his predecessors and colleagues, including Corot, Courbet, Manet, Boudin, Renoir, Pissarro, and Morisot. The course is organized chronologically and will cover the major art movements of Realism, Impressionism, and Symbolism. Through this course, you will gain a better appreciation and understanding of Monet’s innovative approach to the scenery of Normandy. The course will be co-taught by Dr. Anne Helmreich, Associate Professor of Art History at Case, and Dr. Heather Lemonedes, Associate Curator of Drawings, CMA and will also incorporate guest lectures by leading scholars of Impressionist art such as Hollis Clayson, Richard Thomson, and Paul Tucker. Assignments will include both museum-based practice, such as label writing, and academic exercises, such as essay exams. Course texts: Francis Frascina et. al., Modernity and Modernism, French Painting in the Nineteenth Century (1993); Belinda Thomson, Impressionism: Origins, Practice, Reception (2000).

ARTH 384/484 MWF 3:00-3:50

COLONIAL AMERICAN ART ADAMS

In the 18th century, Americans created not only a political revolution but an artistic and creative one as well. In the 17th-century, most Americans were subsistence farmers and most of their products, manufactures, and buildings were relatively crude. In the 18th century, Americans not only established a new and lasting form of government, but for the first time produced paintings, buildings, furniture and silver that rivaled the finest productions of Europe. Notably, many of the leaders of the American Revolution, such as Paul Revere, George Washington, and Thomas Jefferson, also made significant contributions to the arts.

This course will devote particular attention to the emergence of accomplished representational painting, in the work of such figures as John Singleton Copley and Benjamin West, as well as of sophisticated architecture in a classical style, in the work of such figures as Peter Harrison and William Buckland. It will close with an investigation of buildings that remain national icons: George Washington’s Mount Vernon, Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello, and the National Capitol in the newly created city of Washington D.C. Throughout the course we will consider the role not only of privileged classes but of slaves, Native Americans, women, and other minority groups. Grading: The course will entail weekly readings and ten verbal and/or written reports. Each paper or report will constitute 10% of the grade. There will be no final exam.

Graduate Students: In addition to the weekly papers and/or written reports, graduate students will write a final research paper of approximately 20 typescript pages.

ARTH 385/485 MW 12:30-1:45

AMERICAN AVANT-GARDE: 1900-1925 LANDAU

This course will concentrate on avant-garde styles in American art during the first quarter of the 20th century, focusing on the impact of key figures such as Robert Henri, Alfred Stieglitz and Marcel Duchamp. The importance of Stieglitz’s 291 Gallery, the 1913 Armory Show and Duchamp’s move to New York will be highlighted in our investigation of the Photo-Secession, the influence of European modernism, and the formation of New York Dada. Areas of discussion will integrate the social, political, and aesthetic factors which fostered advanced experimentation in art at this juncture in American culture.

Required Books:
Wanda M. Corn, The Great American Thing: Modern Art and National Identity, 1915-1935 (U. of Calif. Press, 1999)
Marcia Brennan, Painting Gender, Constructing Theory: The Alfred Stieglitz Circle and American Formalist Aesthetics (MIT Press, 2001)
Francis M. Naumann with Beth Venn, Making Mischief: Dada Invades New York (Whitney Museum of Art, 1996)

ARTH 393/493 T TH 4:30-5:45

CONTEMPORARY ART: CRITICAL DIRECTIONS: SWENSON

NEW MEDIA AND PERFORMANCE ART, 1950-2000

This course will survey the often-interconnected histories of new media and performance art through the 1990s. We will pay special attention to the social-historical contexts from which these art forms emerged, importantly feminism and other instances in which the body was specifically politicized. Trends in new media and performance have tended to be international in scope; this course will encompass the work of artists from Japan, Cuba, Brazil, Europe and the United States. Topics will include Fluxus, Actionism, Neo-Concretism, happenings, the spread of video art, the "post-studio" school, feminist body art, and AIDS activist performance. We will consider the work of diverse figures including Nam June Paik, Lygia Clark, Shigeko Kubota, Yoko Ono, Allan Kaprow, Carolee Schneemann, Chris Burden, Ana Mendieta, Vito Acconci, Hanna Wilke, Marina Abramovic, David Wojnarowicz, and Andy Warhol.

There will be a fieldtrip to the Wexner Center in Columbus to see the Gillian Wearing survey, and one to the Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh for a screening of the “Screen Tests.”

Reading: TBA

ARTH 395 AS ARRANGED

INTERNSHIP SWENSON

This course is designated for students seeking professional experience in art history. It focuses on the museum experience (registration, exhibition, interpretation, and administration) although students may also elect to conduct internships in museum-related environments such as art conservation. Students are encouraged to have gained significant experience in art history coursework before embarking on an internship. Students must identify an internship and supervisor as well as a campus internship supervisor the semester before enrolling in the internship.

ARTH 398 AS ARRANGED

INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ART HISTORY STAFF

Individual research and reports on special topics. Consent of Professor.

ARTH 399 AS ARRANGED

HONORS THESIS STAFF

Consent of Department Chair. List name of supervising Professor.

ARTH 489 AS ARRANGED

MA QUALIFYING PAPER STAFF

Graduating Art History (ARH) Master=s students only.

ARTH 490 W 1:45-4:15

VISUAL ARTS AND MUSEUMS HELMREICH

This course examines the idea of the art museum in both its historical and contemporary manifestations. The art museum is a rich topic; we will focus on three themes: 1) The History of the Art Museum, its Institutional Framework and Display Practices: Through selected readings, we will consider how notions of art museums, including practices of collecting and display, changed over time and in different historical contexts; and how modes of display influence our interpretations of works of art. 2) The Art Museum and the Architect: We will examine, through selected case studies, directions, themes, and issues in contemporary museum architecture. 3) Museological Practice: Through interviews and discussions with museum professionals in the area as well as selected readings, we will develop an understanding of the different jobs that contribute to the function of a museum; gain practical knowledge that can be applied and developed through internships and future employment; and explore ethical issues facing museum professionals. Course assignments include the development and programming of a virtual exhibition.

ARTH 491 A & B AS ARRANGED

VISUAL ARTS AND MUSEUMS: INTERNSHIP HELMREICH

Consent of supervising Professor. Prerequisite: ARTH 490

ARTH 494 AS ARRANGED

DIRECTED READINGS IN ART HISTORY

Consent of the Instructor is required for all Directed Readings:

SEC. A NON-WESTERN ART PETRIDIS

SEC. B ANCIENT ART NEILS

SEC. D RENAISSANCE/BAROQUE ART OLSZEWSKI

SEC. D RENAISSANCE/BAROQUE ART SCALLEN

SEC. E AMERICAN ART ADAMS

SEC. F MODERN ART crn V0614 LANDAU or HELMREICH

ARTH 512 T 1:15-3:45

SEMINAR IN ANCIENT ART: NEILS

THE PARTHENON FROM ANTIQUITY TO THE PRESENT

The Temple of Athena Parthenos on the Acropolis is one of the icons of western art. Although every detail of its construction and decoration has been scrutinized by scholars for centuries, there are still many unresolved issues. This seminar will focus on various controversial aspects of the classical Parthenon and its Nachleben. In their research projects studentsmay investigate some specific feature of the building or its sculptural program or the impact of these on later western art. The text is Jenifer Neils, ed. The Parthenon From Antiquity to the Present (Cambridge 2005).

ARTH 551 M 2:00-4:30

SEMINAR IN RENAISSANCE ART: OLSZEWSKI

THE DRAWINGS OF PARMIGIANINO AND BAROCCI

A study of the draftsmanship of Parmigianino and Federico Barocci, both prolific draftsmen for whom numerous drawings exist (970 and more than 2,000, respectively). The drawings will be studied as they relate to finished paintings to obtain an understanding of each artist's working methods, namely how the final compositions of paintings were derived from preliminary studies. The drawings will also be examined for insights into the development of iconography. Readings will touch on drawing techniques, drawing types, sketchbooks, and collectors and albums.


ARTH 552 TH 1:15-3:45

SEMINAR IN BAROQUE ART: RUBENS AND REMBRANDT SCALLEN

In this seminar we will investigate the work and careers of two major figures in seventeenth-century Netherlandish art: Peter Paul Rubens and Rembrandt van Rijn. Each has been viewed as quintessential artist of two different traditions: Rubens as the exemplar of the Counter-Reformation Baroque painter, and Rembrandt as the embodiment of a new Protestant culture. There are clear differences between their work in terms of patronage and subject matter, as different as the two cities in which they lived. Yet there are intriguing similarities between them as well, such as their roles as masters of major workshops, their promotion of printmaking, and their relations with leading intellectuals of the time. Finally, each has been the subject of a great deal of recent scholarship that lends itself to methodological analysis. The seminar will consider the art of each master independently and in the kinds of comparative analyses that will provide models for seminar research reports and papers.

Requirements: Class meetings will include discussion of readings done in common. Each participant will be responsible for reviewing a recent book-length interpretation of Rubens’s or Rembrandt’s art, leading a discussion on this publication, and writing an extended critique of this publication. Finally, each student will develop an interpretive or historiographic research project to be presented formally to the class and submitted as a paper; an annotated bibliography should be handed out to the class at the time of the oral presentation.

Course readings: Readings will be drawn from books, journals, and exhibition catalogues available at Ingalls Library. Whenever possible they will be scanned as E-reserves through KSL. It is recommended that those taking the seminar read Kristin Belkin, Rubens, Phaidon, 1998 and Mariët Westermann, Rembrandt, Phaidon, 2000.

ARTH 575 T 1:15-3:45

CRITICAL THEORY SEMINAR LANDAU

This course concentrates on fostering an in-depth understanding of the crucial ways in which recent, often controversial revisionist writings demonstrate the vitality of semiotic, deconstructionist, Marxist, psychoanalytic, post-colonial, film and gender theories for advanced art historical discourse. We will explore the notion that artworks can be read as texts with indeterminate cultural, social and psychological boundaries, and will discuss how to incorporate these newer theoretical positions into what we write. Each student will craft four “chapters” examining the same artist through the lens of various advanced theoretical positions. These essays will be presented orally and critiqued by the class. This seminar is not confined to the study of modern art and is highly recommended for all doctoral students and any MA students who wish to write qualifying papers and/or apply to our doctoral program, as well as to equivalent programs at other universities. Limit: 8; apply to instructor for permission. No auditors. Textbooks: Bradford R. Collins, 12 Views of Manet’’s Bar (Princeton)
Michael Ann Holly, Past Looking: Historical Imagination and the Rhetoric of the Image (Cornell)
Madan Sarup, An Introductory Guide to Post-Structuralism and Postmodernism (U. of Georgia)
Donald Preziosi, ed., The Art of Art History: A Critical Anthology (Oxford)

ARTH 601 AS ARRANGED

RESEARCH IN ART HISTORY STAFF

List name of supervising Professor.

ARTH 610 AS ARRANGED

CLEVELAND MUSEUM OF ART INTERNSHIP STAFF

Open to doctoral candidates in the Museum Studies Program only.

ARTH 701 AS ARRANGED

DISSERTATION PH.D.

List name of supervising Professor.

ARTH 703 AS ARRANGED

DISSERTATION FELLOWSHIP

Advancement to PhD candidacy required. Permission of department chair and research adviser required. List name of supervising Professor