Department of Art History and Art

Department of Art History and Art 2005 Spring Courses


Spring 2005 - Art History Courses


ARTH 102 M W 10:30-11:20

ART HISTORY II: MICHELANGELO TO MAPPLETHORPE CIOFALO

In addition to M W 10:30-11:20 choose ONE of the following discussion group sessions: Wed. 6:00-6:50 pm - crn 46878

Wed. 7:00-7:50 pm - crn 55205

Fri. 10:30-11:20 am - crn 55581

Fri. 10:30-11:20 am - crn 63373

Fri. 11:30-12:20 am - crn 51759

Fri. 11:30-12:20 am - crn 55608

In this course we will examine major works of world art from around 1400 to our own contemporary era. The introduction to this survey of art will come in the form of lectures, discussions, field trips, gallery meetings in the Cleveland Museum of Art, guest lectures, and more. Course requirements include 3 non‑comprehensive exams and three engaging projects. The text will be Laurie Schneider Adams, Art Across Time: Volume II B The Fourteenth Century to the Present (Second Edition).

ARTH 102 may be used (in conjunction with any other 100 or 200 level Art History class) to fulfill the Humanities core requirement.

ARTH 200 M W 12:30-1:45

ORPHEUS TO ROCK-AND-ROLL: CIOFALO

THE REPRESENTATION OF MUSICAL

INSTRUMENTS IN WESTERN ART

crn 50837

The dynamic relationship between music and visual arts has been an enduring feature of the creative impulse in human history. There has been an abundant amount of inquiry into the relationship between the evocation of music in art by way of the correspondence of color and sounds, of the vibrating line and a plucked instrument, of abstraction and its sonorous equivalent. Contrary to but not entirely exclusive from such significant yet numerous examinations, this course will predominantly examine the fascination that artists have had from antiquity to modernity to represent musical instruments themselves in the plastic arts. Some would argue that, aside from formalistic devices, the closest that the visual arts can come to representing a specific sound of an instrument is to represent the instrument itself, but more than this, instruments have absorbed relative cultural, sociological, artistic, and psychological meaning throughout the centuries. Inseparable from their physical appearance and the sound that they produce, musical instruments have from cave paintings to Pop Art revealed to the viewer the most overt and subtlest faculties of human nature and the spiritual world.

Requirements: There will be two non-comprehensive exams and three short engaging projects. While there are no assigned texts, students will be required to read from books and articles on reserve at Kelvin Smith Library and Kulas Music Library.

ARTH 260 T TH 10:00-11:15

ART IN THE AGE OF GRANDEUR SCALLEN

crn 51556

The seventeenth and eighteenth centuries in western and central Europe were times of significant change and upheaval in European societies, but also times of tremendous artistic creativity. In this course, which will focus on painting, sculpture and architecture, we will consider such issues as: how did the arts serve nation building and political symbolism? How were religious reforms reflected in works of art? What role did the rising middle class play as patrons of art? Where did open art markets develop and why? Among the artists studied will be: Caravaggio, Bernini, Rubens, Rembrandt, Vermeer, Poussin, Watteau, Hogarth. We will look at building projects in Rome, Paris, and Versailles. Format: course lectures, in-class discussion of readings, and visits to the galleries of the Cleveland Museum of Art. Requirements: 2 short essays about articles read for the course; one 6-8 page paper, midterm and final examinations. Texts: Required for purchase - Vernon Hyde Minor, Baroque and Rococo: Art and Culture, Prentice Hall, 1999, ISBN 0130856485. Recommended - John Rupert Martin, Baroque, Harper Collins, 19990, ISBN 0064300773.

ARTH 304/404 T TH 1:15-2:30

ART OF WEST AFRICA PETRIDIS

crn 51567/50996

This course will survey artistic traditions of the past and traditions that continue to flourish to this day in the culture regions of West Africa called the Western Sudan and the Guinea Coast. An area of immense geographical and human diversity, the Western Sudan is the homeland of some of Africa=s most renowned medieval empires. An ancient culture known as Jenne (8thB17th century) has produced a wide variety of refined ceramic artifacts. The Guinea Coast is densely populated by hundreds of different ethnic groups and harbors a diversity of artistic traditions. An active trade with Europeans was established in the region as early as the 15th century. Gender-restricted and ritually powerful organizations still serve as the major patrons of the arts in the region. Contrary to the elongated so-called Apole style@ typical of the Western Sudan, the arts of the Guinea Coast are characterized by organic and elegant forms, and smooth surfaces in a variety of media. Requirements: In addition to a mid-term and final exam students will write a paper on an aspect of one of the artistic traditions covered in the course, and present the results in class. Text: M. Blackmun Visona, A History of Art in Africa, New York, 2001.

ARTH 328/428 (CLSC 328) T TH 10:00-11:15

GREEK SCULPTURE NEILS

crn 51575/51624

This course will deal with the development of bronze and marble sculpture in ancient Greece from its beginnings in the seventh century B.C. to the end of the Hellenistic period in the first century B.C. Both free-standing and architectural sculpture will be studied as well as major artists like Myron, Pheidias, Praxiteles and Lysippos. Special attention will be given to the emergence of the classical style in Athens in the mid-fifth century B.C. Class meetings will consist of illustrated lectures, gallery visits and discussion groups. There will be a midterm, paper/report, and final exam. Text: Andrew Stewart, Greek Sculpture (Yale University Press).

ARTH 351/451 M W F 2:00-2:50

GOTHIC ART IN ITALY OLSZEWSKI

crn 51575/51631

Italian Gothic architecture, late Gothic developments in Pisa, Siena and Florence; sculpture of the Pisani; Italo-Byzantine painting; Cimabue and Giotto; Duccio, Simone Martini, and the Lorenzetti; painting in Florence and Siena after the Black Death; the International Style. Course requirements include two lecture examinations (15% of grade each) a final examination (35% of grade) and a term paper project (35% of grade).

Texts: J. White, Art and Architecture in Italy, 1250-1400, Pelican. T. Hyman, Sienese Painting, Thames & Hudson.

ARTH 356/456 M W F 11:30-12:20

ITALIAN SCULPTURE 1250-1750 OLSZEWSKI

crn 51608/51645

A survey of sculpture in Italy from the Late Gothic to the Late Baroque periods, with a consideration of stylistic development including Renaissance, High Renaissance and Mannerism. Major monuments and the art of major masters will be discussed, and will include the works of Arnolfo di Cambio, Andrea Pisano, Lorenzo Ghiberti, Donatello, Verrocchio, Pollaiuolo, Michelangelo, Benvenuto Cellini, Giovanni Bologna and Gianlorenzo Bernini. Various genres will also be considered, such as church furniture - tombs, pulpits and portals - the equestrian monument, the portrait bust, illusionistic relief carving, sculpture programs, group installations, site specific works, etc. Conceptual issues will include the notion of invenzione, gender specific iconography, contrapposto and the fourth dimension in three dimensional art, the figura serpentinata, optical correction and pivotal presentation, the psychomachic representation, etc. Course requirements include three lecture examinations given at five week intervals including the final examination comprising 15%, 15% and 35% of the final grade, respectively, and a term paper assignment (35%).

Texts: H, Hibbard, Bernini, Penguin. B. Boucher, Italian Baroque Sculpture, Thames & Hudson. R Olson, Italian Renaissance Sculpture, Thames & Hudson.

ARTH 392/492 T 5:45-8:15

ARTWRITING CARRIER

crn 31201/51631 Class held at

The Cleveland Institute of Art

Art critics and art historians describe visual art. We will read a great variety of art criticism and art history, and analyze this literature. Then we show why this concern with the literary dimension of art writing is important. To understand why these writings are produced, and how they are understood we need to look at these communities of readers. We value art because it plays an essential role in creating groups of people with shared interests in visual art. Two short papers and one longer essay are required. Textbook: Carrier, Writing About Visual Art, 2002.

ARTH 393/493 W 2:00-5:00

ANDY WARHOL CARRIER

crn 51613/41769

Andy Warhol was the most influential high artist of the second half of the twentieth century. After a successful career as a decorator, he became one of the founders of pop art. He became the only pop artist who, achieving general fame, became a culture hero. Apart from painting, Warhol also made films, directed the Velvet Underground, and important innovative music group, and was involved with creative writing. And so, not surprisingly, his achievement has been hard to bring into focus. Traditional art historians have described his stylistic development, interpreting his paintings. But many other approaches to his art are possible. Arthur Danto has described the philosophical significance of Warhol=s achievement; cultural historians have discussed his role as a gay artist; and attention has been drawn to the importance of his lifelong interests in religion. Warhol has become a significant subject for scholarship in part because his body of art poses significant interpretative challenges. We will do a close reading of some biographies, and also look at some of Warhol=s own writings.

Required texts: Bob Colacello, Holy Terror: Andy Warhol Close Up, Cooper Square Publishers; Wayne Koestenbaum, Andy Warhol, Viking.

Recommended texts: I=ll Be Your Mirror: The Selected Andy Warhol Interviews, Carroll & Graf; Pat Hackett, The Andy Warhol Diaries, Warner Books; Andy Warhol, The Philosophy of Andy Warhol, Harcourt

ARTH 396 TH 1:15-3:45

MAJORS SEMINAR LANDAU

crn 72451 Class held at KSL

Special Collections

The topic for this semester centers on how to organize an exhibition. We will work directly with a collection of original WPA prints, created in Cleveland during the 1930s and early 1940s and now owned by Kelvin Smith Library=s Special Collections division. This Ahands-on@ class will meet at Kelvin Smith with occasional trips to other venues including the Cleveland Museum of Art. We will study techniques for researching original objects and the principles of curating a thematically-designed show. As a group, students will prepare a virtual catalogue explicating the works chosen for Aexhibition.@ Readings will include texts concerning the interconnection of depression-era social issue, politics and art.

All art history majors must take ARTH 396 in order to graduate. It is recommended for minors as well. This course is generally offered every other spring. Juniors and seniors who have not already taken ARTH 396 should sign up for this class. Sophomores may enroll or wait until the next time it is taught (spring 2007).

ARTH 398 AS ARRANGED

INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ART HISTORY STAFF

crn V1019

Individual research and reports on special topics. Consent of Professor.

ARTH 399 AS ARRANGED

HONORS THESIS STAFF

crn 67334

Consent of Department Chair. List name of supervising Professor.

ARTH 489 AS ARRANGED

MA QUALIFYING PAPER STAFF

crn 49322

Graduating Art History (ARH) Master=s students only.

ARTH 490 W 3:00-6:00

VISUAL ARTS AND MUSEUMS ADAMS

crn 67343

A general survey of the history, philosophy, objectives, and practices of the art museum. The chief model will be the Cleveland Museum of Art and many classes will be conducted in the various departments of the museum by museum staff. Candidates for the Master's Degree in Art History and Museum Studies who successfully complete this course will be eligible for consideration as an intern in an art museum or gallery (ARTH 491). Readings will include histories of major museums, such as Andrew McClellan's Inventing the Louvre, and Walter Whitehill's The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston: A Centennial History, as well as memoirs of key figures in shaping the museum profession, such as John Walker's Self Portrait with Donors, and Thomas Hoving's Making the Mummies Dance.

ARTH 491 A & B AS ARRANGED

VISUAL ARTS AND MUSEUMS: INTERNSHIP ADAMS

crn 74613 & 74548

Consent of supervising Professor. Prerequisite: ARTH 490

ARTH 494 AS ARRANGED

DIRECTED READINGS IN ART HISTORY

Consent of the Instructor is required for all Directed Readings:

SEC. A NON-WESTERN ART crn V8400 PETRIDIS

SEC. B ANCIENT ART crn V0610 NEILS

SEC. D RENAISSANCE/BAROQUE ART crn V0615 OLSZEWSKI

SEC. D RENAISSANCE/BAROQUE ART crn V0612 SCALLEN

SEC. E AMERICAN ART crn V0613 ADAMS

SEC. F MODERN ART crn V0614 CIOFALO or LANDAU

ARTH 512 T 2:00-5:00

SEMINAR IN ANCIENT ART: NEILS

MONUMENT, MEMORY AND CIVIC IDENTITY

IN CLASSICAL ATHENS

crn 36154

Today we are moved and inspired by those monuments that memorialize profound events in our past: the unrestored ruins of the Ged├Ąchtnis church in Berlin reflect the devastation of Europe in WWII; a statue of Paul Revere conjures up the freedom fighters of the American revolution; the Iwo Jima monument conveys the elation of victory over a ruthless enemy; and the Vietnam War memorial with the inscribed names of 58,209 service personnel is seen as the ultimate shrine to war dead. It is not generally known that such memorials have a long history and that many similar monuments could be seen in fifth-century Athens. Returning to their city after its sack by the Persians, the Athenians prominently displayed the ruins of the older Temple of Athena in the new north wall of the Acropolis as a reminder to all; they set up a sculptural group in the very center of the Agora commemorating the freedom fighters, the Tyrannicides; they built splendid marble temples and commissioned elaborate wall paintings to celebrate their victories over the barbarian Persians; and they were the first we know of in history to create a public cemetery (demosion sema) for those who died in war with the victims= names inscribed. Although many of these practices seem familiar enough to us today, they were radical and innovative in the fifth century B.C. It is the purpose of this course to examine the ways in which these influential monuments were significant for the developing civic identity of the Athenian citizen. In a city which prided itself on being an Aeducation to all of Greece@ such monuments assume a key role in our understanding of the community, its self-definition, and its values. Requirements: one research paper and a class presentation.

ARTH 551 TH 2:00-5:00

SEMINAR IN RENAISSANCE ART: SCALLEN

ART THE MIRROR OF ART: IMAGES ABOUT

ARTISTS AND THE MAKING OF ART

crn 31303

Starting with the Renaissance period in northern and southern Europe, many paintings, prints, drawings and sculptures were devoted to the theme of art itself. Representations of artists, whether at work in a Ahistorical@ context (Apelles with Alexander the Great, Saint Luke Painting the Virgin Mary) or in the form of artists= portraits and self portraits become popular. Mythological subjects, or those derived from classical literature were also featured: Mercury and Saturn as planetary gods of art in astrological systems, allegorical representations of Minerva as patroness of the arts, stories such as Pygmalion sculpting Galatea. Other works also speak to the interest in the art of image making B depictions of mirrors in paintings and prints, and their Areflection@ of the outside world, or art consumption, by way of paintings of real or imagined private art collections, dealer shops, and, eventually, public museums. A late contribution to this trend is the nineteenth century creation of painted historical tableaus featuring stories from the lives of Leonardo, Raphael, Michelangelo, and Rembrandt van Rijn.

In this seminar we will examine together these diverse images about the world of art to see what they tell us about the place of the visual arts, and or artists, in the Renaissance and early modern Europe. How do changes in the kinds of subjects shown, and changes in how they are depicted, reflect changes in status? Our greatest emphasis will be on the period 1400-1700, but we will follow several themes up to about 1850. Requirements: Extensive discussion of readings done in common will be at the heart of this seminar, and each student will help to lead one of these discussions. Two other oral presentations will also be required, one discussing a specific work of art, and one derived from a research project devoted to a larger theme (such as those outlined above). The research paper will have a required length of about 20 text pages, plus notes and bibliography. No required textbooks; we will be reading articles, book chapters and exhibition catalogue essays weekly.

ARTH 576 M 2:00-5:00

SEMINAR IN MODERN ART: LANDAU

ART AND LITERATURE: THE BEAT GENERATION AND

THE DEVELOPMENT OF POP ART

crn 51659

This seminar will focus on the parallels and inter-relationships between avant-garde artists, writers, poets, and musicians in New York, Los Angeles and San Francisco in the late 1950s and early >60s. Interconnections between literary figures such as Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg and Frank O=Hara; artists like Robert Rauschenberg, Claes Oldenberg, and Jasper Johns; and creative talents in other fields, including composer John Cage and dancer/choreographer Merce Cunningham, will be explored. Emphasis will be placed on the vitality of the Aassemblage@ aesthetic during this period. Each student will participate in group projects as well as research and write an original theme paper.

ARTH 601 AS ARRANGED

RESEARCH IN ART HISTORY STAFF

crn V1020

List name of supervising Professor.

ARTH 610 AS ARRANGED

CLEVELAND MUSEUM OF ART INTERNSHIP ADAMS

crn 67351

Open to doctoral candidates in the Museum Studies Program only.

ARTH 701 AS ARRANGED

DISSERTATION PH.D.

crn V3805

List name of supervising Professor.

ARTH 703 AS ARRANGED

DISSERTATION FELLOWSHIP

crn V3805

Advancement to PhD candidacy required. Permission of department chair and research adviser required. List name of supervising Professor