Department of Art History and Art


Fall 2010 - Art History Courses


The following courses in Art History will be offered by the faculty of the Case Western Reserve University/Cleveland Museum of Art Joint Program in Art History. Courses at the 100, 200 and 300 levels are open to undergraduate students. Further information may be obtained in the art history department Office, Mather House, Room 108 (x4118), via e-mail (dxt6@case.edu).

ARTH 101
M W F 10:30-11:20 - SCALLEN
PYRAMIDS TO PAGODAS

Cave paintings, Egyptian pyramids, the Colosseum, Byzantine mosaics, Chinese scroll paintings, Hindu temples, Mayan sculptures, Chartres Cathedral. ARTH 101 is a broad-ranging course - geographically and chronologically - which highlights the major artistic monuments created throughout the world from the Paleolithic era up to the start of the fifteenth century. Students will learn how to look at, discuss, and write about works of art, considering such issues as how historical and cultural contexts shape the meaning, appearance, and function of art, and how artistic concepts and styles develop and change over time and in different world regions. In addition to two weekly lectures once a week discussion sessions will provide time to review concepts and prepare for examinations and paper writing. Requirements: Two short papers, two in-class tests, a final examination and participation in discussions and any assignments in the small group sessions. Required text: Marilyn Stokstad, Art History, vol. 1, fourth edition (published 2010), VOLUME 1: 9780205719891, or the three hole punch version VOLUME 1: 9780205795574

ARTH 220 (JDST220)
T TH 10:00-11:15 - NEULANDER
JEWISH TRADITIONAL ART AND ARCHITECTURE

The course will trace tradition and transformation in Jewish traditional art and architecture over time and across space. The semester will carry us from the Israelite phase beginning with Solomon's Temple, to the present day in Israel and America, over the course of which 29 centuries terms like "Jewish," and even "art," will undergo remarkable change.

ARTH 271
MW 12:30-1:45 ADAMS
AMERICAN ART AND CULTURE: THE 20TH/21ST CENTURY

A survey of the development of American art from 1900 to the present (and the future) which will explore how art has expressed both American values and American anxieties. Painting will be emphasized but the course will also consider architecture, the decorative arts, film, literature and music. Requirements: There will be weekly writing assignments, a midterm and final exam.

ARTH 308/408
T TH 1:15-2:30 - GIUFFRIDA
THE ARTS OF JAPAN

A survey of the major developments in Japanese art from prehistoric times to the present in a wide range of media, including sculpture, ceramics, architecture, calligraphy, painting, garden design, woodblock prints, film, and installations. Among topics covered are: Buddhist art, narrative handscrolls, ink painting and portraiture associated with Zen, ceramics for tea ceremony, Edo and Meiji period woodblock prints, and Western and Chinese influences on Japanese artists. Modern and contemporary artists and filmmakers such as Isamu Noguchi, Akira Kurosawa, Yayoi Kusama, Yasumasa Morimura, and Takashi Murakami are also investigated. The course explores factors behind the making of works of art, including social, political and religious meanings, while examining the historical contexts for and aesthetic principles of the arts of Japan. Prerequisites: One previous art history course at the 100 or 200 level or permission of the instructor. Students with some Asian studies, Japanese language, Japanese history, or other appropriate background may be permitted to enroll at the discretion of the instructor.
Required Text: Penelope Mason. History of Japanese Art, second edition. New York: Prentice Hall, 2004. Additional readings are required and are available as course reserves at Kelvin Smith Library, Ingalls Library at the Cleveland Museum of Art, and on BlackBoard.

ARTH 333/433
T TH 10:00-11:15 - NEILS
GREEK AND ROMAN PAINTING

An overview of the masterpieces of ancient painting from Minoan frescoes at Knossos to Roman wall decoration in the houses of Pompeii. Special attention will be given to Greek vases and Etruscan and Hellenistic tombs in an effort to reconstruct the development of monumental painting in antiquity. Course requirements consist of a midterm and final exam, an oral presentation, and a term paper.

ARTH 349/449
T TH 11:30-12:45 - GERTSMAN
GOTHIC ART: VISION AND MATTER

This course will examine the development and dissemination of Gothic art in Western Europe in the High and Late Middle Ages. We will consider a variety of media, including architecture, metalwork, sculpture, manuscript illumination, panel paintings, fresco cycles, and small devotional objects. As we study medieval art in its socio-historical contexts - private and public, monastic and political, liturgical and lay - we will pay special attention to issues of patronage, relationships between texts and images, the introduction of visionary and mystical devotion, attitudes towards education and authority, differences between male and female piety, modes of medieval viewing, and reception and manipulation of art by medieval audiences. Visits to the CMA will form an integral part of the course.
Textbook 1: Rolf Toman, ed. Gothic: Architecture, Sculpture, Painting. Langenscheidt, 2008. Textbook 2: Michael Camille, Gothic Art: Glorious Visions. New York: Harry N Abrams, 1996. Primary sources: Teresa G. Frisch, ed., Gothic Art 1140-c1450. Sources and Documents. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1987.

ARTH 360/460
M W 12:30-1:45 - SCALLEN
RENAISSANCE ART IN NORTHERN EUROPE, ca. 1380-1570

The visual arts of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries participated in the widespread social and political changes in northern Europe in what is today Belgium, The Netherlands, Germany, and France. In this course we will examine both the work of pioneering individual artists, such as Jan van Eyck, Hieronymus Bosch, Albrecht Dürer and Pieter Bruegel, and larger themes such as patronage and the rise of the art market, the invention and dissemination of prints, the development of new subjects in art (landscapes, scenes of daily life) and the use of art for political propaganda and religious devotion.
Requirements for 362: Midterm and final examinations, two critiques of articles read for class discussion, a research paper of 8-12 pages, oral presentations on the research project, participation in class discussions.
Requirements for 462: Same as for 362, with a longer (ca. 15-20 page) research paper and three critiques of assigned readings. Graduate students will also lead one class discussion.
Text to purchase: Jeffrey Chipps Smith, The Northern Renaissance, Phaidon, 2004, ISBN071483675. The other course readings will consist of articles, book chapters, and exhibition catalogues that will be placed on reserve at the CMA and Kelvin Smith libraries.

ARTH 395
AS ARRANGED - STAFF
INTERNSHIP

This course is designated for undergraduate students seeking professional experience in art history. It focuses on the museum experience (registration, exhibition, interpretation, and administration) although students may also elect to conduct internships in museum-related environments such as art conservation. Students are encouraged to have gained significant experience in art history coursework before embarking on an internship. Students must identify and internship and supervisor as well as a faculty supervisor the semester before enrolling in the internship.

ARTH 398
AS ARRANGED - STAFF
INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ART HISTORY

Individual research reports on special topics. Consent of supervising Professor and permit is required.

ARTH 399
AS ARRANGED - STAFF
HONORS THESIS

Consent of supervising Professor and a permit is required.

ARTH 490A
W 3:00-6:00 - WITCHEY
VISUAL ARTS AND MUSEUMS

This course examines the idea of the art museum in both its historical and contemporary manifestations. The art museum is a rich topic; we will focus on three themes: 1) The History of the Art Museum, its Institutional Framework and Display Practices: Through selected readings, we will consider how notions of art museums, including practices of collecting and display, changed over time and in different historical contexts; and how modes of display influence our interpretations of works of art. 2) The Art Museum and the Architect: We will examine, through selected case studies, directions, themes, and issues in contemporary museum architecture. 3) Museological Practice: Through interviews and discussions with museum professionals in the area as well as selected readings, we will develop an understanding of the different jobs that contribute to the function of a museum; gain practical knowledge that can be applied and developed through internships and future employment; and explore ethical issues facing museum professionals. Course assignments include the development and programming of a virtual exhibition.

ARTH 491 A & B
AS ARRANGED
VISUAL ARTS AND MUSEUMS: INTERNSHIP

Consent of supervising Professor. Prerequisite: ARTH 490

ARTH 494 (A-F)
AS ARRANGED
DIRECTED READINGS

Consent of supervising Professor and a permit is required for all Directed Readings:
A: Non-Western Art - GIUFFRIDA
B: Ancient Art - NEILS
C: Medieval Art - GERTSMAN
D: Renaissance and Baroque Art - OLSZEWSKI or SCALLEN
E: American Art - ADAMS
F: Modern Art - HELMREICH, or CARRIER

ARTH 495
F 11:30-2:30 - OLSZEWSKI
METHODOLOGIES OF ART HISTORY

An introduction to art historical research and writing highlighting methods of interpretation ranging from ekphrasis to deconstruction. Course requirements include a series of shorter analyses of an object in the collection of the Cleveland Museum of Art from numerous points of view, including provenance, connoisseurship, style, iconography, iconology and semiotics. A final paper will be presented orally. This is a reading and writing-intensive seminar which provides a basis for all subsequent graduate work in art history.

ARTH 518B
W 2:00-5:00 - GIUFFRIDA
SEMINAR IN ASIAN ART: CHINESE ART: 19th CENTURY TO NOW

From the last decades of imperial rule through the rise of Communism and ending with China's current presence on the global stage, this seminar investigates the multiple realities that Chinese artists have constructed for themselves. By examining artworks in a variety of media including painting, sculpture, decorative arts, performance art, and installations, the seminar explores relationships between tradition and modernity, confluences between East and West, representations of cultural identity, the role of expatriate artists, and the impact of the international art market. The class will be conducted as a graduate-level seminar, with primary emphasis on student discussion and research. Each weekly session focuses on a specific historical time period, theme, artistic movement, and/or issue. We examine and discuss the works of several representative artists during each session. Students undertake independent research projects and complete a 10-page research paper and share the results of their work with the class through an oral presentation. Prerequisites: Open to graduate students or by permission of instructor. Undergraduates with some background in Chinese art history, language, history, political science, fine arts, or other appropriate background may be permitted to enroll at the discretion of the instructor.

ARTH 601
AS ARRANGED
RESEARCH IN ART HISTORY

List name of supervising Professor.

ARTH 610
AS ARRANGED
CLEVELAND MUSEUM OF ART INTERNSHIP

Open to doctoral candidates in the Museum Studies Program only.

ARTH 701
AS ARRANGED
DISSERTATION PhD

List name of supervising Professor.