Department of Art History and Art


Fall 2009 - Art History Courses


The following courses in Art History will be offered by the faculty of the Case Western Reserve University/Cleveland Museum of Art Joint Program in Art History. Courses at the 100, 200 and 300 levels are open to undergraduate students. Further information may be obtained in the art history department Office, Mather House, Room 108 (x4118), via e-mail (dxt6@case.edu).

ARTH 101
M W F 10:30-11:20 - ADAMS
ACTS OF GENIUS: THE ARTS OF MANKIND - CAVE PAINTING TO THE RENAISSANCE

Cave paintings, Egyptian pyramids, the Colosseum, Byzantine mosaics, Chinese scroll paintings, Hindu temples, Mayan sculptures, Chartres Cathedral. ARTH 101 is a broad-ranging course - geographically and chronologically - which highlights the major artistic monuments created throughout the world from the Paleolithic era up to the start of the fifteenth century. Students will learn how to look at, discuss, and write about works of art, considering such issues as how historical and cultural contexts shape the meaning, appearance, and function of art, and how artistic concepts and styles develop and change over time and in different world regions. In addition to two weekly lectures once a week discussion sessions will provide time to review concepts and prepare for examinations and paper writing. Requirements: Two short papers, two in-class tests, a final examination and participation in discussions and any assignments in the small group sessions. Required texts: Marilyn Stokstad, Art History, Revised Volume I (w/CD-ROM) Prentice Hall.

ARTH 221 (CLSC 221)
T TH 10:00-11:15 - BURROUGHS
BUILDING ON ANTIQUITY

The history of European and Euro-American architecture and urban planning is, with few intervals, the history of the creative imitation and development of so-called classical forms and ideas that emerged in the ancient civilizations of Greece and Rome. This course will begin with the exploration of Greek and Roman architecture, especially the emergence and use of the orders of architecture, as well as key building types. Cleveland is an especially good place to study the American deployment of classicism; since we are here and while the good weather lasts we will study actual buildings and spaces. We will then return (virtually) to Europe and trace different responses to classicism in contrasting cultural and political contexts, both in the service of state power and, less often, in connection with radical, even revolutionary agendas. Grading will depend on quizzes, a final exam, and a research paper, as well as some group work involving oral presentations.

Objectives: This course will provide orientation in the architectural orders and in most periods of European and Euro-American architectural history as well as, to an extent, criticism. There will be considerable writing, as well as oral participation. Students will learn how to research buildings from different historical epochs, how to work with relevant databases and a range of on-line resources, as well as with the print resources available. Students will also gain some familiarity with the conventions and strategies of architectural representation and criticism as these became established over centuries.

ARTH 293
W 5:45-8:15 CARRIER
A WORLD ART HISTORY

Traditionally art historians have focused on the history of European art. But recently there has been great interest in art of other cultures. Is a history of world art possible? And if so, what form might it take? This course explores that question. We read Richard Wollheim's aesthetic focused on European art. And then we discuss James Elkins, Stories of Art, which attempts to imagine a history of world art. We then pursue our investigation by reading recent accounts of Islamic art (Oleg Grabar on Islamic Art, Indian art (Partha Mitter, Indian Art), and Chinese art (Craig Clunas, Art in China), World Art History (David Carrier).

This class requires a good deal of reading. It does not presuppose any prior knowledge of art history or aesthetics. Three papers, two short ones and one long one will be required. There is no final exam.

ARTH 334/434 (CLSC 334)
T TH 10:00-11:15 - NEILS
ART AND ARCHAEOLOGY OF GREECE

Where do those classical columns in front of Thwing come from and what is that triangular relief on the facade of Severance Hall? Find out in this course which explores the development of Greek art and architecture over three millennia from Bronze Age figurines made of Greek island marble to portraits of Alexander the Great. Learn about the latest archaeological discoveries in the ancient Mediterranean and visit (virtually) major sites such as Athens, Olympia and Delphi.

The text is John Griffiths Pedley's Greek Art and Archaeology, 4rd ed. (2007). There will be a midterm, final, and paper, presented both orally and in written form.

ARTH 340/440
GIUFFRIDA
ARTS OF CHINA A survey of major developments in Chinese art from the Neolithic period to the present, including archaeological discoveries, bronzes, calligraphy, painting, sculpture, ceramics, performance art, and installations. Among topics covered are: ancient funerary art and tombs; painting and sculpture of early Buddhist grottoes; landscape painting; art commissioned and collected by the imperial court; literati painting and calligraphy; public and private art associated with Daoist, Buddhist, and Confucian religious practices and sites; art produced during periods of non-Chinese rule under the Tanguts, Mongols, and Manchus; foreign influences on artists in China; and the role of Chinese artists in the contemporary international art market. The course explores factors behind the creation and reception of works of art, including social, political and religious meanings, while examining the historical contexts for and artistic traditions of the visual culture of China.

ARTH 350/450
T TH 2:45-4:00 - BURROUGHS
ISSUES IN MEDIEVAL ART
CLASSICISM VS MODERNISM, MEDIEVAL STYLE: CONTRASTS IN EUROPEAN ART AND ARCHITECTURE FROM SUGER TO BRUNELLESCHI

Renaissance of course means "rebirth" and implies a claim of cultural transformation involving the revival of the supposedly lost learning and of the artistic and even political achievements of classical antiquity. In fact, certain elements of classical culture retained crucial importance in the medieval period, though a holistic understanding of antiquity was certainly lacking and indeed unattainable given medieval priorities and habits of mind. A key aspect of the fifteenth century Renaissance was a shift of geographical focus: Florence (quickly followed by Rome) replaced Paris as the major European center of cultural innovation and diffusion. The Gothic style, which emerged in the Paris region in the 12th century, developed as an immensely successful "modern" style, associated with the rise of the French monarchic state and court culture, and with the effects of the crusades and increasing linkages across the Mediterranean region.

This course will begin with Gothic (usually treated as the culmination of medieval architecture) and move on to the early Renaissance (usually treated as the beginning of a new cultural epoch). The main emphasis will be on architecture, though we will necessarily consider the visual arts in general. We will focus on late medieval urban centers and/or courts: e.g., Paris, London, Prague, Florence, Siena, Venice, Assisi. We will then consider the various cultural manifestations that much later became labeled as "early Renaissance," including such major topics as the invention of perspective, the emergence (in humanism) of a philological attitude to the legacy of the ancient world, and the issue of the appearance of recognizably modern forms of subjectivity and individualism.

Objectives: The course is designed to develop writing and research skills. It will introduce students to important resources and methodologies in historical and art historical study. Students will learn about key moments in the development of major European cities and nation states, and about cultural and social transformations with continuing effect in the contemporary world.

Coursework and Grading: There will be a major term paper (50% of grade) as well as reports (30%). There will be a quiz on both the medieval and the Renaissance material (10% each).

ARTH 353/453
M W F 11:30-12:20 - OLSZEWSKI
SIXTEENTH CENTURY ITALIAN ART

A specialized study of the visual arts in Italy from 1500-1600 with emphasis on major masters, artistic programs, conditions of patronage and conceptual issues. Stylistic categories will be discussed including the High Renaissance, Mannerism and the new seriousness in art after the Council of Trent. The artistic careers of Michelangelo, Leonardo, Raphael, Titian, Correggio, Parmigianino, Rosso, Pontormo, Cellini and Giovanni da Bologna, among others, will be examined. Texts: F. Hart & D. Wilkins, History of Italian Renaissance Art, Prentice Hall, 2006; A Hughes, Michelangelo, Phaidon, 1999; L. Schianchi, Correggio, Scala/Riverside, 1994. Requirements: examination every five weeks, term paper and two critical reviews on assigned topics. Lecture exams: 15% of fine grade each, final exam: 35% of fine grade, and paper assignments: 35% of final grade.

ARTH379/479
W 6:00-8:30 - HELMREICH
ISSUES IN 19TH CENTURY ART: PAUL GAUGUIN

This course concerns the painter Paul Gauguin, whose career spanned some of the most important movements in modernism, from Impressionism to Symbolism and Post Impressionism. The course will focus on the exhibition at the Cleveland Museum of Art featuring the work of Paul Gauguin and focusing on his period in Paris (4 October 2009 - 17 January 2009). Students will gain a behind-the-scenes perspective to the making of an exhibition. Through the study of works by this artist, students will gain familiarity with technical issues pertaining to works on paper as well as oil. In addition, because Gauguin has been the subject of much revisionary scholarship, students will have the opportunity to become familiar with recent theoretical perspectives in art history, including gender studies as well as colonialism and post-colonialism. Assignments will introduce students to aspects of curatorial practice in an art museum.

*ARTH 479 ONLY
F 9:00-10:15

*In addition to participating in the lectures and discussion in the Wednesday evening session, graduate students are required to enroll in a separate discussion section in which specialized readings and topics appropriate for the graduate level will be the focus.

ARTH 380/480
T TH 10:00-11:15 - LANDAU
ABSTRACT EXPRESSIONISM AND ITS AFTERMATH

Recent scholars have increasingly challenged the canonical view of who and what Abstract Expressionism represents, reconfiguring our understanding of this critically important American movement of the mid-20th century in a variety of exciting directions. Training a primary focus on Jackson Pollock, Lee Krasner, Barnett Newman, David Smith and Willem de Kooning, in addition to analyzing the art they produced, we will try to make sense of the discoveries, theories and controversies that, over the past fifty years, have expanded aesthetic, critical and contextual understanding of Abstract Expressionist innovation. We will also consider the complementary and/or contradictory role of other artists working in the 1940s and '50s, whose work was related but who did not express the same goals and stylistic conventions as the recognized practitioners. This course will take the form of a pro-seminar combining lectures, class discussion and oral presentations. Major assignments will include a bibliographic report, a mid-term essay and a final theme paper.

Required Texts: Ellen G. Landau, Reading Abstract Expressionism: Context and Critique (2005), Michael Leja, Reframing Abstract Expressionism: Subjectivity and Painting in the 1940s (1993), Ann Eden Gibson, Abstract Expressionism: Other Politics (1997)

ARTH 392/492
T 5:45-8:15 - CARRIER
ISSUES IN 20th/21st CENTURY ART: ART SINCE 1945

Starting in 1945, the dominant American art movement was Abstract Expressionism. After first tracing its development, we then focus on the history of abstract painting and sculpture in America and Europe, looking also at its influence upon other various movements - minimalism, pop art, and photography. This course presupposes no particular art historical background.

ARTH 395
AS ARRANGED - STAFF
INTERNSHIP

This course is designated for undergraduate students seeking professional experience in art history. It focuses on the museum experience (registration, exhibition, interpretation, and administration) although students may also elect to conduct internships in museum-related environments such as art conservation. Students are encouraged to have gained significant experience in art history coursework before embarking on an internship. Students must identify and internship and supervisor as well as a faculty supervisor the semester before enrolling in the internship.

ARTH 398
AS ARRANGED - STAFF
INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ART HISTORY

Individual research reports on special topics. Consent of supervising Professor and permit is required.

ARTH 399
AS ARRANGED - STAFF
HONORS THESIS

Consent of supervising Professor and a permit is required.

ARTH 490
W 3:00-6:00 - HELMREICH
VISUAL ARTS AND MUSEUMS

This course examines the idea of the art museum in both its historical and contemporary manifestations. The art museum is a rich topic; we will focus on three themes: 1) The History of the Art Museum, its Institutional Framework and Display Practices: Through selected readings, we will consider how notions of art museums, including practices of collecting and display, changed over time and in different historical contexts; and how modes of display influence our interpretations of works of art. 2) The Art Museum and the Architect: We will examine, through selected case studies, directions, themes, and issues in contemporary museum architecture. 3) Museological Practice: Through interviews and discussions with museum professionals in the area as well as selected readings, we will develop an understanding of the different jobs that contribute to the function of a museum; gain practical knowledge that can be applied and developed through internships and future employment; and explore ethical issues facing museum professionals. Course assignments include the development and programming of a virtual exhibition.

ARTH 491 A & B AS ARRANGED VISUAL ARTS AND MUSEUMS: INTERNSHIP Consent of supervising Professor. Prerequisite: ARTH 490

ARTH 494 (A-F)
AS ARRANGED
DIRECTED READINGS

Consent of supervising Professor and a permit is required for all Directed Readings:
A: Non-Western Art - STAFF
B: Ancient Art - NEILS
C: Medieval Art - STAFF
D: Renaissance and Baroque Art - OLSZEWSKI
E: American Art - ADAMS
F: Modern Art - LANDAU, HELMREICH, or CARRIER

ARTH 495
T 1:15-4:15 - LANDAU
METHODOLOGIES OF ART HISTORY

An introduction to art historical research and writing highlighting methods of interpretation ranging from ekphrasis to deconstruction. Course requirements include a series of shorter analyses of an object in the collection of the Cleveland Museum of Art from numerous points of view, including provenance, connoisseurship, style, iconography, iconology and semiotics. A final paper will be presented orally. This is a reading and writing-intensive seminar which provides a basis for all subsequent graduate work in art history. Required texts include David Carrier, Principles of Art History Writing and a variety of essays by authors from Vasari and Panofsky to Roland Barthes and T.J. Clark.

ARTH 551
TH 1:15-4:15 - OLSZEWSKI
SEMINAR IN RENAISSANCE ART: ART IN ITALY, 1400-1600

The seminar will involve discussion and research on topics in Italian art over a 200-year period that includes objects in the CMA collection as well as conceptual issues, problems in iconography, issues of patronage and audience, feminist topics, semiotics, etc. Textbooks: Readings will be taken from journal articles, collections of essays, monographs, and exhibition catalogues. Requirements: Class discussion, brief oral presentations, short writing assignments, an end-of-semester oral presentation of research, term paper.

ARTH 565
M 2:00-5:00
SEMINAR IN AMERICAN ART: ADAMS AMERICAN GOTHIC: GRANT WOOD REVISITED

In much of what has been written about him, Grant Wood has been portrayed as a sweet-tempered individual, whose art celebrated wholesome American values, and whose stylized paintings embodied "the American dream." But if we look more deeply, cracks emerge in this rosy view. How are we to reconcile this serene image of Wood with the violent conflicts that surrounded his career at the University of Iowa, with the accusations that he was homosexual, and with the fact that, as Gertrude Stein astutely noted, his works are filled with "a wicked sense of satire"? This class will take a revisionist look at the work of Grant Wood and will examine the ways in which his work is profoundly subversive, and takes a critical stance towards America and small-town life. Much of our effort will be devoted to looking very closely at his individual paintings, decoding their iconography, and examining their imagery in a historical and cultural context. But we will also look at his biography, his writings, his connections with modern art, and his role in the Regionalist movement.

ARTH 601
AS ARRANGED
RESEARCH IN ART HISTORY

List name of supervising Professor.

ARTH 610
AS ARRANGED
CLEVELAND MUSEUM OF ART INTERNSHIP

Open to doctoral candidates in the Museum Studies Program only.

ARTH 701
AS ARRANGED
DISSERTATION PhD

List name of supervising Professor.