Department of Art History and Art


Fall 2008 - Art History Courses


The following courses in Art History will be offered by the faculty of the Case Western Reserve University/Cleveland Museum of Art Joint Program in Art History. Courses at the 100, 200 and 300 levels are open to undergraduate students. Further information may be obtained in the art history department Office, Mather House, Room 108 (x4118), via e-mail (dxt6@case.edu) or see our web page:

ARTH 101 M W F 10:30-11:20
ACTS OF GENIUS: THE ARTS OF MANKIND – ADAMS
CAVE PAINTING TO THE RENAISSANCE

Cave paintings, Egyptian pyramids, the Colosseum, Byzantine mosaics, Chinese scroll paintings, Hindu temples, Mayan sculptures, Chartres Cathedral. ARTH 101 is a broad-ranging course –– geographically and chronologically –– which highlights the major artistic monuments created throughout the world from the Paleolithic era up to the start of the fifteenth century. Students will learn how to look at, discuss, and write about works of art, considering such issues as how historical and cultural contexts shape the meaning, appearance, and function of art, and how artistic concepts and styles develop and change over time and in different world regions. In addition to two weekly lectures once a week discussion sessions will provide time to review concepts and prepare for examinations and paper writing. Requirements: Two short papers, two in-class tests, a final examination and participation in discussions and any assignments in the small group sessions. Required texts: Marilyn Stokstad, Art History, Revised Volume I (w/CD-ROM) Prentice Hall.

ARTH 203 T TH 10:00-11:15
THE ARTS OF ASIA CUNNINGHAM
INTRODUCTION TO ASIAN ART AND CULTURE:
20 MONUMENTS

This class introduces and then explores the diverse cultural histories of Southeast, and East Asian peoples. It will do so by focusing on an array of manmade structures and artifacts, both secular and religious in function. These structures/artifacts illuminate discreet as well as continuous timeframes in the evolution of Asian civilizations, ethnic and cultural identities, technological and material applications, as well as human values.
Requirements: class attendance and active student participation is essential; weekly reading/study assignments; 4 exercises; mid-term and final exam.

CLSC 211/ARTH 211 - Building on Antiquity (3 hrs) Charles Burroughs, T.R. 1:15-2:30 PM

This course will provide orientation in the architectural orders and in most periods of European and Euro-American architectural history as well as, to an extent, criticism: students will learn how to research buildings from different historical epochs, how to work with relevant databases and a range of on-line resources, as well as with the print resources available. Students will gain some familiarity with the conventions of architectural representation as these became established over centuries. There will be an important writing component and a considerable amount of group work involving oral presentation and classroom discussion. The issue of the meaning(s) of architecture will be central; we will consider the blatant political uses of architecture and of imagery associated with architecture, as well as more elusive and/or ambiguous cases, as well as the phenomenon of meanings changing from one era to another, or according to audience. We will consider, therefore, the relationship of the relatively formal "language" of classical architecture (the orders, especially as endowed with gender associations in the Vitruvian tradition) and the more subtle and ad hoc ways that buildings project meaning or mood.

ARTH 271 MW 12:30-1:45
AMERICAN ART & ARCHITECTURE ADAMS
THE 20/21ST CENTURY

A survey of the development of American art from 1900 to the present (and the future) which will explore how art has expressed both American values and American anxieties. Painting will be emphasized but the course will also consider architecture, the decorative arts, film, literature and music. Requirements:There will be weekly writing assignments, a midterm and final exam. Textbook: Wayne Craven, American Art and Culture, McGraw-Hill.

CLSC 311/ ARTH 311/411 - Rome: City and Image (3 hrs) Charles Burroughs, T.R. 4:30-5:45
Prerequisite for 311: At least one 200-level course in one of the following programs: ANTH, ARTH, CLSC, ENGL, HSTY, or RLGN.)

This course studies the architectural and urban history of Rome from the republican era of the ancient city up to the eighteenth century, using the city itself as the major text. The emphasis will be placed on the extraordinary transformations wrought in the city, or at least in key districts, by powerful rulers and/or elites, especially in the ancient empire and in the Renaissance and baroque eras. In a larger perspective, the great construction projects exerted a far-reaching effect within and beyond Europe, but we will study them especially in relation to their topographical situation, their functions, and their place in a long history of variations on prestigious themes since many of the artworks and especially the urban settings featured in the course carry the mark of the long history of the city itself.

ARTH 332/432 (CLCS 332) T TH 10:00-11:15
THE ART AND ARCHAEOLOGY OF ANCIENT ITALY DUMSER

This course explores the development of architecture, sculpture and painting in Roman Italy from the Republican to Late Imperial periods (c.500 BCE - 350 CE). While the course will focus on monuments in Rome and Italy, important material from North Africa, Asia Minor, and Europe will also be surveyed. Topics to be addressed include: Rome’s emergence as a world capital under the Empire, and its transformation into a Christian capital after 312 CE; the architectural revolution inspired by the new technologies of the arch, vault, and concrete; Pompeii and Roman urbanism; the social and political contexts of monuments, sculpture and painting. The course will consist of illustrated lectures and discussion sessions. Requirements: midterm, final, and research paper with oral report. Graduate students will write a longer research paper, and lead a class session on their topic. Textbook: F. Kleiner, A History of Roman Art (Thomson Wadsworth 2007); additional primary source readings on reserve and/or online.

ARTH 352/452 MWF 11:30-12:20
ITALIAN ART OF THE 15TH CENTURY OLSZEWSKI

A survey of fifteenth century Italian art from Ghiberti and Masaccio to Verrocchio and Signorelli, with emphasis on stylistic development, questions of patronage and iconography, conceptual issues, and religious cultural and political considerations.
Requirements: Two lecture examinations, final exam, critical reviews, research paper.

ARTH 361/461 T TH 1:15-2:30
DUTCH AND FLEMISH 17TH CENTURY PAINTING SCALLEN

This course will examine the rich achievements in the arts of painting and printmaking in the northern and southern Netherlands from about 1585 to 1700. We will use the collections of the Cleveland Museum of Art. We will discuss the careers of major masters such as Rubens and Van Dyck, Rembrandt and Vermeer, and trace the development of newer subjects such as still life, landscape, and genre painting. Other topics to be featured include: patronage and the development of the open art market; the role of religious art in Catholic and Protestant cultures; the rise of artistic specialization, and problems of interpretation. Requirements: midterm and take-home final examination, a term paper and oral presentation, short written critiques of articles, and participation in class discussions. Graduate students will be required to write a longer paper and additional critiques. Required text: Mariët Westermann, A Worldly Art. The Dutch Republic 1585-1718, Yale University Press, 2005. ISBN: 107234

ARTH 393/493 T 5:45-8:15
CONTEMPORARY ART/CRITICAL DIRECTIONS CARRIER

Abstract Expressionism - the first grand American art movement, is by now well understood. But what happens after that? That question is difficult to answer. We will look at earth art, minimalism and pop art in the 1060s, focusing on the role of Andy Warhol. We will pay special attention to the art and writings of Robert Smithson, and to such figures as Gordon Matta-Clark and Bas van Ader. Then we will consider how abstraction became an ongoing gradation, studying the painting of Robert Ryman, Robert Mangold, Brice Marden, and the most important abstract painter of this period, Sean Scully. In the 1980s, figurative art was revived. We will look at such figures as David Salle and Julian Schnabel. In this period, feminism became very important both for the theory and the practice of art. We will focus special attention on the photography of Cindy Sherman. The past twenty years remain very hard, still to understand. What new movements and individual artists have emerged? And how has the role of art writing changed? We will offer tentative answer to these questions.
Requirements: three essays. There is no final exam.
Textbooks: David Joselit, American Art Since 1945, Thames & Hudson (June 2003); Hilary Robinson, Feminism-Art-Theory, Wiley-Blackwell (October 2001); Sean Scully, Resistance and Persistance: Selected Writings, Merrell (October 2006); Hal Foster, Rosalind Krauss, Yve-Alain Bois, Benjamin H.D. Buchloh, Art Since 1900: Modernism, Antimodernism, Postmodernism, Volume 2, 1945 to the Present, Thames & Hudson (May 2005)

ARTH 398 AS ARRANGED
INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ART HISTORY STAFF

Individual research reports on special topics. Consent of supervising Professor and permit is required.

ARTH 395 AS ARRANGED
INTERNSHIP STAFF

This course is designated for students seeking professional experience in art history. It focuses on the museum experience (registration, exhibition, interpretation, and administration) although students may also elect to conduct internships in museum-related environments such as art conservation. Students are encouraged to have gained significant experience in art history coursework before embarking on an internship. Students must identify and internship and supervisor as well as a faculty supervisor the semester before enrolling in the internship.

ARTH 399 AS ARRANGED
HONORS THESIS STAFF

Consent of supervising Professor and a permit is required.

ARTH 490 T 2:45-5:15
VISUAL ARTS AND MUSEUMS HELMREICH
This course examines the idea of the art museum in both its historical and contemporary manifestations. The art museum is a rich topic; we will focus on three themes: 1) The History of the Art Museum, its Institutional Framework and Display Practices: Through selected readings, we will consider how notions of art museums, including practices of collecting and display, changed over time and in different historical contexts; and how modes of display influence our interpretations of works of art. 2) The Art Museum and the Architect: We will examine, through selected case studies, directions, themes, and issues in contemporary museum architecture. 3) Museological Practice: Through interviews and discussions with museum professionals in the area as well as selected readings, we will develop an understanding of the different jobs that contribute to the function of a museum; gain practical knowledge that can be applied and developed through internships and future employment; and explore ethical issues facing museum professionals. Course assignments include the development and programming of a virtual exhibition.

ARTH 491 A & B AS ARRANGED
VISUAL ARTS AND MUSEUMS: INTERNSHIP

Consent of supervising Professor. Prerequisite: ARTH 490

ARTH 494 (A-F) AS ARRANGED
DIRECTED READINGS
Consent of supervising Professor and a permit is required for all Directed Readings:
A: Non-Western Art STAFF
B: Ancient Art STAFF
C: Medieval Art STAFF
D: Renaissance and OLSZEWSKI or SCALLEN
Baroque Art
E: American Art ADAMS
F: Modern Art LANDAU, HELMREICH, or CARRIER

ARTH 495 W 3:00-5:30
METHODOLOGIES OF ART HISTORY LANDAU

An introduction to art historical research and writing highlighting methods of interpretation ranging from ekphrasis to deconstruction. Course requirements include a series of shorter analyses of an object in the collection of the Cleveland Museum of Art from numerous points of view, including provenance, connoisseurship, style, iconography, iconology and semiotics. A final paper will be presented orally. This is a reading and writing-intensive seminar which provides a basis for all subsequent graduate work in art history. Required texts include David Carrier, Principles of Art History Writing and a variety of essays by authors from Vasari and Panofsky to Roland Barthes and T.J. Clark.

ARTH 540 F 2:00-5:00
SEMINAR IN NON-WESTERN ART: PETRIDIS
POWER FIGURES, ANCESTOR WORSHIP,
AND MASQUERADES IN CENTRAL AFRICA

This course will explore the visual arts of various cultures belonging to the Bantu civilization of Central Africa. The focus will be on the so-called tradition-based or classical arts of the Kongo and related peoples in the west to the Lega and related peoples in the east. Through an investigation of the three topics mentioned in the course's title, light will be shed on the contextual framework of the artistic traditions of this region. However, attention will also be devoted to the formal and stylistic diversity of the arts, and to issues of artistic production and patronage. The course will consist of lectures by the instructor, weekly discussions of required readings, and student presentations.
Requirements: weekly required readings, a research paper, and a 20-minute class presentation. The paper and presentation will be an analysis of a single work of art from the Cleveland Museum of Art's collection. Journal articles and book chapters will be made available on line and placed on reserve at Ingalls and Kelvin Smith.


ARTH 576 M 2:00-5:00
SEMINAR IN MODERN ART: LANDAU
MARCEL DUCHAMP AND AMERICAN ART

As one art historian recently noted, the French expatriate artist Marcel Duchamp has been “the obsessive object (and subject) of desire for art and artists in the United States, particularly those challenging the hegemony of abstract expressionism.” Considered the “Daddy of Dada” and “Grandpop of Pop,” despite the fact that most of his works were produced before 1921, Duchamp’s major strategies (including the use of ready-mades and alter egos that question the nature of originality; his employment and enjoyment of visual puns, irony, playfulness and chance; his focus on eroticism and the blurring of boundaries of sexual difference) have constituted a central set of prototypes for postmodern developments in American art beginning in the 1980s.
More than a century after his birth, Duchamp remains an enigma whose seminal role in the history of art is still being felt and debated by artists and critics alike. In this seminar we will first examine Duchamp’s participation in New York Dada during the early years of the 20th century and then attempt to chart key aspects of his impact on a wide range of artists practicing from the 1960s to today. Some possible examples for the latter focus include Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, Claes Oldenburg, Andy Warhol, Robert Morris, Robert Mapplethorpe, Hannah Wilke, Vito Acconci, Yasumaso Morimura, Cindy Sherman and Joseph Cornell. Assignments will include: bibliographic critique, a group close reading and a theme paper presented orally. Limit of 15 students. Advanced undergraduates (juniors and seniors) may enroll in this seminar with instructor permission.
READINGS: Among other sources, we will read and analyze Wanda Corn’s chapter on Duchamp in The Great American Thing: Modern Art and National Identity 1915-1935 (1999); essays in Rudolf E. Kuenzli and Francis M. Naumann, Marcel Duchamp: Artist of the Century (1996) and Martha Buskirk and Mignon Nixon, The Duchamp Effect: Essays Interviews, Round Table (1996); Dalia Judovitz, Unpacking Duchamp: Art in Transit (1995); and Amelia Jones, Postmodernism and the En-gendering of Marcel Duchamp (1994).

ARTH 601 AS ARRANGED
RESEARCH IN ART HISTORY

List name of supervising Professor.

ARTH 610 AS ARRANGED
CLEVELAND MUSEUM OF ART INTERNSHIP

Open to doctoral candidates in the Museum Studies Program only.

ARTH 701 AS ARRANGED
DISSERTATION PhD

List name of supervising Professor.