Department of Art History and Art


Fall 2007 - Art History Courses


The following courses in Art History will be offered by the faculty of the Case Western Reserve University/Cleveland Museum of Art Joint Program in Art History. Courses at the 100, 200 and 300 levels are open to undergraduate students. Further information may be obtained in the art history department Office, Mather House, Room 108 (x4118), via e-mail (dxt6) or see our web page:

ARTH 101 M W F 10:30-11:20
ACTS OF GENIUS: THE ARTS OF MANKIND – ADAMS
CAVE PAINTING TO THE RENAISSANCE

Cave paintings, Egyptian pyramids, the Colosseum, Byzantine mosaics, Chinese scroll paintings, Hindu temples, Mayan sculptures, Chartres Cathedral. ARTH 101 is a broad-ranging course –– geographically and chronologically –– which highlights the major artistic monuments created throughout the world from the Paleolithic era up to the start of the fifteenth century. Students will learn how to look at, discuss, and write about works of art, considering such issues as how historical and cultural contexts shape the meaning, appearance, and function of art, and how artistic concepts and styles develop and change over time and in different world regions. In addition to two weekly lectures once a week discussion sessions will provide time to review concepts and prepare for examinations and paper writing. Requirements: Two short papers, two in-class tests, a final examination and participation in discussions and any assignments in the small group sessions. Required texts: Marilyn Stokstad, Art History, Revised Volume I (w/CD-ROM) Prentice Hall.

ARTH 220/JDST220 T TH 2:45-4:00
JEWISH TRADITIONAL ART & ARCHITECTURE NEULANDER

This course will trace tradition and transformation in Jewish artistic expression over time and across space. The semester will carry us from the Israelite phase beginning with Solomon’s Temple, across the vast expanse of Europe, Asia and North Africa, to the present day in Israel and America, over which 29 centuries terms like “Jewish” and even “art” will undergo remarkable change.

ARTH 227 T TH 10:00-11:15
ANCIENT CITIES AND SANCTUARIES NEILS

From the first appearance of proto-urban complexes in the ancient Near East to the creation of Constantinople as the last major capital of the Roman Empire, this lecture course will explore the design and development of cities in the ancient Mediterranean. The approach will be primarily archaeological, and urban centers will be considered in their cultural and historical contexts. The course will utilize the latest virtual reality programs to recreate the experiences of early city dwellers, and students will participate in a mid-term project investigating common elements of urban design in ancient Athens and modern Cleveland, resulting in a class presentation. Any relevant lectures or programs in conjunction with the theme of Cities taking place at the Baker-Nord Humanities Center will be part of the course requirements.
The course text is Charles Gates’ Ancient Cities: The Archaeology of Urban Life in the Ancient Near East and Egypt, Greece, and Rome (Routledge 2003).

NB: graduate students may enroll in this course under
ARTH 494B

ARTH 260 T TH 10:00-11:15
ART IN THE AGE OF GRANDEUR SCALLEN

The seventeenth and eighteenth centuries in western and central Europe were a time of great artistic innovation and creativity; they also represent a period of significant change and upheaval in European societies. As we look at the major monuments of architecture, painting, and sculpture, in addition to studying the development of new artistic styles, we will consider such issues as : how did the arts serve nation building and political symbolism? How were religious reforms reflected in works of art? What role did the rising middle class play as patrons of art? Where did open art markets develop and why? Among the artists studied will be: Caravaggio, Bernini, Rubens, Rembrandt, Vermeer, Poussin, Watteau, Hogarth. We will look at building projects in Rome, Paris, and Versailles. Format: course lectures and in-class discussion of readings. Requirements: two 3-4 page papers, one brief class presentation, in-class mid-term examination, take-home final examination, and active participation in class discussions. Texts: Required for purchase: Vernon Hyde Minor, Baroque and Rococo: Art and Culture, Prentice Hall, 1999, ISBN 0130856485. Recommended: John Rupert Martin, Baroque, Harper Collins, 1990, ISBN 0064300773.

ARTH 302/402 MW 12:30-1:45
BUDDHIST ART IN ASIA CUNNINGHAM

Buddhist thought and ritual have had a profound impact upon East Asian cultures for over two millennia. This course offers a broad examination of the vitality of this religious culture in the daily life of China, Korea, and Japan through the ages. It focuses on particularly venerated monuments, beginning with t hose in India, and ending with Japanese spiritual centers in Nara and Kyoto. Architecture, sculpture, and the “decorative” arts, and garden design represent important visual, as well as philosophical components of this courses. Requirements: Student must be able to use the Cleveland Museum of Art library resources. As there is no course textbook, weekly reading assignments will be given. Reserve shelves will be available at KSL and CMA libraries for this purpose. A midterm, final exam and paper are required.

ARTH 350/450 F 2:00-4:30
ISSUES IN MEDIEVAL ART: BRILLIANT
MEDIEVAL ART AT THE CLEVELAND MUSEUM OF ART

This course offers an introduction to the history and historiography of medieval art c. 300-1500 through the examination of objects in the outstanding collections of the Cleveland Museum of Art. While the major historical periods and developments, artistic achievements, and architectural monuments of the Middle Ages will be considered, the course will focus particular attention on areas of strength in Museum’s collections: Late Antique and Early Christian art, the art of the Byzantine Empire, the art of the Migration period, Carolingian and Ottonian art, Romanesque and Gothic art in Germany and France, art at the court of Burgundy, high Gothic art in Germany and Italy, arms and armor, and Islamic art. Art used in sacred and secular, public and private spheres will be considered, and themes of interest include artistic materials and techniques, ritual and devotional practices, and relationships between the production and display of luxurious art objects and cultures of learning, power, and desire. The history of collecting, preserving, studying, and exhibiting medieval art at the Cleveland Museum of Art and beyond will also be discussed, and students will have an opportunity to assess the comprehensive reinstallation and reinterpretation of Cleveland’s collections currently underway.
Course requirements include weekly readings and slide quizzes, two short papers, and midterm and final exams. Textbooks: Marilyn Stokstad, Medieval Art (2004) and Elizabeth Bradford Smith, ed., Medieval Art in America: Patterns of Collecting 1800-1940 (1996).

ARTH 392/492 T TH 2:45-4:00
ISSUES IN 20TH/21ST CENTURY ART: LANDAU

This course will explore the new directions taken by contemporary art after Abstract Expressionism decisively shifted the locus of innovation from Paris to New York. Moving from an examination of the formalist stance of modernism prevalent in the 1960s, into a study of postmodern developments of the ‘80s and ‘90s, key trends in painting, sculpture, photography, performance and other avant-garde media will be analyzed in light of parallel fashions in art theory and criticism. Special focus will be placed on the impact of feminism, multi-culturalism, and identity politics. Required books include Caroline Jones, Machine in the Studio: Constructing the Postwar American Artist, and Irving Sandler, Art of the Postmodern Era: From the Late 1960s to the Early 1990s, among others. Course requirements include midterm, weekly reading summaries, and a theme paper.

ARTH 394 T 1:15-4:15
DEPARTMENT SEMINAR (SAGES) HELMREICH

This course fulfills the SAGES requirement of a departmental seminar. We will investigate the myth of the modern artist, focusing on the career of Vincent Van Gogh. Many people only know Van Gogh as a temperamental artist who cut off his ear. We will look at popular conceptions of the artist in such media as film and biographies and then contrast these popular conceptions with examinations of Van Gogh in his art historical, social-cultural, and religious contexts. We will also closely study works by Van Gogh, focusing on such issues as fakes and forgeries and conservation. We will utilize such methodological approaches as post-structuralism, feminism, and social-history.

The course focuses on close readings of art historical texts, examination of original works of art when possible, analytical writing, and intensive seminar-style discussion. The course, in particular, attends to methodological issues in art history—that is, how one investigates, analyzes and presents research findings in written form. Research is always inherently a collaborative process, even if an article or book is written by a single author, and thus we will utilize seminar-style discussions to formulate and critically examine ideas.
Course readings include materials on reserve and Tsukasa Kodera, ed. Mythology of Vincent van Gogh, 1992. Course assignments include short essays and presentations.

ARTH 393/493 T 5:45-8:15
CONTEMPORARY ART CARRIER
ANDY WARHOL

Andy Warhol was the most influential high artist of the second half of the twentieth century. After a successful career as a decorator, he became on of the founders of pop art. He became the only pop artist who, achieving general fame, became a culture hero. Apart from painting, Warhol also made films, directed the Velvet Underground, and important innovative music group, and was involved with creative writing. And so, not surprisingly, his achievement has been hard to bring into focus. Traditional art historians have described his stylistic development, interpreting his paintings. But many other approaches to his are art possible. Arthur Danto has described the philosophical significance of Warhol’s achievement; cultural historians have discussed his role as a gay artist; and attention has been drawn to the importance of his lifelong interests in religion. Warhol has become a significant subject for scholarship in part because his body of art poses significant interpretative challenges. We will do a close reading of some biographies, and also look at some of Warhol’s own writings.
Required texts: Bob Colacello, Holy Terror: Andy Warhol Close Up, Cooper Square Publishers; Wayne Koestenbaum, Andy Warhol, Viking.
Recommended texts: I’ll Be Your Mirror: The Selected Andy Warhol Interviews, Carroll & Graf; Pat Hackett, The Andy Warhol Diaries, Warner Books; Andy Warhol, The Philosophy of Andy Warhol, Harcourt

ARTH 398 AS ARRANGED
INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ART HISTORY STAFF

Individual research reports on special topics. Consent of supervising Professor and permit is required.

ARTH 395 AS ARRANGED
INTERNSHIP STAFF

This course is designated for students seeking professional experience in art history. It focuses on the museum experience (registration, exhibition, interpretation, and administration) although students may also elect to conduct internships in museum-related environments such as art conservation. Students are encouraged to have gained significant experience in art history coursework before embarking on an internship. Students must identify and internship and supervisor as well as a faculty supervisor the semester before enrolling in the internship.

ARTH 399 AS ARRANGED
HONORS THESIS STAFF

Consent of supervising Professor and a permit is required.

ARTH 491 A & B AS ARRANGED
VISUAL ARTS AND MUSEUMS: INTERNSHIP

Consent of supervising Professor. Prerequisite: ARTH 490

ARTH 494 (A-F) AS ARRANGED
DIRECTED READINGS
Consent of supervising Professor and a permit is required for all Directed Readings:
A: Non-Western Art PETRIDIS
B: Ancient Art NEILS
C: Medieval Art STAFF
D: Renaissance and SCALLEN
Baroque Art
E: American Art ADAMS
F: Modern Art LANDAU OR HELMREICH

ARTH 495 W 3:00-5:30
METHODOLOGIES OF ART HISTORY LANDAU

An introduction to art historical research and writing highlighting methods of interpretation ranging from ekphrasis to deconstruction. Course requirements include a series of shorter analyses of an object in the collection of the Cleveland Museum of Art from numerous points of view, including provenance, connoisseurship, style, iconography, iconology and semiotics. A final paper will be presented orally. This is a reading and writing-intensive seminar which provides a basis for all subsequent graduate work in art history. Required texts include David Carrier, Principles of Art History Writing and a variety of essays by authors from Vasari and Panofsky to Roland Barthes and T.J. Clark.

ARTH 540 TH 1:15-4:15
SEMINAR IN NON-WESTERN ART: STAFF
MODERNITY AND MODERNISM IN AFRICA

This course considers modernity and visual art (including film and photography) in Africa and its diasporas from the 15th century to the present. We begin by
examining what "tradition" and "modernity" can mean in the African context. We examine the tension between political and economic modernity from a global and long hisorical perspective, and modernism as defined using recent European art as the basis. Readings include debates over the nature of representation in colonial and postcolonial worlds, critiques of the historic place of African art in the symbolic and monetary economies of the Western metropolis, catalogues of recent international exhibitions of contemporary art, and studies of the new contexts of so-called ethnographic objects. Each week course time is split between short lectures on objects led by the professor, and intensive student-led discussion of essays. Course assignments include weekly response papers to the literature, and two research papers on subjects chosen by the students.

ARTH 551 T 1:15-4:15
SEMINAR IN RENAISSANCE ART: SCALLEN
DÜRER AND HOLBEIN

The two most famous German artists of the Northern Renaissance, Albrecht Dürer and Hans Holbein the Younger, had careers that spanned the 1490s to the 1540s. This was one of the most tumultuous eras in western European history, during which artists were particularly affected by the Protestant Reformation. In this seminar we will consider first the art of Albrecht Dürer and then of Hans Holbein, with an eye to how their careers were affected by Protestantism and other developments in European society, including changes in patronage and increased internationalism. For both artists, their work in the media of drawing, painting, and printmaking will be examined. We will also draw upon the resources of the Cleveland Museum of Art, particularly for the study of Dürer and Holbein as graphic artists.
Requirements: Class meetings will include discussion of readings done in common. Each participant will be responsible for reviewing a recent book-length interpretation of Dürer’s or Holbein’s art, leading a discussion on this publication, and writing an extended critique of this publication. Finally, each student will develop an interpretive or historiographic research project to be presented formally to the class and submitted as a paper; an annotated bibliography should be handed out to the class at the time of the oral presentation.
Course readings: There are no textbooks for the course. Readings will be drawn from books, journals, and exhibition catalogues available at Ingalls Library. Whenever possible, readings will also be scanned for E-Reserves through Kelvin Smith Library.

ARTH 565 M 2:00-5:00
SEMINAR IN AMERICAN ART: ROSE IRON WORKS ADAMS

This class will focus on Rose Iron Works, the oldest decorative metalwork company in the United States, which still operates from its original location at 1536 East 43rd Street in Cleveland. In the 1930’s the firm produced the finest Art Deco ironwork in the United States. Today it still remains active as a sort of living medieval workshop, continuing the craft and metalworking traditions of Austria-Hungary. What is amazing about Rose Iron Works is not only that it harbors masterworks of hand-forged ironwork (gates, railings, andirons, lamps, fire-screens, console tables, a decorative frieze portraying the history of metalwork, and so forth) but that the factory, with all its supporting materials it still intact—bringing to life the entire working process. There is a library of books on decorative metalwork; hundreds of presentation drawings; thousands of working drawings (which were used as templates in manufacturing objects); and a notable collection of historical metal work, some it dating back to the 14th century or earlier. The goal of the class is to document, organize and interpret this material, with the goal of producing a book on Rose Iron Works, and perhaps other products as well, such as a website, a film, and a traveling exhibition. To accomplish all this we may need to venture into unusual areas, including promotion and fundraising.

The class will be an unusual one since it does not primarily deal with knowledge that is available in books. Its goal is to push forward into the unknown. Students will go through source materials, conduct interviews, do background research, and prepare summaries and catalogue entries. They will investigate the economic and social history of Cleveland, including its involvement with design and metalwork and the role that immigrants from Eastern Europe and elsewhere played in these industries. In a departure from the usual procedure at Case, the class is open to both graduate and undergraduate students (UNDERGRADUATES MUST OBTAIN A PERMIT TO REGISTER FOR THIS CLASS). There are no prerequisites, but obviously this class is aimed at people of a special type, individuals who are interested not simply in passive learning but in actually making something, as well as the adventure of discovery.

ARTH 601 AS ARRANGED
RESEARCH IN ART HISTORY
crn V0310

List name of supervising Professor.

ARTH 610 AS ARRANGED
CLEVELAND MUSEUM OF ART INTERNSHIP
crn 31446

Open to doctoral candidate in the Museum Studies Program only.

ARTH 701 AS ARRANGED
DISSERTATION PhD
crn V0312

List name of supervising Professor.

ARTH 703 AS ARRANGED
DISSERTATION FELLOWSHIP
crn V1705

Advancement to PhD candidacy required. Permission of Department Chair and Research Advisor required.