Department of Art History and Art


Fall 2006 - Art History Courses


ARTH 101 M W F 10:30-11:20

ART HISTORY I: PYRAMIDS TO PAGODAS SCALLEN

crn 30832, 30804, 86966, 30855, 31207, 30861

Cave paintings, Egyptian pyramids, the Colosseum, Byzantine mosaics, Chinese scroll paintings, Hindu temples, Mayan sculptures, Chartres Cathedral. ARTH 101 is a broad-ranging course –– geographically and chronologically –– which highlights the major artistic monuments created throughout the world from the Paleolithic era up to the start of the fifteenth century. Students will learn how to look at, discuss, and write about works of art, considering such issues as how historical and cultural contexts shaper the meaning, appearance, and function of art, and how artistic concepts and styles develop and change over time and in different world regions. In addition to two weekly lectures once a week discussion sessions will provide time to review concepts and prepare for examinations and paper writing. Requirements: Two short papers, two in-class tests, a final examination and participation in discussions and any assignments in the small group sessions.Required texts: Marilyn Stokstad, Art History, Revised Volume I (w/CD-ROM),2/E (revised second edition), Prentice Hall, 2005. ISBN: ISBN: 0-13-145528-1; Sylvan Barnet, A Short Guide to Writing about Art, 8/E (eighth edition), Pearson Longman, 2005. ISBN: 0-321-29248-0

ARTH 104 T TH 10:00-11:15

INTRODUCTION TO ASIAN ART CUNNINGHAM

This course offers an overview of the world’s oldest cultural traditions, and among today’s most vibrant artistic environments: Asian. Comprising the vast global regions of India , Central Sia, Southeast Asia, China , Korea and Japan , we will begin twith the Neolithis, and end in 2001 Seoul—or Shanghai. Clay, architecture, gardens, glass, calligraphy and sculpture represent some of the media to be considered through time, as well as themes focusing on Buddhism and the nature of representational art.

Requirements: Weekly readings will be assigned from an assortment of books and articles selected by the instructor and placed on reserve at Kevin Smith Library. There will be 4 quizzes (50% of grade), a midterm (25% of grade) and a final exam (25% of grade).

ARTH 280 T TH 2:45-4:00

MODERN ART AND MODERN SCIENCE: TECHNOLOGY STAFF

AND THE BODY IN MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY ART

crn 15357

This course will examine apocalyptic and utopian visions of the human body in art, as mediated through technology. For background, we will consider mechanized visions of the human form in art between the wars, including the Dada movement and Fritz Lang's film Metropolis. More recently, artists have employed robotics technologies and even plastic surgery to transform the body. The fantasy of the "cyborg" has been a prevalent theme in performance and web-based art since the 1990s. We will look broadly at imagined and real transformations of the body through technology, always grounding examples in their social historical context. Requirements: midterm and final exams; one ten-page research paper. Reading: TBA

ARTH 290 T TH 1:15-2:30

INTRODUCTION TO THE ART OF SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA PETRIDIS

crn 10224

In this course we will explore the diverse forms and multiple contexts of the visual arts of sub-Saharan Africa. Attention will be focused on the sculpture of different peoples of West and Central Africa. Aside from surveying the most important contemporary art-producing cultures, we will also discuss ancient arts in terracotta and metal of Nigeria , Mali and Chad , and rock art of Southern Africa. The course will consist of lectures, critical readings, questions and discussions. Requirements: There will be a mid-term exam and a final exam as well as two short research papers. Text: In addition to five chosen journal articles and book chapters, the course will rely on the introductory textbook: A History of Art in Africa by Monica Blackmun VISONÀ et al. ( New York: Harry N. Abrams, 2001). Chapters from this book will be assigned as required reading per week.

ARTH 303/403 T TH 2:45-4:00

HISTORY OF FAR EASTERN ART: CUNNINGHAM

URBAN FANTASIES OF MODERN JAPAN -

THE “FLOATING WORLD” OF JAPANESE WOODBLOCK PRINTS

crn 05310/05332

Edo (modern Tokyo) was a bustling metropolis of some one million inhabitants in the 18th century. It was also the locus of dynamic social and political shifts in a culture traditionally known for its conservatism. Yet beginning in the 17th century wealthy commoners sought out respite from the government's eyes in the entertainment districts northeast of the city, as well in the city's stylish theatre life. These two subjects comprise two of the most popular subjects of "ukiyo-e," the Japanese word now familiar to westerners for describing the fascinating realms of life and intriguing compositional designs that characterize Japanese woodblock prints, books, and paintings. Their mesmerizing visuality propelled the appreciation of Japanese art among 19th and twentieth century western artists and collectors alike, as no other medium in Asian art has done. This class will introduce the subjects, social settings and visual evolution of "Floating World" imagery. It will also incorporate readings in contemporary literature as well as make references to the European and American artists influenced by their contact with ukiyo-e.

Requirements: Half of the classes will take place actually viewing prints at the Cleveland Museum of Art. Weekly reading assignments will be given. Reserves will be established at both Kelvin Smith Library and the Cleveland Museum of Art Ingalls Library, which is the more significant resource for this subject.

4 short(3-5 pages) papers, midterm and final exam.

ARTH 328/428 M 2:00-05:00

GREEK SCULPTURE NEILS

crn 10231/10277

This course will deal with the development of bronze and marble sculpture in ancient Greece from its beginnings in the seventh century B.C. to the end of the Hellenistic period in the first century B.C. Both free-standing and architectural sculpture will be studied as well as major artists like Myron, Pheidias, Praxiteles and Lysippos. Special attention will be given to the emergence of the classical style in Athens in the mid-fifth century B.C. Class meetings will consist of illustrated lectures and discussion groups. There will be a midterm, paper/report, and final exam. Text: Andrew Stewart, Greek Sculpture ( Yale University Press).

ARTH 350/450 F 2:00-4:30

ISSUES IN MEDIEVAL ART: PAINTING IN STAFF

THIRTEENTH AND FOURTEENTH CENTURY SIENA

crn 15366/15379

This course introduces painting during the period in which the small Tuscan town of Siena became one of Italy ’s foremost artistic centers. It also aims to provide a more general introduction to themes in late medieval and early Renaissance art. Study will focus on paintings associated with Guido da Siena, Duccio, Simone Martini, Pietro and Ambrogio Lorenzetti. The works connected with these artists raise not only traditional questions of attribution, style, and iconography, but also fundamental issues including the ritualistic and political functions of painting; the role of patrons and commissioners; workshop practice; artistic techniques; the development of narrative painting and altarpiece design; art in the service of the church and state. Relationships between Sienese paintings and those produced in other Italian artistic centers such as Assisi and Florence, as well as northern Europe and Byzantium, will also be considered, as will other Sienese arts including sculpture, manuscript illumination, goldsmith’s work, and textiles.

Requirements: midterm and final examinations, one oral presentation on an assigned topic, two papers on assigned topics, two short in class visual quizzes, and participation in class discussions. Texts: weekly reading assignments will be given and discussed in class. Please purchase T. Hyman, Early Sienese Painting: The Art of a City Republic 1278-1477 ( London, 2003), D. Norman, Painting in Late Medieval and Renaissance Siena ( New Haven and London, 2003), and J. White, Art and Architecture in Italy 1250-1400 (New Haven, 1966).

ARTH 353/453 MWF 11:30-12:20

SIXTEENTH CENTURY ITALIAN ART OLSZEWSKI

crn 10245/10286

A specialized study of the visual arts in Italy from 1500-1600 with emphasis on major masters, artistic programs, conditions of patronage and conceptual issues. Stylistic categories will be discussed including the High Renaissance, Mannerism and the new seriousness in art after the Council of Trent. The artistic careers of Michelangelo, Leonardo, Raphael, Titian, Correggio, Parmigianino, Rosso, Pontormo, Cellini and Giovanni da Bologna, among others, will be examined. Texts: Anon, Bronzino, Riverside, 1996; L. Murray, Michelangelo, Thames & Hudson, 1984; F. Hart & D. wilkins, History of Italian Renaissance Art, Prentice Hall, 2006. Requirements: examination every five weeks, term paper and two critical reviews on assigned topics. Lecture exams: 15% of fine grade each, final exam: 35% of fine grade, and paper assignments: 35% of final grade.

ARTH 360/460 M W 12:30-1:45

THE RENAISSANCE IN NORTHERN EUROPE SCALLEN

ca, 1380-1570

crn 10259/10290

The visual arts of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries participated in the widespread social and political changes in northern Europe in what is today Belgium , The Netherlands, Germany , and France . In this course we will examine both the work of pioneering individual artists, such as Jan van Eyck, Hieronymus Bosch, Albrecht Dürer and Pieter Bruegel, and larger themes such as patronage and the rise of the art market, the invention and dissemination of prints, the development of new subjects in art (landscapes, scenes of daily life) and the use of art for political propaganda and religious devotion.Requirements for 360: Midterm and final examinations, two critiques of articles read for class discussion, a research paper of 8-12 pages, oral presentations on the research project, participation in class discussions. Requirements for 460: Same as for 362, with a longer (ca 15-20 page) research paper and three critiques of assigned readings. Graduate students will also lead one class discussion. Text to purchase: Jeffrey Chipps Smith, The Northern Renaissance, Phaidon, 2004, ISBN 0714838675. The other course readings will consists of articles, book chapters, and exhibition catalogues that will be placed on reserve at the CMA and Kelvin Smith libraries.

ARTH 382/482 T TH 10:00-11:15

VISIONS OF UTOPIA: 20TH CENTURY EUROPEAN ART HELMREICH

crn 10262/ 10306

This course examines European art from the turn of the last century to World War two. It considers art movements such as Futurism, Cubism, Dadaism, Purism, Die Stijl, Expressionism, and Surrealism that sought to remake the world. Art and its makers will be contextualized in terms of social, political, and economic change as well as new developments in literature, philosophy and the sciences. The first half of the semester will provide an overview of these different movements and the second half of the course will focus on the exhibition at the Cleveland Museum of Art, Barcelona & Modernity: Picasso, Gaudi, Miro, Dali, that opens 15 October. Students will have an opportunity to study works of art first hand and to learn directly from this landmark exhibition of Spanish art. As course texts, we will utilize the exhibition catalogue as well as a selection of books on European art c. 1900-1939.

ARTH 382: Course assignments will range from museum-based exercises, such as writing an object label, to thematic essays and examinations on such questions as the nature of the avant-garde.

ARTH 482: In addition to gaining familiarity with the various forms of avant-garde expression in the period c. 1900-1939; the graduate section of this course will focus on the nature of the avant-garde and will engage with theoretical readings on this topic by such authors as Peter Bürger, Hal Foster, Rosalind Krauss, and Renato Poggioli. Students will be responsible for completing a variety of writing assignments designed to gain mastery of these fields of knowledge as well as leading at least one undergraduate class in the exhibition developed in consultation with the course instructor.

ARTH 392/492 T TH 4:30-5:45

ISSUES IN 20TH/21ST CENTURY ART: STAFF

THE MUSEUM AS MEDIUM: INSTITUTIONAL CRITIQUE SINCE 1970

crn 15382/15398

Art that is directly engaged with the politics of exhibitions has emerged as a significant mode of global artistic production over the last several decades. We will briefly examine the roots of institutional critique in Dada, nouveau réalisme, and Fluxus before considering the diverse politics of international practitioners from 1970s through the 1990s including Hans Haacke, Fred Wilson, Louise Lawler, Michael Asher, Kryzstof Wodiczko, Marina Abramoviæ, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Renée Green, the Guerrilla Girls, and Andrea Fraser. Finally, the course will consider the recent emergence of many artists' collectives such as "The Wrong Gallery" and the Bernadette Corporation in which artists appropriate the role of the institution. We will question the status of institutional critique today, considering the example of the 2006 Whitney Biennial in which institutional critique functioned as an institutional (curatorial) strategy. Requirements for 392: midterm and final exams plus ten-page research paper. Requirements for 492: additional theoretical readings will be assigned; twenty-page research paper, plus classroom presentation. Reading: Texts include Douglas Crimp, On the Museum's Ruins; Miwon Kwan, One Place after Another: Site-Specific Art and Locational Identity. However, most readings will be available in a course pack.

ARTH 398 AS ARRANGED

INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ART HISTORY STAFF

crn V0309

Individual research reports on special topics. Consent of supervision Professo and a permit is required.

ARTH 399 AS ARRANGED

HONORS THESIS STAFF

crn 24544

Consent of supervising Professor and a permit is required.

ARTH 491 A & B AS ARRANGED

VISUAL ARTS AND MUSEUMS: INTERNSHIP

A: crn 25204 B: crn 25315

Consent of supervising Professor. Prerequisite: ARTH 490

ARTH 494 (A-F) AS ARRANGED

DIRECTED READINGS

Consent of supervising Professor and a permit is required for all Directed Readings:

A: Non-Western Art crn V4941 PETRIDIS

B: Ancient Art crn V36335 NEILS

C: Medieval Art crn V3636 OLSZEWSKI

D: Renaissance and crn V3637 SCALLENOROLSZEWSKI

Baroque Art

E: American Art crn V3638 STAFF

F: Modern Art crn V2059 LANDAU OR HELMREICH

ARTH 495 W 3:00-5:30

METHODOLOGY OF ART HISTORY OLSZEWSKI

crn 86532

An introduction to the library as a research tool - basic source books; object research; methods and theories of art historical research.

Requirements: frequent written exercises, oral and written reports on research of an art object, final examination.

Textbooks: Butler, Postmodernism; Eagleton, Literary Theory: Introduction; Jones, Art Information; Pointon, History of Art; Focillon, The Life of Forms in Art

ARTH 584 T 1:15-4:15

TOPICS IN THE HISTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHY: PHOTOGRAPHY HELMREICH

NINETEENTH-CENTURY EUROPE

crn 10319

This seminar will examine the development of photography as a medium for artistic expression in nineteenth-century Europe. It will investigate the relationship between photography and other art forms, namely painting and printmaking. The course will focus upon those photographers and photographs pertinent to this topic found in the collections of the Cleveland Museum of Art. The course will be co-taught with the curator of photography at the Cleveland Museum of Art, Tom Hinson, and will provide students with experience in aspects of museum practice. The key outcomes of the course are a research paper on an object in the Cleveland Museum of Art collection, a research presentation based on this object, an essay demonstrating mastery of the secondary literature on a specific topic, and a presentation on a selected assigned reading. The assigned readings will be drawing from a wide variety of sources (primary and secondary) that will be on reserve at Ingalls Library at the Cleveland Museum of Art and Kelvin Smith Library.

ARTH 576 TH 1:15-4:15

SEMINAR IN CONTEMPORARY ART: PICASSO LANDAU

crn 10322

In conjunction with the Cleveland Museum of Art’s exhibition Barcelona and Modernity: Picasso, Gaudí, Miró, Dalí opening October 15, 2006, this seminar will investigate what is inarguably the pre-eminent theme in Pablo Picasso’s oeuvre: the female nude. We will take advantage of guest lecturers and public programs in conjunction with the Barcelona show to provide a more in-depth look at Picasso’s formative years; however, the seminar will cover later development of this subject as well. Psychoanalytic, feminist, semiotic and other theoretical approaches will be applied to analysis of key works including Cleveland’s La Vie and the Museum of Modern Art’s Demoiselles d’Avignon. Competing critical approaches, examining topics such as primitivism, anarchism, power and spectacle, eros and thanatos, will be compared. We will determine how the Catalán milieu prepared Picasso to develop his “eye for the ladies” and where this led in his subsequent career.

Required texts will include Christopher Green, ed., Picasso’s Les Demoiselles d’Avignon (2001) as well as an extensive list of recent articles and catalogue essays. It is recommended that class participants read John Richardson’s A Life of Picasso (v. 1-2) over the summer in preparation for this class.

Limit: 15 students

ARTH 601 AS ARRANGED

RESEARCH IN ART HISTORY

crn V0310

List name of supervising Professor.

ARTH 610 AS ARRANGED

CLEVELAND MUSEUM OF ART INTERNSHIP

crn 31446

Open to doctoral candidate in the Museum Studies Program only.

ARTH 701 AS ARRANGED

DISSERTATION PhD

crn V0312

List name of supervising Professor.

ARTH 703 AS ARRANGED

DISSERTATION FELLOWSHIP

crn V1705

Advancement to PhD candidacy required. Permission of Department Chair and Research Advisor required.