Department of Art History and Art


Fall 2005 - Art History Courses


ARTH 101M W 10:30-11:20

ART HISTORY I:PYRAMIDS TO PAGODAS - SCALLEN

CHOOSE ONE OF THE FOLLOWING SECTIONS:W 5:30-6:20CRN 90914

W 6:30-7:20CRN 90884

W 7:30-8:20CRN 07311

F 10:30-11:20 CRN 90937

F 10:30-11:20 CRN 91480

F 11:30-12:20 CRN 90946

Cave paintings, Egyptian pyramids, the Colosseum, Byzantine mosaics, Chinese scroll paintings, Hindu temples, Mayan sculptures, Chartres Cathedral. ARTH 101 is a broad-ranging course –– geographically and chronologically –– which highlights the major artistic monuments created throughout the world from the Paleolithic era up to the start of the fifteenth century. Students will learn how to look at, discuss, and write about works of art.We will consider such issues as how historical and cultural contexts shape the meaning, appearance, and function of art, and how artistic concepts and styles develop and change over time and in different world regions.In addition to two weekly lectures, once a week discussion sessions will provide time to review concepts and prepare for examinations and paper writing.Requirements: Two short papers, two in-class tests, a final examination, and participation in discussions and assignments in the small group sessions.

Required texts: Marilyn Stokstad, Art History, Revised Volume I (w/CD-ROM), 2/E (revised second edition), Prentice Hall, 2005.ISBN: 0-13-145528-1

Sylvan Barnet, A Short Guide to Writing about Art, 8/E (eighth edition), Pearson Longman, 2005. ISBN: 0-321-29248-0

ARTH 203

The East Asian Continent and Japan: Historic Waves of Cultural Transmission

CUNNINGHAM
T TH 1:15-2:30


Japan and Korea are two of the most dynamic economic and cultural centers of the contemporary world. In both places extraordinary innovation, especially in technology and design, coexists with attachment to tradition and the preservation of the cultural heritage.
Through Samurai movies etc., Japanese traditional culture is well known in the west, and Japanese painting and ceramics have inspired western artists and molded western art since the nineteenth century. Korean art is less familiar. This course will offer an introduction
to the art of both Japan and Korea. An important theme will be the relationship between the island nation of Japan and the Korean peninsula, not least in the transmission of Buddhism. We will of course study the impact of China on Japanese culture. This is well recognized in the West, but in fact Korea's contributions to the Japanese cultural heritage have been more important. Pots, paintings, and the architecture and decoration of Buddhist shrines are but some of the surviving cultural emblems shared by Korea and Japan, and they will provide the focus of this class.
Requirements:
4 class quizzes; weekly reading assignments, with discussion and reporting assignments; midterm and final exams

ARTH 220 (JDST 220)T TH 1:15-2:20

JEWISH TRADITIONAL ART & ARCHITECTURE - NEULANDER

CRN 12352

Tradition and transformation in Jewish artistic expression over time and across space.Course will begin with the biblical period and continue down to the present day in Israel and America .Examination of how concepts such as “Jewish” and “art” undergo change within the Jewish community over this period.For information on requirements and textbooks please contact Prof. Neulander in the Religion Department (368-2210).

ARTH 271 (AMST 271) TTH 2:45-4:00

AMERICAN ART AND CULTURE - ADAMS

CRN 13458

A survey of the development of American art from 1900 to the present (and the future) which will explore how art has expressed both American values and American anxieties.Painting will be emphasized but the course will also consider architecture, the decorative arts, film, literature and music.Requirements: There will be weekly writing assignments, a midterm and final exam.Textbook:Wayne Craven, American Art and Culture, McGraw-Hill, 2003.

ARTH 303/403

Urban Fantasies of Modern Japan: The "Floating World" of Japanese Woodblock Prints

CUNNINGHAM

T TH 10:00-11:15

Edo (modernTokyo) was a bustling metropolis of some one million inhabitants in the 18th century. It was also the locus of dynamic social and political shifts in a culture traditionally known for its conservatism. Yet beginning in the 17th century wealthy commoners
sought out respite from the government's eyes in the entertainment districts northeast of the city, as well in the city's stylish theatre life.These two subjects comprise two of the most popular subjects of "ukiyo-e," the Japanese word now familiar to westerners for describing the fascinating realms of life and intriguing compositional designs that characterize Japanese woodblock prints, books, and paintings. Their mesmerizing visuality propelled the appreciation of Japanese art among 19th and twentieth century western artists and collectors alike, as no other medium in Asian art has done. This class will introduce the subjects, social settings and visual evolution of "Floating World" imagery. It will also incorporate readings in contemporary literature as well as make references to the European and American artists influenced by their contact with ukiyo-e.
Requirements:
class visits to Oberlin's Allen Memorial Art Museum to view their Japanese print exhibition and collection; weekly reading assignments, with discussion/reportage; 4 short(3-5 pages) papers; midterm and final exams

ARTH 361/461 M W F 2:00-2:50

DUTCH AND FLEMISH 17TH CENTURY PAINTING - SCALLEN

CRN 10367/10375

This course will examine the rich achievements in the arts of painting and printmaking in the northern and southern Netherlands from about 1585 to 1700. We will discuss the careers of major masters such as Rubens and Van Dyck, Rembrandt and Vermeer, and trace the development of newer subjects such as still life, landscape, and genre painting.

Other topics to be featured include:patronage and the development of the open art market; the role of religious art in Catholic and Protestant cultures; the rise of artistic specialization, and problems of interpretation.

Requirements: midterm and take-home final examination, a term paper and oral presentation, short written critiques of articles, and participation in class discussions. Graduate students will be required to write a longer paper and additional critiques.

Required text: Mariët Westermann, A Worldly Art. The Dutch Republic 1585-1718,Yale Press, 2005.ISBN: 107234


ARTH 383/483 M W 12:30-1:45

GENDER ISSUES IN FEMINIST ART - HELMREICH

CRN 10381/10394

This course examines the issues of gender and sexuality in modern art of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.This period witnessed numerous and rapid changes in the societal roles and personal relationships of men and women as well as the development of new ideas regarding human sexuality.Such transformations gave rise to intense questioning, anxiety, and concern, much of which was expressed in the art of this period.Topics to be addressed include: changing notions of masculinity and femininity, the expression of sexual desire, and women as both producers and subjects.These issues will be examined in relationship to changing historical conditions and ideas of art.It will be argued throughout the course that the issues of gender and sexuality confronting artists of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries were fundamental to the development of Modernism in art.

Requirements:2 positions papers (3-5 pages), a written visual analysis of an original work of art (5-7 pages), 2 essay exams.

Required textbooks: Norma Broude and Mary D. Garrard, The Expanding Discourse: Feminism and Art History, HarperCollins, 1992. Whiteny Chadwick, Women, Art, and Society, Thames and Hudson, Revised Edition, 1996. Peter Elbow, Writing with Power, Techniques for Mastering the Writing Process, Oxford University Press, 1981. Recommended (for those with little or no art history background): Sylvan Barnet, A Short Guide to Writing About Art, Longmans, 1997.

ARTH 393/493 T 5:45-8:15

CONTEMPORARY ART: CRITICAL DIRECTIONS - CARRIER

CRN 10424/10431

Traditionally art historians have focused on the history of European art.But recently there has been great interest in art of other cultures.Is a history of world art possible?And if so, what form might it take?This course explores that question.We read Richard Wollheim’s aesthetic focused on European art.And then we discuss James Elkins, Stories of Art, which attempts to imagine a history of world art.We then pursue our investigation by reading recent accounts of Islamic art (Oleg Grabar, The Formation of Islamic Art), Indian art (Partha Mitter, Indian Art), and Chinese art (Craig Clunas, Art in China).This class requires a good deal of reading.It does not presuppose any prior knowledge of art history or aesthetics.

Requirements: Three papers, two short ones and one long one will be required.There is no final exam.

Required textbooks:Craig Clunas, Art in China, Oxford Univ. Press, ISBN 0-19-284207-2.

James Elkins, Stories of Art, Routledge, ISBN 0-415-93943-7. Oleg Grabar, The Formation of Islamic Art, Yale University Press. Partha Mitter, Indian Art, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-284221-8. Richard Wollheim, Art and Its Objects, Cambridge University Press, ISBN 0-521-297060

ARTH 398AS ARRANGED

INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ART HISTORY - STAFF

CRN V0309

Individual research reports on special topics.Consent of supervision Professor.

ARTH 399AS ARRANGED

HONORS THESIS STAFF

CRN 83716

Consent of supervising Professor.

ARTH 491 A & BAS ARRANGED

VISUAL ARTS AND MUSEUMS: INTERNSHIP - ADAMS

A:CRN 84387B: CRN 84508

Consent of supervising Professor.Prerequisite:ARTH 490

ARTH 494 (A-F) AS ARRANGED

DIRECTED READINGS

Consent of supervising Professor is required for all Directed Readings:

A: Non-Western Art CRN V4941 PETRIDIS

B: Ancient Art CRN V3635 STAFF

C: Medieval Art CRN V3636 OLSZEWSKI

D: Renaissance and CRN V3637 SCALLEN OR OLSZEWSKI

Baroque Art

E: American Art CRN V3638 ADAMS

F:Modern Art CRN V3639 STAFF

ARTH 495 W 3:00-5:30

METHODOLOGY OF ART HISTORY - OLSZEWSKI

CRN 06878

An introduction to the library as a research tool - basic source books; object research; methods and theories of art historical research.

Requirements:frequent written exercises, oral and written reports on research of an art object, final examination.

Textbooks: Christopher Butler, Postmodernism, Oxford, 2002. Cynthia Freeland, Art Theory, Oxford 2001. Terry Eagleton, Literary Theory, University of Minnesota Press, 1983.

Lois Swan Jones, Art Information, Research Methods and Resources, Dubuque, Iowa, 1990.

MarciaPointon, History of Art,Routledge, 1994. Heinrich Wolffin, Principles of Art History, Dover, 1950.

ARTH 540T 9:00-11:30

SEMINAR IN NON-WESTERN ART - PETRIDIS

STUDYING, COLLECTING, PRESERVING, AND

EXHIBITING AFRICAN ART

CRN 10445

Through lectures, readings, discussions, and museum field trips, this seminar will explore important developments in the history of the reception and study of African art.An analysis of a number of key publications by pioneering scholars in the field will illustrate the multiple approaches that have been developed to gain insight into Africa’s artistic heritage.Special attention will be devoted to the dialogue between anthropological and art-historical perspectives on the arts of Africa.This seminar will also address the politics and ethics of the acquisition and representation of African art.Requirements:In addition to short weekly writing assignments, students are expected to write a research paper and present the results of their research to their fellow students. Prior basic knowledge of the visual arts of sub-Saharan Africa is recommended.

ARTH 551TH 2:30-5:00

SEMINAR IN RENAISSANCE ART - OLSZEWSKI

CRN 10459

Readings on the historiography of Mannerism in Italy ; study of the links among style, iconography and semiotics; research on select paintings of late Mannerism and the Counter-Reformation.

Requirements:oral reports and class discussion; frequent written assignments; oral and written term paper report.

Texts:Assigned readings in an Anthology of Italian Mannerism

ARTH 601AS ARRANGED

RESEARCH IN ART HISTORY

CRN V0310

List name of supervising Professor.

ARTH 610AS ARRANGED

CLEVELAND MUSEUM OF ART INTERNSHIP

Open to doctoral candidate in the Museum Studies Program only.

CRN 91792

ARTH 701AS ARRANGED

DISSERTATION PhD

CRN V0312

List name of supervising Professor.

ARTH 703AS ARRANGED

DISSERTATION FELLOWSHIP

CRN V1705

Advancement to PhD candidacy required.Permission of Department Chair and Research Advisor required.