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Spring 2008 COURSE LISTINGS


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Undergraduate

ANTH 102. Being Human: An Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology.
Dr. Katia Almeida - M/W 9:00 - 10:15 AM - 3 credits - CRN 84444
Dr. Melvyn Goldstein – T/Th 1:15 - 2:30 PM – 3 credits - CRN 10054

The nature of culture and humans as culture-bearing animals. The range of cultural phenomena
including language, social organization, religion, and culture change, and the relevance of
anthropology for contemporary social, economic, and ecological problems.

ANTH 103. Introduction to Human Evolution.
Adriann Balok - M/W/F 9:30 -10:20 AM - 3 credits - CRN 00031
Dr. Cynthia Beall – T/Th 10:00–11:15 AM - 3 credits - CRN 84203

Physical, cultural, and technological evolution of humans. The systematic interrelationships
between humans, culture, and environment.

ANTH 107. Archaeology: An Introduction.
Dr. Jim Shaffer - T/Th 10:00 - 11:15 AM - 3 credits - CRN 94741

Basic archaeological concepts are discussed followed by a review of human cultural and biological evolution from the earliest times through development of state organized societies. Geographical scope is worldwide with special attention given to ecological and cultural relationships affecting human societies through time.

ANTH 215. Health, Culture, and Disease: An Introduction to Medical Anthropology.
Dr. Eileen Anderson-Fye - T/Th 10:00 - 11:15 AM - 3 credits - CRN 10142

This course is an introduction to the field of medical anthropology. Medical Anthropology is
concerned with the cross-cultural study of culture, health, and illness. During the course of the
semester, our survey will include (1) theoretical orientations and key concepts; (2) the cross-cultural diversity of health beliefs and practices (abroad and at home); and (3) contemporary issues and special populations (e.g. AIDS, homelessness, refugees, women’s health, and children at risk).

ANTH 233.  Introduction to Jewish Folklore.
Dr. Judith Neulander - T/Th 4:30 - 5:45 PM - 3credits - CRN51387

Exploration of a variety of genres, research methods and interpretations of Jewish folklore, from antiquity to the present. Emphasis on how Jewish folk traditions and culture give us access to the spirit and mentality of the many different generations of the Jewish ethnic group, illuminating its past and informing the direction of its future development.

ANTH 302. Darwinian Medicine.
Dr. Cynthia Beall - T/Th 1:15 - 2:30 PM - 3 credits - CRN 00045

Darwinian medicine deals with evolutionary aspects of modern human disease. It applies the
concepts and methods of evolutionary biology to the question of why we are vulnerable to disease. Darwinian (or evolutionary) medicine proposes several general hypotheses about disease causation including disease as evolutionary legacy and design compromise, the result of a novel environment, a consequence of genetic adaptation, the result of infectious organisms’ evolutionary adaptations, and disease symptoms as manifestation of disease mechanisms. It proposes that evolutionary ideas can explain, help to prevent, and perhaps help to treat some diseases. This course presents the basic logic of Darwinian medicine and evaluates hypotheses about specific diseases that illustrate each of the hypotheses about disease causation.
Prerequisite: ANTH 103 or consent of department.

ANTH 307.  Child Policy Experiential.
Dr. Mary Elizabeth Irwin - M 4:00 - 6:30 PM (3-6 credits) CRNV3071

Crosslist:  CHST 302.  Consent of the department.

ANTH 308.  Child Policy Externship.
Dr. Mary Elizabeth Irwin - TBA (3-6 credits) CRNV3081

Crosslist:  CHST 398.  Consent of the department.

ANTH 313. The Anthropology of Adolescence.
Dr. Eileen Anderson-Fye - T/Th 2:45 - 4:00 PM - 3 credits - CRN 53343

This investigates the anthropology of adolescence. What are the conditions under which
adolescence has appeared around the world as a life stage? What are the roles of adolescence
cross-culturally? What are the varieties of adolescent experience? Through classic and
contemporary texts, the course will address these questions as well as special topics particularly important to adolescence such as globalization, mental health, and sexuality.

ANTH 321. Methods in Archaeology.
Dr. Brian Redmond - T/Th 2:45 - 4:00 PM - 3 credits - CRN 50179

This course reviews the basic methods and techniques used in modern anthropological archaeology. Topics to be discussed include the nature of the archaeological record, research design, techniques of field archaeology, methods of laboratory analysis, museum archaeology, ethnoarchaeology, and cultural interpretation.
Prerequisite: ANTH 107 or consent of the department.

ANTH 323. AIDS: Epidemiology, Biology, and Culture.
Dr. Janet McGraft - M/W 12:30 - 1:45 PM - 3 credits - CRN 50157

This course will examine the biological and cultural impact of AIDS in different societies around the world. Topics include: the origin and evolution of the virus, the evolutionary implications of the epidemic, routes of transmission, a historical comparison of AIDS to other epidemics in human history, current worldwide prevalences of AIDS, and cultural responses to the epidemic. Special emphasis will be placed on the long-term biological and social consequences of the epidemic.
Prerequisite: ANTH 102 or ANTH 103 or consent of the department.


ANTH 326. Power, Illness, and Inequality: The Political Economy of Health.
David Kaawa Mafigiri - M/W 9:00 - 10:15 AM - 3 credits - CRN 53365

This course explores the relationship between social inequality and the distribution of health and
illness across class, race, gender, sexual orientation, and national boundaries. Class readings
drawn from critical anthropological approaches to the study of health emphasize the fundamental importance of power relations and economic constraints in explaining patterns of disease. The course critically examines the nature of Western biomedicine and inequality in the delivery of health services. Special consideration is given to political economic analysis of health issues in the developing world such as AIDS, hunger, reproductive health, and primary health care provision.
Prerequisite: ANTH 102 or ANTH 215 or consent of the department.

ANTH 330. Special Topics in Prehistory. Topic: Archaeology of South America.
Dr. Marc Abramiuk - M/W/F 10:30 - 11:20 AM - 3 credits - CRN 15693

Dominated by the largest river basin as well as one of the highest mountain ranges in the world, the continent of South America is home not only to a wealth of biodiversity, but it is home to a multitude of cultures. The origins of many of these contemporary cultures have their roots in such ancient peoples as the Moche and the Nasca. Using the archaeological record, we will chart the ancient inhabitants of South America from their first settlements through the rise and fall of one of the only empires in the New World, namely the Inca Empire. During their florescence, the miraculous ancient peoples of South America excelled in engineering, art, and astronomy. While the descendants of these people are still alive today, much of their heritage is buried beneath the epochs of time. We will learn about these people, how they lived, what they accomplished, and the heritage they left behind.
Prerequisite: ANTH 102 or 107 or consent of the department.


ANTH 333. Roots of Ancient India: The Archaeology of South Asia.
Dr. Jim Shaffer - T/Th 2:45 - 4:00 PM - 3 credits - CRN 95679

Examination of the archaeological record of cultural development from earliest times through the Iron Age in India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and Bangladesh. Particular attention devoted to how these ancient cultural developments laid the foundations for the early historic civilizations of this region.
Prerequisite: ANTH 102 or 107 or consent of the department.

ANTH 353. Chinese Culture and Society.
Dr. Charlotte Ikels - T/Th 8:30 - 9:45 AM - 3 credits - CRN 50182

Focuses on Chinese cultural and social institutions during the Maoist and post-Maoist eras. Topics include ideology, economics, politics, religion, family life, and popular culture.
Prerequisite: ANTH 102 or consent of the department.

ANTH 357. Native American Cultures.
Dr. Sharon Dean - T/Th 4:30 - 5:45 PM - 3 credits - CRN 02703

Intensive examination of the cultures of selected Native American peoples, including historical, political, religious , social organizational, linguistic, and medical/psychiatric aspects of American Indian life.
Prerequisite: ANTH 102.


ANTH 362. Contemporary Theory in Anthropology.
Dr. Atwood Gaines - T/Th 1:15 - 2:30 PM - 3 credits - CRN 06862

A critical examination of anthropological thought in England, France and the United States during the second half of the twentieth century. Emphasis will be on the way authors formulate questions that motivate anthropological discourse, on the way central concepts are formulated and applied and on the controversies and debates that result. Readings are drawn from influential texts by prominent contemporary anthropologists.
Prerequisite: ANTH 102 or consent of the department.

ANTH 367Topics in Evolutionary Biology.  Topic:  Human Evolution During the Pleistocene.
Dr. Scott Simpson - T 4:30 - 7:00 PM - 3 credits - CRN56959
During the last two million years, humans and our closest relatives experienced significant evolutionary changes in phyletic evolution, distribution, anatomy and behavior,  During the past decade, a number of newly discovered fossils in tandem with novel analytic techniques have led to a revision to our understanding of the tempo and mode of evolution of the genus Homo.  This seminar will focus on the evolution, distribution and adaptations of hominids during the Pleistocene epoch (1.8 MY - 10,000) with an emphasis on the genus
Homo.
Prerequisites:  ANTH/BIOL/GEOL/PHIL 225 and consent of the department.
Cross-list:  BIOL 368/GEOL/PHIL 367.

ANTH 378. Reproductive Health. An Evolutionary Perspective.
Marianne Reeves - T/Th 8:30 - 9:45 AM - 3 credits - CRN 53380

This course provides students with an evolutionary perspective on the factors influencing human
reporductive health, including reporductive biology, ecology, and various aspects of natural human fertility. Our focus will be on variation in human reproduction in mostly non-western populations.
Prerequisite: ANTH 103.

ANTH 381. Independent Study in Laborarory Archaeology II.
Dr. Brian Redmond - TBA - 1-3 credits - CRN V1011

This course provides an introduction to the basic methods and techniques of artifact curation and laboratory analysis in archaeology. Under the supervision of the department, each student will develop and carry out a focused project of material analysis and interpretation using the
archaeology collections of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History. Each student is required to
spend a minimum of two hours per week in the Archaeology laboratory at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History for each credit hour taken. By the end of the course, the students will prepare a short report describing the results of their particular project.
Prerequisite: ANTH 107, permission of department, and prior permission of the Archaeology
Department at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History.


ANTH 388. Globalization, Development, and Underdevelopment: Anthropological Perspectives.
Dr. Katia Almeida - M/W 12:30 - 1:45 PM - 3 credits - CRN 14933

This course examines both theoretical and practical perspectives on globalization and economic
development in the “Third World”. From “Dependency”, “Modernization”, and “World System” theory to post-structuralist critiques of development discourse, the class seeks to provide a framework for understanding current debates on development and globalization. The “neoliberal monologue” that dominates the contemporary development enterprise is critically examined in the context of growing global inequality. Special consideration is given to the roles of international agencies such as the World Bank, International Monetary Fund, United Nations, and non-governmental organizations (NGO’s) in the “development industry”. This course also focuses on the contributions of anthropologists to development theory and practice with emphasis on the impact of development on the health of the poor and survival of indigenous cultures. Opportunities for professional anthropologists in the development field are reviewed.



ANTH 391. Honors Tutorial .
Staff - TBA - 3 credits - CRN 14925
Prerequisite: Acceptance into Honors Program.

ANTH 392. Honors Tutorial
Staff - TBA - 3 credits - CRN 89500
Prerequisite: Acceptance into Honors Program.

ANTH 394. Seminar in Evolutionary Biology
Dr. Patricia Princehouse - W 3:00 - 5:30 PM - 3 credits - CRN 17804
(See PHIL 394.)
Cross-list: PHIL 394.

ANTH 396. Undergraduate Research in Evolutionary Biology.
Staff - TBA - 3 credits - CRN 11732
Students propose and conduct guided research on an aspect of evolutionary biology. The research will be sponsored and supervised by a member of the CASE faculty or other qualified professional. A written report must be submitted to the Evolutionary Biology Steering Committee before credit is granted.
Prerequisite: ANTH/BIOL/GEOL/PHIL 225, and consent of the department.
Cross-list: BIOL/GEOL/PHIL 396.


ANTH 398. Anthropology SAGES Capstone.
Staff - TBA - 3 credits - CRN 03144

Supervised original research on a topic in anthropology, culminating in a written report and a public presentation. The research project may be in the form of an independent research project, a literature review, or some other original project with anthropological significance. The project must be approved and supervised by faculty. Group research projects are acceptable, but a plan which clearly identifies the distinct and substantial role of each participant must be approved by the supervising faculty. Approved SAGES capstone.
Prerequisite: Major in Anthropology.

ANTH 399. Independent Study.
Staff - TBA - 1-6 credits - CRN V1010

Students may propose topics for independent reading and research.
Prerequisite: consent of the department.

GRADUATE COURSES

ANTH 402. Darwinian Medicine.
Dr. Cynthia Beall - T/Th 1:15 - 2:30 PM - 3 credits - CRN 00059

(See ANTH 302.) Prerequisite: ANTH 103 or consent of the department.

ANTH 413. The Anthropology of Adolescence.


Dr. Eileen Anderson-Fye - T/Th 2:45 - 4:00 PM - 3 credits - CRN53351

(See ANTH 313.)

ANTH 423. AIDS: Epidemiology, Biology, and Culture.
Dr. Janet McGrath - M/W 12:30 - 1:45 PM - 3 credits - CRN 50166

(See ANTH 323.) Prerequisite: ANTH 102 or ANTH 103 or consent of the department.

ANTH 426. Power, Illness, and Inequality: The Political Economy of Health.
David Kaawa Mafigiri - M/W 9:00 - 10:15 AM - 3 credits - CRN 53378

(See ANTH 326.) Prerequisite: ANTH 102 or ANTH 215 or consent of the department.

 

ANTH 453. Chinese Culture and Society.
Dr. Charlotte Ikels - T/Th 8:30 - 9:45 AM - 3 credts - CRN 50198

(See ANTH 353.) Prerequisite: ANTH 102 or consent of the department.

ANTH 457. Native American Cultures.
Dr. Sharon Dean - T/Th 4:30 - 5:45 PM - 3 credits - CRN 02712

(See ANTH 357.) Prerequisite: ANTH 102.
ANTH 462. Contemporary Theory in Anthropology.
Dr. Atwood Gaines - T/Th 1:15 - 2:30 PM - 3 credits - CRN 06916 (See ANTH 362.) Prerequisite: ANTH 102 or consent of the department.

ANTH 478. Reproductive Health: An Evolutionary Perspective.
Marianne Reeves - T/Th 8:30 - 9:45 AM - 3 credits - CRN 53399

(See ANTH 376.) Prerequisite: ANTH 102 or ANTH 103.

ANTH 481. The Anthropology of Health and Illness II.
Dr. Lawrence Greksa – W/F 3:00-5:00 PM – 3 credits - CRN 82911

Part two of the graduate core course in medical anthropology includes sections giving an overview of topics such as the history and conceptual development of medical anthropology, anthropological epidemiology, psychiatric anthropology, social networks/support systems, and health care systems.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ANTH 488. Globalization, Development, and Underdevelopment: Anthropological Perspectives.
Dr. Katia Almeida - M/W 12:30 - 1:45 PM - 3 credits - CRN 09064

ANTH 494. Seminar in Evolutionary Biology.
Dr. Patricia Princehouse - W 3:00 - 5:30 PM - 3 credits - CRN 17849
( See ANTH 394.) Cross-list: PHIL 394.

ANTH 498. Public Policy and Aging.
Dr. Robert Binstock - W 4:00 - 6:30 PM - 3 credits - CRN 96627

Cross-list: EPBI 408.


ANTH 507. Seminar in Controversial Issues in Anthropology.
Dr. Charlotte Ikels - W 3:00 - 5:30 PM - CRN 50205

The goals of this course are to provide students with opportunities to:

(1) Familiarize themselves with the (alleged) facts of various controversial issues that have characterized the field of anthropology over the past 50 years; (2) enhance their skills in analyzing and assessing the nature and quality of the arguments and empirical data employed by parties to the controversies; (3) develop an appreciation of the role of historical and political contexts in shaping the emergence and evolution of the controversies; and (4) consider the ethics involved in the practice and public representation of anthropology.
Prerequisite:  ANTH 480 and ANTH 481.

ANTH 599. Tutorial (1-18 credits) - CRN V1012
Advanced studies in anthropology.

ANTH 601. Independent Research (1-18 credits) - CRN V1013

ANTH 700. Dissertation Fieldwork (0 credit) - CRN 15080
Students conducting dissertation fieldwork off-campus may choose to register for this course with the permission of their dissertation advisor. Students may register for a maximum of one academic year. Under extraordinary circumstances (e.g. civil war) students may petition for additional time.
Prerequisites: Must be Ph.D. candidate with an approved dissertation prospectus and have
permission of department.


ANTH 701. Dissertation (Ph.D.) (1-18 credits) - CRN V1014
Prerequisite: Must be Ph.D. candidate and have consent of the department.

ANTH 703. Appointed Dissertation Fellowship (1-8 credits) - CRN V3804