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Anthropology Course Offerings: Fall 2008

 

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Undergraduate Courses

ANTH 102. Being Human: An Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology.
Dr. Katia Almeida - M/W 9:00 - 10:15 AM - 3 credits - SEC 101-LEC(1142)
Dr. Melvyn Goldstein - T/Th 1:15 - 2:30 PM - 3 credits - SEC 100-LEC(10876)
The nature of culture and humans as culture-bearing animals. The range of cultural phenomena including language, social organization, religion, and culture change, and the relevance of anthropology for contemporary social, economic, and ecological problems.

ANTH 103. Introduction to Human Evolution.
Adriann Balok - M/W/F 9:30 -10:20 AM - 3 credits - SEC 101-LEC(1146)
Dr. Cynthia Beall - T/Th 10:00 - 11:15 AM - 3 credits - SEC 100-LEC(1144)

Physical, cultural, and technological evolution of humans. The systematic interrelationships between humans, culture, and environment.

ANTH 107. Archaeology: An Introduction.
Dr. Jim Shaffer - T/Th 10:00 - 11:15 AM - 3 credits - SEC 100-LEC(1148)

Basic archaeological concepts are discussed followed by a review of human cultural and biological evolution from the earliest times through development of state organized societies. Geographical scope is worldwide with special attention given to ecological and cultural relationships affecting human societies through time.

ANTH 215. Health, Culture, and Disease: An Introduction to Medical Anthropology.
Dr. Atwood Gaines- M/W 9:00 - 10:15 AM - 3 credits - SEC 100-LEC(1152)

This course is an introduction to the field of medical anthropology. Medical Anthropology is concerned with the cross-cultural study of culture, health, and illness. During the course of the semester, our survey will include (1) theoretical orientations and key concepts; (2) the cross-cultural diversity of health beliefs and practices (abroad and at home); and (3) contemporary issues and special populations (e.g. AIDS, homelessness, refugees, women’s health, and children at risk.)

ANTH 225. Evolution.
Staff- M/W 12:30 - 1:45 PM - 3 credits - SEC 100-LEC(1154)

Multidisciplinary study of the course and processes of organic evolution provides a broad understanding of the evolution of structural and functional diversity, the relationships among organisms and their environments, and the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of organisms. Topics include the genetic basis of micro- and macro-evolutionary change, the concept of adaptation, natural selection, population dynamics, theories of species formation, principles of phylogenetic inference, biogeography, evolutionary rates, evolutionary rates, evolutionary convergence, homology, Darwinian medicine, and conceptual and philosophic issues in evolutionary theory. Cross-list: PHIL 225, BIOL 225, GEOL 225, HSTY 225.

ANTH 304. Introduction to the Anthropology of Aging.
Dr. Charlotte Ikels - T/Th 1:15 - 2:30 PM - 3 credits - SEC 100-LEC(8109)

Reviews historical and methodological approaches to the study of aging. Examines theoretical assuptions about aging by comparing studies from Western and non-Western societies that illustrate the differential importance of culture in the experience of aging.                                                                                                                        Recommended prerequisite: ANTH 102.

ANTH 305. Child Policy.
Mary Irwin- M/W 4:00 - 5:15 PM - 3 credits - SEC 100-LEC(1156)

This course introduces students to issues in child policy. Local, state and federal child policy will be considered. Topics will include, for example, policies related to child poverty, schooling, child welfare, and children's physical, and mental health. Students will learn how policy is developed and how research informs policy and vice versa.    Prerequisite: One social sciences course. Crosslist: CHST 301.

ANTH 308. Child Policy Externship.
Mary Irwin- TBA - 3-6 credits - 100-PRA(11300)

This course provides students with externships in child policy. Students apply for the externship and are placed with a local child policy agency for the semester. An individualized learning plan will be developed in consultation with the Childhood Studies Program faculty, the child policy agency, and the student.                                                                                                                        Crosslist: CHST 398.

ANTH 317. Asian Medical Systems.
Dr. Charlotte Ikels- T/Th 8:30 - 9:45 AM - 3 credits - SEC 100-LEC(8145)

Examines the philosophical assumptions and therapies of the traditional and contemporary medical systems of India, Tibet, China and Japan. Particular attention will be given to the folk, popular, and institutional sectors of medical practice as well as to the contemporary relationship between traditional medicine and Western medicine in each of these societies. Recommended prerequisite: ANTH 102.

ANTH 319. Introduction to Statistical Analysis in the Social Sciences.
Dr. Marc Abramiuk - M/W/F 10:30 - 11:20 AM - 3 credits - SEC 100-LEC(1160)

Statistical description (central tendency, variation, correlation, etc.) and statistical evaluation (two sample comparisons, regression, analysis of variance, non parametric statistics). Developing an understanding of statistical inference, particularly on proper usage of statistical methods. Examples from the social sciences. Cannot be used to meet the A&S Humanities and Social Sciences requirement. Not available for credit to students who have completed STAT 201 or PSCL 282.

ANTH 330. Special Topics in Prehistory. Topic: Archaeology of Mesoamerica.
Dr. Marc Abramiuk - M/W/F 9:30 - 10:20 AM - 3 credits - SEC 101-LEC(8251)

From 1500 B.C. until the Spanish Conquest, the area known as Mesoamerica (modern day:
Mexico, Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador), was occupied by several ancient
civilizations – among them, the Maya and the Aztecs. During their florescence, these miraculous ancient people constructed some of the largest bustling cities of their time. They excelled in engineering, art, and astronomy. They had rich histories, full of political intrigue, which can be pieced together from the archaeological record. Just as quickly as they arose in the rainforests and highlands of Mesoamerica, the people of these civilizations abandoned their cities. We will learn about these people, how they lived, what they accomplished, and we will explore the reasons for their rise and fall.
Recommended prerequisite: ANTH 102 or 107.

ANTH 330. Special Topics in Prehistory. Topic: Archaeology of New World Colonization.
Dr. Brian Redmond- T/Th 2:45 - 4:00 PM - 3 credits - SEC 100-LEC(1162)

Who were the first Americans? When did they arrive, and how did they get here? These and other intriguing (and controversial) questions will be addressed through the examination of archaeological evidence for the earliest human migrations to the western hemisphere. Parallel studies from bioanthropology, geology, DNA analysis, liguistics, and oral history will be reviewed and compared with the archaeological perspectives. Course content will include an overview of the best-documented, early culture called "Clovis," as well as discussions of the landmark Kennewick Man discovery and the finds at Monte Verde, Chile, which have dramatically altered our understanding of New World colonization.
Recommended prerequisite: ANTH 102 or 107.

ANTH 331. Ancient Civilizations of the Near East:
Dr. Jim Shaffer - T/Th 2:45 - 4:00 PM 3 credits - SEC 100-LEC(1164)

The social, economic, and ecological factors involved in the formation of the earliest Asian civilizations. The developmental role of cities, warfare, trade, and irrigation considered with respect to “state” formation in Mesopotamia, Iran, and the Indus Valley.
Recommended prerequisite: ANTH 102 or 107.

ANTH 335. Illegal Drugs and Society.
Dr. Lee Hoffer - T/Th 2:45 - 4:00 PM 3 credits - SEC 100-LEC(11185)

This course provides perspectives on illegal drug use informed by the social, political and economic dimensions of the issues. Framed by history, epidemiology, and medical consequences of drug use, students will confront the complex challenges posed by addiction. Anthropological research conducted in the U.S. and cross-culturally will demonstrate, elaborate and juxtapose various clinical, public health, and law enforcement policies and perspectives. Topics examined will include: why exclusively using a biomedical model of addiction is inadequate; how effective is the war on drugs; what prevention, intervention and treatment efforts work; and various ideological/moral perspectives on illegal drug use.

ANTH 338. Maternal Health: Anthropological Perspectives on Reproductive Practices and Health Policy.
Dr. Vanessa Hildebrand - M/W/F 9:30 - 10:20 AM 3 credits - SEC 100-LEC(11210)

The reproductive process is shared by humans as biological beings. However, the experience of pregnancy and childbirth is also dependent on the cultural, social, political, historical, and political-economic setting. This course frames issues in reproductive health by looking at the complex issues associated with maternal health and mortality world-wide. After reviewing biomedical perspectives on reproductive processes this course will focus on childbirth and pregnancy as the process and ritual by which societies welcome new members. This course will review ethnomedical concepts; discuss the interaction between local, national, and global agendas shaping reproductive practices; and conclude with anthropological critiques of reproductive health initiatives.

ANTH 367. Topics in Evolutionary Biology.
Topic: Darwin and Evolutionary Theory.
Dr. Cynthia Beall - W 4:00 - 6:30 PM - 3 credits - SEC 100-LEC(11089)

The focus for this course is on a special topic of interest in evolutionary biology and will vary from one offering to the next. Examples of possible topics include theories of speciation, the evolution of language, the evolution of sex, evolution and biodiversity, and molecular evolution.
Prerequisite: ANTH/BIOL/GEOL/PHIL 225. Cross-list: BIOL 368/GEOL/PHIL 367.

ANTH 369D.  The Anthropology of Nutrition.
Dr. Lawrence Greksa - T/Th 10:00 - 11:15 AM - 3 credits - SEC 100-SEM(1172)

Human nutrition is examined from an anthropological perspective.  We will briefly cover methods for assessing and evaluating dietary intake and dietary patterns.  The remainder of the course will focus on various social, ecological, and genetic factors which influence human nutritional patterns and the causes and consequences of protein-energy malnutrition.  The course will be taught in a seminar format and is designed to enhance your skills in critically reading the anthropological literature and in improving your written and oral communication skills.
This course is an approved SAGES Departmental Seminar.

ANTH 375. Human Evolution: The Fossil Evidence.
Dr. Yohannes Haile-Selassie - M/W/F 2:00 - 2:50 PM - 3 credits - SEC 100-LEC(8243)

This course will survey the biological and behavioral changes that occurred in the hominid lineage during the past five million years. In addition to a thorough review of the fossil evidence for human evolution, students will develop the theoretical framework in evolutionary biology.
Prerequisites: BIOL 110, recommended prerequisite: ANTH 103. Cross-list: ANAT 375.

ANTH 377. Human Osteology.
Dr. Scott Simpson- T/Th 2:30 - 4:20 PM - 4 credits - SEC 100-LEC(1178)

This course for upper division undergraduates and graduate students will review the following topics: human skeletal development and identification; and forensic identification (skeletal aging, sex identification and population affiliation).   Cross-list: ANAT 377.

ANTH 379. Topics in Cultural and Social Anthropology. Special Topic: Cultures of Latin America.
Dr. Katia Almeida - M/W 12:30 - 1:45 PM - 3 credits - SEC 100-LEC(1180)

The aim of this course is to consider cultural diversity and social inequality in contemporary Latin America from an anthropological perspective. A variety of aspects related to ethnicity, religion, music, gender, social movements, cuisine, urban spaces, violence, and ecology are considered in addition to current economic and political issues. These topics will be analyzed in relation to Latin America's complex historical and social formation and its identity representations. The course takes under consideration various and detailed case studies in which not just local communities but also perceptions of national institutions and practices will be analyzed from pluralistic approaches (provided by either Latin American and non- Latin American researchers) that combine fieldwork, interviews and life experiences with textual and media sources.

Recommended prerequisite: ANTH 102

Anth 380. Independent Study in Laboratory Archaeology I.
Dr. Brian Redmond - TBA - 1-3 credits - SEC 100-IND(1182)

This course provides an introduction to the basic methods and techniques of artifact curation and laboratory analysis in archaeology. Under the supervision of the department, each student will develop and carry out a focused project of material analysis and interpretation using the archaeology collections of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History. Each student is required to spend a minimum of two hours per week in the Archaeology laboratory at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History for each credit hour taken. By the end of the course, the students will prepare a short report describing the results of their particular project.
Recommended prerequisite: ANTH 107, permission of department, and prior permission of the Archaeology
Department of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History.

ANTH 396. Undergraduate Research in Evolutionary Biology.
Staff - TBA - 3 credits - SEC 100-RSC(8170)-Beall.

Students propose and conduct guided research on an aspect of evolutionary biology. The research will be sponsored and supervised by a member of the CASE faculty or other qualified professional. A written report must be submitted to the Evolutionary Biology Steering Committee before credit is granted.
Prerequisite: ANTH/BIOL/GEOL/PHIL 225, and consent of supervising faculty member.
Cross-list: BIOL/GEOL/PHIL 396.

ANTH 398. Anthropology SAGES Capstone.
Staff - TBA - 3 credits - SEC 100-RSC(8171)-Greksa, SEC 101-RSC(10892)-Beall, SEC 102-RSC(10893)-Goldstein, SEC 103-RSC(10894)-Shaffer, SEC 104-RSC(10900)-Anderson-Fye, SEC 105-RSC(10899)-Gaines, SEC 106-RSC(10898)-Ikels, SEC 107-RSC(10897)-Korbin, SEC 108-RSC(10896)-McGrath.

Supervised original research on a topic in anthropology, culminating in a written report and a public presentation. The research project may be in the form of an independent research project, a literature review, or some other original project with anthropological significance. The project must be approved and supervised by faculty. Group research projects are acceptable, but a plan which clearly identifies the distinct and substantial role of each participant must be approved by the supervising faculty. Approved SAGES capstone.
Prerequisite: Major in Anthropology and consent of supervising faculty member.

ANTH 398C. Child Policy Externship and Capstone.
Mary Irwin- TBA - 3 credits - 100-LEC(11302)

This course provides students with externships in child policy. These externships give students an opportunity to work directly with professionals who design and implement policies that impact the lives of children and their families. Agencies involved are active in the areas of childcare, education, juvenile justice, and physical and mental health. Students apply for the externship. Selected students are placed in a local child policy agency. An idividualized learning plan is developed in consultation with the Childhood Studies Program faculty, the supervisor in the agency, and the student. This is a 3 credit-hour course and may be taken twice for a total of 6 credit hours. Satisfactory completion of 3-credit hours fulfills the SAGES Capstone requirement. Crosslist: CHST 398C, PSCL 398C.                                                                                                                   

ANTH 399. Independent Study.
Staff - TBA - 1-6 credits - SEC 100-IND(1186)-Anderson-Fye, SEC 101-IND(8252)-Beall, SEC 102-IND(8405)-Gaines, SEC 103-IND(8406)-Goldstein, SEC 104-IND(8407)-Greksa, SEC 105-IND(8408)-Ikels, SEC 106-IND(8409)-Korbin, SEC 107-IND(8410)-McGrath, SEC 108-IND(8492) Shaffer.

Students may propose topics for independent reading and research.
Prerequisite: consent of supervising faculty member.

GRADUATE COURSES

ANTH 404. Introduction to the Anthropology of Aging.
Dr. Charlotte Ikels - T/Th 1:15 - 2:30 PM - 3 credits - SEC 100-LEC(8146).

(See ANTH 304)

ANTH 417. Asian Medical Systems.
Dr. Charlotte Ikels- T/Th 8:30 - 9:45 AM - 3 credits - SEC 100-LEC(8230).

(See ANTH 317)

ANTH 435. Illegal Drugs and Society.
Dr. Lee Hoffer - T/Th 2:45 - 4:00 PM - 3 credits - SEC 100-LEC(11194).

(See ANTH 335).

ANTH 438. Maternal Health: Anthropological Perspectives on Reproductive Practices and Health Policy.
Dr. Vanessa Hildebrand - M/W/F 9:30 - 10:20 AM - 3 credits - SEC 100-LEC(11212).

(See ANTH 338)

ANTH 467. Topics in Evolutionary Biology.
Topic: Darwin and Evolutionary Theory.
Dr. Cynthia Beall - W 4:00 - 6:30 PM - 3 credits - SEC 100-LEC(11088)

The focus for this course is on a special topic of interest in evolutionary biology and will vary from one offering to the next. Examples of possible topics include theories of speciation, the evolution of language, the evolution of sex, evolution and biodiversity, and molecular evolution.
  (See ANTH 367) Prerequisite: ANTH/BIOL/GEOL/PHIL 225 and consent of department. Cross-list: BIOL 468/GEOL/PHIL 467

ANTH 469.  The Anthropology of Nutrition.
Dr. Lawrence Greksa - T/Th 10:00 - 11:15 AM - 3 credits - SEC 100-LEC(10895)

Examines human nutrition and physical performance within the framework of human adaptability theory. The emphasis is on the measurement of energetic intake and expenditure in human populations; the assessment, health consequences, and biocultural correlates of malnutrition and obesity; and the uses of energetic data in assessing human population adaptation. (See ANTH 369D.) Recommended prerequisite: 
ANTH 103.

ANTH 475. Human Evolution: The Fossil Evidence.
Dr. Yohannes Haile-Selassie - M/W/F 2:00 - 2:50 PM - 3 credits - SEC 100-LEC(8245).

(See ANTH 375)

ANTH 477. Human Osteology.
Dr. Scott Simpson- T/Th 2:30 - 4:20 PM - 4 credits - SEC 100-LEC(9109).

(See ANTH 377)

ANTH 479. Topics in Cultural and Social Anthropology. Special Topic: Cultures of Latin America.
Dr. Katia Almeida - M/W 12:30 - 1:45 PM - 3 credits - SEC 100-LEC(8342).

(See ANTH 379) Recommended prerequisite: ANTH 102.

ANTH 480. The Anthropology of Health and Illness I.
Dr. Lawrence Greksa – W/F 3:00-5:00 PM – 3 credits - SEC 100-LEC(1198).

Part one of the graduate core course in medical anthropology includes sections giving an overview of topics such as the history and conceptual development of medical anthropology, anthropological epidemiology, psychiatric anthropology, social networks/support systems, and health care systems.
Recommended prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ANTH 504. Anthropological Research Design.
Dr. Janet McGrath - M 3:00 - 5:30 PM - 3 credits - SEC 100-LEC(1200).

Practical and theoretical issues in the selection of questions for health and aging research in societal settings. Illustration of frameworks and designs for research. Discussion of the problems of collection, analysis, and interpretation of data along with the non-scientific influences on the research process and the use of results.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ANTH 513. Seminar in Ethnopsychiatry.
Dr. Atwood Gaines - M/W 12:30 - 1:45 PM 3 credits - SEC 100-SEM(8237).

Theory and practice of psychotherapeutic forms. Diagnostic and therapeutic forms from Europe, the United States, Japan, India, and other major cultural traditions and those of local areas such as West Africa, Native America, and Latin America. The cultural theories of mental disorders, related conceptions of self and person, and the relationships of local psychological theory to clinical praxis and outcome.

ANTH 599. Tutorial.
Staff - TBA - (1-18 credits) - SEC 100-RSC(1204)-Anderson-Fye, SEC 101-RSC(1206)-Beall, SEC 102-RSC(8417)-Gaines, SEC 103-RSC(8418)-Goldstein, SEC 104-RSC(8419)-Greksa, SEC 105-RSC(8420) Ikels, SEC 106-RSC(8422)-Korbin, SEC 107-RSC(8423)-McGrath.
Advanced studies in anthropology. Prerequisite: consent of supervising faculty member.

ANTH 601. Independent Research.
Staff - TBA (1-18 credits) - SEC 100-RSC(1208)-Anderson-Fye, SEC 101-RSC(1210)-Beall, SEC 102-RSC(1212)-Gaines, SEC 103-RSC(8424)-Goldstein, SEC 104-RSC(8425)-Greksa, SEC 105-RSC(8426)-Ikels, SEC 106-RSC(8427)-Korbin, SEC 107-RSC(8428)-McGrath.

Course offered for Pass/No Pass or Pass/Fail grading only. Prerequisite: consent of supervising faculty member.


ANTH 700. Dissertation Fieldwork.
Staff - TBA - (0 credit) - SEC 100-THE(8332)-Anderson-Fye, SEC 101-THE(8333)-Beall, SEC 102-THE(8334)-Gaines, SEC 103-THE(8335)-Goldstein, SEC 104-THE(8336)-Greksa, SEC 105-THE(8337)-Ikels, SEC 106-THE(8338)-Korbin, SEC 107-THE(8339)-McGrath.

Students conducting dissertation fieldwork off-campus may choose to register for this course with the permission of their dissertation advisor. Students may register for a maximum of one academic year. Under extraordinary circumstances (e.g. civil war) students may petition for additional time.
Prerequisites: Must be Ph.D. candidate with an approved dissertation prospectus and have consent of supervising faculty member.

ANTH 701. Dissertation (Ph.D.)
Staff - TBA -
(1-18 credits) - SEC 100-THE(1224)-Anderson-Fye, SEC 101-THE(1216)-Beall, SEC 102-THE(1218)-Gaines, SEC 103-THE(1220)-Goldstein, SEC 104-THE(1222)-Greksa, SEC 105-THE(1224)-Ikels, SEC 106-THE(8429)-Korbin, SEC 107-THE(8430)-McGrath.
Prerequisite: Must be Ph.D. candidate and have consent of supervising faculty member.