ACES+ DISTINGUISHED LECTURESHIPS

ACES+ DISTINGUISHED LECTURESHIPS NOW AVAILABLE

The ACES+ Distinguished Lectureships provide support for senior women faculty or underrepresented minority to visit the CWRU campus for up to four days of collaboration and lectures. The Lectureship includes a $1,500 honorarium and funds for travel, lodging and a reception.

ACES+ Lectureships, previously awarded only to science and engineering departments hosting senior women scientists or engineers, are now open to faculty from all disciplines at the university.

The Lecturer will be invited for a minimum stay of 2 days and 2 full nights, and a maximum stay of 4 nights and give 2 to 4 lectures, which may include specialized seminars or course lectures, and a public lecture followed by a reception.

Applications should include:

  • one page description of the mutual research interests and scheduled interactions with CWRU Faculty
  • brief (up to 4 pages) current CV of the distinguished scholar
  • list of proposed lectures
  • a description of scheduled interactions with Case faculty
  • anticipated budget including travel, lodging, meals, reception expenses etc.
  • relevanance to the mission of increasing participation of women and minorities in academia

Please submit the Request for Funds application found at the link below along with the supporting materials electronically to: Deputy Provost at DeputyProvost@case.edu. Successful applicants will receive notice within two weeks of their submission date.

Download Request for Funds Application Here

Download Flyer Here

 

2013 - 2014 Recipients

2013 - 2014

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Levi T. Thompson of the University of Michigan visited March 20, 2014, and was hosted by the department of Chemical Engineering. He conducted a lecture titled, "Using Cascading Catalysis Concepts to Design Highly Active & Selective Heterogeneous Catalysits."

Lorna Gibson of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology visited April 29 - 30, 2008, and was hosted by the department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering and the department of Material Science & Engineering. She conducted a lecture titled, "Mechanical Behavior of Cells on Tissue Engineering Scaffolds." For more information, please see this flyer. Additionally, she held a meet and greet for graduate students and post-doctoral fellows, and more information about this event can be found on this PDF flyer.

Linda Waite of the University of Chicago visited April 4 - 6, 2008, and was hosted by the department of Sociology. She conducted a lecture titled "Sexual Activity, Sexual Function and Health at Older Ages." For more information, please download the PDF flyer. She conducted another lecture titled "National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project: An Introduction," and more on that event can be found on this PDF flyer.

Rebecca Lange of the University of Michigan visited April 10, 2008, and was hosted by the department of Geological Sciences. She conducted a colloquium titled, "Why Everything You Were Taught About Crystal Fractionation in Magma Chambers is Wrong: Heresy or Truth?"

Lucy Candib of the University of Massachusetts Medical School and the Family Health Center for Worcester visited March 25 - 27, 2008, and was hosted by the department of Family Medicine. She held a lecture titled "Obesity and Related Chronic Illnesses in Vulnerable Populations – Considering Causation." For more information, please see the PDF flyer. She also held a lecture titled "Unsafe in the Medical Home: Examining Our Own Spaces," and for more information about this event, please see the PDF flyer.

Eve Sweetser of the University of California, Berkeley, visited March 24 - 28, 2008, and was hosted by the department of Cognitive Science. She conducted a lecture titled, "Viewpoint and perspective in language and gesture." To view the lecture on Case TV, please click this link.

Zena Werb of the University of California, San Francisco, visited February 11 - 14, 2008, hosted by the department of Physiology and Biophysics. She conducted a lecture titled "Tube or Not Tube: Molecular Regulation Mammary Epithelial Morphogenesis In Vivo and in Organotypic Culture." For more information, please see the Powerpoint flyer. She was also part of a minisymposium on phenotyping genetically modified mice, which you can find out more about by seeing the Powerpoint flyer.