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SUMMER SESSION

 

Course Descriptions

 
Preliminary Summer 2011 Roster
Scroll down for course list.
May Term! May 9 - 27
8 Week Session: June 6 - August 1
4 Week Session (1): June 6 - July 1
5 Week Session: June 6 - July 8
6 Week Session: June 20 - August 1
4 Week Session (2): July 11 - August 5

What follows is a preliminary roster for Summer 2011. The official roster will be available on SIS beginning February 1, 2011. Registration for summer classes begins on March 28, 2011 for CWRU undergraduate students. Graduate students may register beginning March 21, 2011. All visiting and non-degree students will be able to register beginning April 11, 2011. All students will register using the Student Information System (SIS). Closing dates for registration will vary by session. Students will need to check their enrollment appointment or the registrar's website for this information.  It will be posted here as it becomes available.

Information regarding instructors and time/day scheduling will be posted as it becomes available. For questions regarding course equivalencies, contact either the appropriate department or the Office of Undergraduate Studies at (216) 368-2928.

Please see the Case General Bulletin for official course descriptions.

Drop-Add

The drop-add period ends at the end of the business day (4:30 p.m.) on the third day of each session.

End of drop/add for classes beginning May 9: May 11
End of drop/add for classes beginning June 6: June 8
End of drop/add for classes beginning June 20: June 22
End of drop/add for classes beginning July 11: July 13

Course Cancellation Policy

Classes offered by the College of Arts and Sciences have a 4 student enrollment minimum. Undergraduate Engineering classes have a 6 student enrollment minimum. If the class you are registered for has fewer enrolled than its minimum, please attend class the first day to find out its status. Students may register through the third day of the session and thus, online numbers do not necessarily represent actual enrollment.

This is a preliminary 2011 roster.


Anthropology Communication Sciences Physics
Art History Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Political Science
Art Studio Engineering Psychology
Astronomy English SAGES
Bioethics Ethnic Studies Sociology
Biology Geological Sciences Statistics
Biomedical Engineering History Theater
Chemistry Mathematics World Literature
Civil Engineering Modern Languages and Literatures  
Classics Philosophy

ANTHROPOLOGY

3 week

ANTH 314/414 — 3 credits
Cultures of the United States
May 9 - May 27
MTWRF 9:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Atwood Gaines
Contact: atwood.gaines@case.edu
This course considers the rich ethnic diversity of the U.S. from the perspective of social/cultural anthropology. Conquest, immigration, problems of conflicts and accommodation, and the character of the diverse regional and ethnic cultures are considered as are forms of racism, discrimination, and their consequences. Groups of interest include various Latina/o and Native peoples, African-American groups, and specific ethnic groups of Pacific, Mediterranean, European, Asian, and Caribbean origin.

5 week

ANTH 319 — 3 credits
Introduction to Statistical Analysis in the Social Sciences
June 6 - July 8
TWR 9:00-11:20 a.m.
Lawrence Greksa
Contact: lawrence.greksa@case.edu
Statistical description (central tendency, variation, correlation, etc.) and statistical evaluation (two sample comparisons, regression, analysis of variance, non-parametric statistics). Developing an understanding of statistical inference, particularly on proper usage of statistical methods. Examples from the social sciences. Cannot be used to meet the A&S Humanities and Social Sciences requirement. Not available for credit to students who have completed STAT 201 or PSCL 282.

6 week

ANTH 225 — 3 credits
Evolution
June 20 - August 1
MW 6:00-9:00 p.m.
Patricia Princehouse
Contact: patricia.princehouse@case.edu
Multidisciplinary study of the course and processes of organic evolution provides a broad understanding of the evolution of structural and functional diversity, the relationships among organisms and their environments, and the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of organisms.  Topics include the genetic basis of micro- and macro-evolutionary change, the concept of adaptation, natural selection, population dynamics, theories of species formation, principles of phylogenetic inference, biogeography, evolutionary rates, evolutionary convergence, homology, Darwinian medicine, and conceptual and philosophic issues in evolutionary theory.

ANTH 324 — 3-5 credits
Field Methods in Archaeology
June 13 - July 15
* Note dates for ANTH 324
MTWRF 8:30 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
Brian G. Redmond
Contact: bredmond@cmnh.org
Join us for a comprehensive introduction to archaeological field work. Students will be introduced to the methods of archaeological survey, techniques of hand excavation, artifact identification, and the preparation of field notes and documentation. Field experience supplemented by formal and informal lectures and discussions about archaeological methods and regional prehistory.  PERMIT ONLY

The Field School is held as five weekly sessions of instruction at a prehistoric Native American archaeological site near Milan, Ohio. Students not commuting daily to the site (approximately 60 miles from University Circle) are responsible for room and board costs and transportation to and from the site. For additional information, contact Dr. Redmond. (216) 231-4600, ext. 3301; email bredmond@cmnh.org

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ART HISTORY
8 week

ARTH 102 — 3 credits
Art History II: Michelangelo to Maya Lin
June 6 - August 1
Days/Times
Christina Larson
Contact: christina.larson@case.edu
The second half of a two-semester survey of world art highlighting the major monuments of Renaissance and Baroque Europe, America, and Asia.  Special emphasis on visual analysis, historical and sociocultural contexts, and objects in the Cleveland Museum of Art.

6 week

ARTH 280 — 3 credits
Modern Art and Modern Science
June 20 - August 1
MW 6:00-9:00 p.m.; Wednesdays at Cleveland Museum of Art
Indra Lacis
Contact: indra.lacis@case.edu
Twentieth Century Art: From Picasso to Pollock to Postmodernism. The function and appearance of art have changed radically throughout the twentieth century.  Based on close study of objects in the collection of the Cleveland Museum of Art, this course will examine how the tenets of European and American Modernism were expanded and overturned by later twentieth century movements such as Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, Minimalism, and Feminism.  With emphasis on changing aesthetic attitudes as well as on how social and political circumstances affect the creation and interpretation of art, we will analyze specific, influential works of art in view of larger, overarching trends. Since we study many works of art in person, we will also consider how the meaning and role of art is altered within the context of a museum. How were these paintings and sculptures understood when they were first made: were they scandalous or immediately admired, and why are they accepted as part of the canon today?

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ART STUDIO
8 week

ARTS 220 — 3 credits
Photography Studio I
June 6 - August 1
TR 6:00-9:00 p.m.
Alexander Aitken
Contact: alexander.aitken@case.edu
Art Studio Facility, Corner of Murray Hill and Adelbert Roads
Camera, film, and darkroom techniques. Development of basic perceptual and photographic skills. Darkroom and photographic field and lab work. 35mm camera required.

5 week

ARTS 350/450 — 3 credits
Multimedia I
June 6 - July 8
MTWR 5:00-8:00 p.m.
Jared Bendis
Contact: jared.bendis@case.edu
Class meets in KSL 215
Fundamental concepts and skills for using technology to design, create, express, and present. This project-oriented class will develop knowledge and competencies related to digital imaging, animation, video, multimedia, production and presentation.  Prereq.: One from ARTS 101, ARTS 106, ARTS 216, or ARTS 220 or permission of the director of art education

6 week

ARTS 399 — 1-3 credits
Independent Study in Art Studio (Ceramics)
June 13 - June 24; July 9
MTWRF 10:00 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
Tim Shuckerow
Contact: tim.shuckerow@case.edu
Class meets at Squire Valleevue Farm, lower farm
Permit required from instructor, Tim Shuckerow, txs10@case.edu

ARTS 497 — 3 credits
Independent Study in Art Studio (Ceramics)
June 13 - June 24; July 9
MTWRF 10:00 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
Tim Shuckerow
Contact: tim.shuckerow@case.edu
The properties of clay, traditional hand-building forming techniques,
and Japanese raku firing processes will be explored. Projects
undertaken will be ceramic vessels, sculptures, multicultural masks
and musical instruments. Individual creative expression and cooperative peer interaction is necessary. Class meets at Squire Valleevue Farm, lower farm
Permit required from instructor, Tim Shuckerow, txs10@case.edu

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ASTRONOMY

8 week

ASTR 201 — 3 credits
The Sun and its Planets
June 6 - August 1
TWR 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Jeffrey Kreissler
Contact: jeffrey.kriessler@case.edu
An overview of the solar system; the planets and other objects that orbit about the Sun and the Sun itself as the dominant mass and the most important source of energy in the solar system.  Concepts and the development of our knowledge will be emphasized.  Not available for credit to astronomy majors.

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BIOETHICS

Contact goabroad@case.edu for the following Bioetchics travel courses

BETH 315/415 — 3 credits
Tissues and Issues:  Ethical and Social Challenges in the Biosciences
Dates:  TBA
Days/Times
Instructor
Description

BETH 315/415 — 3 credits
Global Health:  India
Dates: TBA
Days/Times
Instructor
Description

BETH 315/415 — 3 credits
Netherlands:  Death, Dying and Euthanasia
Dates:  TBA
Days/Times
Instructor
This course will compare how two liberal democracies, the United States and the Netherlands, have handled difficult end-of-life issues, including:  The Dutch regulation of euthanasia; regulation of physician-assisted suicide in the state of Oregon; terminal sedation; end-of-life decisions in newborns; withholding and withdrawing of artificially-provided fluids and nutrition; the legal basis for end-of-life decision making in the USA; palliative care and hospice; public trust in medicine and physicians. Interested students should visit the summer2010-Amsterdam website.

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BIOLOGY
3 week

BIOL 216 — 3 credits
Organisms and Ecosystems
May 9 - May 27
MTWRF 9:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Barbara Kuemerle
Contact: barbara.kuemerle@case.edu
Third in a series of three courses required of the Biology major.  Topics include:  homeostasis, including endocrine and autonomic controls; function of neurons and nervous systems; function of organ systems involved in circulation, excretion, osmoregulation, gas exchange, feeding, digestion, and temperature regulation; reproduction and development; behavior, population dynamics, community ecology, and function of ecosystems.  Prereq:  BIOL 214 and either CHEM 105 or CHEM 111.

BIOL 216L — 1 credit
Organisms and Ecosystems Laboratory
May 9 - May 27
MW 1:00-2:00 p.m. Recitation
TR 1:00-4:00 p.m. Lab
Barbara Kuemerle
Contact: barbara.kuemerle@case.edu
Third in a series of three laboratory courses required of the Biology major. Students will conduct laboratory experiments designed to provide students with hands-on empirical laboratory experience in order to better understand the complex interactions governing the basic physiology and development of organisms, as well as the functioning of ecosystems. Laboratories and discussion sessions offered in alternate weeks.  Prereq or Coreq:  BIOL 216.

5 week

BIOL 214 3 credits
Genes and Evolution
June 6 - July 8
MTWRF 9:00-10:00 a.m.
James Bader
Contact: james.bader@case.edu
First in a series of three courses required of the Biology major.  Topics include: biological molecules (with a focus on DNA and RNA); basics of cell structure (with a focus on the nucleus and chromosome); cell cycle, mitosis and meiosis; molecular genetics, viruses and gene technology; classical and microbial genetics; population genetics and evolution, diversity resulting from evolution. Class limited to 24 students.

BIOL 214L — 1 credit
Genes and Evolution Laboratory
June 6 - July 8
TR 12:00-3:00 p.m.
Deborah Harris
Contact: deborah.vallance@case.edu
First in a series of three laboratory courses required of the Biology major.  Topics include: biological molecules (with a focus on DNA  and RNA); basics of cell structure (with a focus on the nucleus and chromosome); cell cycle, mitosis and melosis; molecular genetics, biotechnology; population genetics and evolution, diversity resulting from evolution.  Laboratories and discussion sessions offered in alternate weeks.

BIOL 215 — 3 credits
Cells and Proteins
June 6 - July 8
MTWR 10:00-11:45 a.m.
Valerie Haywood

Contact: valerie.haywood@case.edu
Second in a series of three courses required of the Biology major. Topics include: biological molecules (focus on proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids); cell structure (focus on plasma membrane, endomembrane system and organelles of energy metabolism); protein synthesis, targeting and trafficking; protein structure-function, including binding of antibodies to antigens, enzymes to substrates, and oxygen to hemoglobin. Transduction of neural and hormonal signals; cellular controls involved in development, cell cycle, and cancer; cellular energetics, respiration and photosynthesis. Prereq: CHEM 105 and CHEM 106; BIOL 214 or consent.

BIOL 215L — 1 credit
Cells and Proteins Laboratory
June 6 - July 8
MW 1:00-4:00 p.m.
Deborah Harris
Contact: deborah.vallance@case.edu
Second in a series of three laboratory courses required of the Biology major.  Topics to include: protein structure-function, enzymes kinetics; cell structure; cellular energetics, respiration and photosynthesis.  In addition, membrane structure and transport will be covered.  Laboratory and discussion sessions offered in alternate weeks.  This course is not available for students who have taken BIOL 215 as a 4-credit course.

BIOL 302 — 3 credits
Human Learning and the Brain
June 6 - July 8
MWF 2:30-5:00 p.m.
James Zull
Contact: james.zull@case.edu
This course focuses on the question, "How does the human brain learn?" Through assigned readings, extensive class discussions, and a major paper, each student will explore personal perspectives on learning. Specific topics include, but are not limited to: the brain's cycle of learning; neocortex structure and function; emotion and limbic brain; synapse dynamics and changes in learning; images in cognition; symbolic brain (language, mathematics, music); memory formation; and creative thought and brain mechanisms. The major paper will be added to each student's SAGES writing portfolio. In addition, near the end of the semester, each student will make an oral presentation on a chosen topic. Approved SAGES departmental seminar. Prereq: BIOL 114 or BIOL 214 or PSCL 101.
 XListed with COGS 322.

BIOL 362/462 — 3 credits
Principles of Developmental Biology
June 6 - July 8
MWF 9:00-11:30 a.m.
Stephen Haynesworth
Contact: stephen.haynesworth@case.edu
The descriptive and experimental aspects of animal development. Gametogenesis, fertilization, cleavage, morphogenesis, induction, differentiation, organogenesis, growth, and regeneration. Prereq: BIOL 216 or BIOL 220.  20 student limit.

6 week

BIOL 225 — 3 credits
Evolution
June 20 - August 1
MW 6:00-9:00 p.m.
Patricia Princehouse
Contact: patricia.princehouse@case.edu
Multidisciplinary study of the course and processes of organic evolution provides a broad understanding of the evolution of structural and functional diversity, the relationships among organisms and their environments, and the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of organisms. Topics include the genetic basis of micro- and macro- evolutionary change, the concept of adaptation, natural selection, population dynamics, theories of species formation, principles of phylogenetic inference, biogeography, evolutionary rates, evolutionary convergence, homology, Darwinian medicine, and conceptual and philosophic issues in evolutionary theory.

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BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING

3 week

EBME 370 — 2 credits
Principles of Biomedical Engineering Design
May 9 - May 27
MTWRF 9:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Dustin Tyler
Contact: dustin.tyler@case.edu; 368-0319
The design process required to produce biomedical devices, research equipment, and clinical tools is developed. Topics include identification of need; requirements specification; project management; working in teams; solutions conceptualization, refinement, and selection; hazard and risk analysis and mitigation; verification; validation; regulatory requirements; and medical device pathways to the market. Through critical examination of contemporary medical research and clinical problems, students, working in teams, will identify a need to develop a specific problem statement, project plan, input requirements, solution concept and risk analysis. Recommended preparation: EBME 310.

8 week

EBME 328 — 1 credit
Biomedical Engineering R&D Training I
June 6 - August 1
Days/Times TBA
Jeffrey Duerk
Contact: jeffrey.duerk@case.edu
This course will provide research and development in the laboratory of a mentoring faculty member. Varied R&D experiences will include activities in biomedical instrumentation, tissue engineering, imaging, drug delivery, and neural engineering. Each Student must identify a faculty mentor, and together they will create a description of the training experience prior to the first class. Prereq: EBME 201 and EBME 202.

EBME 329 — 1 credit
Biomedical Engineering R&D Training II
June 6 - August 1
Days/Times TBA
Jeffrey Duerk
Contact: jeffrey.duerk@case.edu
This course will provide research and development training in the laboratory of a mentoring faculty member. Varied R&D experiences will include activities in biomedical instrumentation, tissue engineering, imaging, drug delivery, and neural engineering. Each student must identify a faculty mentor, and together they will create a description of the training experience prior to the first class. Recommended preparation EBME 328.  Prereq:  EBME 201 and EBME 202.

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CHEMISTRY

4 week (1)

CHEM 301 — 3 credits
Introductory Physical Chemistry I
June 6 - July 1
Days/Times
Michael Kenney
Contact: michael.kenney@case.edu
First of a two-semester sequence covering principles and applications of physical chemistry, intended for chemistry and engineering majors and other students having primary interests in biochemical, biological or life-science areas.  States and properties of matter.  Thermodynamics and its application to chemical and biochemical systems.  Chemical equilibrium.  Electrochemistry.  Recommended preparation:  A year each of physics and calculus, preferably including partial derivatives.  Prereq:  CHEM 106 or equivalent.

* Note dates of sequential sessions

5 week

CHEM 105 — 3 credits
Principles of Chemistry I
June 6 - July 8
MTWR 10:30 a.m.-12:20 p.m.
James Burgess
Contact: james.burgess@case.edu
Atomic structure; thermochemistry; periodicity, bonding and molecular structure; intermolecular forces; properties of solids; liquids, gases and solutions. Recommended preparation: One year of high school chemistry.

CHEM 223 — 3 credits
Introductory Organic Chemistry I
June 6 - July 8
MTWRF 10:30 a.m.-12:20 p.m.
Ormond Brathwaite
Contact: ormond.brathwait@case.edu
Introductory course for engineering students and science majors. Develops themes of structure and bonding along with elementary reaction mechanism. Includes extensive treatment of hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols and ethers.  Prereq: CHEM 106 or CHEM 111.

CHEM 233 — 2 credits
Introductory Organic Laboratory I
June 6 - July 8
MTWR 1:30-4:30 p.m.
Thomas Robilotto
Contact: thomas.robilotto@case.edu
An introductory organic laboratory course emphasizing microscale operations. Synthesis and purification of organic compounds, isolation of natural products, and systematic identification of organic compounds by physical and chemical methods. Prereq: CHEM 106 or CHEM 111 and CHEM 113 or equivalent.  Coreq: CHEM 223 or CHEM 323.

4 week (2)

CHEM 106 — 3 credits
Principles of Chemistry II
July 11 - August 5
MTWR 10:30 a.m.-12:40 p.m.
Clemens Burda
Contact: clemens.burda@case.edu
Thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium; acid/base chemistry; oxidation and reduction; kinetics; spectroscopy; introduction to nuclear, organic, and polymers. Prereq: CHEM 105 or its equivalent.

CHEM 113 — 2 credits
Principles of Chemistry Lab
July 11 - August 5
MTWR 1:00-5:30 p.m.
Instructor: TBA
A one semester laboratory based on quantitative chemical measurements. Experiments include analysis, synthesis and characterization, thermochemistry, and chemical kinetics. Computer analysis of data is a key part of all experiments.  Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 105, CHEM 106, CHEM 111, or ENGR 145.

CHEM 224 — 3 credits
Introductory Organic Chemistry II
July 11 - August 5
MTWRF 10:30 a.m.-12:20 p.m.
Ormand Brathwaite
Contact: ormond.brathwait@case.edu
Continues and extends themes of structure and bonding from CHEM 223 and introduces spectroscopy and more complex reaction mechanisms. Includes extensive treatment of aromatic rings, carbonyl compounds, amines and selected special topics.  Prereq: CHEM 223 or CHEM 323.

CHEM 234 — 2 credits
Introductory Organic Laboratory II
July 11 - August 5
MTWR 1:30-4:30 p.m.
Thomas Robilotto
Contact: thomas.robilotto@case.edu
A continuation of CHEM 233, involving multi-step organic synthesis, peptide synthesis, product purification and analysis using sophisticated analytical techniques such as chromatography and magnetic resonance spectroscopy.
Prereq: CHEM 233.  Coreq:  CHEM 224.

CHEM 302 — 3 credits
Introductory Physical Chemistry II
July 11 - August 5
Days/Times
Michael Kenney
Contact: michael.kenney@case.edu
Continuation of CHEM 301. Chemical kinetics and catalysis. Introductory quantum chemistry. Spectroscopy. Statistical thermodynamics. Prereq: CHEM 301 or CHEM 335.

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CIVIL ENGINEERING
8 week

ECIV 310 — 3 credits
Strength of Materials
June 6 - August 1
TR 10:30 a.m.-12:40 p.m.
Staff
Stresses and deformations of structural, machine and biological elements; transformation of stress and strain tensors. Mechanical properties of materials. Analysis of indeterminate structures. Inelasticity, failure theories, fatigue. Introduction to the mechanics of solid deformable bodies. Energy methods, virtual work and column stability.  Prereq: ENGR 200.

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CLASSICS

6 week

CLSC 202 — 3 credits
Classical Mythology
June 20 - August 1
MW 9:00-12:00 p.m.
Rachel Sternberg
Contact: rachel.sternberg@case.edu
The myths of Classical Greece and Rome, their interpretation and influence.

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COMMUNICATION SCIENCES

3 week

COSI 302/402 — 3 credits
Instrumental Measurements in Speech Sciences
May 9 - May 27
MTWRF 9:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Patrizia Bonaventura
Contact: patrizia.bonaventura@case.edu; 368-0056
This course will provide hands on experience on techniques for instrumental measurements of speech and voice parameters, for applications to assessment and diagnosis of speech and voice disorders, to linguistic analysis of speech parameters (prosodic and segmental), and to speech production modeling. In particular, instrumental measures of voice parameters will be carried out emphasizing use rather than theory. All instrumentation is available at the Case Speech Production Lab. This course is of interest to all communication sciences, cognitive sciences, cognitive linguistics, physics, and biomedical engineering students. For more information, see: http://www.case.edu/artsci/cosi/cspl/index.html.

5 week

COSI 260 — 3 credits
Multicultural Aspects of Human Communication
June 6 - July 8
MTWR 10:30 a.m.-12:20 p.m.
Tonia Kates Florence
Contact: tonia.kates-stewart@case.edu
Introduces intercultural/interracial communication by discussing specific communication principles and by putting theory into practice by exploring differences in perception, and verbal and nonverbal communication messages. Course emphasizes relationship between communication, race, culture; nature of race and culture; and how they influence the communication process. Various theories and approaches to study of intercultural/interracial communication will be discussed, along with significant concepts, processes and considerations. Practical outcomes of intercultural/interracial encounters will also be discussed.

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ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE
8 week

EECS 246 — 4 credits
Signals and Systems
June 6 - August 1
MWF 1:45-3:45 p.m.
There will be a separate 1 hour lab session at a time TBD
Marc Buchner and Vira Chankong
Contact: marc.buchner@case.edu and vira.chankong@case.edu
The sinusoidal steady state and phasor analysis. Bode plots and their relationship to the frequency domain representation of signals. Gain-bandwidth product, slew-rate and other limitations of real devices. Filter design. Frequency domain considerations including Fourier series and Fourier transforms. Sampling theorem. The Discrete Fourier Transform. The z-transform and digital signal processing. Accompanying laboratory exercises which reinforce classroom lectures.  Prereqs: ENGR 210 and MATH 224.

EECS 281 — 4 credits
Logic Design and Computer Organization
June 6 - August 1
TR 1:00-3:10 p.m.; Lab Session TBA
Daniel Oldham
Contact: daniel.oldham@case.edu
Fundamentals of digital systems in terms of both computer organization and logic level design. Organization of digital computers; information representation; boolean algebra; analysis and synthesis of combinational and sequential circuits; datapaths and register transfers; instruction sets and assembly language; input/output and communication; memory.   Prereq: ENGR 131.

EECS 301 — 2 credits
Digital Logic Laboratory
June 6 - August 1
M 2:30-3:50 p.m.
Staff
This course is an introductory experimental laboratory for digital networks. The course introduces students to the process of design, analysis, synthesis and implementation of digital networks. The course covers the design of combinational circuits, sequential networks, registers, counters, synchronous/asynchronous Finite State Machine, register based design, and arithmetic computational block.   Prereq: EECS 281.

EECS 399 — 4 credits
Engineering Projects II
Days/Times: First meeting June 6 11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.  Future meetings will be arranged to accommodate student schedules.
Behnam Malakooti
Contact: behnam.malakooti@case.edu
The emphasis on this course is upon engineering practice especially as found in industry. There is a major design experience which is taught from the industrial viewpoint of project management and design to specification. Considerable time is spent with the students to define a suitable project with an appropriate subject including specifications, technical depth, and achievable objectives. This course is the capstone of the senior year experience with an expected course time of 16-20 hours per week. The course covers the design process, the dynamics of teamwork including working under stress, project management as practiced in industry, professional ethics, and professional communications as expected of any practicing engineer. The project is open-ended but the final design is expected to represent a design to the project specifications. Additional time is spent on topics which professional engineers may encounter such as entrepreneurship and small business practices, intellectual property, and technical library research.

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ENGINEERING

3 week

ENGR 225B — 4 credits
Thermodynamics, Fluid Dynamics, Heat and Mass Transfer
Taught in Botswana
May 16 - June 4
MTWRF 8:30 a.m.-11:00 a.m.
REC MTWRF 1:00 p.m.-2:15 p.m.
Daniel Lacks and R. Mohan Sankaran
Contact: daniel.lacks@case.edu and ramanathan.sankaran@case.edu
Elementary thermodynamic concepts: first and second laws, and equilibrium. Basic fluid dynamics, heat transfer, and mass transfer: microscopic and macroscopic perspectives. The course will be taught at the University of Botswana, and engineering applications will be discussed in the context of regional issues specific to Botswana. Prereq: CHEM 111 and ENGR 145 and PHYS 121.

8 week

ENGR 131 — 3 credits
Elementary Computer Programming
June 6 - August 1
MTWR 10:30-11:50 a.m.
LAB: TBA
Staff
Students will develop an understanding of, and an appreciation for, the use of algorithms to solve problems, as well as the ability to translate them into good computer programs. The problems dealt with in this course will be chosen to illustrate the fundamentals of computer programming. Java is the programming language used in this course, and students create and debug Java programs as an important part of learning the fundamentals of computer programming.

ENGR 145 — 4 credits
Chemistry of Materials
June 6 - August 1
MTW 4:00-5:50 p.m.
REC R 5:00-5:50 p.m.
Peter Lagerlof
Contact: peter.lagerlof@case.edu
Application of fundamental chemistry principles to materials. Emphasis on bonding and how this relates to the structure and properties in metals, ceramics, polymers, and electronic materials. Application of chemistry principles to develop an understanding of how to synthesize materials.  Prereq: CHEM 111 or equivalent.

ENGR 200 — 3 credits
Statics and Strength of Materials
June 6 - August 1
TR 10:30 a.m.-12:40 p.m.
Xiangwu Zeng
Contact: xiangwu.zeng@case.edu
An introduction to the analysis, behavior and design of mechanical/structural systems. Course topics include: concepts of equilibrium; geometric properties and distributed forces; stress, strain, and mechanical properties of materials; and, linear elastic behavior of elements.  Prereq: PHYS 121.

ENGR 210 — 4 credits
Introduction to Circuits and Instrumentation
June 6 - August 1
MWF 2:30-4:30 p.m.
LAB: TBA
Christian Zorman
Contact: christian.zorman@case.edu
Modeling and circuit analysis of analog and digital circuits. Fundamental concepts in circuit analysis; voltage and current sources, Kirchhoff's Laws, Thevenin and Norton equivalent circuits, inductors capacitors, and transformers. Modeling sensors and amplifiers and measuring DC device characteristics. Characterization and measurement of time dependent waveforms. Transient behavior of circuits. Frequency dependent behavior of devices and amplifiers, frequency measurements. AC power and power measurements. Noise in real electronic systems. Electronic devices as switches. Digital logic circuits. Introduction to computer interfaces. Analog/digital systems for measurement and control.  Prereq: MATH 122. Coreq: PHYS 122.

ENGR 225 — 4 credits
Thermodynamics, Fluid Dynamics, Heat and Mass Transfer
June 6 - August 1
TWR 4:00-6:00 p.m.
REC: M 4:00-6:00 p.m.
Yasuhiro Kamotani
Contact: yasuhiro.kamotani@case.edu
Elementary thermodynamic concepts: first and second laws, and equilibrium. Basic fluid dynamics, heat transfer, and mass transfer: microscopic and macroscopic perspectives. Prereq: CHEM 111, ENGR 145, and PHYS 121. Coreq: MATH 223.

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ENGLISH

3 week

ENGL 368C/468C — 3 credits
Topics in Film: Asian Cinemas
May 9 - May 27
MWF 9:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
TR 9:30 a.m.-1.00 p.m.
Linda Ehrlich
Contact: linda.ehrlich@case.edu
Asian cinema’s popularity and importance can be seen in the list of awards at film festivals, and in cinematheque schedules, and home-viewing sales, but what might the term “Asian cinema” actually mean?  Is “Asia” a region that stretches from Japan to Turkey, or does it have other geographical boundaries? In this¨Topics in Film” course, we look at films as examples of national film industries and trans-national co-productions. In particular, we will analyze films from India, the People’s Republic of China, Taiwan, Korea, Japan, and Hong Kong.

 8 week

ENGL 180 — 1-2 credits
Writing Tutorial
June 6 - August 1
Days/Times
Daniel Anderson
Contact: daniel.p.anderson@case.edu
Substantial scheduled tutorial work in writing.

ENGL 203 — 3 credits
Introduction to Creative Writing
June 6 - August 1
MTW 1:00-2:30 p.m.
Nicole Emmelhainz
Contact: nicole.emmelhainz@case.edu
A course exploring basic issues and techniques of writing narrative prose and verse through exercises, analysis, and experiment. For students who wish to try their abilities across a spectrum of genres.  Prereq: ENGL 150 or USFS/FSCC 100.

6 week

ENGL 308 — 3 credits
American Literature
June 20 - August 1
Days/Times
Judith Oster
Contact: judith.oster@case.edu
A survey of major American authors from the puritans to the present.  Prereq:  100 level first year seminar in USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, FSTS, FSCS or ENGL 150.

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ETHNIC STUDIES

6 week

ETHS 385 — 3 credits
Hispanic Literature in Translation
June 20 - August 1
MTWR 5:30-7:00 p.m.
Jacqueline Nanfito
Contact: jacqueline.nanfito@case.edu
Critical analysis and appreciation of representative literary masterpieces from Spain and Latin America, and by Hispanics living in the U.S.  Texts cover a variety of genres and a range of literary periods, from works by Cervantes to those of Gabriel Garcia Marquez.  The course will examine the relationship between literature and other forms of artistic production, as well as the development of the Hispanic literary text within the context of historical events and cultural production of the period.  Counts toward Spanish major only as related course.  No knowledge of Spanish required. 

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GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES

3 week

GEOL 100 — 3 credits
Introduction to Geology in the Field
May 9 - May 27
MTWRF 9:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Peter McCall
Contact: peter.mccall@case.edu
This course is designed for those that want to get out of the classroom and DO geology. In a series of multi-day field trips we will see firsthand how geologists interpret the landscape, read stories in rock, and reconstruct 400 million years of climatic and tectonic history exposed in our region. We will visit world class fossil collecting sites in Indiana and Ohio, see the effects of glaciers in the Niagara and Finger Lakes regions of New York, and examine the geology and hydrology of hazardous waste sites, salt mines, landslide areas near Syracuse. We will see the legacy of coal mining, explore a cave, and do a day of whitewater rafting in Pennsylvania. And we will visit the Appalachian Mountain region of West Virginia and Maryland to make and interpret geological maps and see how mountains are made. No prior experience is assumed. The only course pre-requisites are an open mind, tolerance for travel, and a pair of worn-in boots. Contact peter.mccall@case.edu; 368-3676 for more information.

6 week

GEOL 115 — 3 credits
Introduction to Oceanography
June 20 - August 1
MTWR 4:30-6:00 p.m.
Gerald Matisoff
Contact: gerald.matisoff@case.edu
The sciences of oceanography.  Physical, chemical, biologic, and geologic features and processes of the oceans.  Differences and similarities between the oceans and large lakes including the Great Lakes.  Required:  Sunday field trip.

GEOL 225 — 3 credits
Evolution
June 20 - August 1
MW 6:00-9:00 p.m.
Patricia Princehouse
Contact: patricia.princehouse@case.edu
Multidisciplinary study of the course and processes of organic evolution provides a broad understanding of the evolution of structural and functional diversity, the relationships among organisms and their environments, and the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of organisms. Topics include the genetic basis of micro- and macro- evolutionary change, the concept of adaptation, natural selection, population dynamics, theories of species formation, principles of phylogenetic inference, biogeography, evolutionary rates, evolutionary convergence, homology, Darwinian medicine, and conceptual and philosophic issues in evolutionary theory.

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HISTORY

3 week

HSTY 330 — 3 credits
History of the American Teenager
May 9 - May 27
MTWRF 9:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Renee Sentilles
Contact: renee.sentilles@case.edu
This part-seminar, part-lecture hybrid course focuses on adolescent experience in the United States from the Colonial Period to the present.  “Teenager” is a twentieth-century term, as is adolescent, but there has always been a stage of life bridging the dependency of childhood and the self-sovereignty of adulthood; this course examines that stage of life and how it has been described, defined, and perpetuated, as well as the roles, images, and functions assigned to it.  We will look at the images created by the adult world and explore their reception (and acceptance or rejection) by teenagers themselves.  Using a particular age as an individual category, this course draws heavily upon psychology, sociology, anthropology, literature, film, advertising, and art, as well historical writing.  Although materials may force us to give the largest share of attention to white, middle-class youth, this course seeks to illuminate differences created by race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and region.

8 week

HSTY 113 — 3 credits
Introduction to Modern World History
June 6 - August 1
MTWR 9:00-10:10 a.m.
Instructor
Contact:
The history of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in global context. Emphasis on the forces that have created or shaped the modern world: industrialization and technological change; political ideas and movements such as nationalism; European imperialism and decolonization; and the interplay of cultural values.

HSTY 306/406 — 3 credits
History Museums: Theory and Reality
June 6 - August 1
Days/Times: TBA
Instructor
Contact:
This course is an intensive summer internship (10 hours per week) at the Western Reserve Historical Society, complemented by extensive readings in museum/archival theory and public historical perception. It is designed both to introduce students to museum/archival work and to compare theoretical concepts with actual museum situations. Interns will be assigned a specific project within one of the Society's curatorial or administrative divisions, but will have the opportunity to work on ancillary tasks throughout the Historical Society's headquarters in University Circle. Prereq: Consent of department.

6 week

HSTY 225 — 3 credits
Evolution
June 20 - August 1
Days/Times
Patricia Princehouse
Contact: patricia.princehouse@case.edu
Multidisciplinary study of the course and processes of organic evolution provides a broad understanding of the evolution of structural and functional diversity, the relationships among organisms and their environments, and the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of organisms. Topics include the genetic basis of micro- and macro- evolutionary change, the concept of adaptation, natural selection, population dynamics, theories of species formation, principles of phylogenetic inference, biogeography, evolutionary rates, evolutionary convergence, homology, Darwinian medicine, and conceptual and philosophic issues in evolutionary theory.

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MATHEMATICS

8 week

MATH 121 — 4 credits
Calculus for Science and Engineering I
June 6 - August 1
MTWR 8:45-10:15 a.m.
Instructor TBA
Contact:
Functions, analytic geometry of lines and polynomials, limits, derivatives of algebraic and trigonometric functions. Definite integral, antiderivatives, fundamental theorem of calculus, change of variables. Prereq: Three and one half years of high school mathematics.

MATH 122 — 4 credits
Calculus for Science and Engineering II
June 6 - August 1
MTWR 8:45-10:15 a.m.
Instructor TBA
Contact:
Continuation of MATH 121. Exponentials and logarithms, growth and decay, inverse trigonometric functions, related rates, basic techniques of integration, area and volume, polar coordinates, parametric equations. Taylor polynomials and Taylor's theorem.  Prereq: MATH 121.

MATH 125 — 4 credits
Math and Calculus Applications for Life, Managerial, and Social Sci I
June 6 - August 1
MTWR 8:45-10:15 a.m.
Instructor TBA
Contact:
Discrete and continuous probability; differential and integral calculus of one variable; graphing, related rates, maxima and minima. Integration techniques, numerical methods, volumes, areas. Applications to the physical, life, and social sciences. Students planning to take more than two semesters of introductory mathematics should take MATH 121.  Prereq: Three and one-half years of high school math.

MATH 126 — 4 credits
Math and Calculus Applications for Life, Managerial, and Social Sci II
June 6 - August 1
MTWR 8:45-10:15 a.m.
Instructor TBA
Contact:
Continuation of MATH 125 covering differential equations, multivariable calculus, discrete methods. Partial derivatives, maxima and minima for functions of two variables, linear regression. Differential equations; first and second order equations, systems. Taylor series methods; Newton's method; difference equations.  Prereq: MATH 125.

MATH 201 — 3 credits
Introduction to Linear Algebra
June 6 - August 1
MTWR 10:30-11:45 a.m.
Instructor TBA
Contact:
Matrix operations, systems of linear equations, vector spaces, subspaces, bases and linear independence, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, digaonalization of matrices, linear transformations, determinants. Less theoretical than MATH 307. May not be taken for credit by mathematics majors. Only one of MATH 201, MATH 307, or MATH 470 may be taken for credit.  Prereq: MATH 122 or MATH 126.

MATH 223 — 3 credits
Calculus for Science and Engineering III
June 6 - August 1
MTWR 9:00-10:15 a.m.
Instructor TBA
Contact:
Introduction to vector algebra; lines and planes. Functions of several variables: partial derivatives, gradients, chain rule, directional derivative, maxima/minima. Multiple integrals, cylindrical and spherical coordinates. Derivatives of vector valued functions, velocity and acceleration. Vector fields, line integrals, Green's theorem.  Prereq: MATH 122.

MATH 224 — 3 credits
Elementary Differential Equations
June 6 - August 1
MTWR 9:00-10:15 a.m.
Instructor TBA
Contact:
A first course in ordinary differential equations. First order equations and applications, linear equations with constant coefficients, linear systems, Laplace transforms, numerical methods of solution.  Prereq: MATH 223.

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MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

3 week

SPAN 308 — 3 credits
The Spanish Experience
May 9 - May 27
Antonio Candau
Contact: antonio.candau@case.edu
Three-week total-immersion language experience in Spain combined with intensive classroom instruction on grammar and vocabulary study. We use literary texts and culture readers to explore Spain's history and contemporary society and culture. Visits and trips to different cities, cultural sites and museums enhance the cultural component. Students live with host families. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 or permission by the instructor.

Associate Professor Antonio Candau, a native of Madrid, Spain grew up in Valladolid, the site of this program. He has taught Spanish in the United States for nineteen years. He has directed Summer Study Abroad Programs in Alcala de Henares and Valladolid for five years with Texas State University at San Marcos.  For more information, contact antonio.candau@case.edu, 216-368-8976

4 week (1)

CHIN 101 — 4 credits
Elementary Chinese I
June 6 - July 1
MTWR 6:00-9:00 p.m.
Yuxiu Liang
Contact: yuxiu.liang@case.edu
Introductory course in speaking, understanding, reading and writing Chinese. Students are expected to achieve control of the sound system and basic sentence patterns of standard Mandarin Chinese. The course emphasizes speaking and aural comprehension.

ITAL 101 — 4 credits
Elementary Italian I
June 6 - July 1
Days/Times
Denise Caterinacci
Contact: denise.caterinacci@case.edu
Introductory course; stress on mastery of the sound system and basic sentence structure of spoken and written Italian. Independent laboratory practice is a requirement.

4 week (2)

CHIN 102 — 4 credits
Elementary Chinese II
July 11 - August 5
MTWR 6:00-9:00 p.m.
Yuxiu Liang
Contact: yuxiu.liang@case.edu
Continuation of CHIN 101. Recommended preparation: Consent of department.

ITAL 102 — 4 credits
Elementary Italian II
July 11 - August 5
Denise Caterinacci
Contact: denise.caterinacci@case.edu
Continuation of ITAL 101; independent laboratory practice is required in addition to scheduled class meetings. Prereq: ITAL 101.

6 week

SPAN 385 — 3 credits
Hispanic Literature in Translation
June 20 - August 1
MTWR 5:30-7:00 p.m.
Jacqueline Nanfito
Contact: jacqueline.nanfito@case.edu
Critical analysis and appreciation of representative literary masterpieces from Spain and Latin America, and by Hispanics living in the U.S. Texts cover a variety of genres and a range of literary periods, from works by Cervantes to those of Gabriel Garcia Marquez. The course will examine the relationship between literature and other forms of artistic production, as well as the development of the Hispanic literary text within the context of historical events and cultural production of the period. Counts toward Spanish major only as related course. No knowledge of Spanish required.

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PHILOSOPHY
3 week

PHIL 201 — 3 credits
Introduction to Logic
May 9 - May 27
MTWRF 9:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Colin McLarty
Contact: colin.mclarty@case.edu
Presentation, application, and evaluation of formal methods for determining the validity of arguments. Discussion of the relationship between logic and other disciplines.

PHIL 206 — 3 credits
Contemporary Moral Issues:  Experiential
May 9 - May 27
MTWRF 9:15 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Sara Waller
Contact: sara.waller@case.edu
What is good and how is it different from evil? How do you know when you have done the right thing? Is there an absolute grounding to morality? What is the role of reason in our lives? What is human nature? Are human beings essentially creatures of emotion? What bearing do these questions have on our basic moral determinations of good and evil? How are all these questions related to concerns about personal identity? These are just a few examples of the kinds of questions we will be discussing during the semester. Using sources from different eras and schools of philosophic thought, we will become better at some of the intricacies involved in thinking clearly about these issues.  Students will volunteer in a homeless or battered women's shelter as they learn about systems of ethical thought and ask moral questions.

6 week

PHIL 101 — 3 credits
Introduction to Philosophy
June 20 - August 1
Days/Times
Chin-Tai Kim
Contact: chin-tai.kim@case.edu
We will compare and discuss some major views of human nature, human good and human destiny, trying to understand what issues and what reasons divide them, and what different ethical, political and social implications they have. We will inquire how humans may attempt to achieve peace and harmony despite their conflicting views of being human.  Selections from Aristotle, Lao Tzu, Confucius, the Buddha, Augustine, Kant, Kierkegaard, Marx, Nietzsche and Heidegger, among other thinkers, will be read.

PHIL 225 — 3 credits
Evolution
June 20 - August 1
MW 6:00-9:00 p.m.
Patricia Princehouse
Contact: patricia.princehouse@case.edu
Multidisciplinary study of the course and processes of organic evolution provides a broad understanding of the evolution of structural and functional diversity, the relationship among organisms and their environments, and the phylogenetic relationships among major groups of organisms. Topics include the genetic basis of micro- and macro- evolutionary change, the concept of adaptation, natural selection, population dynamics, theories of species formation, principles of phylogenetic inference, biogeography, evolutionary rates, evolutionary convergence, homology, Darwinian medicine, and conceptual and philosophic issues in evolutionary theory.

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PHYSICS

Click here for additional information about introductory physics courses.

8 week

PHYS 122 — 4 credits
General Physics II — Electricity and Magnetism
June 6 - August 1
MTR 6:00-7:30 p.m.
Lab: R 2:00-5:00 p.m.
Sri Rahm
Contact: sri.rahm@case.edu
* Please note that PHYS 121 and 122 are NOT sequential
Electricity and magnetism, emphasizing the basic electromagnetic laws of Gauss, Ampere, and Faraday. Maxwell's equations and electromagnetic waves, interference, and diffraction. This course has a laboratory component.
Prereq: PHYS 121 or PHYS 123. Coreq: MATH 122, MATH 124, or MATH 126.

5 week

PHYS 115 — 4 credits
Introductory Physics I
June 6 - July 8
MTWR 9:30-11:20 a.m.
Lab: MW 12:30-3:30 p.m. (also TR if necessary)
Diana Driscoll
Contact: diana.driscoll@case.edu
* Note dates of sequential sessions for PHYS 115/116
First part of a two-semester calculus-based sequence directed primarily towards students working towards a B.A. in science, with an emphasis on the life science. Kinematics; Newton's laws, gravitation, simple harmonic motion; mechanical waves; fluids; ideal gas law; heat and the first and second laws of thermodynamics. This course has a laboratory component.  Prereq: MATH 121, MATH 123, or MATH 125.

PHYS 121 — 4 credits
General Physics I — Mechanics
June 6 - July 8
MTWRF 9:30-11:20 a.m.
Lab: TR 12:30-3:30 p.m.
Corbin Covault and Harsh Mathur
Contact: corbin.covault@case.edu and harsh.mathur@case.edu
* Please note that PHYS 121 and 122 are NOT sequential
Particle dynamics, Newton's laws of motion, energy and momentum conservation, rotational motion, and angular momentum conservation. This course has a laboratory component.  Prereq: MATH 121, or MATH 123, or MATH 125 or one year of high school calculus.

4 week (2)

PHYS 116 — 4 credits
Introductory Physics II
July 11 - August 5
MTWRF 9:30-11:20 a.m.
Lab: MW 12:30-3:30 p.m. (also TF if necessary)
Diana Driscoll
Contact: diana.driscoll@case.edu
* Note dates of sequential sessions for PHYS 115/116
Electrostatics, Coulomb's law, Gauss's law; capacitance and resistance; DC circuits; magnetic fields; electromagnetic induction; RC and RL circuits; light; geometrical optics; interference and diffraction; special relativity; introduction to quantum mechanics; elements of atomic, nuclear and particle physics. This course has a laboratory component.  Prereq: PHYS 115.

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POLITICAL SCIENCE
3 week

POSC 389 — 3 credits
Special Topics: The Tea Party and U.S. Right-wing Political Movements
May 9 - May 27
MTWRF 9:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Karen Beckwith
Contact: karen.beckwith@case.edu
This course focuses on right-wing US political movements and asks whether the current Tea Party phenomenon constitutes a political movement, what constitutes its relationship with the Republican Party and the US party system, and its likely impact on the future of US politics.  Readings in the course include political movement theory, case studies of rightwing organizations and movements in the US, and contemporary readings and analyses of the Tea Party.  No prerequisites.

6 week

POSC 308/408 — 3 credits
The American Presidency
June 20 - August 1
TR 6:00-9:00 p.m.
Alexander Lamis
Contact: alexander.lamis@case.edu
The purpose of this course is to improve the student's understanding of the central role the American presidency plays in our country's political system.  The focus will be on the significant domestic and foreign challenges faced by presidents from Harry S. Truman to George W. Bush. In general, the goal is to understand the modern American presidency in the broader context of American national politics.

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PSYCHOLOGY

8 week

PSCL 453 — 3 credits
Seminar:  Critical Thinking in Research
June 6 - August 1
TR 2:00-4:30 p.m.
Joseph Fagan
Contact: joseph.fagan@case.edu
The goal of this course is to facilitate a statement of your research ideas. That statement will take the forma of a PHS, R01 grant proposal. Through lectures and discussion, ideas that are important to each person will be elicited, refined, presented as a formal talk, and written, down. A first draft of the grant will be critiqued by three reviewers. The critique will aid in shaping a final proposal. The final proposal will be ready to be mailed out. Open to graduate students and faculty. Contact Professor Fagan, jjf@case.edu, for more information, and click here for a class schedule and additional details.

5 week

PSCL 313 — 3 credits
Psychology of Personality
June 6 - July 8
MTR 2:00-4:20 p.m.
Heath Demaree
Contact: heath.demaree@case.edu
The development and organization of personality; theories of personality and methods for assessing the person; problems of personal adjustment.

PSCL 352 — 3 credits
Physiological Psychology
June 6 - July 8
MTR 10:30 a.m.-12:50 p.m.
Heath Demaree
Contact: heath.demaree@case.edu
The nervous system as it relates to behavior.  Prereq: PSCL 101.

6 week

PSCL 101 — 3 credits
General Psychology I
June 20 - August 1
TWR 4:30-6:30 p.m.
Robert Greene
Contact: robert.greene@case.edu
Methods, research, and theories of psychology. Basic research from such areas as psychophysiology, sensation, perception, development, memory, learning, psychopathology, and social psychology.

PSCL 321 — 3 credits
Abnormal Psychology
June 20 - August 1
MWF 1:00-3:00 p.m.
Todd McCallum
Contact: todd.mccallum@case.edu
Major syndromes of mental disorders, their principal symptoms, dynamics, etiology, and treatment.  Prereq: PSCL 101.

PSCL 353 — 3 credits
Psychology of Learning
June 20 - August 1
TWR 8:20-10:20 a.m.
Robert Greene
Contact: robert.greene@case.edu
The basic methods in the study of learning.  The major theories proposed to account for the learning process.  Development of the fundamental concepts and principles governing the learning process in both humans and lower animals.  Recommended prep:  PSCL 101.

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SAGES

8 week

USNA 223 — 3 credits
Critical Science Fiction
June 6 - August 1
MWF 9:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m.
Dmitri Kourennyi
Contact: dmitri.kourennyi@case.edu
Students will be introduced into the marvelous world of the science fiction. The emphasis will be on developing skills of critical analysis of science fiction (and, as a consequence, any information received by the students). During the semester, the students will also be introduced to the history of science. Ancient and modern superstitions and misconceptions will be discussed in relation to scientific knowledge. The goal of the course is that the students will be able to distinguish plausible from impossible when they read their next science fiction book or watch a sci-fi movie. Upon completion of the course, the students will be well equipped to recognize scientifically unrealistic assumptions and statements in the numerous pseudoscientific books, movies, TV programs and other mass media sources. The course will be sufficiently flexible to allow coverage of topics that are proposed by, and interesting to, students, or the topics which would arise during discussions. The course will encourage open-minded approach to understanding controversial areas, as well as emphasize the great achievements that humankind made in the short historical period of our civilization. Prereq:  100-level USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, or FSTS.

6 week

USNA 240 3 credits
Technologies of the City
June 20 - August 1
TWR 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Bernard Jim
Contact: bernard.jim@case.edu
Based on the premise that cities are never "finished," and constantly being remade, the University Seminar, Technologies of the City, will look at the technological and cultural history of cities from the ancient world to the present day.  Students will explore the history of building materials -- wood, brick, steel, concrete, and glass -- used in the construction of cities.  We will also trace the development of city infrastructure such as electricity, water and sewage systems, streets, bridges, and subways.  Technological innovations, such as the automobile, will receive special consideration.  We will move both geographically and temporally to visit the world's great cities, studying examples of significant building projects, such as the Brooklyn Bridge, the Chicago World's Fair, and Cleveland's first skyscraper, the Rockefeller Building.  The course will cover the history of the professions -- engineering, architecture, and urban planning -- that have contributed to the construction of cities, and will review the works of these practitioners, as well as that of artists, reformers, and utopians that have imagined new directions for the city.  Prereq:  100-level USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, or FSTS.

USSO 285T 3 credits
Why We Believe Weird Things
June 20 - August 1
MWR 10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Jennifer Butler
Contact: jennifer.butler@case.edu
How, in such a skeptical age, can people maintain questionable beliefs regarding urban legends, alternative medicine, superstitions, and paranormal phenomena?  How do cults manage to attract and maintain large memberships?  How can so many seemingly normal people come to the conclusion that they have been abducted by aliens?  We will explore the idea that these behaviors are not examples of pathological thought processes, but rather natural consequences of the biases that characterize everyday reasoning.  Emphasis will be placed on critical examination of questionable phenomena with a goal of understanding why people might want to hold such beliefs. Grading will be based on 3 papers, an oral presentation, and regular class participation. Prereq:  100-level USFS, FSCC, FSNA, FSSO, FSSY, or FSTS.

USSY 287Z 3 credits
Representing Nature
June 20 - August 1
TWR 2:00-4:00 p.m.
Judith Oster
Contact: judith.oster@case.edu

This course will begin by discussing what we mean by “nature,” as well as the many ways it has been represented: in art, writing, even music. We will read essays, stories, poems, and take advantage of the riches offered by the Cleveland Museum of Art, the Natural History Museum, and the Botanical Gardens. We will read or draw from books such as Anthill (E.O. Wilson), Walden (Thoreau), Pilgrim at Tinker Creek (Dillard), and The Sea around Us (Carson). There will be informal response writing and much discussion as well as graded presentations and papers. Of the two major papers, presentations, or projects, one will use sources, another one can be creative (writing, drawing, painting, photography). Revision, peer workshops and conferences will be important aspects of the course.

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SOCIOLOGY

3 week

SOCI 255 — 3 credits
Special Topics: Sociology of Law: Law, Rights, and Policy
May 9 - May 27
MTWRF 9:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Brian Gran
Contact: brian.gran@case.edu
Course Description

SOCI 275 — 3 credits
Lives in Medicine:  Becoming and Being a Physician
May 9 - May 27
MTWRF 9:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Susan Hinze
Contact: susan.hinze@case.edu; 368-2702
Are you thinking about medical school? Believe it or not, a sociological approach to medical culture can inform a range of decisions you will make, from specialty choice to practice setting. Medical sociology emerged as a distinct field of study in the 1950s. Since then, we have learned a great deal about how issues of race, gender, aging and ethnicity are tied to issues of medical education, medical training, medial socialization and physician decision-making. Using a life course perspective, this course will examine how lives in medicine change over time; in particular, we’ll study changing workforce patterns, physician satisfaction, and burnout.  Other topics to be covered include contemporary ethical issues and alternative professional health careers. The course provides an overview of how medicine and medical practice have a profound influence on—and are influenced by—social, cultural, political and economic forces.

5 week

SOCI 208 — 3 credits
Dating, Marriage, and Family
June 6 - July 8
TWR 10:30 a.m.-12:50 p.m.
Gary Deimling
Contact: gary.deimling@case.edu
What is the family today? How has it changed over the last century? How will it change in the future? This course aims to answer these questions as it explores the influences of work, education, government, health and religion on today's changing families. The course considers the factors that affect mate selection. It also examines parenting, roles of husbands and wives, and family dysfunction, and divorce.

6 week

SOCI 101 — 3 credits
Introduction to Sociology: Human Interaction
June 20 - August 1
MTR 4:00-6:00 p.m.
Tanetta Andersson
Contact: tanetta.andersson@case.edu
How do “law” and the legal system work? Does medicine really help? What makes a person a good liar?  Does Teach for America make a difference? What do we learn from disasters? We will discuss books and articles, we will talk with experts, and we will go out into Cleveland to visit its courts, health providers, and other institutions to learn more about sociology and the work of sociologists.  Equivalent of SOCI 112A.

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STATISTICS

8 week

STAT 201 — 3 credits
Basic Statistics for Social and Life Sciences
June 6 - August 1
TR 10:20 a.m.-12:35 p.m.
Alexandru Belu
Contact: alexandru.belu@case.edu
Designed for undergraduates in the social sciences and life sciences who need to use statistical techniques in their fields. Descriptive statistics, probability models, sampling distributions. Point and confidence interval estimation, hypothesis testing. Elementary regression and analysis of variance. Not for credit toward major or minor in Statistics.

6 week

STAT 312 — 3 credits
Basic Statistics for Engineering and Science
June 20 - August 1
MTW 4:00-6:00 p.m.
Wojbor Woyczynski
Contact: wojbor.woyczynski@case.edu
For advanced undergraduate students in engineering, physical sciences, life sciences. Comprehensive introduction to probability models and statistical methods of analyzing data with the object of formulating statistical models and choosing appropriate methods for inference from experimental and observational data and for testing the model's validity. Balanced approach with equal emphasis on probability, fundamental concepts of statistics, point and interval estimation, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, design of experiments and regressions modeling. Note: Credit given for only one (1) of STAT 312, 313, 333, 433.  Prereq: MATH 122 or equivalent.

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THEATER

3 week

THTR 206 — 3 credits
Mr. Kiss Kiss Bang Bang: James Bond and Popular Culture
May 9 - May 27
MTWRF 9:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
MW 12:00-1:00 p.m.
Robert Ullom
Contact: JeffUllom@aol.com; 368-6097 for more information
The twenty-one films of James Bond have become part of popular culture, and the figure of the superspy has become mythic in proportion. This series, from its first installment in 1963 to the latest reinvention of James Bond in 2006, not only depicts one dashing man's efforts to save the world again and again from disaster, but also traces the development of our popular culture. Issues such as violence, sex, the presentation and treatment of women, racial stereotypes, and spectacle will be discussed, providing an opportunity to explore the changing expectations of American audiences and the developing form of contemporary cinema.

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WORLD LITERATURE

3 week

WLIT 368C/468C — 3 credits
Topics in Film:  Asian Cinemas
May 9 - May 27
MWF 9:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
TR 9:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
Linda Ehrlich
Contact: linda.ehrlich@case.edu
Asian cinema’s popularity and importance can be seen in the list of awards at film festivals, and in cinematheque schedules, and home-viewing sales, but what might the term “Asian cinema” actually mean?  Is “Asia” a region that stretches from Japan to Turkey, or does it have other geographical boundaries? In this¨Topics in Film” course, we look at films as examples of national film industries and trans-national co-productions. In particular, we will analyze films from India, the People’s Republic of China, Taiwan, Korea, Japan, and Hong Kong.

6 week

WLIT 385 — 3 credits
Hispanic Literature in Translation
June 20 - August 1
MTWR 5:30-7:00 p.m.
Jacqueline Nanfito
Contact: jacqueline.nanfito@case.edu
Critical analysis and appreciation of representative literary masterpieces from Spain and Latin America, and by Hispanics living in the U.S.  Texts cover a variety of genres and a range of literary periods, from works by Cervantes to those of Gabriel Garcia Marquez.  The course will examine the relationship between literature and other forms of artistic production, as well as the development of the Hispanic literary text within the context of historical events and cultural production of the period.  Counts toward Spanish major only as related course.  No knowledge of Spanish required. 

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